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1

Definition: Available Transfer Capability | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transfer Capability Transfer Capability Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Available Transfer Capability A measure of the transfer capability remaining in the physical transmission network for further commercial activity over and above already committed uses. It is defined as Total Transfer Capability less existing transmission commitments (including retail customer service), less a Capacity Benefit Margin, less a Transmission Reliability Margin.[1] Related Terms transfer capability, transmission lines, transmission line, capacity benefit margin, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Available_Transfer_Capability&oldid=502496

2

Coordination of Transmission Line Transfer Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordination of Transmission Line Transfer Capabilities Final Project Report Power Systems since 1996 PSERC #12;Power Systems Engineering Research Center Coordination of Transmission Line Summary The maximum power that can be transferred over any transmission line, called the transfer capacity

3

Definition: Transfer Capability | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transfer Capability Transfer Capability The measure of the ability of interconnected electric systems to move or transfer power in a reliable manner from one area to another over all transmission lines (or paths) between those areas under specified system conditions. The units of transfer capability are in terms of electric power, generally expressed in megawatts (MW). The transfer capability from 'Area A' to 'Area B' is not generally equal to the transfer capability from 'Area B' to 'Area A.'[1] Related Terms transmission lines, power, electricity generation, transmission line References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Transfer_Capability&oldid=480565"

4

A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3) Place requirements gathering from prospective users on a more formal footing, updating requirements on a regular basis and incorporate them into planning and execution of the project in a traceable fashion; (4) Seek out the best available data for validation purposes, and work with experimental programs to design and carry out new experiments that satisfy the need for data suitable for validation of high-fidelity M&S codes; (5) Develop and implement program-wide plans and policies for export control, licensing, and distribution of NEAMS software products; (6) Establish a program of sponsored alpha testing by experienced users in order to obtain feedback on NEAMS codes; (7) Provide technical support for NEAMS software products; (8) Develop and deliver documentation, tutorial materials, and live training classes; and (9) Be prepared to support outside users who wish to contribute to the codes.

Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Analyses of power system vulnerability and total transfer capability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................................................. 121 VITA?............................................................................................................................ 123 xii LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 2.1 Transmission Line Protections with Redundant Components................................................................................... 91 Table 6.2 WSCC-9 Transmission Line Thermal Limits.................................................. 91 Table 6.3 Effect of TCSC on TTC (Thermal Limit Dominant)....................................... 95 Table 6.4 Effect of TCSC on TTC (Voltage...

Yu, Xingbin

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

6

HIGH RESOLUTION NMR IN INHOMOGENEOUS MAGNETIC FIELDS: APPLICATION OF TOTAL SPIN COHERENCE TRANSFER ECHOES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION OF TOTAL SPIN COHERENCE TRANSFER ECHOES D.P.by total spin coherence transfer echo spectroscopy. (a) Thesequence to use total spin coherence transfer echoes to

Weitekamp, D.P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Transferring new dynamic capabilities to SMEs: the role of ONERA the French Aerospace LabTM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the public R&D laboratories and the SMEs in terms of Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). Some the "national innovation system". Keywords: French SMEs, technology transfer, information asymmetries, dynamic1 Transferring new dynamic capabilities to SMEs: the role of ONERA ­ the French Aerospace Lab

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

Milagro Version 2 An Implicit Monte Carlo Code for Thermal Radiative Transfer: Capabilities, Development, and Usage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have released Version 2 of Milagro, an object-oriented, C++ code that performs radiative transfer using Fleck and Cummings' Implicit Monte Carlo method. Milagro, a part of the Jayenne program, is a stand-alone driver code used as a methods research vehicle and to verify its underlying classes. These underlying classes are used to construct Implicit Monte Carlo packages for external customers. Milagro-2 represents a design overhaul that allows better parallelism and extensibility. New features in Milagro-2 include verified momentum deposition, restart capability, graphics capability, exact energy conservation, and improved load balancing and parallel efficiency. A users' guide also describes how to configure, make, and run Milagro2.

T.J. Urbatsch; T.M. Evans

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

NSF Workshop on Available Transfer Capability, Urbana IL, USA, June 1997 INITIAL CONCEPTS FOR APPLYING SENSITIVITY TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSF Workshop on Available Transfer Capability, Urbana IL, USA, June 1997 INITIAL CONCEPTS Engineering Dept. University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA University of Illinois, Urbana IL 61801 USA 1

10

Total Solar Irradiance Calibration Transfer Experiment/TIM Frequently Asked Questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TCTE Total Solar Irradiance Calibration Transfer Experiment/TIM Frequently Asked Questions What is the purpose of the TCTE mission? The Total Solar Irradiance Calibration Transfer Experiment (TCTE to monitor changes in solar irradiance at the top of the Earth's atmosphere. TCTE will launch as one of five

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

11

Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

860. Batchelor, G.K. 1954. Heat transfer by free convectionfree convection. In: Heat Transfer and Turbulent BuoyantHEAT2, A PC-program for heat transfer in two dimensions.

Gustavsen, Arild

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

across vertical fluid layers, Journal of Heat Transfer.fluid dynamics and conduction simulations of heat transferheat transfer through such window frames, we need, ideally, to simulate fluid

Gustavsen, Arild

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

14

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

15

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

16

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

17

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

18

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

19

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

20

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

22

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

23

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

24

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

25

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

26

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

27

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

28

Sierra/Fuego Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of existing capabilities in SierraFuego applied to modeling several aspects of grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) including: fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and fluid-structure...

29

Mimicking the electron transfer chain in photosystem II with a molecular triad thermodynamically capable of water oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development of synthetic fuel production systems that draw...electron-transfer in protein-hydrogen bonds and reorganization...optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes . Proc Natl...dye-sensitized solar cells by using a biomimetic...Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production, an Energy...Focus Inc.) and box car (SR250...

Jackson D. Megiatto; Jr.; Antaeres Antoniuk-Pablant; Benjamin D. Sherman; Gerdenis Kodis; Miguel Gervaldo; Thomas A. Moore; Ana L. Moore; Devens Gust

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

validation and Enhancement of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer Predictive Capabilities for Generation IV Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nationwide, the demand for electricity due to population and industrial growth is on the rise. However, climate change and air quality issues raise serious questions about the wisdom of addressing these shortages through the construction of additional fossil fueled power plants. In 1997, the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology Energy Research and Development Panel determined that restoring a viable nuclear energy option was essential and that the DOE should implement a R&D effort to address principal obstacles to achieving this option. This work has addressed the need for improved thermal/fluid analysis capabilities, through the use of computational fluid dynamics, which are necessary to support the design of generation IV gas-cooled and supercritical water reactors.

Robert E. Spall; Barton Smith; Thomas Hauser

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

31

Total analysis of surface structure and properties by UHV transfer system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) complex sample preparation and analysis system, which realizes a reliable surface science analyzing various characters on an identical surface. The system contains three sample-preparation-and-characterization chambers and five analysis chambers. They are (1) an electronic-properties-characterization chamber, (2) a magnetic-properties-characterization chamber, (3) an organic-molecule chamber, (4) UHV SEM, (5) a high-energy-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer, (6) a high-energy-resolution display-type spherical mirror analyzer, (7) a room-temperature (RT) STM, and (8) an optical-properties characterization chamber. A special sample holder is used with six electrodes on it, which enables accurate temperature measurement of a sample by connecting a thermocouple directly to the sample even if it is transferred. Four other electrodes can be used for construction of various circuits including evaporators. Some examples are shown.

Hiroshi Yamatani; Ken Hattori; Takahisa Matsuta; Takuji Ito; Tomohito Nohno; Madoka Hori; Yutaka Miyatake; Shigenori Konno; Tsukasa Tanaka; Yoji Hamada; Hiroshi Katagiri; Mikiharu Hibi; Toshiki Miyai; Mie Hashimoto; Keita Kataoka; Takeshi Tatsuta; Azusa N. Hattori; Naoto Higashi; Mitsunori Honda; Norifumi Masunaga; Hiroaki Mino; Shintaro Yasui; Janathul Nayeem; Tatsuya Shimizu; Nobuaki Takahashi; Yukako Kato; Chikako Sakai; Masashi Yoshimura; Sakura N. Takeda; Fumihiko Matsui; Hiroshi Daimon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Capabilities Series  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Series Capabilities Series www.emsl.pnl.gov Scientific Innovation Through Integration WHY USE EMSL'S MOLECULAR SCIENCE COMPUTING CAPABILITY? Ì Molecular Science Computing provides users with an integrated suite of computing hardware and software capabilities optimized for achieving the fastest time-to-solution for complex systems-level environmental molecular science simulations. Ì Expert staff members have extensive knowledge and experience in high-performance computing, as well as the operations, domain expertise, and scientific knowledge to support EMSL's users. Ì Substantial integration of transformational high-end computing simulations with experimental resources at EMSL provides a unique multidisciplinary research environment. The Molecular Science Computing capability at EMSL

33

CAMS Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAMS Capabilities HVEC 10 MV Model FN Tandem Of the three accelerators CAMS utilizes the largest is the HVEC 10 MV Model FN Tandem, which was obtained from the University of...

34

ENVIRONMENTAL CAPABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Section 25 - Electrostatic Discharge Additional Capabilities: · RF Cable Insertion Loss and VSWR Testing to advance technologies. The Institute's clientele include many of the world's aerospace manufacturers, NASAEquipment·FAA ·Medical ·Electrical ·Automotive ·Mechanical ·RailRoad ·Pneumatic ·Nautical ·Hydraulic ·Metallic

35

Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools Title Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-1022E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Gustavsen, Arlid, Dariush K. Arasteh, Bjørn Petter Jelle, Dragan C. Curcija, and Christian Kohler Journal Journal of Building Physics Volume 32 Pagination 131-153 Call Number LBNL-1022E Abstract While window frames typically represent 20-30% of the overall window area, their impact on the total window heat transfer rates may be much larger. This effect is even greater in low-conductance (highly insulating) windows which incorporate very low conductance glazings. Developing low-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. Based on a literature review and an evaluation of current methods of modeling heat transfer through window frames, we conclude that current procedures specified in ISO standards are not sufficiently adequate for accurately evaluating heat transfer through the low-conductance frames.

36

Capabilities Strategy: Science Pillars  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Innovation Capabilities Strategy: Science Pillars science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Capabilities Strategy: Science Pillars The Lab's four Science Pillars...

37

Transferable Denitrification Capability of Thermus thermophilus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mcdonald, JA Dodsworth, A Pati, L Goodwin, L Peters, S Pitluck, T Woyke and BP Hedlund. 24 January 2013. Whole genome sequencing...N Ivanova, I Pagani, A Pati, L Goodwin, L Peters, S Pitluck, J Lam, AI Mcdonald, JA Dodsworth, T Woyke and BP Hedlund...

Laura Alvarez; Carlos Bricio; Alba Blesa; Aurelio Hidalgo; Jos Berenguer

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

38

Sandia National Laboratories: technology transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technology transfer Federal Laboratory Consortium Regional Technology-Transfer Awards Salute Innovation, Commercialization at Sandia On September 23, 2014, in Capabilities, Carbon...

39

Federal Technical Capability Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides requirements and responsibilities to ensure recruitment and hiring of technically capable personnel to retain critical technical capabilities within the Department at all times. Cancels DOE M 426.1-1. Canceled by DOE O 426.1.

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Research & Capabilities, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering, Transportation Energy As hydrogen (H2) fuel cell...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NSTec Overview and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes the history of the Nevada National Security Site (Nevada Test Site) Contract as well as current capabilities.

Meidinger, A.

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

NREL: Transportation Research - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities A Vision for Sustainable Transportation Line graph illustrating three pathways (biofuel, hydrogen, and electric vehicle) to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas...

43

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities FEI Titan Extreme Schottky-field emission gun (X-FEG) CEOS dodecapole probe (STEM) aberration corrector GIF Quantum with dual EELS and fast spectrum imaging...

44

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Events, Nuclear Energy, Research & Capabilities Yifeng Wang (Radiological Consequence Management and Response Technologies Dept.) has been selected by the Chinese Institute of...

45

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Culture On March 7, 2013, in Capabilities, Climate, Global, Global, Global Climate & Energy, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Research...

46

Scientific Capabilities | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Microfabrication Mass Spectrometry Microscopy Molecular Science Computing NMR and EPR Spectroscopy and Diffraction Subsurface Flow and Transport Scientific Capabilities We...

47

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2017) TechniquesCapabilities LEAP Atom Probe Tomography Local electrode variant Crossed delay line, single atom sensitive detector 200 kHz high voltage pulse generator...

48

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface andor groundwater may be available through permitting with the state water-management agency, alternatively water might be purchased and transferred out of its...

49

Federal Technical Capability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive defines requirements and responsibilities for meeting the Department of Energy (DOE) commitment to recruiting, deploying, developing, and retaining a technically competent workforce that will accomplish DOE missions in a safe and efficient manner through the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP). Cancels DOE M 426.1-1A, Federal Technical Capability Manual.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

Federal Technical Capability Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Federal Technical Capability Manual provides the process for the recruitment, deployment, development, and retention of Federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Departments missions and responsibilities at defense nuclear facilities. Canceled by DOE M 426.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Federal Energy Capabilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Energy Capabilities Federal Energy Capabilities Federal Energy Capabilities MCKINSTRY'S CYCLE OF SERVICES PROGRAM SERVICES McKinstry is dedicated to excellence in design, construction, and facilities operation. We strive to develop innovative, cost effective facility solutions for you. Below are the services we can deliver under our energy services program: * Design-Build MEDP contracting * Energy savings performance contracting * Smart Building System integration * Demand response * Smart metering to Smart Grid solutions * Advanced metering services * Renewable energy systems * Cogeneration/combined heat power * Creative tax credit and green tags/white tags * ESCO preventative maintenance APPROACH * No premium for the energy services delivery * Open book pricing and guaranteed

52

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

53

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEM TechniquesCapabilities JEOL 6500F High current, 30kV FE gun SecondaryBS electron imaging Low voltage imaging Si drift detector for X-ray micro- analysis (Z>3) Fast EDS...

54

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Microsope TechniquesCapabilities Nion UltraSTEAM 60-100 Cold field emission gun 3rd generation C3C5 aberration corrector 60-100kV operation <1 spatial resolution at...

55

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TechniquesCapabilities Philips CM200 200-kV Schottky field-emission gun (FEG) Post-column Gatan imaging filter (GIF) for EFTEM and EELS EDAX R-TEM Si(Li) X-ray spectrometer...

56

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4000X HR) TechniquesCapabilities LEAP Atom Probe Tomography Laser and voltage pulsing 200 kHz high voltage pulse generator, 1 MHz laser Reflectron energy-compensating lens Crossed...

57

EMSL: Capabilities: Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microscopy Microscopy Additional Information Meet the Microscopy Experts Related EMSL User Projects Microscopy Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Watch the Microscopy capability video on EMSL's YouTube channel and read the transcript. Microscopy brochure Quiet Wing brochure EMSL hosts a variety of sophisticated microscopy instruments, including electron microscopes, optical microscopes, scanning probe microscopes, and computer-controlled microscopes for automated particle analysis. These tools are used to image a range of sample types with nanoscale-and even atomic-resolution with applications to surface, environmental, biogeochemical, atmospheric, and biological science. Each state-of-the-art instrument and customized capability is equipped with features for specific

58

Electronic Mail Analysis Capability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes the pilot program to test the Department of Energy (DOE) Electronic Mail Analysis Capability (EMAC), which will be used to monitor and analyze outgoing and incoming electronic mail (e-mail) from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and DOE laboratories that are engaged in nuclear weapons design or work involving special nuclear material. No cancellation.

2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

59

Federal Technical Capability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To define requirements and responsibilities for meeting the Department of Energy (DOE) commitment to recruiting, deploying, developing, and retaining a technically competent workforce that will accomplish DOE missions in a safe and efficient manner through the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP). Chg. 1 dated 9-20-11 Cancels DOE O 426.1. Cancels DOE P 426.1.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

Federal Technical Capability Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Technical Capability Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Home About the FTCP FTCP Topics FTCP Meetings Performance Indicator Reports Guiding Documents Qualifying Official Training Approaches FTCP Plans, Reports & Issue Papers Workforce Analysis & Staffing Site Specific Information Nuclear Executive Leadership Training General Information 2004-1 FTCP Commitments FTCP Correspondence Site Map Contact Us Quick Reference Departmental Representative to the DNFSB Facility Representative Safety System Oversight DOE Integrated Safety Management National Training Center DOE Directives Program DOE Technical Standards Program DOE Phone Book HSS Logo FTCP FTCP Topics DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2006 - 2011) New Directions in Learning: Building a DOE University System May 4, 2007, the Deputy Secretary memorandum designating Karen Boardman the FTCP Chairperson.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

TMV Technology Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TMV Technology Capabilities TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor Brake monitoring systems are proactive maintenance systems that provide instant identification of wheel specific, out-of-adjustment, non-functioning or dragging brake issues. AC Shore Power Since the TMV is equipped with DC power in-vehicle, shore power is needed to 1) charge the batteries that supply power to those outlets and 2) be used when running off battery power is not necessary FMCSA Laptop The laptop contains key software which helps enforcement officials perform inspections, look up information, etc. This computer also contains software for the USDOT # reader. Electronic On-Board Recorder EOBRs remove the need for paper logs by automatically recording duty status and location. EOBRs help

62

Advanced Simulation Capability for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Simulation Capability for Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of perfor- mance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activi- ties throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing pro- grams as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science, Fossil Energy, and Nuclear Energy. Challenge Current groundwater and soil remediation challenges that will continue to be addressed in the next decade include

63

ORISE Science Education Programs: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Science Education Programs Capabilities The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) connects the best and most diverse students and faculty members to...

64

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM C C A A L L E E N N D D A A R R Y Y E E A A R R S S 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 - - 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 B B I I E E N N N N I I A A L L R R E E P P O O R R T T UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK FTCP 2011-2012 Biennial Report ~ 2 ~ Table of Contents Section Title Page 1.0 Purpose and Scope .......................................................................................... 3 2.0 2011/2012 Accomplishments.......................................................................... 3

65

ENHANCING THE TRANSFER STUDENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efforts #12;Who Are Ohio State Transfer Students? #12;TRANSFER PROFILE DatafromSU12,AU12,SP13 3 as NFYS: 576 Average Transfer Hours of Enrolled Student: 52.2 Living on Campus: 470 Total # Sending Expectations (time management skills, balancing a more rigorous course load, study skills) 13.24% Majors (how

66

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

67

Mobile systems capability plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

69

LANL Analytical and Radiochemistry Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities.

Steiner, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burns, Carol J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamont, Stephen P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

70

On Building Inexpensive Network Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many deployed approaches for blocking unwanted traffic, either once it reaches the recipient's network, or closer to its point of origin. One of these schemes is based on the notion of traffic carrying capabilities that grant access to a network and/or end host. However, leveraging capabilities results in added complexity and additional steps in the communication process: Before communication starts a remote host must be vetted and given a capability to use in the subsequent communication. In this paper, we propose a lightweight mechanism that turns the answers provided by DNS name resolution---which Internet communication broadly depends on anyway---into capabilities. While not achieving an ideal capability system, we show the mechanism can be built from commodity technology and is therefore a pragmatic way to gain some of the key benefits of capabilities without requiring new infrastructure.

Shue, Craig A [ORNL; Kalafut, Prof. Andrew [Grand Valley State University (GVSU), Michigan; Allman, Mark [International Computer Science Institute (ICSI); Taylor, Curtis R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Transmission Services WIST Task Force Dynamic Transfer Capability...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Team ("WIST"), a Task Force of technical staff primarily from Northwest and California transmission providers and sub-regional entities, completed a report documenting Phase 1...

72

Sandia National Laboratories: NSTTF Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NSTTF Capabilities Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage,...

73

Sandia National Laboratories: Research & Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research & Capabilities, Solar, SunShot Sandia scientists have developed glitter-sized photovoltaic (PV) cells that have the potential to achieve the cost breakthrough necessary...

74

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Capabilities Photo showing a row of homes in the distance. The NREL Residential Buildings group is an innovative, multidisciplinary team focused on accelerating the...

75

Sandia National Laboratories: Research & Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News & Events, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Systems Analysis, Wind Energy Wind-turbine wakes lead to lower power production and increased loading on downstream...

76

NETL: Research Capabilities and Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities and Facilities Research Capabilities and Facilities Onsite Research Research Capabilities and Facilities Lab Worker As the lead field center for the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's research and development program, NETL has established a strong onsite research program conducted by Federal scientists and engineers. Onsite R&D – managed by NETL's Office of Research and Development – makes important contributions to NETL's mission of implementing a research, development, and demonstration program to resolve the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil resources. With its expert research staff and state-of-the-art facilities, NETL has extensive experience in working with the technical issues related to fossil resources. Onsite researchers also participate with NETL's industrial partners to solve problems that become barriers to commercialization of power systems, fuels, and environmental and waste management. Onsite research capabilities are strengthened by collaborations with well-known research universities.

77

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of nuclear nonproliferation by combining two groups within its Global Security organization. June 27, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

78

Sandia National Laboratories: Research & Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Capabilities, Solar Sandia researchers have received a 1.2M award from the DOE's SunShot Initiative to develop a technique that they believe will significantly improve...

79

Technology Transfer Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's capabilities, and the innovations it supports, help ensure the country's role as a leader in science and technology. In particular, technology transfer supports the maturation and deployment of DOE discoveries, providing ongoing economic, security and environmental benefits for all Americans.

80

Federal Technical Capability Program - Quarterly Performance Indicator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 16, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability June 5, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 20, 2013 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 20, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 8, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 30, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability March 6, 2012 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 10, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 24, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 18, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 23, 2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High...

82

Argonne CNM: Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities Synthesis Synthesis of metal oxide, semiconducting, metallic, and magnetic nanoparticles Self-assembly of monodisperse nanoparticles into two- and three-dimensional crystals and binary superlattices Bioconjugation and biochemical techniques with a focus on the synthetic biology and recombinant DNA/protein techniques Peptide synthesis (CSBio CS136XT) Functionalization of nanocrystalline surfaces with biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins and antibodies, using biochemical, electrochemical, and photochemical techniques Equipment Centrifuges (Beckman Coulter Optima L-100 XP Ultracentrifuge and Avanti J-E Centrifuge) Biological safety cabinets [Labconco Purifier Delta Series (Class II, B2)] Glovebox (MBraun LabMaster 130)

83

Research for new UAV capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses research for new Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) capabilities. Findings indicate that UAV performance could be greatly enhanced by modest research. Improved sensors and communications enhance near term cost effectiveness. Improved engines, platforms, and stealth improve long term effectiveness.

Canavan, G.H.; Leadabrand, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Measuring and Improving Cell Capability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring and Improving Cell Capability by Tom Bering Rate Parts / Hour Parts / Car Good Parts 1000 ppm defects/part 1 ppm defects/part 0.1 ppm defects/part 0.001 ppm defects/part 3600 Good Parts / Hour Defect Every 20 Min. Defect Every 2 Weeks Defect Every 20 Weeks Defect Every 40 Years 5000 Good Parts = 1

Bone, Gary

85

Technology Transfer: About the Technology Transfer Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management About the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management Department The Technology Transfer Department helps move technologies from the Lab to the marketplace to benefit society and the U. S. economy. We accomplish this through developing and managing an array of partnerships with the private and public sectors. What We Do We license a wide range of cutting-edge technologies to companies that have the financial, R & D, manufacturing, marketing, and managerial capabilities to successfully commercialize Lab inventions. In addition, we manage lab-industry research partnerships, ensure that inventions receive appropriate patent or copyright protection, license technology to start-up companies, distribute royalties to the Lab and to inventors and serve as

86

Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Since 1974, the Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer has recognized scientists and engineers at federal government...

87

Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 1 4 3 48 23 30 10 Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards Numbers represent active grants as at 1 October 2013 Figure 2. Technology Transfer award Transfer funding division. In the 2012/13 financial year Technology Transfer approved awards worth a total

Rambaut, Andrew

88

NREL: Energy Storage - Laboratory Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities Photo of NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. Welcome to our Energy Storage Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Much of our testing is conducted at this state-of-the-art laboratory, where researchers use cutting-edge modeling and analysis tools to focus on thermal management systems-from the cell level to the battery pack or ultracapacitor stack-for electric, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles (EVs, HEVs, and FCVs). In 2010, we received $2 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to enhance and upgrade the NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility. The Energy Storage Laboratory houses two unique calorimeters, along with

89

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column:...

90

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;...

91

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column:...

92

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;...

93

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

94

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

95

PPPL Scientific and Engineering Capabilities | Princeton Plasma...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PPPL Scientific and Engineering Capabilities The Off-Site University Research Program has access to PPPL's extensive scientific, engineering, technical, and safety capabilities. In...

96

PNNL Chemical Hydride Capabilities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Hydride Capabilities PNNL Chemical Hydride Capabilities Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC....

97

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity...

98

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model v. 1.1. (February 2014) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model v. 1.1. (February 2014) The...

99

EMSL: Capabilities: Deposition and Microfabrication  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Additional Information Meet the Deposition and Microfabrication Experts Related EMSL User Projects Deposition and Microfabrication Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Deposition and Microfabrication brochure Designed to augment research important to a variety of disciplines, EMSL's Deposition and Microfabrication Capability tackles serious scientific challenges from a microscopic perspective. From deposition instruments that emphasize oxide films and interfaces to a state-of-the-art microfabrication suite, EMSL has equipment to tailor surfaces, as diverse as single-crystal thin films or nanostructures, or create the microenvironments needed for direct experimentation at micron scales. Users benefit from coupling deposition and microfabrication applications

100

Argonne CNM: Materials Synthesis Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Synthesis Facilities Materials Synthesis Facilities Capabilities biosynthesis View larger image. Biosynthesis Methods Peptide and DNA synthesis (E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Nanobio hybrid synthesis (T. Rajh, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Hierarchal assembly View larger image. Hierarchical Assembly Bottom-up polymeric and bio-templating as well as lithographically directed self-assembly (S. Darling, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group; E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Molecular beam epitaxy View high-resolution image. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Complex oxide nanoferroelectric and nanoferromagnetic materials and devices created using a DCA R450D Custom MBE instrument (A. Bhattacharya, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Nanoparticle synthesis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EMSL: Capabilities: Spectroscopy and Diffraction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy and Diffraction Spectroscopy and Diffraction Additional Information Meet the Spectroscopy and Diffraction Experts Related EMSL User Projects Spectroscopy and Diffraction Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Tutorial: XPS Tools for Surface Analysis Spectroscopy and Diffraction brochure EMSL's suite of spectroscopy and diffraction instruments allows users to study solid-, liquid-, and gas-phase sample structure and composition with remarkable resolution. Ideal for integrated studies, spectrometers and diffractometers are easily coupled with EMSL's computational and modeling capabilities, allowing users to apply a multifaceted research approach for experimental data interpretation and gain fundamental understanding of scientific problems. At EMSL, spectroscopy and diffraction instruments are

102

Transferring Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transferring Data Transferring Data to and from NERSC Yushu Yao 1 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Overview 2 * Structure of NERSC Systems and Disks * Data Transfer Nodes * Transfer Data from/to NERSC - scp/sftp - bbcp - GridFTP * Sharing Data Within NERSC Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Systems and Disks 3 System Hopper Franklin Carver Euclid Data Transfer Node PDSF Global Home ($HOME) Global Scratch ($GSCRATCH) Project Directory Local Non-shared Scratch Data transfer nodes can access most of the disks, suggested for transferring data in/out NERSC Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Data Transfer Nodes * Two Servers Available Now: - dtn01.nersc.gov and dtn02.nersc.gov - Accessible by all NERSC users * Designed to Transfer Data: - High speed connection to HPSS and NGF (Global Home, Project, and Global Scratch) - High speed ethernet to wide area network

103

Testing whether major innovation capabilities are systemic design capabilities: analyzing rule-renewal design capabilities in a case-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Testing whether major innovation capabilities are systemic design capabilities: analyzing rule-renewal design capabilities are positively related to new business development, whereas rule-reuse design-renewal design capabilities in a case- control study of historical new business developments. Authors: Pascal Le

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

104

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

105

Argonne CNM: Proximal Probes Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proximal Probes Proximal Probes Capabilities Omicron VT-AFM XA microscope scanning tunneling microscope VIew high-resolution image. Variable-temperature, ultra-high-vacuum, atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope: Omicron VT-AFM XA (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Measurement modes include: Contact and non-contact AFM Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) Scanning tunneling spectroscopy Preparation tools include: Resistive sample heating Direct current heating E-beam heating Sputter ion etching Gas dosing E-beam evaporation An analysis chamber contains combined four-grid LEED/Auger optics Omicron nanoprobe View high-resolution image Scanning probe/scanning electron microscopy: Omicron UHV Nanoprobe (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group)

106

EMSL: Capabilities: Molecular Science Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Welcome to Chinook! Welcome to Chinook! Chinook Supercomputer Chinook is a supercluster with 2310 HP(tm) dual-socket, quad-core AMD(tm) nodes for computation. With 32 GB of memory per node, each processor-core has 4 GB available. Thus, Chinook is the only computer in its class capable of running certain chemical computations. The overall system has 74 TB of memory, 350 GB of local scratch disk per node, a 250 TB of global parallel file system, and a peak performance 163 teraFLOPs. Fast communication between nodes is obtained using single rail InfiniBand interconnect from Voltaire (switches) and Mellanox (network interface cards). Currently, Chinook's operating system is an EMSL modified version of a Red Hat's Scientific Linux. Node allocation is scheduled using Moab® and Simple

107

Core Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the Western Hemisphere. Photons are accelerated to over 99% of the speed of light around its ring, which is the size of a baseball stadium. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. The Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne is a premier user facility, providing expertise, instruments, and infrastructure for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology research. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Core Capabilities Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time. Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time:

108

EMSL: Capabilities: Molecular Science Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphics and Visualization Laboratory Graphics and Visualization Laboratory Photo of researcher in the Graphics and Visualization Laboratory EMSL's Graphics and Visualization Laboratory (GVL) helps researchers visualize and analyze complex experimental and computational data sets. GVL provides EMSL users with high-performance graphics systems as well as support staff who have capabilities in illustration and image editing, data modeling and image analysis, scene rendering and model creation, as well as audio/video compositing and editing. The GVL contains five high-performance graphics stations based on SGI technologies with high-speed connections to parallel computers and the database/archive system, a video system integrated with the workstations to facilitate the display and capture of scientific data, and video editing

109

Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids: measuring thermophysical properties, measuring fluid flow and heat transfer, and simulating flow of thermal energy and fluid.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Technology Transfer Overview | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Services » Technology Transfer and Procurement » Technology Services » Technology Transfer and Procurement » Technology Transfer & Intellectual Property » Technology Transfer Overview Technology Transfer Overview Through strategic investments in science and technology, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) helps power and secure America's future. DOE's capabilities, and the innovations it supports, help ensure the country's role as a leader in science and technology. In particular, technology transfer supports the maturation and deployment of DOE discoveries, providing ongoing economic, security and environmental benefits for all Americans. "Technology transfer" refers to the process by which knowledge, intellectual property, or capabilities developed at the Department of Energy's National Laboratories, single-purpose research facilities, plants,

111

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Cryogenic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mn(IV,IV) dimer acquired at 9.4 T. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Cryogenic NMR and Advanced Electronic Structure Theory as a Unique EMSL Capability for Complex...

112

Cryogenic technology boosts linear accelerator capability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryogenic technology boosts linear accelerator capability ... Two critical properties of matter at cryogenic temperaturessuperconductivity and superfluidityshould open the way for a major advance in electron linear accelerator capability. ...

1968-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

(February 2014) The Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2) was derived from the Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Version 1.1 by...

114

Dynamic capabilities in the software process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Software development is an important dynamic capability of a software-developing organisation. This paper explores product development in general and software development in particular from the viewpoint of the dynamic capabilities research stream ... Keywords: RBV, dynamic capabilities, inductive reasoning, product development, product innovation, resource transformation typology, resource-based view, software business, software development, software engineering, software process

Markus M. Makela; Nilay V. Oza; Jyrki Kontio

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INLs Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INLs Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customers needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

EMSL: Science: Research and Capability Development Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intramural Research & Capability Development Program Intramural Research & Capability Development Program The EMSL Intramural Research and Capability Development Program facilitates development of new research tools and enables EMSL staff members to advance the important skills and expertise necessary to enhance the EMSL user program. These intramural projects are intended to increase the scientific visibility of EMSL staff in areas that promote the objectives of EMSL's three science themes- Biological Interactions and Dynamics, Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science, and Science of Interfacial Phenomena. Technical outcomes of this program include journal publications, scientific presentations, new capabilities or capability enhancements, and expertise to augment EMSL user activities and foster development of innovative

117

DOE Technology Transfer Website Features New Tool to Search Tech Transfer  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Transfer Website Features New Tool to Search Tech Transfer Technology Transfer Website Features New Tool to Search Tech Transfer Information from DOE National Laboratories December 3, 2012 DOE Technology Transfer Website Features New Tool to Search Tech Transfer Information from DOE National Laboratories The Department of Energy (DOE) Technology Transfer website has a new search feature that for the first time allows searching of technology transfer information across the DOE national laboratories. The new tool enables users to search all of DOE's technology transfer information, including inventions, patents and other applied research, available from DOE's national laboratories in real time. Using web-crawling technology, the search capability allows users to enter a single query for a technology transfer term; the search feature returns a

118

Frame Heat Transfer Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools Arild Gustavsen 1,* , Dariush Arasteh 2 , Bjørn Petter Jelle 3,4 , Charlie Curcija 5 and Christian Kohler 2 1 Department of Architectural Design, History and Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Alfred Getz vei 3, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway 2 Windows and Daylighting Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road Mail Stop 90R3111, Berkeley, CA 94720- 8134, USA 3 Department of Civil and Transport Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Høgskoleringen 7A, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway 4 Department of Building Materials and Structures, SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, Høgskoleringen 7B,NO-7465 Trondheim, Norway

119

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of performance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activities throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing programs as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science,

120

Enhancements to Generic Disposal System Modeling Capabilities...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

disposal system modeling and analysis capability that takes advantage of high-performance computing (HPC) environments to simulate the important multi-physics phenomena and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Facilities and Capabilities | Neutron Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SHARE Facilities and Capabilities ORNL operates two of the world's most powerful neutron scattering user facilities: the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Spallation...

122

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...

123

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites...

124

Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Industry Day...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Capability Technology Demonstration Industry Day Presentations Partnering with Utilities for Energy Efficiency & Security 2010 Smart Grid Peer Review Day Two Morning Presentations...

125

Sandia National Laboratories Test Capabilities Revitalization...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Test Capabilities Revitalization Phase 2 Project Completed On Time, Under Budget | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

126

Marketing capabilities, innovation and firm performance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The importance of marketing capabilities and innovation is widely acknowledged in strategic marketing literature. Yet, extant research has examined the importance of these strategic factors (more)

Swaminathan, Arunachalam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

ELECTRICITY SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of the electricity subsector. The program supports the ongoing development and measurement of cybersecurity capabilities within the electricity subsector, and the model can...

128

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Instruments | ASTERIX | Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and optical scattering. Neutron scattering capabilities: Specular and off-specular reflectometry Long wavelength neutron diffraction Grazing incidence small angle scattering...

129

Alliance Management Capability in Dutch Universities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Over the past two decades alliances have become an important strategic element for organizations. Prior research has identified alliance management capability (AMC) as an important (more)

Hanna, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Occupational requirements as compared to worker capabilities with respect to total weight lifted per day  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Gender r resentation in each wei ht rou Weight Group 0- 7000- 11500-22500 22500-34000 34000-45500 7000 k 11500 kg k kg 'lo of Females '/o of Males 38 62 4 96 6 94 2 98 6 94 13 Male A erage Age p=o. cool Female Average Age p =-0. 07 87...). Females in the jobs with the lowest weight demands had significantly lower working VO& measurements than those in jobs with higher weight demands. Females in the 0-7000 kg group had a mean working VOq value of 0. 8 L/min, which was significantly...

Narvaez, Angela Marae

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locatingdominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater[186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locatingtotal dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

133

Reactive capability limits of wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) technology can be classified into two main types: fixed speed and variable speed. Fixed speed WECS use an induction generator connected directly to the grid while variable speed WECS use a power converter to connect the generator to the grid. Fixed speed WECS require shunt capacitors for reactive power compensation, while variable speed WECS have reactive power capability. Under the Spanish grid code, wind farms have to operate in a range of power factor values. This paper determines the reactive power capability of wind farms equipped with both fixed and variable speed WECS. The reactive power capability can be represented as a reactive capability curve. In this paper, the reactive capability curve is used to calculate the additional reactive power compensation needed to meet the requirements of the Spanish grid code.

Alberto Rios Villacorta; Santiago Arnaltes Gomez; Jose Luis Rodriguez-Amenedo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Definition: Dynamic Capability Rating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capability Rating Capability Rating Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Dynamic Capability Rating Dynamic capability rating can be achieved through real-time determination of an element's (e.g., line, transformer etc.) ability to carry load based on electrical and environmental conditions.[1] Related Terms rating References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Functions' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Dynamic_Capability_Rating&oldid=506158" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

135

Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

136

Data Transfer | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Transfer Data Transfer The Blue Gene/P connects to other research institutions using a total of 20 GBs of public network connectivity. This allows scientists to transfer datasets to and from other institutions over fast research networks such as the Energy Science Network (ESNet) and the Metropolitan Research and Education Network (MREN). Data Transfer Node Overview Two data transfer nodes are available to all Intrepid users, that provide the ability to perform wide and local area data transfers. dtn01.intrepid.alcf.anl.gov (alias for gs1.intrepid.alcf.anl.gov) dtn02.intrepid.alcf.anl.gov (alias for gs2.intrepid.alcf.anl.gov) Data Transfer Utilities HSI/HTAR HSI and HTAR allow users to transfer data to and from HPSS Using HPSS on Intrepid GridFTP GridFTP provides the ability to transfer data between trusted sites such

137

Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Deployment SBIR/STTR - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer USEFUL LINKS Contract Opportunities: FBO.gov FedConnect.net Grant Opportunities DOE Organization Chart Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Feedback Contact us about Tech Transfer: Mary.McManmon@science.doe.gov Mary McManmon, 202-586-3509 link to Adobe PDF Reader link to Adobe Flash player Licensing Guide and Sample License The Technology Transfer Working Group (TTWG), made up of representatives from each DOE Laboratory and Facility, recently created a Licensing Guide and Sample License [762-KB PDF]. The Guide will serve to provide a general understanding of typical contract terms and provisions to help reduce both

138

Multilevel bioluminescence tomography based on radiative transfer equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multilevel bioluminescence tomography based on radiative transfer equation Part 2: total variation with both l1 and total- variation norm for bioluminescence tomography based on radiative transfer equation, Radiative Transfer (Dover Publications, 1960). 14. K. M. Case and P. F. PF Zweifel, Linear Transport Theory

Soatto, Stefano

139

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

140

EMSL: Capabilities: Cellular Isolation and Systems Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cell Isolation and Systems Analysis Cell Isolation and Systems Analysis Additional Information Related EMSL User Projects Cell Isolation & Systems Analysis Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Cell Isolation & Systems Analysis brochure CISA Capability Group movie series: CISA Read the transcript. The Cell Isolation & Systems Analysis (CISA) capability at EMSL includes techniques for isolating cells from complex cell populations or environmental samples for further 'omics and imaging analyses. EMSL specializes in quantitative live cell fluorescence imaging with single molecule sensitivity, super resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy techniques, and transcriptomics and proteomics analyses. These capabilities provide the foundation for attaining a molecular-level understanding of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,,"Electricity Receipts",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)"," "

142

Property:Wavemaking Capabilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wavemaking Capabilities Property Type String Pages using the property "Wavemaking Capabilities" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Yes + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + Yes + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + None + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None +

143

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a world-class testing facility dedicated to advanced fuels and vehicles research. The lab features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Combustion Lab. Because the ReFUEL Laboratory is located in Denver, Colorado, it offers the additional capability of testing emissions and vehicle performance at high altitude. It also features an altitude simulation system to mimic results found at lower altitudes, including sea level.

144

Property:Wind Capabilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capabilities Capabilities Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wind Capabilities Property Type String Pages using the property "Wind Capabilities" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + None + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + None + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None +

145

Property:Towing Capabilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Towing Capabilities Property Type String Pages using the property "Towing Capabilities" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + None + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + None + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + None + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None +

146

NREL: Biomass Research - Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities Research into producing microalgal biofuels for transportation has been revitalized at NREL. Because algae have the potential to produce the feedstock for a number of transportation fuels-biodiesel, "green" diesel and gasoline, and jet fuel-NREL has developed strong capabilities in producing biofuels from microalgae. Through standard procedures for microalgal biofuels analysis, NREL helps scientists and researchers understand more about the chemical composition of algae. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the microalgae-to-biofuels conversion process. NREL's capabilities in microalgal biofuels R&D include: Why is algal research important? Algae have the potential to produce the feedstock for transportation fuels.

147

Overview of Capabilities Conversion System Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycles Heat exchanger design and optimization TES Material Integration & Optimization: Solar power plantOverview of Capabilities Conversion System Technology - Power System Demonstrations - Systems Conceptual Design/Trade Space Exploration - Simulation Modeling for Manufacturing - Hybrid Energy Systems

Lee, Dongwon

148

capabilitiesFlier_subsurfaceFlow_WEB  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

From the micron scale to the geographic scale, EMSL houses an integrated suite of capabilities to support EMSL offers users access to cutting-edge instruments and the in-house...

149

DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

Salvaggio, Carl

150

Scientific Innovation Through Integration Capabilities Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? EMSL provides users the capability to focus on the application of fundamental physical chemistry and technological innovation in the environmental molecular sciences to support the needs of DOE and the nation

151

Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to present and analyze the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. During Phase 1, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the database for the project was created. During Phase 2, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the database was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed. Each assessment of cask-handling capability contains three parts: the current capability of the facility (planning base); the potential enhanced capability if revisions were made to the facility licensing and/or administrative controls; and the potential enhanced capability if limited physical modifications were made to the facility. The main conclusion derived from the planning base assessments is that the current facility capabilities will not allow handling of any of the FICA Casks at 49 of the 122 facilities evaluated. However, consideration of potential revisions and/or modifications showed that all but one of the 49 facilities could be adapted to handle at least one of the FICA Casks. For this to be possible, facility licensing, administrative controls, and/or physical aspects of the facility would need to be modified.

Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); MacDonald, R.R. [ed.] [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Vienna, VA (United States); Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Computation Engineering Computation and Design > Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Capabilities Engineering Computation and Design Engineering and Structural Mechanics Systems/Component Design, Engineering and Drafting Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Overview Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Underhood Thermal Management Combustion Simulations Advanced Model and Methodology Development Multi-physics Reactor Performance and Safety Simulations Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Bookmark and Share Engineering Simulation Capabilities at Argonne Nuclear Engineering Division The Engineering Simulation section specializes in the development and

154

TRANSFER LINES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last two decades, production and manufacturing management has rapidly adopted a range of new concepts: manufacturing strategy, focused factory, just-in-time manufacturing, concurrent engineering, total ...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Electron Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Pierre Kennepohl1,2 and Edward Solomon1* 1Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Electron transfer, or the act of moving an electron from one place to another, is amongst the simplest of chemical processes, yet certainly one of the most critical. The process of efficiently and controllably moving electrons around is one of the primary regulation mechanisms in biology. Without stringent control of electrons in living organisms, life could simply not exist. For example, photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation (to name but two of the most well-known biochemical activities) are driven by electron transfer processes. It is unsurprising, therefore, that much effort has been placed on understanding the fundamental principles that control and define the simple act of adding and/or removing electrons from chemical species.

156

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

404-NOV. 1, 2000 404-NOV. 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 VerDate 11-MAY-2000 04:52 Nov 16, 2000 Jkt 089139 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6579 Sfmt 6579 E:\PUBLAW\PUBL404.106 APPS27 PsN: PUBL404 114 STAT. 1742 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 Public Law 106-404 106th Congress An Act To improve the ability of Federal agencies to license federally owned inventions. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the ''Technology Transfer Commer- cialization Act of 2000''. SEC. 2. FINDINGS. The Congress finds that- (1) the importance of linking our unparalleled network of over 700 Federal laboratories and our Nation's universities with United States industry continues to hold great promise

157

Peak Power Bi-directional Transfer From High Speed Flywheel to Electrical Regulated Bus Voltage System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were performed to determine the energy transfer capabilities of a flywheel coupled high speed permanent magnet synchronous machine through the proposed system's energy storage tank. Results are presented

Szabados, Barna

158

NETL: Tech Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Licensing & Technology Transfer Available Technologies Partnerships and Licensing Success Stories Contact Us Technology transfer is the process of transferring new technologies...

159

Investigation of hydrogen transfer in coprocessing using model systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coprocessing of coal with petroleum resid involves the reaction of two very different materials: coal is aromatic and resid is naphthenic. Hydrogen transfer is an important mechanism in most coal liquefaction systems. When coal is reacted with a coal-derived solvent, a high hydroaromatic content capable of transferring hydrogen in the solvent is desirable for achieving the desired coal conversions. But, resids tend to be naphthenic rather than hydroaromatic in character. The current study evaluated the reactivity of naphthenic compounds as models for resids in the presence of aromatic acceptors that are representative of the coal structure. The model donor used was perhydropyrene and the model acceptors were phenanthrene and anthracene. Thermal and catalytic reactions were performed at 400 and 440{degrees}C for 30 min in a H{sub 2} or N{sub 2} atmosphere with 1:1 and 5:1 ratios of model donor to model acceptor and with slurry phase catalysts, Mo naphthenate and Ni octoate. In reactions containing anthracene, the presence of perhydropyrene had increased the total amount of hydrogen being accepted by anthracene, while excess perhydropyrene was required to increase the hydrogen accepted by the model phenanthrene. Catalysis by Mo naphthenate promoted hydrogen transfer from perhydropyrene to anthracene, but catalysis by Ni octoate did not.

Shen, J.; Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Definition: Blackstart Capability Plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackstart Capability Plan Blackstart Capability Plan Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Blackstart Capability Plan A documented procedure for a generating unit or station to go from a shutdown condition to an operating condition delivering electric power without assistance from the electric system. This procedure is only a portion of an overall system restoration plan.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A black start is the process of restoring a power station to operation without relying on the external electric power transmission network. Normally, the electric power used within the plant is provided from the station's own generators. If all of the plant's main generators are shut down, station service power is provided by drawing power from the grid through the plant's transmission line. However, during a wide-area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from the commercial facilities. In support of the development of the CRWMS, OCRWM sponsored the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project. The objective of this project was to assess the capability of each commercial facility to handle various spent nuclear fuel shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. The project was conducted in two phases. During Phase I, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the data base for the project was created. During Phase II, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the data base was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed.

Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States); Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Laboratory Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities To research, develop, and test a variety of concentrating solar power technologies, NREL features the following laboratory capabilities: High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) Large Payload Solar Tracker Advanced Optical Materials Laboratory Advanced Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory Optical Testing Laboratory and Beam Characterization System Receiver Test Laboratory Heat Collection Element (HCE) Temperature Survey Photo of NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) The power generated at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) can be used to expose, test, and evaluate many components-such as receivers, collectors, and reflector materials-used in concentrating solar power systems. The 10-kilowatt HFSF consists of a tracking heliostat and 25 hexagonal

163

Scientific Innovation Through Integration Capabilities Series  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EMSL EMSL 's expansive mass spectrometry capability group enables high-throughput, high-resolution analysis of complex mixtures of many sample types. These world-class instruments and techniques are part of an unparalleled collection of capabilities designed for research that integrates experimental and computational tools. In particular, mass spectrometry at EMSL facilitates advanced global proteomics research, aerosol particle characterization, the study of ion-surface collisions, and materials characterization. These tools enable novel, fundamental research in EMSL's Science Themes of Biological Interactions and Dynamics, Geochemistry/ Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science, and Science of Interfacial Phenomena. Specific research topics include:

164

Audit Report - Office of Secure Transportation Capabilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Secure Transportation Office of Secure Transportation Capabilities OAS-M-12-05 June 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 29, 2012 UN MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR, OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION FROM: George W. Collard Assistant Inspector General for Audits Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Office of Secure Transportation Capabilities" BACKGROUND The National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Secure Transportation (OST) is responsible for safely and securely transporting nuclear weapons, weapon components and special nuclear material for customers such as the Department of Energy, Department of Defense and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Specifically, OST shipments support the nuclear

165

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Capabilities Biochemical Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are working to improve the efficiency and economics of the biochemical conversion process by focusing on the most challenging steps in the process. Biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels involves three basic steps: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock through: Pretreatment Conditioning and enzymatic hydrolysis Enzyme development. Fermenting these biomass-derived feedstocks using: Microorganisms for fermentation. Processing the fermentation product to produce fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels, chemicals, heat, and electricity by: Integrating the bioprocess. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the biochemical conversion

166

Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: Dec. 2014 - Jan. 2015...

167

21 briefing pages total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

168

Blue Waters: An Extraordinary Research Capability for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

questions. The Office of C berinfrastr ct re in the National Science Fo ndation isThe OfficeBlue Waters: An Extraordinary Research Capability for Ad ancing Science & Engineering Frontiers in Computational and Information Sciences Seminar Series Advancing Science & Engineering Presented byPresented by

169

Matlab-based Optimization Basic Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matlab-based Optimization Basic Capabilities Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff@vt.edu ) 3:00pm - 4:45pm: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 28 #12;Matlab-based Optimization Introduction & function functions fminbnd fminsearch lsqnonneg fzero 2 / 28 #12;INTRO: Basic Matlab provides several functions

Crawford, T. Daniel

170

Summary and conclusions: capabilities and challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......benefits of closer integration are such that means...to promote the integration of nuclear emergency...impediments to achieving integration and how they might...capabilities. Challenge 3: role of radiation...use of nuclear energy are all impacting...strategy for its sustainable maintenance. Competence......

G. N. Kelly; R. Jones; M. J. Crick; W. Weiss; M. Morrey; J. Lochard; S. French

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Dynamic Capabilities Building Blocks of Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollution Control licensing · 1992 · Irish Environmental Protection Agency. #12;High DC · strategy to `liftDynamic Capabilities Building Blocks of Innovation Rachel Hilliard Centre for Innovation the intellectual capacity of the organisation' · `routine setting of new environmental targets and objectives

Paxton, Anthony T.

172

TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor Brake monitoring systems are proactive maintenance This technology allows for CMV operators to have knowledge of their steer, drive, and tandem axle group weights setup is required. Current Safety/Enforcement Technologies EOBR (electronic on-board recorder) On

173

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

174

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

175

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

177

Table A57. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by" 7. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by" " Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics, 1991 " " (Estimates in Thousand Short Tons)" " "," "," ", " "," "," Coal",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" " "," ","-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other","Factors"

178

Table A58. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by" 8. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by" " Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics, 1991" " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" ,," LPG",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity",,,,,,,"Row" ,,"Consumed(b)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

179

Table A67. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Source  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" 7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," " 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,"Electricity Receipts",,,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"," "

180

NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Conversion Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion Capabilities Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are developing gasification and pyrolysis processes for the cost-effective thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. Gasification-heating biomass with about one-third of the oxygen necessary for complete combustion-produces a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis-heating biomass in the absence of oxygen-produces a liquid bio-oil. Both syngas and bio-oil can be used directly or can be converted to clean fuels and other valuable chemicals. Areas of emphasis in NREL's thermochemical conversion R&D are: Gasification and fuel synthesis R&D Pyrolysis R&D Thermochemical process integration. Gasification and Fuel Synthesis R&D Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities ORISE partners with NOAA to operate climate monitoring network U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) station in Hawaii The U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) consists of 121 stations throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii and Canada. The stations use highly accurate and reliable sensors and gauges to measure temperature, wind speed and precipitation. The network allows scientists to study the climate of an area over sustained periods, from 50 to 100 years. Pictured here is a CRN station at the Mauna Loa Slope Observatory in Hawaii. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) works closely with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to perform lower

182

EMSL: Capabilities: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery Act Logo EMSL researchers are benefitting from a recent $60 million investment in innovation through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. These Recovery Act funds were employed to further develop and deploy transformational capabilities that deliver scientific discoveries in support of DOE's mission. Today, they are helping EMSL accomplish the following: Establish leadership in in situ chemical imaging and procure ultrahigh-resolution microscopy tools Additional Information Investing in Innovation: EMSL and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery Act and Systems Biology at EMSL Recovery Act Instruments coming to EMSL In the News EMSL ARRA Capability Features News: Recovery Act and PNNL Recovery Act in the Tri-City Herald

183

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Capabilities Biomass Characterization Capabilities A photo of a man wearing a white lab coat and looking into a large microscope. A researcher uses an Atomic Force Microscope to image enzymes used in biochemical conversion. Through biomass characterization, NREL develops, refines, and validates rapid and cost-effective methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment, as well as during bioconversion processing. Detailed and accurate characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a necessity for any biomass-to-biofuels conversion. Understanding how the individual biomass components and reaction products interact at each stage in the process is important for researchers. With a large inventory of standard biomass samples as reference materials,

184

ARAC: A support capability for emergency managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is intended to introduce to the non-radiological emergency management community the 20-year operational history of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), its concept of operations, and its applicability for use in support of emergency management decision makers. ARAC is a centralized federal facility for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time, using a robust suite of three-dimensional atmospheric transport and diffusion models, extensive geophysical and source-description databases, automated meteorological data acquisition systems, and experienced staff members. Although originally conceived to respond to nuclear accidents, the ARAC system has proven to be extremely adaptable, and has been used successfully during a wide variety of nonradiological hazardous chemical situations. ARAC represents a proven, validated, operational support capability for atmospheric hazardous releases.

Pace, J.C.; Sullivan, T.J.; Baskett, R.L. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Enhanced heat transfer for thermionic power modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermionic power module is capable of operating at very high heat fluxes, which in turn serve to reduce capital costs. The most efficient operation also requires uniform heat fluxes. The development of enhanced heat transfer systems is required to meet the demand for high heat fluxes (>20 w/cm/sup 2/) at high temperatures (>1500K) which advanced thermionic power modules place upon combustion systems. Energy transfer from the hot combustion gases may take place by convection, radiation, or a combination of radiation and convection. Enhanced convective heat transfer with a jet impingement system has been demonstrated in a thermionic converter. The recently-developed cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer system has also been applied to a thermionic converter. By comparing the jet impingement and cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer systems, an appropriate system may be selected for utilization in advanced thermionic power modules. Results are reported.

Johnson, D.C.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Development of Live and LC-NMR Microbial Metabolomics Methods for Systems Biology Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-of-the-art in vitro metabolomics nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with advanced in vivo NMR bioreactor capabilities in an attempt to use the total reactor weight to control the fluid levels. Two cyclone vessels were constructed. "Technologies for Tomorrow: Expanded Capabilities at the EMSL User Facility Supporting

188

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

189

SciTech Connect: Development of Numerical Simulation Capabilities...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Development of Numerical Simulation Capabilities for In Situ Heating of Oil Shale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of Numerical Simulation Capabilities for In...

190

Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events April...

191

Research Capabilities | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Home > Research > Research Capabilities The basic energy conversion steps of charge photogeneration, separation, and recombination link research themes and principal...

192

Local Energy Alliance Program Adds Green Appraisal Capabilities...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Local Energy Alliance Program Adds Green Appraisal Capabilities to its Energy Efficiency Services Local Energy Alliance Program Adds Green Appraisal Capabilities to its Energy...

193

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) The Oil...

194

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

195

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models Building America Technical Update Meeting Eric Wilson April 30, 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Definitions Current definitions for HSP/BEopt: Single Family Attached = Townhouses, row houses, duplexes Multifamily Buildings = 5+ units; shared floors/ceilings 2 Single Family Attached - Rowhouses 3 Multifamily - Stacked Units * Enable Superinsulated Slab and Roof options in Option Manager 4 Multifamily Modeling Needs * Adiabatic shared walls, floors, and ceilings * Unit multipliers  Whole-Building Model * Corridors * Common Areas * Operating Conditions (Benchmark)

196

Kazakhstan seeks to step up crude oil export capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the Commonwealth of Independent States' Kazakhstan republic is driving to achieve international export capability for its crude oil production. Latest official figures showed Kazakhstan producing 532,000 b/d, or a little more than 5% of the C.I.S. total of 10.292 million b/d. As part of its oil export campaign, Kazakhstan agreed with Oman to a joint venture pipeline to ship oil from Kazakh fields, including supergiant Tengiz, earmarked for further development by a Chevron Corp. joint venture. In addition, Kazakh leaders were scheduled to conduct 3 days of talks last week with Turkish officials covering construction of a crude oil pipeline to the Mediterranean Sea through Turkey.

Not Available

1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

197

SRS K-AREA MATERIAL STORAGE - EXPANDING CAPABILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Department of Energys continued plans to de-inventory and reduce the footprint of Cold War era weapons material production sites, the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility, located in the K-Area Complex (KAC) at the Savannah River Site reservation, has expanded since its startup authorization in 2000 to accommodate DOEs material consolidation mission. During the facilitys growth and expansion, KAMS will have expanded its authorization capability of material types and storage containers to allow up to 8200 total shipping containers once the current expansion effort completes in 2014. Recognizing the need to safely and cost effectively manage other surplus material across the DOE Complex, KAC is constantly evaluating the storage of different material types within K area. When modifying storage areas in KAC, the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) must undergo extensive calculations and reviews; however, without an extensive and proven security posture the possibility for expansion would not be possible. The KAC maintains the strictest adherence to safety and security requirements for all the SNM it handles. Disciplined Conduct of Operations and Conduct of Projects are demonstrated throughout this historical overview highlighting various improvements in capability, capacity, demonstrated cost effectiveness and utilization of the KAC as the DOE Center of Excellence for safe and secure storage of surplus SNM.

Koenig, R.

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

198

Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

Manhart, R.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

200

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

202

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " 2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"LPG",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

203

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " 8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

204

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Billion Cubic Feet." ,,"Natural Gas",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

205

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

206

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Billion Cubic Feet." ,,"Natural Gas",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

207

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"LPG",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)"

208

UNH Jerard/Fussell 1 Project Summary -Dynamic Evaluation of Machine Tool Process Capability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNH ­ Jerard/Fussell 1 Project Summary - Dynamic Evaluation of Machine Tool Process Capability large and small plant operations and decisions. For example, we show some real world examples where part, annual expenditures on machining operations total more than $200 Billion or about 2% of GDP. · Self

New Hampshire, University of

209

Transferring Data at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Transferring Data Advice and Overview NERSC provides many facilities for storing data and performing analysis. However, transfering data - whether over the wide area network...

210

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biofuel Blending Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section...

211

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

212

Federal Technical Capabilities Panel Meeting Minutes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Meeting Minutes May 22, 2013 The May 22, 2013 F2F Meeting was held thru VTC, video streaming and call-in number. Karen Boardman welcomed the FTCP and expressed her appreciation for the participation and support. She emphasized to everyone that we would work thru the meeting in regards to the new technology capabilities being used (VTC, video streaming, etc.) for the first time on this DOE FTCP Face-to-Face meeting. There were some issues with the video streaming and at the end of the meeting Ms. Boardman thanked everyone for the participation. She also asked everyone to provide feedback regarding the VTC and video streaming. As part of Ms. Boardman's welcome, she informed the group that Mark Alsdorf, NTC Nuclear Safety Training Program Manager (NSTPM) has retired from the DOE, and introduced Al MacDougall who will be on detail to

213

EMSL: Capabilities: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EMSL Procurements under Recovery Act EMSL Procurements under Recovery Act Additional Information Investing in Innovation: EMSL and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery Act and Systems Biology at EMSL Recovery Act Instruments coming to EMSL In the News EMSL ARRA Capability Features News: Recovery Act and PNNL Recovery Act in the Tri-City Herald Related Links Recovery.gov DOE and the Recovery Act Message from Energy Secretary Chu Recovery Act at PNNL EMSL evolves with the needs of its scientific users, and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has helped to accelerate this evolution. Thirty-one instruments were acquired and installed at EMSL. These instruments are listed below, and each listing is accompanied by a brief overview. Each of these new and leading-edge instruments was chosen by design to

214

Federal Technical Capability Panel Contacts list  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 U. S. Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Technical Capability Panel Organization Name Telephone Fax E-Mail FTCP CHAIR Chair (DOE/NTC) Karen L. Boardman (505) 845-6444 (505) 845-6079 kboardman@ntc.doe.gov FTCP Deputy Dave Chaney (505) 845-4300 (505) 845-4879 david.chaney@nnsa.doe.gov FTCP Technical Standards Mgr. Jeanette Yarrington (301) 903-7030 (301) 903-3445 Jeanette.Yarrington@hq.doe.gov FTCP Coordinator Patricia Parrish (505) 845-4057 (505) 284-7057 patricia.parrish@nnsa.doe.gov FTCP Agents DOE Headquarters Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) Richard Lagdon (202) 586-9471 (202) 586-5533 Chip.Lagdon@eh.doe.gov Office of Health, Safety & Security Pat Worthington (301) 903-6929 (301) 903-3445 pat.worthington@hq.doe.gov

215

Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

216

Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer Express Licensing fast tracks commercialization. May 1, 2013 Division Leader Dave Pesiri Division Leader Dave Pesiri. Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Express Licensing program To better serve its partners, one of the first improvements the Lab's Technology Transfer Division (TT) has made is through its new Express Licensing initiative. Standardized license agreements and fee structures will remove long and complicated negotiations and decrease the time required to get patented Lab technology and software into the hands of

217

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

219

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

220

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2008 Prepared by: National Institute to submit this fiscal year 2008 Technology Transfer Summary Report to the President and the Congress transfer authorities established by the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 (P.L. 106

Perkins, Richard A.

222

Data Transfer | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Globus Online Using GridFTP Debugging & Profiling Performance Tools & APIs Software & Libraries IBM References Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Data Transfer The Blue Gene/Q will connect to other research institutions using a total of 100 Gbit/s of public network connectivity (10 Gbit/s during early access). This allows scientists to transfer datasets to and from other institutions over fast research networks such as the Energy Science Network (ESNet) and the Metropolitan Research and Education Network (MREN). Data Transfer Node Overview A total of 12 data transfer nodes (DTNs) will be available to all Mira

223

Federal Technical Capability Program Assessment Guidance and Criteria  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE AND CRITERIA Federal Technical Capability Panel and the Office of Human Resources and Administration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 September 1998 Federal Technical Capability Program Assessment Guidance and Criteria 1 September 15, 1998 INTRODUCTION The Federal Technical Capability Program provides for the recruitment, deployment, development and retention of federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Department' s missions and responsibilities. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (Panel) reports to the Deputy Secretary and oversees and resolves issues affecting the Federal Technical Capability Program. The Panel periodically assesses the effectiveness of the four functions of the

224

Table A19. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,1.4,1.3,1.9,0.5 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

225

"Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" 6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

226

Table A26. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2.1,1.2,2,0.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

227

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

228

Argonne CNM: X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Microscopy Facilities X-Ray Microscopy Facilities The Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) facility provides scanning fluorescence, scanning diffraction, and full-field transmission and tomographic imaging capabilities with a spatial resolution of 30 nm over a spectral range of 6-12 keV. Modes of Operation Full-Field Transmission Imaging and Nanotomography X-ray transmission imaging uses both the absorption and phase shift of the X-ray beam by the sample as contrast mechanisms. Absorption contrast is used to map the sample density. Elemental constituents can be located by using differential edge contrast in this mode. Phase contrast can be highly sensitive to edges and interfaces even when the X-ray absorption is weak. These contrast mechanisms are exploited to image samples rapidly in full-field transmission mode under various environmental conditions, or combined with nanotomography methods to study the three-dimensional structure of complex and amorphous nanomaterials with the HXN.

229

Refueling machine with relative positioning capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A refueling machine having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images.

Challberg, Roy Clifford (Livermore, CA); Jones, Cecil Roy (Saratoga, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Meso-scale machining capabilities and issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Meso-scale manufacturing processes are bridging the gap between silicon-based MEMS processes and conventional miniature machining. These processes can fabricate two and three-dimensional parts having micron size features in traditional materials such as stainless steels, rare earth magnets, ceramics, and glass. Meso-scale processes that are currently available include, focused ion beam sputtering, micro-milling, micro-turning, excimer laser ablation, femto-second laser ablation, and micro electro discharge machining. These meso-scale processes employ subtractive machining technologies (i.e., material removal), unlike LIGA, which is an additive meso-scale process. Meso-scale processes have different material capabilities and machining performance specifications. Machining performance specifications of interest include minimum feature size, feature tolerance, feature location accuracy, surface finish, and material removal rate. Sandia National Laboratories is developing meso-scale electro-mechanical components, which require meso-scale parts that move relative to one another. The meso-scale parts fabricated by subtractive meso-scale manufacturing processes have unique tribology issues because of the variety of materials and the surface conditions produced by the different meso-scale manufacturing processes.

BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; ADAMS,DAVID P.; YANG,PIN

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) 2005 Annual Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Technical Capability Program Fiscal Year (FY) 2005 Annual Plan January 15, 2005 FTCP Annual Plan, FY 2005 INTRODUCTION The objective of the Federal Technical Capability Program (Program) is to recruit, deploy, develop, and retain Federal personnel with the necessary technical capabilities to safely accomplish the U.S. Department of Energy (also known as the "Department" or DOE) missions and responsibilities. The current Program was formalized in 1998 through Department directives DOE Policy 426.1, Federal Technical Capability Program for Defense Nuclear Facilities, and DOE Manual (M) 426.1-1A, Federal Technical Capability Manual. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) provides leadership in implementing the

232

Radiological standards and calibration laboratory capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national radiological standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE sites, and research programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site`s 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, and thermoluminescent and radiochromic dosimetry. The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, and a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentations, photon transfer standards and alpha, beta and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory. Photographs that accompany the text appear in the Appendix and are designated Figure A.1 through A.29.

Goles, R.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Clean Cities: Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Capabilities Video (Text  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Anniversary Anniversary Capabilities Video (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Capabilities Video (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Capabilities Video (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Capabilities Video (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Capabilities Video (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Capabilities Video (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Capabilities Video (Text Version) on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Partnerships Hall of Fame Contacts Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Capabilities Video (Text Version)

234

OIL AND NATURAL GAS SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY CAPABILITY MATURITY...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

OIL AND NATURAL GAS SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL (ONG-C2M2) Version 1.1 February 2014 Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...

235

LVRT Capability of DFIGs in Interconnected Power Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents a new control scheme for the enhancement of the low-voltage ride-through (LVRT) capability of doubly-fed induction generators (DFIGs). LVRT capability is provided by extending the range o...

Jahangir Hossain; Hemanshu Roy Pota

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) Oil and Natural...

237

Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Illness Compensation Program Pamphlet Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Accident Investigation Reports Nuclear Safety Facility Safety Security Classification...

238

SPIDERS Joint Capability Technology Demonstration Industry Day Presentations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentations from the SPIDERS Joint Capability Technology Demonstration Industry Day, which occurred on April 22, 2014, at Fort Carson, Colorado.

239

The Capability Concept and the Evolution of European Social Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Cambridge Abstract Amartya Sen's capability approach has the potential to counter neoliberal of `capability', developed by Amartya Sen in a series of economic and philosophical texts,1 could play a major equivalent to Sen's notion of `capability'. However, certain legal concepts undoubtedly bear a certain

de Gispert, Adrià

240

Mobile Munitions Assessment System Field Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US has developed, stored, tested, and conducted disposal operations on various forms of chemical munitions for several decades. The remnants of these activities have resulted in the presence of suspect CWM at more than 200 sites in the US, the District of Columbia, and the US Virgin Islands. An advanced Mobile Munitions Assessment System (Phase II MMAS) has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory under contract to the US Army's Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel for use in the assessment and characterization of ''non-stockpile'' chemical warfare materiel (CWM). The Phase II MMAS meets the immediate need to augment response equipment currently used by the US Army with a system that includes state-of-the-art assessment equipment and advanced sensors. The Phase II MMAS will be used for response to known storage and remediation sites. This system is designed to identify the munition type; evaluate the condition of the CWM; evaluate the environmental conditions in the vicinity of the CWM; determine if fuzes, bursters, or safety and arming devices are in place; identify the chemical fill; provide other data (e.g., meteorological data) necessary for assessing the risk associated with handling, transporting, and disposing of CWM; and record the data on a dedicated computer system. The Phase II MMAS is capable of over-the-road travel and air transport to any site for conducting rigorous assessments of suspect CWM. The Phase II MMAS utilizes a specially-designed commercial motor home to provide a means to transport an interactive network of non-intrusive characterization and assessment equipment. The assessment equipment includes radiography systems, a gamma densitometer system, a Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) system, a Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) system, air monitoring equipment (i.e., M-90s and a field ion spectroscopy system), and a phase determination equipment Command and control equipment includes a data acquisition and handling system, two meteorological stations, video equipment, and multiple communication systems. The Phase II MMAS motor home also serves an as environmentally controlled on-site command post for the MMAS operators when deployed. The data developed by the MMAS will be used to help determine the appropriate methods and safeguards necessary to transport, store, and dispose of agent-filled munitions in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner.

A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; K. D. Watts

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

LNG fleet increases in size and capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LNG fleet as of early 1997 consisted of 99 vessels with total cargo capacity of 10.7 million cu m, equivalent to approximately 4.5 million tons. One of the newest additions to the fleet, the 137,000-cu m tanker Al Zubarah, is five times the size of the original commercial vessel Methane Princess. Al Zubarah`s first loading of more than 60,000 tons occurred in December 1996 for deliver to Japanese buyers from the newly commissioned Qatargas LNG plant at Ras Laffan. That size cargo contains enough clean-burning energy to heat 60,000 homes in Japan for 1 month. Measuring nearly 1,000 ft long, the tanker is among the largest in the industry fleet and joined 70 other vessels of more than 100,000 cu m. Most LNG tankers built since 1975 have been larger-capacity vessels. The paper discusses LNG shipping requirements, containment systems, vessel design, propulsion, construction, operations and maintenance, and the future for larger vessels.

Linser, H.J. Jr.; Drudy, M.J.; Endrizzi, F.; Urbanelli, A.A. [Mobil Shipping and Transportation, Fairfax, VA (United States)

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

243

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

244

Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) 2004 Annual Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Technical Capalbility Program Federal Technical Capalbility Program Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Annual Plan November 20,2003 FTCP Annual Plan. FY 2004 INTRODUCTION The objective of the Federal Technical Capability Program (Program) is to recruit, deploy, develop, and retain Federal personnel with the necessary technical capabilities to safely accomplish the Department's missions and responsibilities. The current Program was formalized in 1998 through Department directives DOE P 426.1, Federal Technical Capability Program for Defense Nuclear Facilities, and DOE M 426. l-l, Federal Technical Capability Manual. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) provides leadership in implementing the Program. The FTCP consists of senior technical safety managers representing nuclear facilities,

245

Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Vision For DOE to be a technically proficient enterprise, with federal technical personnel overseeing Defense Nuclear Facilities in a manner that enables and enhances the DOE mission in a technically defensible fashion, while being recognized as preeminent in federal technical leadership and competency. Missions and Functions The Department of Energy is committed to developing and maintaining a technically competent workforce to accomplish its missions in a safe and efficient manner. The Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) provides for the recruitment, deployment, development, and retention of Federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely

246

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Capabilities and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities and Technologies Capabilities and Technologies Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News Capabilities and Technologies product images The Sandia National Laboratories MSTC's capabilities are designed to integrate the numerous scientific disciplines necessary to produce functional, robust, integrated microsystems. This represents the center of Sandia's investment in microsystems research, development, and prototyping activities. This facility encompasses approximately nearly 400,000 square feet and includes cleanroom facilities, laboratories and supporting administrate offices. These facilities are divided between the Silicon Fab and the MicroFab.

247

Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes Berkeley Lab's exploration of how the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models distributed generation (DG) and presents possible approaches for improving how DG is modeled. The on-site electric generation capability has been available since the AEO2000 version of NEMS. Berkeley Lab has previously completed research on distributed energy resources (DER) adoption at individual sites and has developed a DER Customer Adoption Model called DER-CAM. Given interest in this area, Berkeley Lab set out to understand how NEMS models small-scale on-site generation to assess how adequately DG is treated in NEMS, and to propose improvements or alternatives. The goal is to determine how well NEMS models the factors influencing DG adoption and to consider alternatives to the current approach. Most small-scale DG adoption takes place in the residential and commercial modules of NEMS. Investment in DG ultimately offsets purchases of electricity, which also eliminates the losses associated with transmission and distribution (T&D). If the DG technology that is chosen is photovoltaics (PV), NEMS assumes renewable energy consumption replaces the energy input to electric generators. If the DG technology is fuel consuming, consumption of fuel in the electric utility sector is replaced by residential or commercial fuel consumption. The waste heat generated from thermal technologies can be used to offset the water heating and space heating energy uses, but there is no thermally activated cooling capability. This study consists of a review of model documentation and a paper by EIA staff, a series of sensitivity runs performed by Berkeley Lab that exercise selected DG parameters in the AEO2002 version of NEMS, and a scoping effort of possible enhancements and alternatives to NEMS current DG capabilities. In general, the treatment of DG in NEMS is rudimentary. The penetration of DG is determined by an economic cash-flow analysis that determines adoption based on the n umber of years to a positive cash flow. Some important technologies, e.g. thermally activated cooling, are absent, and ceilings on DG adoption are determined by some what arbitrary caps on the number of buildings that can adopt DG. These caps are particularly severe for existing buildings, where the maximum penetration for any one technology is 0.25 percent. On the other hand, competition among technologies is not fully considered, and this may result in double-counting for certain applications. A series of sensitivity runs show greater penetration with net metering enhancements and aggressive tax credits and a more limited response to lowered DG technology costs. Discussion of alternatives to the current code is presented in Section 4. Alternatives or improvements to how DG is modeled in NEMS cover three basic areas: expanding on the existing total market for DG both by changing existing parameters in NEMS and by adding new capabilities, such as for missing technologies; enhancing the cash flow analysis but incorporating aspects of DG economics that are not currently represented, e.g. complex tariffs; and using an external geographic information system (GIS) driven analysis that can better and more intuitively identify niche markets.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

State Transfer and Spin Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a Hamiltonian that can be used for amplifying the signal from a quantum state, enabling the measurement of a macroscopic observable to determine the state of a single spin. We prove a general mapping between this Hamiltonian and an exchange Hamiltonian for arbitrary coupling strengths and local magnetic fields. This facilitates the use of existing schemes for perfect state transfer to give perfect amplification. We further prove a link between the evolution of this fixed Hamiltonian and classical Cellular Automata, thereby unifying previous approaches to this amplification task. Finally, we show how to use the new Hamiltonian for perfect state transfer in the, to date, unique scenario where total spin is not conserved during the evolution, and demonstrate that this yields a significantly different response in the presence of decoherence.

A. Kay

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

249

Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors. Therefore, the overriding motivation behind the FFC R&D program described in this plan is to foster closer integration between fuel design and fabrication to reduce programmatic risk. These motivating factors are all interrelated, and progress addressing one will aid understanding of the others. The FFC R&D needs fall into two principal categories, 1) baseline process optimization, to refine the existing fabrication technologies, and 2) manufacturing process alternatives, to evaluate new fabrication technologies that could provide improvements in quality, repeatability, material utilization, or cost. The FFC R&D Plan examines efforts currently under way in regard to coupon, foil, plate, and fuel element manufacturing, and provides recommendations for a number of R&D topics that are of high priority but not currently funded (i.e., knowledge gaps). The plan ties all FFC R&D efforts into a unified vision that supports the overall Convert Program schedule in general, and the fabrication schedule leading up to the MP-1 and FSP-1 irradiation experiments specifically. The fabrication technology decision gates and down-selection logic and schedules are tied to the schedule for fabricating the MP-1 fuel plates, which will provide the necessary data to make a final fuel fabrication process down-selection. Because of the short turnaround between MP-1 and the follow-on FSP-1 and MP-2 experiments, the suite of specimen types that will be available for MP-1 will be the same as those available for FSP-1 and MP-2. Therefore, the only opportunity to explore parameter space and alternative processing is between now and 2016 when the candidate processes are down-selected in preparation for the MP-1, FSP-1, and MP-2 plate manufacturing campaigns. A number of key risks identified by the FFC are discussed in this plan, with recommended mitigating actions for those activities within FFC, and identification of risks that are impacted by activities in other areas of the Convert Program. The R&D Plan does not include discussion of FFC initiatives related to production-scale manufacturing of fuel (e.g., establishment of the Pilot Line Production Facility), rather, the goal of this plan is to document the R&D activities needed ultimately to enable high-quality and cost-effective production of the fuel by the commercial fuel fabricator. The intent is for this R&D Plan to be a living document that will be reviewed and updated on a regular basis (e.g., annually) to ensure that FFC R&D activities remain properly aligned to the needs of the Convert Program. This version of the R&D Plan represents the first annual review and revision.

Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

NERSC's Data Transfer Nodes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Transfer Nodes Data Transfer Nodes Data Transfer Nodes Overview The data transfer nodes are NERSC servers dedicated to performing transfers between NERSC data storage resources such as HPSS and the NERSC Global Filesystem (NGF), and storage resources at other sites including the Leadership Computing Facility at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). These nodes are being managed (and monitored for performance) as part of a collaborative effort between ESnet, NERSC, and ORNL to enable high performance data movement over the high-bandwidth 10Gb ESnet wide-area network (WAN). Restrictions In order to keep the data transfer nodes performing optimally for data transfers, we request that users restrict interactive use of these systems to tasks that are related to preparing data for transfer or are directly

251

Inverse Energy Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which is unstable. It saturates by transfer to a separate, damped eigenmode (i.e., a subcritical spectrum of damped waves). Inverse energy transfer is carried by three-wave...

252

HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

Lenert, Andrej

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Phase-Transfer Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In previous chapters we learned that a phase-transfer catalyst must have two particular chemical functions to be successful, that is, it must rapidly transfer one of the reactant species into the normal phase ...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

CRAD, Federal Assurance Capability Plan - February 11, 2009 | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Assurance Capability Plan - February 11, 2009 Federal Assurance Capability Plan - February 11, 2009 CRAD, Federal Assurance Capability Plan - February 11, 2009 February 11, 2009 Federal Assurance Capability Plan Inspection Criteria and Approach, DNFSB 2004-1, Commitment 16 (HSS CRAD 64-40, Rev. 0) Federal Assurance Capability Review Plan provides a plan, including criteria, approaches, and the lines of inquiry, to be used for assessing the effectiveness of areas relating to the establishment of a robust Federal assurance capability. The review plan covers all areas in Section 5.1 of the DOE Implementation Plan (IP) except for Section 5.1.3, Instituting a Nuclear Safety Research Function. CRAD, Federal Assurance Capability Plan - February 11, 2009 More Documents & Publications CRAD, Operating Experience - February 11, 2009

255

INL Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Through collaboration with industry partners, INL's Technology Deployment office makes available to American agencies and international organizations unique...

256

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

257

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

258

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

259

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

260

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

262

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

263

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

264

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

265

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

266

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

267

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

268

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

269

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

270

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

271

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

272

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

273

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

274

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

275

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

276

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

277

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

278

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

279

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

280

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

282

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

283

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

284

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

285

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

286

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

287

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

288

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

289

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

290

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

291

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

292

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

293

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

294

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

295

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

296

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

297

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

298

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

299

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

300

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

302

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

303

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

304

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

305

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

306

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

307

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

308

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

309

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

310

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

311

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

312

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

313

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

314

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

315

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

316

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

317

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

318

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

319

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2007 Prepared by: National Institute to present to the President and the Congress this Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Report summarizing the achievements of Federal technology transfer and partnering programs of the Federal research and development

Perkins, Richard A.

320

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2009 Prepared by: National Institute to submit this fiscal year 2009 Technology Transfer Summary Report to the President and the Congress in accordance with 15 USC Sec 3710(g)(2) for an annual summary on the implementation of technology transfer

Perkins, Richard A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Heat Transfer Guest Editorial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Heat Transfer Guest Editorial We are indeed delighted in bringing out this special issue was showcased in diverse areas such as traditional heat and mass transfer, lab-on-chip, sensors, biomedical applica- tions, micromixers, fuel cells, and microdevices. Selected papers in the field of heat transfer

Kandlikar, Satish

322

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

323

Photo-induced electron transfer method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospholipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transferring electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

Wohlgemuth, R.; Calvin, M.

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

324

Photo-induced electron transfer method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospho-lipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transfering electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

Wohlgemuth, Roland (2823 Hillegass Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705); Calvin, Melvin (2683 Buena Vista Way, Berkeley, CA 94708)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems [Heat Transfer and Fluid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Hydraulic Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Capabilities Engineering Computation and Design Engineering and Structural Mechanics Systems/Component Design, Engineering and Drafting Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Overview Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Underhood Thermal Management Combustion Simulations Advanced Model and Methodology Development Multi-physics Reactor Performance and Safety Simulations Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Bookmark and Share Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Accelerator Driven Test Facility Target Accelerator Driven Test Facility Target. Click on image to view larger

326

Underhood Thermal Management [Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics] - Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Underhood Thermal Underhood Thermal Management Capabilities Engineering Computation and Design Engineering and Structural Mechanics Systems/Component Design, Engineering and Drafting Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Overview Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Underhood Thermal Management Combustion Simulations Advanced Model and Methodology Development Multi-physics Reactor Performance and Safety Simulations Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Bookmark and Share Underhood Thermal Management Hybrid Vehicle Underhood Thermal Analysis Hybrid Vehicle Underhood Thermal Analysis. Click on image to view larger image. In addition to nuclear system applications, the section applies its

327

Advanced Model and Methodology Development [Heat Transfer and Fluid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Model and Advanced Model and Methodology Development Capabilities Engineering Computation and Design Engineering and Structural Mechanics Systems/Component Design, Engineering and Drafting Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Overview Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Underhood Thermal Management Combustion Simulations Advanced Model and Methodology Development Multi-physics Reactor Performance and Safety Simulations Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Bookmark and Share Advanced Model and Methodology Development Electrorefiner Model for Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel Electrorefiner Model for Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel. Click on image to

328

Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a new Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed lowlevel, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's TA-54 Area G. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to ten sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. Three passes of the analysis were required to assess different site scenarios: 1) a fully consolidated CWC with both transfer/storage and LL W disposal in one location (45 acre minimum), 2) CWC transfer/storage only (12 acre minimum), and 3) LLW disposal only (33 acre minimum). The top site choice for all three options is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. TA-54 East, Zone 4 also deserves consideration as a LLW disposal site.

Booth, Steven Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

329

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

331

Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) 2002 Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

S. Department of Energy S. Department of Energy Federal Technical Capability Panel FY 2002 Annual Report to the Secretary of Energy on the Status of Federal Technical Capability Related to the Safe Operation of Defense Nuclear Facilities Washington, D.C. 20585 JUNE 1, 2001 to MAY 31, 2002 FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PANEL ANNUAL REPORT ON THE STATUS OF FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY RELATED TO THE SAFE OPERATIONS OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES This is the fourth Annual Report issued by the Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP). This report covers the period from June 1, 2001, to May 31, 2002, and summarizes the status of the federal technical capability program in the Department. It identifies accomplishments, issues, and recommendations as appropriate.

332

Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) 2004 Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Technical Capability Program Federal Technical Capability Program Annual Report to the Secretary of Energy for Fiscal Year 2004 2 Federal Technical Capability Program Annual Report to the Secretary of Energy for Fiscal Year 2004 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to ensuring that employees are trained and technically capable of performing their duties. In pursuit of this objective, the Secretary of Energy issued DOE Policy 426.1, Federal Technical Capability Policy for Defense Nuclear Facilities, to institutionalize the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP). This program specifically applies to those offices and organizations performing functions related to the safe operation of defense nuclear facilities, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

333

Definition: Dynamic Capability Rating System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capability Rating System Capability Rating System Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Dynamic Capability Rating System Dynamic capability rating adjusts the thermal rating of power equipment based on factors such as air temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation to reflect actual operating conditions. These systems are primarily used on high capacity or critical power system elements such as transmission lines and large power transformers.[1] Related Terms transmission lines, Dynamic capability rating, thermal rating, power, solar radiation, rating, transmission line, transformer References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/dynamic_capability_rating_system [[Category LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. : Smart Grid Definitions|Template:BASEPAGENAME]]

334

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May 2012) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May 2012) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May 2012) The Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2), which allows electric utilities and grid operators to assess their cybersecurity capabilities and prioritize their actions and investments to improve cybersecurity, combines elements from existing cybersecurity efforts into a common tool that can be used consistently across the industry. The Maturity Model was developed as part of a White House initiative led by the Department of Energy in partnership with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and involved close collaboration with industry, other Federal agencies, and other stakeholders. Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) -

335

Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) 2003 Annual Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Technical Capability Program FY 2003 Annual Plan Washington, D.C. 20585 September 2002 FTCP FY 2003 Annual Action Plan INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) provides management direction to assist the Federal workforce in maintaining necessary technical competencies to safely operate its defense nuclear facilities. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (Panel) consists of senior technical safety managers representing nuclear facilities, and reports to the Deputy Secretary for workforce safety technical capabilities' matters. The Panel will continue to pursue progress in the following areas: 1. Continued development of senior management commitment and support for the technical intern

337

Semiconductor research capabilities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document discusses semiconductor research capabilities (advanced materials, processing, packaging) and national user facilities (electron microscopy, heavy-ion accelerators, advanced light source). (DLC)

Not Available

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

ALS Capabilities Reveal Multiple Functions of Ebola Virus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALS Capabilities Reveal Multiple Functions of Ebola Virus Print A central dogma of molecular biology is that a protein's sequence dictates its fold, and the fold dictates its...

339

Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Industry Day Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Agenda outlines the activities of the 2014 Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Industry Day in Fort Carson, Colorado.

340

Rigorous HDD Emissions Capabilities of Shell GTL Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rigorous HDD Emissions Capabilities of Shell GTL Fuel Ralph A. Cherrillo & Mary Ann Dahlstrom Shell Global Solutions (US) Inc. Richard H. Clark Shell Global Solutions (UK) 11 th...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SciTech Connect: Development of capabilities to simulate the...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes during in situ oil shale production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of capabilities to...

342

Sandia National Laboratories: User Fees for NSTTF Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities * NSTTF User Fees * Optics Lab * rotating platform * solar * Solar Energy * Solar Furnace * solar power * Solar Research * Solar Tower Comments are closed. Last...

343

ORISE: Capabilities in National Security and Emergency Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

will assist public information officials determine the best response to an emergency. Forensic Science Forensic Science ORISE possesses the forensic and analytical capabilities to...

344

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fuel transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fuel transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Cupertino, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The implementation and testing of a file-based CFD database was completed (Task 2.8). The capability for transferring temperature-dependent physical properties from Aspen Plus to Fluent was developed (Task 2.12). The GUI for enabling the process analyst to select models from the CFD database and edit certain CFD model parameters was developed and tested (Task 2.13). Work on developing a CO wrapper for the INDVU code was started (Task 2.15). A solution strategy capability for enabling the process analyst to switch between different models representing a unit operation block was developed and tested (Task 2.16). The development of the Configuration Wizard for converting a FLUENT CFD model into a CO UO model was completed (Task 2.18). A low-order model based on the multiple regression technique was developed and tested (Task 2.19). An installation kit for the V21 Controller was developed using the Installer Vise software (Task 2.24). A flow sheet model for Demo Case 2 was developed and tested for three loads (100%, 75%, and 50%). Documentation of Demo Case 2 was completed and submitted to DOE (Task 3.2). The debugging of the tube bank heat transfer model was completed. The model calibration for a range of loads was started. A problem of oscillating gas temperature was encountered. Work is underway to overcome this problem (Task 4.1).

Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

NCT HE roadmap meeting/LANL capabilities and perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presentation is a summary of LANL capabilities and perspectives on high explosives. it describes our high explosives research capabilities (firing sites and diagnostics), a list of the extent to which high explosive materials have been characterized at LANL, as well as LANL's perspectives on potential research direction for the NCT program.

Robbins, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2) model, which is designed to be used by any organization to enhance its own cybersecurity capabilities, is publicly available and can be downloaded now. The Energy Department continues to work with public and private partners to support adoption of the C2M2

350

J-Orchestra: Enhancing Java Programs with Distribution Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J-Orchestra: Enhancing Java Programs with Distribution Capabilities ELI TILEVICH Virginia Tech and YANNIS SMARAGDAKIS University of Oregon J-Orchestra is a system that enhances centralized Java programs with distribution capabilities. Operating at the bytecode level, J-Orchestra transforms a centralized Java program

Ryder, Barbara G.

351

Carbon Nanotube Field-effect Transistors: AC Performance Capabilities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Nanotube Field-effect Transistors: AC Performance Capabilities. D.L. Pulfrey, D.L. John-barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are examined via simulations using a self-consistent Schrödinger is known about the DC capabilities of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors [1,2,3], and devices

Pulfrey, David L.

352

NREL: Technology Transfer - About Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About Technology Transfer About Technology Transfer Through technology partnerships, NREL seeks to reduce private sector risk and enable investment in the adoption of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. The transfer of these technologies to the marketplace helps displace oil, reduce carbon emissions, and increase U.S. industry competitiveness. Principles NREL develops and implements technology partnerships based on the standards established by the following principles: Balancing Public and Private Interest Form partnerships that serve the public interest and advance U.S. Department of Energy goals. Demonstrate appropriate stewardship of publicly funded assets, yielding national benefits. Provide value to the commercial partner. Focusing on Outcomes Develop mutually beneficial collaborations through processes, which are

353

Partnerships and Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Partnerships and Technology Transfer User Facilities Visiting Us Contact Us Home About Us Success Stories Events News ORNL Inventors (internal only) Find a Technology Search go...

354

Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000, Public Law 106-404 (PDF) was enacted in November 2000. Pursuant to Section 11, Technology Partnerships Ombudsman, each DOE national...

355

Facility Survey & Transfer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

356

MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

357

Tunable transfer | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to microbes by studying that transfer in a nature-inspired, protein and iron-based nanoparticle system. Iron plays a crucial role in environmental biogeochemistry. It readily...

358

Heat transfer dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As heat transfer technology increases in complexity, it becomes more difficult for those without thermal dynamics engineering training to choose between competitive heat transfer systems offered to meet their drying requirements. A step back to the basics of heat transfer can help professional managers and papermakers make informed decisions on alternative equipment and methods. The primary forms of heat and mass transfer are reviewed with emphasis on the basics, so a practical understanding of each is gained. Finally, the principles and benefits of generating infrared energy by combusting a gaseous hydrocarbon fuel are explained.

Smith, T.M. (Marsden, Inc., Pennsauken, NJ (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Microsoft Word - Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign Providing Automated Interfaces between Legacy Systems Army National Guard Issues and Technology Impact The National Guard Bureau (NGB) requires capabilities beyond the scope of standard army systems in order to increase the efficiency and cost effectiveness of its operations. However, the NGB has limited control over the process of enhancing standard army systems. Changing these systems to introduce new capabilities for NGB can require a great deal of time and money. It is a significant achievement to leverage standard army systems to enhance NGB capabilities even when changes to these systems are not permitted or the cost of changes is prohibitive. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers a solution for this challenge called Objective

360

EM Leads with Advanced Simulation Capability Technology | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with Advanced Simulation Capability Technology with Advanced Simulation Capability Technology EM Leads with Advanced Simulation Capability Technology April 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Figure 1: Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management Thrust Areas. Figure 1: Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management Thrust Areas. Figure 2: Spatial distribution of technetium-99 after the releases from the BC cribs using VisIt software on the Hanford Central Plateau. Figure 2: Spatial distribution of technetium-99 after the releases from the BC cribs using VisIt software on the Hanford Central Plateau. Figure 3: Conceptual model of uranium attenuation processes in the Savannah River F Area Seepage Basins plume, including adsorption/desorption (1); dissolution/precipitation (2); mixing/dilution (3); aqueous reactions (4); microbial interactions (5); and abiotic organic interactions (6).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hanford Waste Transfer Planning and Control - 13465  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford tank waste cleanup requires efficient use of double-shell tank space to support single-shell tank retrievals and future waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Every waste transfer, including single-shell tank retrievals and evaporator campaign, is evaluated via the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program for compliance with safety basis, environmental compliance, operational limits and controls to enhance future waste treatment. Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored at the Hanford Site on an interim basis until they can be treated, as necessary, for final disposal. Implementation of the Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program helps to ensure continued safe and prudent storage and handling of these wastes within the Tank Farms Facility. The Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program is a Safety Management Program that is a formal process for evaluating waste transfers and chemical additions through the preparation of documented Waste Compatibility Assessments (WCA). The primary purpose of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures as the result of waste transfer operations. The program defines a consistent means of evaluating compliance with certain administrative controls, safety, operational, regulatory, and programmatic criteria and specifies considerations necessary to assess waste transfers and chemical additions. Current operations are most limited by staying within compliance with the safety basis controls to prevent flammable gas build up in the tank headspace. The depth of solids, the depth of supernatant, the total waste depth and the waste temperature are monitored and controlled to stay within the Compatibility Program rules. Also, transfer planning includes a preliminary evaluation against the Compatibility Program to assure that operating plans will comply with the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program. (authors)

Kirch, N.W.; Uytioco, E.M.; Jo, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

"Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

363

Effect of Channel Configurations for Tritium Transfer in Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very High temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) concept, will provide the first demonstration of a closed-loop Brayton cycle at a commercial scale of a few hundred megawatts electric and hydrogen production. The power conversion system (PCS) for the NGNP will take advantage of the significantly higher reactor outlet temperatures of the VHTR to provide higher efficiencies than can be achieved in the current generation of light water reactors. Besides demonstrating a system design that can be used directly for subsequent commercial deployment, the NGNP will demonstrate key technology elements that can be used in subsequent advanced power conversion systems for other Generation IV reactors. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for the NGNP, the system integration of the NGNP and hydrogen plant was initiated to identify the important design and technology options that must be considered in evaluating the performance of the proposed NGNP. In the VHTR system, an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), which transfers heat from the reactor core to the electricity or hydrogen production system is one key component, and its effectiveness is directly related to the system overall efficiency. In the VHTRs, the gas fluids used for coolant generally have poor heat transfer capability, so it requires very large surface area for a given condition. For this reason, a compact heat exchanger (CHE), which is widely used in industry especially for gasto-gas or gas-to-liquid heat exchange is considered as a potential candidate for an IHX replacing the classical shell and tube type heat exchanger. A compact heat exchanger is arbitrary referred to be a heat exchanger having a surface area density greater than 700 m2/m3. The compactness is usually achieved by fins and micro-channels, and leads to the enormous heat transfer enhancement and size reduction. The surface area density is the total heat transfer area divided by the volume of the heat exchanger. In the case of PCHE units, the heat transfer surface area density may be as high as 2,500 m2/m3. This high compactness implies an appreciable reduction in material reducing cost. In this study, heat transfer and tritium penetration analyses have been performed for two different channel configurations of the PCHE; (1) standard and (2) off-set. One of the goals of this study was to determine whether offsetting the hot and cold streams would significantly reduce the tritium flux, and whether or not it would affect the heat transfer significantly.

Chang Oh; Eung Kim; Robert Shrake; Mike Patterson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Total reflection inelastic x-ray scattering from a 10 nm thick La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.2}CoO{sub 3} thin film.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study equilibrium changes in composition, valence, and electronic structure near the surface and into the bulk, we demonstrate the use of a new approach, total-reflection inelastic x-ray scattering, as a sub-keV spectroscopy capable of depth profiling chemical changes in thin films with nanometer resolution. By comparing data acquired under total x-ray reflection and penetrating conditions, we are able to separate the O K-edge spectra from a 10 nm La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}CoO{sub 3} thin film from that of the underlying SrTiO{sub 3} substrate. With a smaller wavelength probe than comparable soft x-ray absorption measurements, we also describe the ability to easily access dipole-forbidden final states, using the dramatic evolution of the La N{sub 4,5} edge with momentum transfer as an example.

Fister, T. T.; Fong, D. D.; Eastman, J. A.; Iddir, H.; Zapol, P.; Fuoss, P. H.; Balasubramanian, M.; Gordon, R. A.; Balasubramaniam, K. R.; Salvador, P. A.; Simon Fraser Univ.; Carnegie Mellon Univ.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

365

new freshmen new transfers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for AP courses. Transfer GPA is based on a 4-point scale. #12;ETHNICITY African American/Black Am Indian% Number 48 81 GENDER Male Female ETHNICITY African American Am Indian/AK Native Asian Hispanic Pacificth %-ile 690 740 710 31 Transfers 3.67 Freshman GPA is calculated taking into account a 5-point scale

Koehler, Carla

366

Secretarial Policy Statement on Technology Transfer at Department of Energy Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Secretarial Policy Statement on Secretarial Policy Statement on Technology Transfer at Department of Energy Facilities Introduction This Policy Statement is designed to help guide and strengthen the Department of Energy's technology transfer efforts and to heighten awareness of the importance of technology transfer activities throughout DOE. For purposes of this document, the term "technology transfer" refers to the process by which knowledge, intellectual property or capabilities developed at the Department of Energy's National Laboratories, single- purpose research facilities, and other facilities ("Facilities") are transferred to any other entity, including private industry, academia, state and local governments, or other government entities to meet public and private needs. The Policy Statement follows upon

367

Transfers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transfers Transfers Transfers Transfer means a change of an employee, from one Federal government branch (executive, legislative, judicial) to another or from one agency to another without a break in service of 1 full work day. Below are a few tips to better assist you when you transer agencies: If you have any dependents you must complete a standard Form 2809 during new employee orientation as this information does not transfer over automatically. You will not be able to change your coverage until open season or a life changing event occurs. At the time of new employee orientation you must provide your most recent leave and earning statement (LES) so that your leave may be updated accordingly. If you do not provide us with this document it will take approximately 6 weeks before your annual and sick leave is updated.

368

Data Transfer Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

» Data Transfer Examples » Data Transfer Examples Data Transfer Examples Moving data to Projectb Projectb is where data should be written from jobs running on the cluster or Gpints. There are intermediate files or bad results from a run that didn't work out that don't need to be saved. By running these jobs in the SCRATCH areas, these files will be deleted for you by the puge. If you run in the SANDBOX, you will have to clean up after yourselves. Batch Scheduled Transfers Use any queues to schedule jobs that move data to Projectb. A basic transfer script is here: kmfagnan@genepool12 ~ $ cat data_to_projb.sh #!/bin/bash -l #$ -N data2projb /projectb/scratch// kmfagnan@genepool12 ~ $ qsub data_to_projb.sh

369

Foreign ownership, technological capabilities and clothing exports in Sri Lanka  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drawing on recent developments in applied international trade and innovation and learning in developing countries, this paper examines the links between firm-level export performance, foreign ownership and the acquisition of technological capabilities in a sample of 205 clothing enterprises in Sri Lanka. Econometric analysis indicates that foreign ownership, firm size, human capital, technological capabilities and geographical location are all positively associated with export shares. Furthermore, higher levels of technological capability are associated with larger firm size, university-level manpower and in-house technological effort. Micro-level investigations are a complementary input to developing policies for promoting private sector competitiveness in outward-oriented developing countries.

Ganeshan Wignaraja

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Remarks at the Capability Replacement Laboratory (CRL) Completion Ceremony  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at the Capability Replacement Laboratory (CRL) Completion Ceremony at the Capability Replacement Laboratory (CRL) Completion Ceremony by Deputy Administrator Anne M. Harrington | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Speeches > Remarks at the Capability Replacement Laboratory (CRL) ... Speech Remarks at the Capability Replacement Laboratory (CRL) Completion Ceremony

371

Capabilities of the SNAP Instrument | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities of the SNAP Instrument Capabilities of the SNAP Instrument As general note, we have now moved to the MANTID software package for most of our data reduction processing. This makes the reduction of raw data a much easier and automated process for most applications. Current General Capabilities Disordered materials studies (glasses/liquids/sloppy crystals at HP): low-resolution wide Q-range mode, 0.6capabilities are still being developed for this press). Powder crystallographic studies: higher resolution with detectors at 90 degrees. First frame covers 0.5

372

Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies Name Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Focus Area Biomass Topics Resource assessment Website http://www.nrel.gov/internatio Country Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, China, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Chinese Taipei, Thailand, United States, Vietnam Australia and New Zealand, South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South America, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Central America, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, South America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Europe, , South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South-Eastern Asia

373

Multi-axis Capability for Powered Ankle-Foot Prostheses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, the concept of a multi-axis powered ankle-foot prosthesis is introduced. The feasibility of this ... proposed cable-driven mechanism for the multi-axis powered ankle-foot prosthesis is capable of...

Evandro M. Ficanha; Mohammad Rastgaar; Kenton R. Kaufman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A description of the physical capabilities of a mature workforce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to 1) describe and evaluate the physical capabilities and personal factors of a mature workforce, 2) to determine the relationship between identified risk factors and musculoskeletal morbidity 3) to compare the physical...

Bartels, Kendra Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Loop simulation capability for sodium-cooled systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A one-dimensional loop simulation capability has been implemented in the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, THERMIT-4E. This code had been used to simulate and investigate flow in test sections of experimental sodium loops ...

Adekugbe, Oluwole A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Capabilities A.M. Jokisaari and K. Thornton  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Michigan March 29, 2013 CASL- -2013-0346-000 CASL-U-2013-0346-000 L3:MPO.CORROSION.P6.01 CASL-MPO Deliverable: Demonstration of Hyrax Capabilities A. M. Jokisaari, K....

377

Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2) Program | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

(C2M2) Program The Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2) program is a public-private partnership effort that was established as a result of the Administration's...

378

June 8, 2010, Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for for Which Onboard Staff are Overdue to Complete Initial Qualification or Requalification (F) Staffing Shortfall , i.e. Number of Capabilities for Which Personnel are Not Onboard =C-(D+E) Percentage of Capabilities for Which Staff are Onboard =(D+E)/C Percentage of Capabilities Staffed by Onboard, Fully Qualified Personnel =D/C Percentage of Required Capabilities That Are Either Fully Qualified or on Schedule for Qualification =((D+E)-F)/C Comments National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Los Alamos Site Office LASO 114 69 25 2 20 82% 61% 81% Recruiting to fill authorized positions. 7 FTEs are over target. Livermore Site Office LSO 60 39 17 0 4 93% 65% 93% Added 12 staff members to Safeguards and Security Standard. Vacancy announcement in process for Deputy Manager. 1 Facility Rep. vacancy is on HOLD. 1 Facility Rep. and 1

379

NGNP Component Test Capability Design Code of Record  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project is conducting a trade study to select a preferred approach for establishing a capability whereby NGNP technology development testingthrough large-scale, integrated testscan be performed for critical HTGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The mission of this capability includes enabling the validation of interfaces, interactions, and performance for critical systems and components prior to installation in the NGNP prototype.

S.L. Austad; D.S. Ferguson; L.E. Guillen; C.W. McKnight; P.J. Petersen

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

CU-LASP Test Facilities ! and Instrument Calibration Capabilities"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Star tracker ­ Solar position sensors ­ Test & calibration applications ­ End-to-end instrument;Total Solar Irradiance Radiometer Facility (TRF) · Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) instrument calibrations

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

382

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

383

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

384

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

385

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

386

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A software design review meeting was held May 2-3 in Lebanon, NH. The work on integrating a reformer model based on CFD with a fuel cell flow sheet was completed (Task 2.0). The CFD database design was completed and the database API's finalized. A file -based CFD database was implemented and tested (Task 2.8). The task COM-CORBA Bridge-I was completed. The bridge now has CO interfaces for transferring reaction kinetics information from Aspen Plus to Fluent (Task 2.11). The capability for transferring temperature-dependent physical properties from Aspen Plus to Fluent was implemented (Task 2.12). Work on ''Model Selection'' GUI was completed. This GUI allows the process analyst to select models from the CFD database. Work on ''Model Edit'' GUI was started (Task 2.13). A version of Aspen Plus with the capability for using CO parameters in ''design spec'' analysis has become available. With this version being available, work on adding CO wrapper to INDVU code has been started (Task 2.15). A preliminary design for the Solution Strategy class was developed (Task 2.16). The requirements for transferring pressure data between Aspen Plus and Fluent were defined. The ability to include two CFD models in a flow sheet was successfully tested. The capability to handle multiple inlets and outlets in a CO block was tested (Task 2.17). A preliminary version of the Configuration Wizard, which helps a user to make any Fluent model readable from a process simulator, was developed and tested (Task 2.18). Work on constructing a flow sheet model for Demo Case 2 was started. The work on documenting Demo Case 2 is nearing completion (Task 3.2). A Fluent heat exchanger model was installed and tested. Work on calibrating the heat exchanger model was started (Task 4.1). An advisory board meeting was held in conjunction with the Fluent Users Group Meeting on Monday, June 10, 2002. The meeting minutes and presentations for the advisory board meeting have been posted on the project website (Task 5.0). A paper entitled ''Integrated Process Simulation and CFD for Improved Process Engineering'' was presented at the European Symposium on Computer Aided Process Engineering-12, May 26-29, 2002, The Hague, The Netherlands (Task 7.0).

Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices.

Wilson, David Gordon (Winchester, MA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices. 11 figures.

Wilson, D.G.

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

389

Examination of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for high efficiency power conversion and energy transport systems is increasing as world energy use continues to increase, petroleum supplies decrease, and global warming concerns become more prevalent. There are few heat transport fluids capable of operating above about 600oC that do not require operation at extremely high pressures. Liquid fluoride salts are an exception to that limitation. Fluoride salts have very high boiling points, can operate at high temperatures and low pressures and have very good heat transfer properties. They have been proposed as coolants for next generation fission reactor systems, as coolants for fusion reactor blankets, and as thermal storage media for solar power systems. In each case, these salts are used to either extract or deliver heat through heat exchange equipment, and in order to design this equipment, liquid salt heat transfer must be predicted. This paper discusses the heat transfer characteristics of liquid fluoride salts. Historically, heat transfer in fluoride salts has been assumed to be consistent with that of conventional fluids (air, water, etc.), and correlations used for predicting heat transfer performance of all fluoride salts have been the same or similar to those used for water conventional fluids an, water, etc). A review of existing liquid salt heat transfer data is presented, summarized, and evaluated on a consistent basis. Less than 10 experimental data sets have been found in the literature, with varying degrees of experimental detail and measured parameters provided. The data has been digitized and a limited database has been assembled and compared to existing heat transfer correlations. Results vary as well, with some data sets following traditional correlations; in others the comparisons are less conclusive. This is especially the case for less common salt/materials combinations, and suggests that additional heat transfer data may be needed when using specific salt eutectics in heat transfer equipment designs. All of the data discussed above were taken under forced convective conditions (both laminar and turbulent). Some recent data taken at ORNL under free convection conditions are also presented and results discussed. This data was taken using a simple crucible experiment with an instrumented nickel heater inserted in the salt to induce natural circulation within the crucible. The data was taken over a temperature range of 550oC to 650oC in FLiNaK salt. This data covers both laminar and turbulent natural convection conditions, and is compared to existing forms of natural circulation correlations.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Technology Transfer Reporting Form | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transfer Reporting Form Technology Transfer Reporting Form Technology Transfer Reporting Form More Documents & Publications Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles,...

391

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM (Eligible employees are listed at the end of this narrative) Under the Voluntary Leave Transfer Program you can apply, based on a medical emergency, to receive annual leave donated by other employees. A medical emergency is generally defined as a medical condition of the employee or family member that is likely to keep you (the employee) away from work and cause a loss of pay of at least 24 hours. You are required to submit an Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Form 630, Application to Become A Leave Recipient Under the Voluntary Leave Transfer Program, through your supervisor to be considered for the program. The application must include an explanation of the reason the donation is needed (including a brief description of the

392

Technology Transfer Summit  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Agenda as of April 9, 2012 Agenda as of April 9, 2012 Technology Transfer Summit April 16, 2012 IMC - Trinity Ballroom 4 8:00 - 8:10 Welcome & Introduction Pete Tseronis, DOE Chief Technology Officer 8:10 - 8:50 Accelerating Transfer Within an Innovation Ecosystem Debra M. Amidon, Founder and Chief Strategist, ENTOVATION International, and Author, The Innovation SuperHighway 8:50 - 9:20 Tech Transfer - Predicaments, Perplexities, and Possible Panaceas Rex Northen, Executive Director, Cleantech Open 9:20 - 9:50 A Systems Approach to Innovation Mike Schwenk, Vice President and Director Technology Deployment and Outreach, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 9:50 - 10:15 DOE's Online Tech Transfer Ecosystem - aka...Stop Building Moai! Robert Bectel, Senior Policy Advisor / Chief Technology Officer

394

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM LIST Name Organization Fairbanks, Mary H. AU Garnett-Harris, Deborah A. AU James, Debra A. AU Johnston, Robyne AU May, Melanie P. AU Pickens,...

395

Smoothness- transferred random field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new random field (RF) model, smoothness-transfer random field (ST-RF) model, for image modeling. In the objective function of RF models, smoothness energy is defined with compatibility function to capture the ...

Wei, Donglai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Technology Transfer Office November 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer Office November 2009 INVENTION AGREEMENT In consideration of my employment in writing to Dartmouth through the Technology Transfer Office any such discovery or invention and identify

Myers, Lawrence C.

397

Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

Covey, Debra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Ombuds Services for Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tech Transfer Ombuds Ombuds Services for Technology Transfer Committed to the fair and equitable treatment of all employees, contractors, and persons doing business with the...

399

Shielded cells transfer automation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures.

Fisher, J J

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Proceedings of Heat Transfer 2003: ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Heat Transfer 2003: ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference Las Vegas, Nevada, USA July 21-23, 2003 HT2003-47449 HEAT TRANSFER FROM A MOVING AND EVAPORATING MENISCUS ON A HEATED SURFACE meniscus with complete evaporation of water without any meniscus break-up. The experimental heat transfer

Kandlikar, Satish

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NNSA's Second Line of Defense Program Receives Capability Award |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Second Line of Defense Program Receives Capability Award | Second Line of Defense Program Receives Capability Award | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA's Second Line of Defense Program Receives ... NNSA's Second Line of Defense Program Receives Capability Award Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA's Second Line of Defense (SLD) was awarded the 2013 Non-Conventional

402

Argonne CNM: Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Capabilities Synthesis Colloidal chemistry and self-assembly techniques Complex oxide film synthesis via molecular beam epitaxy (DCA R450 Custom) Physical vapor deposition (Lesker CMS 18 and PVD 250) Spin coating (Laurell WS-400) Characterization Variable-temperature (VT) scanning tunneling microscope with atomic force microscopy capabilities (Omicron VT-AFM/STM), operates in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment with a base pressure of < 1E-10 mbar and 55-400 K. Atomic resolution is routinely obtained at room temperature and below. The AFM capabilities support a range of scanning modes. The analysis chamber also houses a LEED/Auger with an attached preparation chamber for sample cleaning and deposition (sputter cleaning, direct current heating, e-beam heating stage, metal deposition, etc.)

403

ASSESSMENT OF TECHNICAL QUALIFICATION AND FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAMS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

And TQP Assessment Crads 11 2012 Smooth (2) 1 11/29/12 And TQP Assessment Crads 11 2012 Smooth (2) 1 11/29/12 ASSESSMENT OF TECHNICAL QUALIFICATION AND FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAMS This document provides guidance and objectives and criteria to support assessments required by DOE O 426.1 Federal Technical Capability (FTC), Section 4. REQUIREMENTS, paragraph b. FTC Program Implementation, subparagraph (7) Self- Assessment. This FTC Order paragraph requires self-assessment of TQP and FTC Program implementation within one's organization. To ensure effective implementation of the Technical Qualification Programs (TQP), Headquarters and field elements conduct self-assessments of these programs. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) also reviews the results of the TQP self-assessments and determines if further action is

404

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses A photo of a woman and four men, all wearing hard hats and looking into a large square bin of dried corn stover. One man is using a white scoop to pick up some of the material and another man holds some in his hand. Members of Congress visit NREL's cellulosic ethanol pilot plant. A team of NREL researchers uses biomass process and sustainability analyses to bridge the gap between research and commercial operations, which is critical for the scale-up of biomass conversion technology. Among NREL's biomass analysis capabilities are: Life cycle assessments Technoeconomic analysis Sensitivity analysis Strategic analysis. Life Cycle Assessments Conducting full life cycle assessments is important for determining the

405

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events PURPOSE: The purpose of this Operating Experience (OE) document is to (1) provide results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, initiatives related to beyond design basis events (BDBEs), and (2) provide direction for enhancing capabilities for mitigating BDBEs at DOE sites. BACKGROUND: After the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to BDBEs. These initiatives

406

Capabilities of the FIE-TAX Instrument | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities of the FIE-TAX Instrument Capabilities of the FIE-TAX Instrument The HB-1A triple axis spectrometer is an excellent instrument for measuring low-lying magnetic excitations in solids, and for measuring structural and magnetic order parameters in bulk materials as well as in nanostructured materials such as thin films and nanoparticles. In the case of thin films the use of energy analysis is key capability which enables the desired signal to be separated from the massive background due to the substrate. This instrument is most beneficial to the condensed matter and materials science communities. Due to its versatility and easy access this instrument can be used for parametric studies using a variety of ancillary sample environments to provide a complete control of thermodynamic

407

NETL Publications: Computational Capabilities to Develop Materials for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computational Capabilities to Develop Materials for Advanced Fossil Energy Power Systems Computational Capabilities to Develop Materials for Advanced Fossil Energy Power Systems February 23, 2011 Table of Contents Disclaimer Presentations PRESENTATIONS Overview of FOA000260 awards Patricia Rawls, NETL Presentation [PDF-153KB] Computational Design of Creep Resistant Alloys and Experimental Validation in Ferritic Alloys Peter Liaw, U. Tennessee Presentation [PDF-5.19MB] Computational Capabilities for Predictions of Interactions at the Grain Boundaries of Refractory Alloys Alex Vasenkov, CFD Research Corp Presentation [PDF-7.03MB] Large Scale Simulations of the Mechanical Properties of Layered Transition Metal Ternary Compounds for Fossil Energy Power System Applications Wai-Yim Ching, U. Missouri - Kansas City Presentation [PDF-1.14MB] Modeling Creep-Fatigue- Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

408

November 29, 2010, Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MEMORANDUM FOR: Distribution FROM: Karen L. Boardman, Chairperson, Federal Technical Capability Panel SUBJECT: Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability - 10-NA SC-010 This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps as of September 30, 2010. Attachment 1 provides the Status of Qualifications in the TQP. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal is to exceed 80% "fully qualified or on schedule for qualification" for all personnel in the TQP. Currently, this overall DOE TQP qualification rate is 90%. In addition, 71% of all required personnel are fully qualified. Headquarters and site office managers are encouraged to maintain emphasis on the

409

Alabama Justice Center Expands its Solar Capabilities | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Justice Center Expands its Solar Capabilities Justice Center Expands its Solar Capabilities Alabama Justice Center Expands its Solar Capabilities March 22, 2010 - 4:56pm Addthis The roof-mounted solar array at the T.K. Davis Justice Center in Opelika, Ala. | Photo courtesy of Lee County Commission The roof-mounted solar array at the T.K. Davis Justice Center in Opelika, Ala. | Photo courtesy of Lee County Commission Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? A $162,000 EECBG grant awarded to Lee County through the Recovery Act is helping add solar power to their facilities and save the community money on energy costs. At the T.K. Davis Justice Center in Opelika, Ala., the county is making an effort to reduce costs and help the environment by installing renewable energy projects, including solar panels on the center's roof and on poles

410

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events, April 2013 Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events, April 2013 PURPOSE: The purpose of this Operating Experience (OE) document is to (1) provide results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, initiatives related to beyond design basis events (BDBEs), and (2) provide direction for enhancing capabilities for mitigating BDBEs at DOE sites. BACKGROUND: After the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to BDBEs. These initiatives

411

Presto 4.20 user's guide : addendum for shock capabilities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an addendum to the Presto 4.20 User's Guide to document additional capabilities that are available for use in the Presto{_}ITAR code that are not available for use in the standard version of Presto. Presto{_}ITAR is an enhanced version of Presto that provides capabilities that make it regulated under the U.S. Department of State's International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) export-control rules. This code is part of the Vivace product, and is only distributed to entities that comply with ITAR regulations. The enhancements primarily focus on material models that include an energy-dependent pressure response, appropriate for very large deformations and strain rates. Since this is an addendum to the standard Presto User's Guide, please refer to that document first for general descriptions of code capability and use. This addendum documents material models and element features that support energy-dependent material models.

Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

LIVE: Meeting on Strengthening Deepwater Blowout Containment Capabilities |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LIVE: Meeting on Strengthening Deepwater Blowout Containment LIVE: Meeting on Strengthening Deepwater Blowout Containment Capabilities LIVE: Meeting on Strengthening Deepwater Blowout Containment Capabilities September 22, 2010 - 12:56pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs At 1 PM EDT today Secretary Chu and Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar will convene top U.S. government scientists and key industry and stakeholder leaders to discuss how to strengthen capabilities for responding to potential blowouts of oil and gas wells on the Outer Continental Shelf. The panel discussion will help guide reforms that are raising the bar for the oil and gas industry's practices, inform recommendations on whether and how to lift the current deepwater drilling suspension and assist in

413

Property:Specializations, Capabilities, and Key Facility Attributes Not  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Specializations, Capabilities, and Key Facility Attributes Not Covered Elsewhere Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Specializations, Capabilities, and Key Facility Attributes Not Covered Elsewhere Property Type Text Pages using the property "Specializations, Capabilities, and Key Facility Attributes Not Covered Elsewhere" Showing 25 pages using this property. 1 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Glass window 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Glass window A Alden Large Flume + This is a recirculating flume facility, so a constant velocity can be maintained indefinitely. This allows collection of a much greater amount of data than possible in tow tanks. Alden's biologists are highly experienced in assessing the impacts of generation devices on fish and the facilities allow for accurate testing with fish in a highly controlled environment.

414

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

415

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

416

DE-SOL-0003174 Critical Capabilities for Emergency Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3174 Critical Capabilities for Emergency Operations 3174 Critical Capabilities for Emergency Operations Training Academy (EOTA) Support 1. Interested parties shall have experience in: a. Developing training for emergency operations type programs such as response to radiological or nuclear incidents, emergency management and preparation, exercises (full scale through table top), continuity of operations, or other related programs, b. Coordinating consultants and instructional design staff to integrate content provided by the consultants with the course development process employed by instructional designers for technical training development, c. conducting comprehensive analyses such as needs assessments, training effectiveness evaluations, job analyses, functional analyses, task analyses, etc.,

417

Robot positioning based on point-to-point motion capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an optimal search method for determining the base location of a robot manipulator so that the robot can have a designated point-to-point (PTP) motion capabilities. Based on the topological characterization of the manipulator workspace and the definitions of various p-connectivity, a computational method is developed for enumerating various PTP motion capabilities into quantitative cost functions. Then an unconstrained search by minimizing the cost function yields the task feasible location of the robot base. This methodology is useful for placement of mobile manipulators and robotic workcell layout design.

Park, Y. S.; Cho, H. S.; Koh, K. C.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Hydrogen peroxide modified sodium titanates with improved sorption capabilities  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The sorption capabilities (e.g., kinetics, selectivity, capacity) of the baseline monosodium titanate (MST) sorbent material currently being used to sequester Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radioisotopes at the Savannah River Site are significantly improved when treated with hydrogen peroxide; either during the original synthesis of MST, or, as a post-treatment step after the MST has been synthesized. It is expected that these peroxide-modified MST sorbent materials will have significantly improved sorption capabilities for non-radioactive cations found in industrial processes and waste streams.

Nyman, May D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hobbs, David T. (North Augusta, SC)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

419

POSITION DESCRIPTION 2012 TRANSFER MENTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest in the Transfer Mentor position with Orientation and Transition Programs' (OTP) Transfer Mentoring Program. The Transfer Mentor (TM) is a member of the Orientation and Transition Programs' staff to CSU including (but not limited to) helping transfer students explore study skills, time management

420

Technology transfer @ VUB Hugo Loosvelt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13/12/2012 Technology transfer @ VUB Hugo Loosvelt #12;VUB in Brussels www.vub.ac.be including or conclude licensing contracts #12;Technology transfer TTI assists academics to realise knowledge transfer by needed for R&D collaboration, licensing and spin-out company formation Technology transfer is the process

Steels, Luc

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

422

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Cryogenic NMR and Advanced Electronic Structure Theory as a Unique EMSL Capability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Temperature dependence of the on-resonance portion Temperature dependence of the on-resonance portion of the 55 Mn-NMR spectrum of a Mn(IV,IV) dimer acquired at 9.4 T. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Cryogenic NMR and Advanced Electronic Structure Theory as a Unique EMSL Capability for Complex Systems: Application to the Photosynthetic Energy Conversion Systems Project start date: April 1, 2010 EMSL Lead Investigator: Ping Yang Molecular Science Computing Group, EMSL, PNNL Co-investigator: Andrew S. Lipton Cell Biology & Biochemistry, FCSD, PNNL Collaborator: K.V. Lakshmi Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate a unique capability to be enabled at EMSL-the integration of leading-edge cryogenic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements and advanced electronic

423

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

NREL: Technology Transfer - Webmaster  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Webmaster Webmaster To report any problems on or ask a question about the NREL Technology Transfer Web site, you may contact the Webmaster using the online form below. If you have a question or concern that's not related to this Web site, please see our list of contacts for assistance. To contact the Webmaster, please provide your name, e-mail address, and message below. When you are finished, click "Send Message." NOTE: If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements Research Facilities Commercialization Programs Success Stories News

425

NREL: Technology Transfer - Ombuds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Ombuds Technology Transfer Ombuds NREL's Technology Transfer Ombuds offers an informal process to help resolve issues and concerns regarding the laboratory's technology partnership, patent, and licensing activities. As a designated neutral party, our ombuds provides confidential, resolution-focused services. Through the ombuds process, we encourage collaborative techniques such as mediation to facilitate the speedy and low-cost resolution of complaints and disputes, when appropriate. The NREL Ombuds does not: Handle contract negotiation or other legal issues Act as a decision maker or draw conclusions Investigate or make formal recommendations on findings of fact. The ombuds also does not replace, override, or influence formal review or appeal mechanisms, or serve as an intermediary when legal action is

426

Partnerships and Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Cooperative Research and Development Agreement visualization scientist A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is a mechanism whereby non-federal entities (industry, universities, non-profits, etc.) can collaborate with federal laboratories on research and development projects. CRADAs are specifically technology transfer agreements; technologies developed under CRADAs are expected to be transferred to the private sector for commercial exploitation, either by the non-federal partner or another licensee of such technologies. CRADAs were authorized by the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-480); the authority for government-owned, contractor-operated laboratories such as ORNL to enter into CRADAs was granted by the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989

427

Assessment of existing Sierra/Fuego capabilities related to grid-to-rod-fretting (GTRF).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report presents an assessment of existing capabilities in Sierra/Fuego applied to modeling several aspects of grid-to-rod-fretting (GTRF) including: fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and fluid-structure interaction. We compare the results of a number of Fuego simulations with relevant sources in the literature to evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and robustness of using Fuego to model the aforementioned aspects. Comparisons between flow domains that include the full fuel rod length vs. a subsection of the domain near the spacer show that tremendous efficiency gains can be obtained by truncating the domain without loss of accuracy. Thermal analysis reveals the extent to which heat transfer from the fuel rods to the coolant is improved by the swirling flow created by the mixing vanes. Lastly, coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis shows that the vibrational modes of the fuel rods filter out high frequency turbulent pressure fluctuations. In general, these results allude to interesting phenomena for which further investigation could be quite fruitful.

Turner, Daniel Zack; Rodriguez, Salvador B.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Federal Technical Capability Program Operational Plan - FY 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

i i * D D e e c c e e m m b b e e r r 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 Revised: February 2012 U U . . S S . . D D E E P P A A R R T T M M E E N N T T O O F F E E N N E E R R G G Y Y F F E E D D E E R R A A L L T T E E C C H H N N I I C C A A L L C C A A P P A A B B I I L L I I T T Y Y P P R R O O G G R R A A M M F F Y Y 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 O O P P E E R R A A T T I I O O N N A A L L P P L L A A N N Federal Technical Capability P rogram FY 2012 Operational P lan December 2011 1 The objective of the Federal Technical Capability Program is to recruit, deploy, develop, and retain Federal personnel with the necessary technical capabilities to safely accomplish the Department's missions and responsibilities. The Department has identified guiding principles to accomplish that objective and identified four general functions of the Federal Technical Capability Program. The guiding principles are:

429

Federal Technical Capability Program Operational Plan - FY 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* D D e e c c e e m m b b e e r r 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 Revised: February 2012 U U . . S S . . D D E E P P A A R R T T M M E E N N T T O O F F E E N N E E R R G G Y Y F F E E D D E E R R A A L L T T E E C C H H N N I I C C A A L L C C A A P P A A B B I I L L I I T T Y Y P P R R O O G G R R A A M M F F Y Y 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 O O P P E E R R A A T T I I O O N N A A L L P P L L A A N N Federal Technical Capability P rogram FY 2012 Operational P lan December 2011 1 The objective of the Federal Technical Capability Program is to recruit, deploy, develop, and retain Federal personnel with the necessary technical capabilities to safely accomplish the Department's missions and responsibilities. The Department has identified guiding principles to accomplish that objective and identified four general functions of the Federal Technical Capability Program. The guiding principles are:

430

www.nasa.gov WSTF SAFETY AND HEALTH CAPABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a positive safety culture where employees and management work together to identify hazards and eliminate jobwww.nasa.gov WSTF SAFETY AND HEALTH CAPABILITIES SUMMARY The White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) offices support all WSTF test activities and general industrial safety

431

Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model- Facilitator Guide (February 2014)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2) program is intended to aid organizations of all types evaluate and make improvements to their cybersecurity programs. This Facilitator Guide is provided to allow any organization the information needed to perform their own self-assessment.

432

Exploring Humanoid Robots Locomotion Capabilities in Virtual Disaster Response Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident that followed the 2011 Great East JapanExploring Humanoid Robots Locomotion Capabilities in Virtual Disaster Response Scenarios Karim-like motor skills to be achieved. We use virtual scenes under the fully- 3D-modeled-environment assumption

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

433

FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, February 24, 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis. Report also displays trend data for overall TQP qualification and staffing shortfalls.

434

Computing, Storage, and Data Dissemination Capabilities in 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing, Storage, and Data Dissemination Capabilities in 2010 Joseph B. Gurman NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Laboratory forAstronomy and Solar Physics Solar Physics Branch Into the Crystal Ba #12;2003 May 28 J.B. Gurma · Anyone who thinks they can predict the computing, storage, and networking

435

Nuclear Data Capabilities Supported by the DOE NCSP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Data Capabilities Supported by the DOE NCSP Symposium on Nuclear Data for Criticality responsible for developing, implementing, and maintaining nuclear criticality safety. 3 #12;NCSP Technical the Production Codes and Methods for Criticality Safety Engineers (e.g. MCNP, SCALE, & COG) · Nuclear Data

Danon, Yaron

436

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage #12;Selected BNL Research · Energy Science and Technology Department Six fully-instrumented hydride stations and complete processing

437

Person Aware Advertising Displays: Emotional, Cognitive, Physical Adaptation Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Person Aware Advertising Displays: Emotional, Cognitive, Physical Adaptation Capabilities advertising. In the future however, the ever more demanding audience will not be satisfied by today's contents the efficiency of outdoor advertising. The paper starts with a vision of out-of-home- media in the year 2034

438

Fault detection and diagnosis capabilities of test sequence selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Fault detection and diagnosis capabilities of test sequence selection methods based on the FSM model T Ramalingam*, Anindya Dast and K ThuIasiraman* Different test sequence selection methods resolution in diagnosing the fault. The test sequence selection methods are then compared based on the length

Thulsiraman, Krishnaiyan

439

FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, November 20, 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis. Report also displays trend data for overall TQP qualification and staffing shortfalls.

440

FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, March 6, 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis. Report also displays trend data for overall TQP qualification and staffing shortfalls.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, August 8, 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis. Report also displays trend data for overall TQP qualification and staffing shortfalls.

442

FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, May 30, 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis. Report also displays trend data for overall TQP qualification and staffing shortfalls.

443

FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, September 2, 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis. Report also displays trend data for overall TQP qualification and staffing shortfalls.

444

FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, July 3, 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis. Report also displays trend data for overall TQP qualification and staffing shortfalls.

445

Capabilities of the VLA pipeline in AIPS Lorant O. Sjouwerman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capabilities of the VLA pipeline in AIPS Lor??ant O. Sjouwerman National Radio Astronomy Observatory November 15, 2006 Abstract This document describes the VLA pipeline procedure. The procedure runs in AIPS, though a system has been set up to process VLA data with this pipeline from a UNIX command line

Sjouwerman, Loránt

446

AIPS Memo 112 Capabilities of the VLA pipeline in AIPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIPS Memo 112 Capabilities of the VLA pipeline in AIPS Lorant O. Sjouwerman March 19, 2007 Abstract This document describes the VLA pipeline procedure. The procedure runs in AIPS, though a system has been set up to process VLA data with this pipeline from a UNIX command line. The latter and an analysis of a pilot

Sjouwerman, Loránt

447

FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, December 15, 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis. Report also displays trend data for overall TQP qualification and staffing shortfalls.

448

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Software and Information Technologies Software and Information Technologies Algorithm for Correcting Detector Nonlinearites Chatelet: More Accurate Modeling for Oil, Gas or Geothermal Well Production Collective Memory Transfers for Multi-Core Processors Energy Efficiency Software EnergyPlus:Energy Simulation Software for Buildings Tools, Guides and Software to Support the Design and Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings Flexible Bandwidth Reservations for Data Transfer Genomic and Proteomic Software LABELIT - Software for Macromolecular Diffraction Data Processing PHENIX - Software for Computational Crystallography Vista/AVID: Visualization and Allignment Software for Comparative Genomics Geophysical Software Accurate Identification, Imaging, and Monitoring of Fluid Saturated Underground Reservoirs

449

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Quartz microbalance device for transfer into ultrahigh vacuum systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An uncomplicated quartz microbalance device has been developed which is transferable into ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) systems. The device is extremely useful for flux calibration of different kinds of material evaporators. Mounted on a commercial specimen holder, the device allows fast quartz microbalance transfer into the UHV and subsequent positioning exactly to the sample location where subsequent thin film deposition experiments shall be carried out. After backtransfer into an UHV sample stage, the manipulator may be loaded in situ with the specimen suited for the experiment. The microbalance device capability is demonstrated for monolayer and submonolayer vanadium depositions with an achieved calibration sensitivity of less the 0.001 ML coverage.

Stavale, F.; Achete, C. A. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais (DIMAT), Inmetro, CEP 25250-020, Xerem, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais (PEMM), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68505, CEP 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Niehus, H. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais (DIMAT), Inmetro, CEP 25250-020, Xerem, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energys Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.?

Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

Developing an operational capabilities index of the emergency services sector.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to enhance the resilience of the Nation and its ability to protect itself in the face of natural and human-caused hazards, the ability of the critical infrastructure (CI) system to withstand specific threats and return to normal operations after degradation must be determined. To fully analyze the resilience of a region and the CI that resides within it, both the actual resilience of the individual CI and the capability of the Emergency Services Sector (ESS) to protect against and respond to potential hazards need to be considered. Thus, a regional resilience approach requires the comprehensive consideration of all parts of the CI system as well as the characterization of emergency services. This characterization must generate reproducible results that can support decision making with regard to risk management, disaster response, business continuity, and community planning and management. To address these issues, Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Sector Specific Agency - Executive Management Office, developed a comprehensive methodology to create an Emergency Services Sector Capabilities Index (ESSCI). The ESSCI is a performance metric that ranges from 0 (low level of capabilities) to 100 (high). Because an emergency services program has a high ESSCI, however, does not mean that a specific event would not be able to affect a region or cause severe consequences. And because a program has a low ESSCI does not mean that a disruptive event would automatically lead to serious consequences in a region. Moreover, a score of 100 on the ESSCI is not the level of capability expected of emergency services programs; rather, it represents an optimal program that would rarely be observed. The ESSCI characterizes the state of preparedness of a jurisdiction in terms of emergency and risk management. Perhaps the index's primary benefit is that it can systematically capture, at a given point in time, the capabilities of a jurisdiction to protect itself from, mitigate, respond to, and recover from a potential incident. On the basis of this metric, an interactive tool - the ESSCI Dashboard - can identify scenarios for enhancement that can be implemented, and it can identify the repercussions of these scenarios on the jurisdiction. It can assess the capabilities of law enforcement, fire fighting, search and rescue, emergency medical services, hazardous materials response, dispatch/911, and emergency management services in a given jurisdiction and it can help guide those who need to prioritize what limited resources should be used to improve these capabilities. Furthermore, this tool can be used to compare the level of capabilities of various jurisdictions that have similar socioeconomic characteristics. It can thus help DHS define how it can support risk reduction and community preparedness at a national level. This tool aligns directly with Presidential Policy Directive 8 by giving a jurisdiction a metric of its ESS's capabilities and by promoting an interactive approach for defining options to improve preparedness and to effectively respond to a disruptive event. It can be used in combination with other CI performance metrics developed at Argonne National Laboratory, such as the vulnerability index and the resilience index for assessing regional resilience.

Collins, M.J.; Eaton, L.K.; Shoemaker, Z.M.; Fisher, R.E.; Veselka, S.N.; Wallace, K.E.; Petit, F.D. (Decision and Information Sciences)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

453

From capability to strategic action: the case of Green IT/S Dynamic Capability Paola Floreddu1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes and products more ecologically sustainable (Chen, Boudreau, & Watson, 2008). IT/S can be used), as it incorporates a greater variety of possible initiatives to support ecologically sustainable business processes Technologies/Systems (IT/S). Dynamic Capability is defined as the two-fold organizational process of: (1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

454

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

455

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

456

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

457

SRNL - Technology Transfer - Ombudsman  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ombudsman Ombudsman Ombudsman Program Policy The Department of Energy and its management and operating contractors (M & O Contractors) engaging in technology partnership activities, share a mutual objective to ensure complete fairness in the transfer of federally funded technologies into the marketplace for the benefit of the U.S. economy. This includes an interest in open lines of communication and the early identification of issues, complaints and disputes between contractors and their existing or potential partners. The Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program provides an independent point of contact for concerns about technology transfer i SRS Sign ssues, complaints and disputes. The mission of the Ombudsman Program is to elevate to the appropriate SRNS officials the information needed to identify and resolve problems thereby improving satisfaction with SRNS practices and reducing the occasion for formal disputes and litigation. The Ombudsman will not be involved in the merits of cases that are the subject of ongoing dispute resolution or litigation, or investigation incidents thereto. The Ombudsman is not established to be a super-administrator, re-doing what specialized officials have already done. Rather, the Ombudsman is to ensure that appropriate SRNS officials consider all pertinent information when deciding the company's position on a technology transfer complaint. To request forms or acquire additional information contact: Michael Wamstad, 803-725-3751 or mike.wamstad@srs.gov.

458

Feed tank transfer requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1998-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

459

Mimicking the electron transfer chain in photosystem II with a molecular triad thermodynamically capable of water oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production, Department...Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production...pulsed laser source and a pump-probe optical setup...conductive face of the ITO with heat-shrink...obtained with a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization...

Jackson D. Megiatto; Jr.; Antaeres Antoniuk-Pablant; Benjamin D. Sherman; Gerdenis Kodis; Miguel Gervaldo; Thomas A. Moore; Ana L. Moore; Devens Gust

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

OPTIMAL EFFICIENCY-POWER TRADEOFF FOR AN AIR MOTOR/COMPRESSOR WITH VOLUME VARYING HEAT TRANSFER CAPABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of air. These results could ben- efit applications such as compressed air energy storage where both high and expansion is both energy efficient and power-dense. An ex- ample would be compressed air energy storage. One density of compressed air storage (about 20 times greater than hydraulic accumulators), and the high power

Li, Perry Y.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

Valentini, J.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Combustion Simulations [Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics] - Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Combustion Simulations Combustion Simulations Capabilities Engineering Computation and Design Engineering and Structural Mechanics Systems/Component Design, Engineering and Drafting Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Overview Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Underhood Thermal Management Combustion Simulations Advanced Model and Methodology Development Multi-physics Reactor Performance and Safety Simulations Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Bookmark and Share Combustion Simulations Density Distribution of Spray in Near-Injector Region Density Distribution of Spray in Near-Injector Region. Click on image to view larger image. Development of computer models based on Front-Tracking and

463

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

464

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Capability Brief_Supply Chain Analysis.pub  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chain Analysis Chain Analysis Center for Transportation Analysis 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 For more information please contact: Diane Davidson (865) 946-1475 davidsond@ornl.gov Capabilities Brief Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies O RNL has a staff with extensive experience in supply chain analysis and automated support for supply chain systems. ORNL's Capabilities  Optimization modeling for supply chain systems, including:  Facility number and location analysis,  Distribution network configuration,

466

Capabilities of the CTAX Instrument - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities of the CTAX Instrument Capabilities of the CTAX Instrument The US-Japan Cold Neutron Triple Axis CTAX ideal for measuring low-lying magnetic and lattice excitations in solids, and in measuring structural and magnetic order parameters in bulk materials. This instrument is most beneficial to the condensed matter and materials science communities. Due to its versatility and easy access this instrument can be used for parametric studies using a variety of ancillary sample environments to provide a complete control of thermodynamic variables such as temperature, magnetic field, and pressure. Most of the recent demand for this instrument has been focused in studies of unconventional superconductors, quantum magnets, thermoelectrics, organometallic magnets and multiferroics. Examples of typical experiments carried out at CTAX since its commissioning

467

Capabilities of the TAX Instrument | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities of the TAX Instrument Capabilities of the TAX Instrument The HB-3 is a high-intensity triple axis spectrometer that is ideal for measuring magnetic excitations in solids, up to 100 meV and for measuring structural and magnetic order parameters in bulk materials. This instrument is most beneficial to the condensed matter and materials science communities. Due to its versatility and easy access this instrument can be used for parametric studies using a variety of ancillary sample environments to provide a complete control of thermodynamic variables such as temperature, magnetic field, and pressure. During the last few years most of the demand for this instrument has been focused in studies of unconventional superconductors, quantum magnets, thermoelectrics, ferroelectrics and multiferroics.

468

Overview of AREVA Logistics Business Unit Capabilities and Expertise  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Outline Outline Presentation Outline Overview of AREVA Logistics Business Unit capabilities and E ti Expertise Overview of Transnuclear Inc Transportation Capabilities in the United States Questions Quick Reminder of Fuel Cycle - p.2 AREVA Logistics Business Unit - p.3 Around 4 000 transports each year Around 4,000 transports each year More than 200 transports of used fuel (France and Europe), of vitrified and compacted waste (Europe and Japan) of vitrified and compacted waste (Europe and Japan) More than 150 MOX fuel transports More than 300 transports of low level waste More than 2,700 front-end transports More than 400 transports of heavy industrial equipment Around 150 transports for research reactors and laboratories - p.4 Around 150 transports for research reactors and laboratories Design, Testing and Licensing:

469

Capabilities of the POWDER Instrument | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities of the POWDER Instrument Capabilities of the POWDER Instrument The scientific areas that may benefit from using the HB-2A instrument are condensed matter physics, chemistry, geology, and material science. Due to its versatility, this instrument can be employed for a large variety of experiments, but it is particularly adapted for determining crystal structures with relatively large unit cells (dmax ≈ 28 Å), as well as complex magnetic structures. Furthermore, studies of phase transitions, thermal expansion, quantitative analysis, and ab-initio structure solution from powder data can be undertaken. A full range of ancillary sample environments can be used to provide a complete control of thermodynamic variables such as temperature, magnetic field, and pressure. The following examples highlight some of the basic features and

470

Capabilities of the WAND Instrument | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities of the WAND Instrument Capabilities of the WAND Instrument The HFIR HB-2C Wide Angle Neutron Diffractometer (WAND) is a dual purpose instrument that can be used as a fast coarse-resolution powder diffractometer or as a single crystal diffractometer to explore broad regions of reciprocal space. This instrument is most beneficial to the condensed matter, materials science, as well as the planetary sciences communities. Due to its versatility and easy access this instrument can be used for parametric studies using a variety of ancillary sample environments to provide a complete control of thermodynamic variables such as temperature, magnetic field, and pressure. Most of the recent demand for this instrument has been focused in studies of unconventional superconductors, low-dimensional magnets, multiferroics and geophysics.

471

MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water capable hydrokinetic turbine water capable hydrokinetic turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage 275px Technology Profile Primary Organization Hills Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description It is an axial flow shrouded turbine direct connected to a water pump that delivers water to an on shore genetator Being completely water proof and submersible the device can operate at any water depth Mooring Configuration An array of turbines are teathered to a cable that is anchored via a dead weight Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions This system is designed for use in Florida s Gulf Stream however any constant ocean current is suitable

472

Capabilities of the ARCS Instrument - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities of the ARCS Instrument Capabilities of the ARCS Instrument ARCS Overview The wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is optimized to provide a high neutron flux at the sample position with a large solid angle of detector coverage. The instrument incorporates modern neutron instrumentation, such as an elliptically focused neutron guide, high speed magnetic bearing choppers, and a massive array of 3He linear position sensitive detectors. Novel features of the spectrometer include the use of a large gate valve between the sample and detector vacuum chambers and the placement of the detectors within the vacuum, both of which provide a window-free final flight path to minimize background scattering while allowing rapid changing of the sample and

473

NREL: Biomass Research - Chemical and Catalyst Science Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical and Catalyst Science Capabilities Chemical and Catalyst Science Capabilities A photo of a man in a white lab coat and dark goggles looking at a microscope. A bright green light shines down from the microscope lens and illuminates a round glass tray containing small white beads. The Laser Raman Spectrometer is used to obtain phase and structural identification information for catalysts used in the thermochemical conversion process. NREL researchers use chemical and catalyst science to assess and improve biochemical and thermochemical conversion throughout the processes, from analyzing feedstocks to improving the yield of desired end products. Catalyst Science Syngas produced during gasification contains tars that are contaminants, but these tars can be reformed to more syngas using tar-reforming

474

Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events, September 2011 Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events, September 2011 Following the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities. These actions focused on learning how DOE can better prepare to manage potential beyond design basis events. A summary of these actions and the resulting insights, and recommended opportunities and actions to improve nuclear safety at DOE> are included in the attached report. I have directed

475

Vehicle System Impacts of Fuel Cell System Power Response Capability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- 01 - 1959 - 01 - 1959 Vehicle System Impacts of Fuel Cell System Power Response Capability Tony Markel and Keith Wipke National Renewable Energy Laboratory Doug Nelson Virginia Polytechnic University and State Institute Copyright © 2002 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT The impacts of fuel cell system power response capability on optimal hybrid and neat fuel cell vehicle configurations have been explored. Vehicle system optimization was performed with the goal of maximizing fuel economy over a drive cycle. Optimal hybrid vehicle design scenarios were derived for fuel cell systems with 10 to 90% power transient response times of 0, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 40 seconds. Optimal neat fuel cell vehicles where generated for responses times of 0, 2, 5, and 7

476

NERSC's Franklin Supercomputer Upgraded to Double Its Scientific Capability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NERSC's Franklin NERSC's Franklin Supercomputer Upgraded to Double Its Scientific Capability NERSC's Franklin Supercomputer Upgraded to Double Its Scientific Capability July 20, 2009 OCEAN EDDIES: This image comes from a computer simulation modeling eddies in the ocean. An interesting feature is the abundance of eddies away from the equator, which is shown in the center of the image at y=0. This research collaboration led by Paola Cessi of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography performed over 15,000 years worth of deep ocean circulation simulations with 1.6 million processor core hours on the upgraded Franklin system. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center has officially accepted a series of upgrades to its Cray XT4 supercomputer, providing the facility's 3,000 users with twice

477

Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability-  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4-2023 4-2023 Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure TEN-YEAR SITE PLAN DOE/ID-11474 Final June 2012 Sustainable INL continues to exceed DOE goals for reduction in the use of petroleum fuels - running its entire bus fleet on biodiesel while converting 75% of its light-duty fleet to E85 fuel. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), slated for completion this year, will be a state-of-the-art laboratory with high-bay lab space where leading bioenergy feedstock processing, advanced battery testing, and hybrid energy systems integration research will be conducted. The Advanced Test Reactor is the world's most advanced nuclear research capability - crucial to (1) the ongoing development of safe, efficient

478

TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES APPLICATIONS SPECIFIC PROJECTS / ADDITIONAL INFORMATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES APPLICATIONS SPECIFIC PROJECTS / ADDITIONAL INFORMATION * Source: 2 ID - EPU 105 (3 m, PM , 20-200 eV) EPU 56 (3 m PM, 200-2000 eV) * High-Resolution Angular Resolved Photoemission Scanning Microscopy (µ-ARPES): 20-1500 eV, 1 µm, < 1 meV, <0.1 o , 5-2000 K * Ambient Pressure Scanning Photoelectron Microscopy (AP- SPEM): 200-1800 eV, < 300 nm, 10 +3 Torr * Low-Energy Electron Microscopy & X-ray Photoemission Electron Microscopy (LEEM/XPEEM): 20 - 1800 eV, < 10 nm, high- transmission aberration correction µ-SP-ARPES: Momentum-resolved electronic structurelectronic bands of magnetic materials and non- magnetic materials with le of solids; spin-polarized arge spin-orbit interaction; a 1 µm spot from NSLS-

479

Capabilities of the FNPB Instrument | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities of the FNPB Instrument Capabilities of the FNPB Instrument Fundamental Physics with Cold and Ultracold Neutrons Fundamental Beamline The fundamental physics beam line showing the "cold neutron" area inside the SNS Experiment Hall and the external UCN facility. For scale, the existing n+ p → d + γ apparatus is shown in the "cold beam" position, and the proposed neutron electric dipole moment apparatus is shown in the external building. Cold neutrons and ultracold neutrons (UCNs) have been employed in a wide variety of investigations that shed light on important issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics in the determination of fundamental constants and in the study of fundamental symmetry violation. In many cases, these experiments provide information not available from existing

480

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total transfer capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

FACILITY SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SURVEY & TRANSFER SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview Transfer Activities Checklist Pre-Survey Information Request Survey Report Content Detailed Walkdown Checklist Walkdown Checklist Clipboard Aids S & M Checklist Survey Report Example - Hot Storage Garden Survey Report Example - Tritium System Test Assembly Survey Report Example - Calutron Overview As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning. Requirements and guidance for such transfers are contained in:  DOE Order 430.1B Chg. 2, REAL PROPERTY & ASSET MANAGEMENT  DOE Guide 430.1-5, TRANSITION IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE The transfer process is illustrated in the Transfer Process figure. The purpose here is to provide examples of methods and

482

Network Communication as a Service-Oriented Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In widely distributed systems generally, and in science-oriented Grids in particular, software, CPU time, storage, etc., are treated as"services" -- they can be allocated and used with service guarantees that allows them to be integrated into systems that perform complex tasks. Network communication is currently not a service -- it is provided, in general, as a"best effort" capability with no guarantees and only statistical predictability. In order for Grids (and most types of systems with widely distributed components) to be successful in performing the sustained, complex tasks of large-scale science -- e.g., the multi-disciplinary simulation of next generation climate modeling and management and analysis of the petabytes of data that will come from the next generation of scientific instrument (which is very soon for the LHC at CERN) -- networks must provide communication capability that is service-oriented: That is it must be configurable, schedulable, predictable, and reliable. In order to accomplish this, the research and education network community is undertaking a strategy that involves changes in network architecture to support multiple classes of service; development and deployment of service-oriented communication services, and; monitoring and reporting in a form that is directly useful to the application-oriented system so that it may adapt to communications failures. In this paper we describe ESnet's approach to each of these -- an approach that is part of an international community effort to have intra-distributed system communication be based on a service-oriented capability.

Johnston, William; Johnston, William; Metzger, Joe; Collins, Michael; Burrescia, Joseph; Dart, Eli; Gagliardi, Jim; Guok, Chin; Oberman, Kevin; O'Conner, Mike

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

483

INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

484

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

485

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

486

Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Heat Transfer and Convection Currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1965 research-article Heat Transfer and Convection Currents D. C...convection in a medium with internal heat generation is discussed semi-quantitatively...States English United Kingdom 1966 Heat transfer and convection currents Tozer D...

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and Thermal/Energy Sciences Naval Postgraduate School Monterey-track faculty position at the assistant professor level in the areas of Heat Transfer and Thermal/Fluid Sciences

489

Phase-Transfer-Catalyzed Reductions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) procedures that have been developed for use with sodium borohydride, lithium aluminum hydride, and several other reducing agents involving anion transfer to organic media are des...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Technology Transfer Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Oil & Gas Technology Transfer Initiatives USEFUL LINKS Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) FLC Technology Locator Feedback Contact us about Tech Transfer: Mary.McManmon@science.doe.gov Mary McManmon, 202-586-3509 link to Adobe PDF Reader link to Adobe Flash player Reports Navigate Home About Us Contact Information Hide Thumbs First Previous Pause Next Last Set Speed Slideshow speed: 5 seconds Move Autoinduction system New Image Set Autoinduction Autoinduction System The award winning Overnight Express(tm) Autoinduction System developed at BNL simplifies protein production in the widely used T7 gene expression system. Decontamination Foam-based decontamination

491

NREL: Technology Transfer - Events  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Events Events February 2014 NASEO Energy Outlook Conference February 4 - 7, 2014 Washington , DC Add to calendar Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements Research Facilities Commercialization Programs Success Stories News Contacts Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback. Would you like to take a moment to tell us how we can improve this page? Submit We value your feedback. Thanks! We've received your feedback. Something went wrong. Please try again later. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC

492

Efficient Data Transfer Protocols  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Efficient Efficient Data Transfer Protocols for Big Data Brian Tierney ∗ , Ezra Kissel † , Martin Swany † , Eric Pouyoul ∗ ∗ Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94270 † School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 Abstract-Data set sizes are growing exponentially, so it is important to use data movement protocols that are the most efficient available. Most data movement tools today rely on TCP over sockets, which limits flows to around 20Gbps on today's hardware. RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE) is a promising new technology for high-performance network data movement with minimal CPU impact over circuit-based infrastructures. We compare the performance of TCP, UDP, UDT, and RoCE over high latency 10Gbps and 40Gbps network paths, and show that RoCE-based data transfers can fill a 40Gbps path using much less CPU than other protocols.

493

Technology Transfer: Site Map  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map About Us About Technology Transfer Contact Us Available Technologies Advanced Materials Biofuels Biotechnology and Medicine Developing World Energy Environmental Technologies Imaging and Lasers Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Nanotechnology and Microtechnology Software and Information Technology For Industry Licensing Overview Frequently Asked Questions Partnering with Berkeley Lab Licensing Interest Form Receive New Tech Alerts For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Forms Record of Invention (Word doc -- please do not use earlier PDF version of the form) Software Disclosure and Abstract (PDF, use Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader 9 and up ONLY to complete the form) Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Empolyment Export Control FAQs for Researchers

494

Feed tank transfer requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1998-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

495

Measuring Information Transfer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An information theoretic measure is derived that quantifies the statistical coherence between systems evolving in time. The standard time delayed mutual information fails to distinguish information that is actually exchanged from shared information due to common history and input signals. In our new approach, these influences are excluded by appropriate conditioning of transition probabilities. The resulting transfer entropy is able to distinguish effectively driving and responding elements and to detect asymmetry in the interaction of subsystems.

Thomas Schreiber

2000-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

496

5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/120 5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven ?bo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering / Värme Three heat transfer mechanisms Conduction Convection Radiation 2/120 Pic: B?88 ?bo Akademi University | Thermal and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland #12;3/120 5.1 Conductive heat transfer ?bo Akademi

Zevenhoven, Ron

497

Heat and moisture transfer through clothing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. C. Eberhart (ed), Heat transfer in medicine and biology.Convective and radiative heat transfer coefficients forsimulation of heat and moisture transfer in a human-

Voelker, Conrad; Hoffmann, Sabine; Kornadt, Oliver; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Development of the Joint Stand Off Weapon (JSOW) Moving Target Capability: AGM-154 Block Three program.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? U. S. Naval Tactical Aviation capabilities are continually analyzed for capability gaps. This analysis has identified the need for a medium range standoff weapon (more)

Turco, Kyle Travis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

E-Print Network 3.0 - anion sorption capability Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sorption capability Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anion sorption capability Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Sorption of arsenic by...

500

RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM CAPABILITIES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY (INL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

--Idaho National Laboratorys, Space Nuclear Systems and Technology Division established the resources, equipment and facilities required to provide nuclear-fueled, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) to Department of Energy (DOE) Customers. RPSs are designed to convert the heat generated by decay of iridium clad, 238PuO2 fuel pellets into electricity that is used to power missions in remote, harsh environments. Utilization of nuclear fuel requires adherence to governing regulations and the INL provides unique capabilities to safely fuel, test, store, transport and integrate RPSs to supply powersupporting mission needs. Nuclear capabilities encompass RPS fueling, testing, handling, storing, transporting RPS nationally, and space vehicle integration. Activities are performed at the INL and in remote locations such as John F. Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station to support space missions. This paper will focus on the facility and equipment capabilities primarily offered at the INL, Material and Fuel Complex located in a security-protected, federally owned, industrial area on the remote desert site west of Idaho Falls, ID. Nuclear and non-nuclear facilities house equipment needed to perform required activities such as general purpose heat source (GPHS) module pre-assembly and module assembly using nuclear fuel; RPS receipt and baseline electrical testing, fueling, vibration testing to simulate the launch environment, mass properties testing to measure the mass and compute the moment of inertia, electro-magnetic characterizing to determine potential consequences to the operation of vehicle or scientific instrumentation, and thermal vacuum testing to verify RPS power performance in the vacuum and cold temperatures of space.

Kelly Lively; Stephen Johnson; Eric Clarke

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z