Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

2

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

3

Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment, Phase 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses recent developments of EPRI's Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model applied to the candidate spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Building on earlier work where a probability-based methodology was developed, the report details the recent modifications to the EPRI TSPA code, IMARC, applied to Yucca Mountain. The report also includes performance analyses using IMARC, identifies key technical components important to Yucca...

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

4

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

5

Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issue (KTI) agreements, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (CNWRA 2002 [158449]), and 10 CFR Part 63. This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are utilized in this document.

J. McNeish

2002-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

EPRI Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment Code (IMARC) Version 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1989, EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level radioactive waste (HLW) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. EPRI pioneered application of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) approach for evaluating performance of geologic repository systems on a probabilistic basis. Along the way, EPRI developed the Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code (IMARC) as its primary analytical tool for ...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect

Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. The new information incorporated in TSPA 1993 includes (1) revised estimates of radionuclide solubilities (and their thermal and geochemical dependency), (2) thermal and geochemical dependency of spent fuel waste alteration and glass dissolution rates, (3) new distribution coefficient (k{sub d}) estimates, (4) revised estimates of gas-phase velocities and travel times, and (5) revised hydrologic modeling of the saturated zone which provides updated estimates of the advective flux through the saturated zone.

Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Program on Technology Innovation: EPRI Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment Code (IMARC) Version 8: Model Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the total system performance of the candidate spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, since 1989. EPRI's total system performance assessment (TSPA) code is formally known as IMARC, or Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code. Descriptions of the current version of IMARC are found in numerous EPRI reports. The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct summary of all components of IMARC...

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain - SNL second iteration (TSPA-1993); Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has completed the second iteration of the periodic total-system performance assessments (TSPA-93) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). These analyses estimate the future behavior of a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site under consideration by the Department of Energy. TSPA-93 builds upon previous efforts by emphasizing YMP concerns relating to site characterization, design, and regulatory compliance. Scenarios describing expected conditions (aqueous and gaseous transport of contaminants) and low-probability events (human-intrusion drilling and volcanic intrusion) are modeled. The hydrologic processes modeled include estimates of the perturbations to ambient conditions caused by heating of the repository resulting from radioactive decay of the waste. Hydrologic parameters and parameter probability distributions have been derived from available site data. Possible future climate changes are modeled by considering two separate groundwater infiltration conditions: {open_quotes}wet{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 10 mm/yr, and {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 0.5 mm/yr. Two alternative waste-package designs and two alternative repository areal thermal power densities are investigated. One waste package is a thin-wall container emplaced in a vertical borehole, and the second is a container designed with corrosion-resistant and corrosion-allowance walls emplaced horizontally in the drift. Thermal power loadings of 57 kW/acre (the loading specified in the original repository conceptual design) and 114 kW/acre (a loading chosen to investigate effects of a {open_quotes}hot repository{close_quotes}) are considered. TSPA-93 incorporates significant new detailed process modeling, including two- and three-dimensional modeling of thermal effects, groundwater flow in the saturated-zone aquifers, and gas flow in the unsaturated zone.

Wilson, M.L.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Dockery, H.A.; Dunn, E.; Eaton, R.R.; Martinez, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauthier, J.H.; Guerin, D.C.; Lu, N. [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain - SNL second iteration (TSPA-1993); Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has completed the second iteration of the periodic total-system performance assessments (TSPA-93) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). These analyses estimate the future behavior of a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site under consideration by the Department of Energy. TSPA-93 builds upon previous efforts by emphasizing YMP concerns relating to site characterization, design, and regulatory compliance. Scenarios describing expected conditions (aqueous and gaseous transport of contaminants) and low-probability events (human-intrusion drilling and volcanic intrusion) are modeled. The hydrologic processes modeled include estimates of the perturbations to ambient conditions caused by heating of the repository resulting from radioactive decay of the waste. Hydrologic parameters and parameter probability distributions have been derived from available site data. Possible future climate changes are modeled by considering two separate groundwater infiltration conditions: {open_quotes}wet{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 10 mm/yr, and {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 0.5 mm/yr. Two alternative waste-package designs and two alternative repository areal thermal power densities are investigated. One waste package is a thin-wall container emplaced in a vertical borehole, and the second is a container designed with corrosion-resistant and corrosion-allowance walls emplaced horizontally in the drift. Thermal power loadings of 57 kW/acre (the loading specified in the original repository conceptual design) and 114 kW/acre (a loading chosen to investigate effects of a {open_quotes}hot repository{close_quotes}) are considered. TSPA-93 incorporates significant new detailed process modeling, including two- and three-dimensional modeling of thermal effects, groundwater flow in the saturated-zone aquifers, and gas flow in the unsaturated zone.

Wilson, M.L.; Gauthier, J.H.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Dockery, H.A.; Dunn, E.; Eaton, R.R.; Guerin, D.C.; Lu, N.; Martinez, M.J. [and others] [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

USE OF ONE-ON ANALYSIS TO EVALUATE TOTAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of analyses of the hypothetical performance of the various configurations of selected natural and engineered elements of the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear-waste repository. These analyses were conducted upon the recommendation of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (NWTRB) regarding an alternative approach to investigate the identified natural and engineered barriers and associated processes with respect to the postclosure performance of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The analyses were conducted per Technical Work Plan (TWP) TWP-MGR-PA-000011 REV 00, Section 3.2.4, Task 2, which states that the task involves ''Identification of barriers that are important to repository performance:'' by means of ''one-on'' analyses to gain a better understanding of repository performance relative to previously identified barriers.'' The ''One-on Analysis'' was performed per Administrative Procedure AP-SIII.9Q. The NWTRB previously reviewed similar analyses conducted by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) (EPRI 2002 [158069]). The approach of the investigation was to simulate the hypothetical performance of the repository after an arbitrarily chosen successive addition of each of the selected natural and engineered barrier components and associated processes that provide for the overall safety of the repository. Because the repository system will behave as an integrated system, the combined interaction of all the processes and barriers identified in this report will provide the ultimate repository performance as indicated in various performance-assessment analyses for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) M&O 2000 [153246]; Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2001 [155950]; and Williams 2001 [157307]. The analyses presented in this report should not be construed as an indication, for the chosen additive sequence, of the relative importance on any one barrier or process. Rather, the results of these analyses provide an indication of the relative performance of those barriers and processes and an understanding of their contribution to the overall performance of the proposed repository system. The analyses in this report considered the nominal-performance scenario only, and did not address performance following unlikely disruptive events (e.g., volcanic activity) (10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 63.342).

G.J. Saulnier Jr.

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

14

International Review Team Report: A Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain IMARC Total System Performance Assessment EPRI Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1989, EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. EPRI pioneered application of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) approach for evaluating performance of geologic repository systems on a probabilistic basis. Along the way, EPRI developed the Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code (IMARC) as its primary analytical tool for TSPA-based e...

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

15

Evaluation of the Proposed High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain Using Total System Performance Assessment: Phase 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful license application for the candidate spent-fuel and high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain depends on a robust demonstration of long-term safety. This report presents EPRI's evaluation of, and makes a case for, the suitability of the Yucca Mountain repository using a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The report discusses factors that make the Yucca Mountain repository system suitable for continued development and initiation of the licensing process. Information in this Phas...

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

16

Program on Technology Innovation: Treatment of Colloid-Facilitated Transport for Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has evaluated the potential importance of colloid-aided radionuclide transport from the candidate high level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the total system performance of Yucca Mountain since 1989. The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct summary of EPRI's independent evaluation of the importance of radionuclide transport via colloids. EPRI concludes th...

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluation of the Candidate High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain Using Total System Performance Assessment: Phase 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful license application for the candidate spent-fuel and high level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain depends on a robust demonstration of long-term safety. This report presents EPRI's independent review to identify any conservatisms in the U.S. Depawrtment of Energy's (DOE's) Phase 5 Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The review specifically identifies key facility components, makes recommendations regarding technical development work priorities, and evaluates ove...

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 2. System performance and supporting studies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. System performance analysis and evaluation are described. Feedback of completed performance analyses on current system design and operating philosophy is discussed. The basic computer simulation techniques and assumptions are described and the resulting energy displacement analysis is presented. Supporting technical studies are presented. These include health and safety and reliability assessments; solar collector component evaluation; weather analysis; and a review of selected trade studies which address significant design alternatives. Additional supporting studies which are generally specific to the installation site are reported. These include solar availability analysis; energy load measurements; environmental impact assessment; life cycle cost and economic analysis; heat transfer fluid testing; meteorological/solar station planning; and information dissemination. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

20

ACCOUNTING FOR A VITRIFIED PLUTONIUM WASTE FORM IN THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY TOTAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (TSPA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vitrification technology utilizing a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass appears to be a viable option for dispositioning excess weapons-useable plutonium that is not suitable for processing into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. A significant effort to develop a glass formulation and vitrification process to immobilize plutonium was completed in the mid-1990s to support the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP). Further refinement of the vitrification process was accomplished as part of the Am/Cm solution vitrification project. The LaBS glass formulation was found to be capable of immobilizing in excess of 10 wt% Pu and to be very tolerant of the impurities accompanying the plutonium material streams. Thus, this waste form would be suitable for dispositioning plutonium owned by the Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) that may not be well characterized and may contain high levels of impurities. The can-in-canister technology demonstrated in the PIP could be utilized to dispose of the vitrified plutonium in the federal radioactive waste repository. The can-in-canister technology involves placing small cans of the immobilized Pu form into a high level waste (HLW) glass canister fitted with a rack to hold the cans and then filling the canister with HLW glass. Testing was completed to demonstrate that this technology could be successfully employed with little or no impact to current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operation and that the resulting canisters were essentially equivalent to the present HLW glass canisters to be dispositioned in the federal repository. The performance of wastes in the repository and, moreover, the performance of the entire repository system is being evaluated by the Department of Energy-Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE-RW) using a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) methodology. Technical bases documents (e.g., Analysis/Modeling Reports (AMR)) that address specific issues regarding waste form performance are being used to develop process models as input to the TSPA analyses. In this report, models developed in five AMRs for waste forms currently slated for disposition in the repository are evaluated for their applicability to waste forms with plutonium immobilized in LaBS glass using the can-in-canister technology. Those AMRs address: high-level waste glass degradation; radionuclide inventory; in-package chemistry; dissolved concentration limits of radioactive elements; and colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. Based on evaluation of how the models treated HLW glass and similarities in the corrosion behaviors of borosilicate HLW glasses and LaBS glass, the models in the AMRs were deemed to be directly applicable to the disposition of excess weapons-useable plutonium. The evaluations are summarized.

Marra, J

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

TSPA 1991: An initial total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an assessment of the long-term performance of a repository system that contains deeply buried highly radioactive waste; the system is assumed to be located at the potential site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The study includes an identification of features, events, and processes that might affect the potential repository, a construction of scenarios based on this identification, a selection of models describing these scenarios (including abstraction of appropriate models from detailed models), a selection of probability distributions for the parameters in the models, a stochastic calculation of radionuclide releases for the scenarios, and a derivation of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) for the releases. Releases and CCDFs are calculated for four categories of scenarios: aqueous flow (modeling primarily the existing conditions at the site, with allowances for climate change), gaseous flow, basaltic igneous activity, and human intrusion. The study shows that models of complex processes can be abstracted into more simplified representations that preserve the understanding of the processes and produce results consistent with those of more complex models.

Barnard, R.W.; Wilson, M.L.; Dockery, H.A.; Kaplan, P.G.; Eaton, R.R.; Bingham, F.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauthier, J.H.; Robey, T.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Colloids in Saturated and Partially-Saturated Porous Media: Approaches to the Treatment of Colloids in Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the Yucca Mountain Project, most contaminant transport modeling has considered the mobility of dissolved aqueous species but has neglected colloid transport. This report provides a survey of what is known about colloid-aided contaminant transport and the incorporation of this mechanism in Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) for deep geologic disposal of radioactive wastes. The report concludes with several recommendations for appropriate approaches to assessing the importance of colloid-a...

1999-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process Final Report December 2001 This document is not an official copy and is for informational purposes only. CONTENTS Summary Objectives International perspective Recommendations for future assessments 1 Introduction 1.1 Background to the Yucca Mountain Project 1.2 Terms of reference, objectives and scope of the review 1.3 Conduct of the review 1.4 Organisation of this report 2 General Considerations 2.1 Regulatory perspective 2.2 Performance assessment rationale 2.3 General approach to performance assessment 2.4 Documentation 3 Sub-system methodology 3.1 Repository design

24

The Total Cost and Measured Performance of Utility-Sponsored...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Total Cost and Measured Performance of Utility-Sponsored Energy Efficiency Programs Title The Total Cost and Measured Performance of Utility-Sponsored Energy Efficiency...

25

Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 01 $4,547,400 FY2002 $4,871,000 FY2003 $6,177,902 FY2004 $8,743,007 FY2005 $13,134,189 FY2006 $7,489,704 FY2007 $9,090,924 FY2008 $10,045,072 FY2009 $12,504,247 FY2010 $17,590,414 FY2011 $17,558,710 FY2012 $14,528,770 Cumulative Fee Paid $126,281,339 Cost Plus Award Fee DE-AC29-01AL66444 Washington TRU Solutions LLC Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: $8,743,007 Contract Period: $1,813,482,000 Fee Information Maximum Fee $131,691,744 Total Estimated Contract Cost: $4,547,400 $4,871,000 $6,177,902 October 2000 - September 2012 Minimum Fee $0 Fee Available EM Contractor Fee Site: Carlsbad Field Office - Carlsbad, NM Contract Name: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operations March 2013 $13,196,690 $9,262,042 $10,064,940 $14,828,770 $12,348,558 $12,204,247 $17,590,414 $17,856,774

26

Combined cycle total energy system  

SciTech Connect

A system is described for the co-generation of steam and electricity comprising: a source of gaseous fuel, a source of air, means for mixing the fuel and air to form a relatively lean fuel/air mixture, a gas turbine, a first fuel/air mixture compressor directly driven by the turbine, a second fuel/air mixture compressor driven by the turbine for further compressing the fuel/air mixture, a catalytic burner between the second compressor and gas turbine, a motor/generator, a steam turbine, means coupling the gas turbine, motor/generator, first and second compressors and steam turbine to one another, a source of water, a steam boiler connected to the source of water and to the exhaust system of the gas turbine, a steam economizer connected to the boiler, a steam superheater in heat exchange relationship with the exhaust system of the gas turbine disposed between the economizer and the steam turbine, and controllable means for bypassing superheated steam from the superheater around the steam turbine to maximize steam or electric power output of the system selectively.

Joy, J.R.

1986-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

Gasification Systems Projects & Performers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Systems Projects & Performers Gasification Systems - Key Technologies Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Syngas...

28

Solar total energy systems final technical summary report. Volume I. Solar total energy systems market penetration  

SciTech Connect

The results of the market penetration analysis of Solar Total Energy Systems (STES) for the industrial sector are described. Performance data derived for STES commercial applications are included. The energy use and price forecasts used in the analysis are summarized. The STES Applications Model (SAM), has been used to develop data on STES development potential by state and industry as a function of time from 1985 through 2015. A second computer code, the Market Penetration Model (MPM), has been completed and used to develop forecasts of STES market penetration and national energy displacement by fuel type. This model was also used to generate sensitivity factors for incentives, and variations in assumptions of cost of STES competing fuel. Results for the STES performance analysis for commercial applications are presented. (MHR)

Bush, L.R.; Munjal, P.K.

1978-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Photovoltaic System Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Photovoltaic (PV) systems are usually composed of numerous solar arrays, which in turn, are composed of numerous PV cells. The performance of the system is therefore dependent on the performance of...

30

Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Design Selection (LADS) Phase 1 Analysis of Surface Modification Consisting of Addition of Alluvium (Feature 23a)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document the analysis that was conducted to evaluate the effect of a potential change to the TSPA-VA base case design that could improve long-term repository performance. The design feature evaluated in this report is a modification of the topographic surface of Yucca Mountain. The modification consists of covering the land surface immediately above the repository foot-print with a thick layer of unconsolidated material utilizing rip-rap and plants to mitigate erosion. This surface modification is designated as Feature 23a or simply abbreviated as F23a. The fundamental aim of F23a is to reduce the net infiltration into the unsaturated zone by enhancing the potential for evapotranspiratiration at the surface; such a change would, in turn, reduce the seepage flux and the rate of radionuclide releases from the repository. Field and modeling studies of water movement in the unsaturated zone have indicated that shallow infiltration at the surface is almost negligible in locations where the bedrock is covered by a sufficiently thick soil layer. In addition to providing storage for meteoric water, a thick soil layer would slow the downward movement of soil moisture to such an extent that evaporation and transpiration could easily transfer most of the soil-water back to the atmosphere. Generic requirements for the effectiveness of this design feature are two-fold. First, the soil layer above the repository foot-print must be thick enough to provide sufficient storage of meteoric water (from episodic precipitation events) and accommodate plant roots. Second, the added soil layer must be engineered so as to mitigate thinning by erosional processes and have sufficient thickness to accommodate the roots of common desert plants. Under these two conditions, it is reasonable to expect that modification would be effective for a significant time period and the net infiltration and deep percolation flux would be reduced by orders of magnitude lower than the present levels. Conceptually, the topographic surface above the repository foot-print would be re-contoured to make it more suitable for placement of unconsolidated materials (e.g., alluvium). Figure 1 shows the region of the surface modification in relation to the location of the repository foot-print. The surface contours in this region after modification are shown in the plot presented in Figure 2. Basically, the surface modification would be accomplished by applying cuts to the ridges slopes on the east flank of Yucca Mountain to produce a relatively uniform slope of about 10%. The alluvium would be covered with rock fragments (to imitate the desert pavement) to reduce erosion. This report documents the modeling assumptions and performance analysis conducted to estimate the long-term performance for Feature 23a. The performance measure for this evaluation is dose-rate. Results are presented that compare the dose-rate time histories for the new design feature to those of the TSPA-VA base case calculation (CRWMS M&O 1998a).

N. Erb

1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

31

Photovoltaic lighting system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of 21 PV-powered low pressure sodium lighting systems on a multi-use has been documented in this paper. Specific areas for evaluation include the vandal resistant PV modules, constant voltage and on/off PV charge controllers, flooded deep-cycle lead-antimony and valve regulated lead-acid (VLRA) gel batteries, and low pressure sodium ballasts and lights. The PV lighting system maintenance intervals and lessons learned have been documented over the past 2.5 years. The above performance data has shown that with careful hardware selection, installation, and maintenance intervals the PV lighting systems will operate reliably.

Harrington, S.R.; Hund, T.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The web of system performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because information system performance is multidimensional, specialist theories of performance dimensions must be integrated into a model of system design.

Brian Whitworth; Jerry Fjermestad; Edward Mahinda

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

34

High performance systems  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a written compilation of the presentations and viewgraphs from the 1994 Conference on High Speed Computing given at the High Speed Computing Conference, {open_quotes}High Performance Systems,{close_quotes} held at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, on April 18 through 21, 1994.

Vigil, M.B. [comp.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

36

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

37

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

38

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

39

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

40

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

42

A Total Energy & Water Quality Management System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a generic model for an energy and water quality management system for the water community, and defines standard specifications for software applications required to minimize energy costs within the constraints of water quality and operation goals.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

44

Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Performance (ESP) Benchmark It is now generally recognized in the high performance computing community that peak performance does not adequately predict the usefulness...

45

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

46

Total Thermal Management System for Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles  

Total Thermal Management System for Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

47

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

48

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump... 53.5...

49

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

50

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

51

Market assessment of fuel cell total energy systems summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An investigation of the potential market penetration of fuel cell total energy systems (FCTES) into the nonindustrial, single building market is summarized. Nine building types, two types of construction, and the ten Department of Energy (DOE) regions were used to model the market for the time period 1985--2000. Input data developed for the penetration model included size distributions of each building type and performance and cost characteristics of FCTES and competing conventional systems. Two fuel cell systems, fuel cell - heat pump and fuel cell - central boiler and chiller, were assumed to compete with two conventional systems, electric heat pump and central chiller-boiler models. Two fuel cell supply situations were considered: (a) one in which only 40 kW(e) modules were available, and (b) one in which a catalog of 25, 40, 100, and 250 kW(e) modules were available. Data characterizing the economic climate, the intended market, and system cost and performance were used to determine the present value of life-cycle costs for each system in each market segment. Two market models were used to estimate FCTES sales. In the first, the perfect market model, FCTES sales were assumed to occur in all segments in which that system had the lowest present-valued costs. In the second, a market diffusion model was used to obtain a more probable (and lower) sales estimate than that of the perfect market model. Results are presented as FCTES sales for each market segment by FCTES module size and the effect on primary energy use by fuel type.

Mixon, W.R.; Christian, J.E.; Jackson, W.L.; Pine, G.D.; Hagler, H.; Shanker, R.; Koppelman, L.; Greenstein, D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

53

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

54

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

55

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

56

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

57

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

58

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

59

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

60

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

62

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

63

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

64

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

65

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

66

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

67

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

68

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

69

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

70

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

71

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

72

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

73

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

74

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

75

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

76

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

77

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

78

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

79

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

80

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

82

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

83

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

84

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

85

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

86

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

87

Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effective System Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark It is now generally recognized in the high performance computing community that peak performance does not adequately predict the usefulness of a system for a given set of applications. One of the first benchmarks designed to measure system performance in a real-world operational environment was NERSC's Effective System Performance (ESP) test. NERSC introduced ESP in 1999 with the hope that this test would be of use to system managers and would help to spur the community (both researchers and vendors) to improve system efficiency. The discussion below uses examples from the Cray T3E system that NERSC was operating in 1999. Improved MPP System Efficiency Equals Million-Dollar Savings

88

Inspection system performance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This procedure establishes requirements to administer a performance demonstration test. The test is to demonstrate that the double-shell tank inspection system (DSTIS) supplied by the contractor performs in accordance with the WHC-S-4108, Double-Shell Tank Ultrasonic Inspection Performance Specification, Rev. 2-A, January, 1995. The inspection system is intended to provide ultrasonic (UT) and visual data to determine integrity of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) site underground waste tanks. The robotic inspection system consists of the following major sub-systems (modules) and components: Mobile control center; Deployment module; Cable management assembly; Robot mechanism; Ultrasonic testing system; Visual testing system; Pneumatic system; Electrical system; and Control system.

Jensen, C.E.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

89

Monitoring System Performance (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Requirements for a standard test to rate the durability of photovoltaic (PV) modules at system voltage are discussed.

Emery, K.; Smith, R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) (a) Total Compensation System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) (a) Total Compensation System The Contractor shall develop, implement and maintain formal policies, practices and procedures to be used in the administration of its compensation system consistent with FAR 31.205-6 and DEAR 970.3102-05-6; "Compensation for Personal Services" ("Total Compensation System"). DOE-approved standards, if any, shall be applied to the Total Compensation System. The Contractor's Total Compensation System shall be fully documented, consistently applied, and acceptable to the Contracting Officer. Periodic appraisals of contractor performance with respect to the Contractors' Total Compensation System will be conducted. (1) The description of the Contractor Employee Compensation Program should

91

Sustained System Performance (SSP) Benchmark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

John M. Shalf, and Erich Strohmaier Background The NERSC Approach to Procurement Benchmarks The NERSC-5 SSP The NERSC-6 SSP The Effective System Performance (ESP) Metric...

92

PV System Performance and Standards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a brief overview of the status and accomplishments during fiscal year (FY) 2005 of the Photovoltaic (PV) System Performance and Standards Subtask, which is part of the PV Systems Engineering Project (a joint NREL-Sandia project).

Osterwald, C. R.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Sustained System Performance (SSP) Benchmark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustained System Sustained System Performance (SSP) Benchmark Sustained System Performance (SSP) Benchmark William T.C. Kramer, John M. Shalf, and Erich Strohmaier Background The NERSC Approach to Procurement Benchmarks The NERSC-5 SSP The NERSC-6 SSP The Effective System Performance (ESP) Metric Conclusion Notes Formal description of SSP A formal description of the SSP, including detailed formulae, is now available. This is a portion of the soon-to-be-published Ph.D. dissertation, Kramer, W.T.C., 2008, "PERCU: A Holistic Method for Evaluating High End Computing Systems," Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley. Background Most plans and reports recently discuss only one of four distinct purposes benchmarks are used. The obvious purpose is selection of a system from

94

Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1...

95

Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. [Geothermally heated]. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An engineering and economic study was made to determine a practical balance of selected agribusiness subsystems resulting in realistic estimated produce yields for a geothermally heated system known as the Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. The subsystem cycles for an average application at an unspecified hydrothermal resources site in the western United States utilize waste and by-products from their companion cycles insofar as practicable. Based on conservative estimates of current controlled environment yields, produce wholesale market prices, production costs, and capital investment required, it appears that the family-operation-sized TERSA module presents the potential for marginal recovery of all capital investment costs. In addition to family- or small-cooperative-farming groups, TERSA has potential users in food-oriented corporations and large-cooperative-agribusiness operations. The following topics are considered in detail: greenhouse tomatoes and cucumbers; fish farming; mushroom culture; biogas generation; integration methodology; hydrothermal fluids and heat exchanger selection; and the system. 133 references. (MHR)

Fogleman, S.F.; Fisher, L.A.; Black, A.R.; Singh, D.P.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Performance tuning for high performance computing systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A Distributed System is composed by integration between loosely coupled software components and the underlying hardware resources that can be distributed over the standard internet (more)

Pahuja, Himanshu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Institutional applications of solar total-energy systems. Draft final report. Volume 2. Appendixes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The appendices present the analytical basis for the analysis of solar total energy (STE) systems. A regional-climate model and a building-load requirements model are developed, along with fuel-price scenarios. Life-cycle costs are compared for conventional-utility, total energy, and STE systems. Thermal STE system design trade-offs are performed and thermal STE system performance is determined. The sensitivity of STE competitiveness to fuel prices is examined. The selection of the photovoltaic array is briefly discussed. The institutional-sector decision processes are analyzed. Hypothetical regional back-up rates and electrical-energy costs are calculated. The algorithms and equations used in operating the market model are given, and a general methodology is developed for projecting the size of the market for STE systems and applied to each of 8 institutional subsectors. (LEW)

None

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive...

99

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 4. Appendices. Final report. [Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology has been developed by Atomics International under contract to the Department of Energy to define the applicability of solar total energy systems (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., retail stores, shopping centers, offices, etc.) in the United States. Candidate STES concepts were selected to provide on-site power generation capability, as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. Each concept was evaluated on the basis of its cost effectiveness (i.e., as compared to other concepts) and its ability to ultimately penetrate and capture a significant segment of this market, thereby resulting in a saving of fossil fuel resources. This volume contains the appendices. Topics include deterministic insolation model computer code; building energy usage data; computer simulation programs for building energy demand analysis; model buildings for STES evaluation; Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) computer code; transient simulation of STES concept; solar data tape analysis; program listings and sample output for use with TRNSYS; transient simulation, and financial parameters sensitivities. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Measurements of the Total Water Content of Cirrus Clouds. Part II: Instrument Performance and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the performance and in-flight validation of an instrument mounted in a pallet on the NASA WB-57 research aircraft that measures the sum of gas phase and solid phase water, or total water, in cirrus clouds. Using a heated ...

E. M. Weinstock; J. B. Smith; D. Sayres; J. V. Pittman; N. Allen; J. G. Anderson

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Solar total energy systems (STES) simulation program user's guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer program which simulates the operations of a STES facility and evaluates its annualized costs and energy displacement is described. The program contains a dynamic model which simulates the interaction of the insolation and electrical and thermal demands on an hourly basis. The program is flexible enough to allow thousands of different configurations to be simulated under a wide variety of conditions. Moreover, with this program, the sizes of the STES components can be adjusted to maximize the return on invested capital or the savings in fossil fuels. The program can also be used to simulate conventional fossil fuel Total Energy (TE) systems and solar thermal energy systems for comparison with STES. The program is written in Fortran for the FTN compiler on The Aerospace Corporation's CDC 7600 computer. It consists of 9 routines and approximately 1300 cards, including comments. A description of the program, its inputs and its outputs are presented. Examples of program input and otput as well as a sample deck structure are provided. A source listing appears in the appendix.

Timmer, B.R.

1979-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

102

The NERSC Sustained System Performance (SSP) Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective System Performance (ESP) Metric High performancerefers to this metric as the ESP (Effective Peak TFlop/sSystem Performance) 4 . ESP 5 has several characteristics

Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Strohmaier, Erich

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

SGDP Storage System Performance Supplement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Energy Storage Projects Update Conference - DOE 2010 Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) November 3, 2010 Presenter: Jacquelyn Bean Organization: DOE-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through National Energy Technology Laboratory 1 Background 2 Metrics and Benefits Data Flow 3 Contact Information Table of Contents 1 4 Appendix NETL's role in SGDP metrics and benefits reporting 2 NETL Energy Delivery Technologies Division SGDP Technical Project Officers (TPOs) SGDP Principal Investigators (PIs) Project Management and Performance Data Analysis NETL Project Management Center's Analysis & Support Team Data Analysis Team (DAT) Lead Contractors: Booz Allen

104

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost...

105

Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

Harto, Andang Widi [Engineering Physics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

106

The NERSC Sustained System Performance (SSP) Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NERSC Sustained System Performance (SSP) Metric WilliamSSP) metric developed by NERSC for its procurements. Theis important. One system at NERSC consistently slowed down

Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Strohmaier, Erich

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF MANAGED WINDOW SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE OF MANAGED WINDOW SYSTEMS S. E. Selkowitz and V.York, N.Y. , (1971). Windows for Energy Efficient Buildings,thermal performance of a window system are its overall heat

Selkowitz, S. E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A network hierarchical feedback system for Taiwanese universities based on the integration of total quality management and innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing number of Taiwanese universities are improving operational performance through innovation and total quality management (TQM). In addition, the National Quality Award (NQA), which is based on TQM, is now used to evaluate quality performance ... Keywords: Decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL), Fuzzy analytical hierarchical process (FAHP), Fuzzy analytical network process (FANP), Gray relational analysis (GRA), Network hierarchical feedback system (NHFS)

Jui-Kuei Chen; I-Shuo Chen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic System Performance  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

110

DOE SES PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This plan covers Department of Energy SES executives, as well as those Presidential appointees who have retained eligibility for SES performance appraisals and awards under 5 U.S.C. 3392(c).

111

SGDP Storage System Performance Supplement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (ESS) November 3, 2010 Presenter: Jacquelyn Bean Organization: DOE-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program...

112

Environmental Emissions from Energy Technology Systems: The Total Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report that compares emissions during the entire project life cycle for a number of fossil-fueled and renewable electric power systems, including geothermal steam (probably modeled after The Geysers). The life cycle is broken into Fuel Extraction, Construction, and Operation. The only emission covered is carbon dioxide.

San Martin, Robert L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Environmental Emissions From Energy Technology Systems: The Total Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report that compares emissions during the entire project life cycle for a number of fossil-fueled and renewable electric power systems, including geothermal steam (probably modeled after The Geysers). The life cycle is broken into Fuel Extraction, Construction, and Operation. The only emission covered is carbon dioxide. (DJE 2005)

San Martin, Robert L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Waterflood control system for maximizing total oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system and method for determining optimal fluid injection pressure is based upon a model of a growing hydrofracture due to waterflood injection pressure. This model is used to develop a control system optimizing the injection pressure by using a prescribed injection goal coupled with the historical times, pressures, and volume of injected fluid at a single well. In this control method, the historical data is used to derive two major flow components: the transitional component, where cumulative injection volume is scaled as the square root of time, and a steady-state breakthrough component, which scales linearly with respect to time. These components provide diagnostic information and allow for the prevention of rapid fracture growth and associated massive water break through that is an important part of a successful waterflood, thereby extending the life of both injection and associated production wells in waterflood secondary oil recovery operations.

Patzek, Tadeusz Wiktor (Oakland, CA); Silin, Dimitriy Borisovich (Pleasant Hill, CA); De, Asoke Kumar (San Jose, CA)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

115

Photovoltaic System Performance Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Performance Basics System Performance Basics Photovoltaic System Performance Basics August 20, 2013 - 4:17pm Addthis Photovoltaic (PV) systems are usually composed of numerous solar arrays, which in turn, are composed of numerous PV cells. The performance of the system is therefore dependent on the performance of its components. Reliability The reliability of PV arrays is an important factor in the cost of PV systems and in consumer acceptance. However, the building blocks of arrays, PV cells, are considered "solid-state" devices with no moving parts and, therefore, are highly reliable and long-lived. Therefore, reliability measurements of PV systems are usually focused not on cells but on modules and whole systems. Reliability can be improved through fault-tolerant circuit design, which

116

Workload characterization using the TAU performance system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workload characterization is an important technique that helps us understand the performance of parallel applications and the demands they place on the system. It can be used to describe performance effects due to application parameters, compiler options, ... Keywords: instrumentation, measurement, performance evaluation, performance mapping, workload characterization

Sameer Shende; Allen D. Malony; Alan Morris

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Total environmental warming impact (TEWI) calculations for alternative automative air-conditioning systems  

SciTech Connect

The Montreal Protocol phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has required manufacturers to develop refrigeration and air-conditioning systems that use refrigerants that can not damage stratospheric ozone. Most refrigeration industries have adapted their designs to use hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) or hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants; new automobile air- conditioning systems use HFC-134a. These industries are now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants on global warming. Automobile air-conditioning has three separate impacts on global warming; (1) the effects of refrigerant inadvertently released to the atmosphere from accidents, servicing, and leakage; (2) the efficiency of the cooling equipment (due to the emission of C0{sub 2} from burning fuel to power the system); and (3) the emission of C0{sub 2} from burning fuel to transport the system. The Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) is an index that should be used to compare the global warming effects of alternative air-conditioning systems because it includes these contributions from the refrigerant, cooling efficiency, and weight. This paper compares the TEWI of current air-conditioning systems using HFC-134a with that of transcritical vapor compression system using carbon dioxide and systems using flammable refrigerants with secondary heat transfer loops. Results are found to depend on both climate and projected efficiency of C0{sub 2}systems. Performance data on manufacturing prototype systems are needed to verify the potential reductions in TEWI. Extensive field testing is also required to determine the performance, reliability, and ``serviceability`` of each alternative to HFC-134a to establish whether the potential reduction of TEWI can be achieved in a viable consumer product.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF INSULATING WINDOW SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE VALUES FOR SEVERAL WINDOW DESIGNS XBL 796-10098IN MINNEAPOLIS AS A FUNCTION OF WINDOW AREA AND GLAZING/Thermal Performance of Insulating Window Systems Stephen E.

Selkowitz, Stephen E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

System to measure heart performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems to measureheart condition are applied to patients with early or chronic cardiac problems with the aim of diagnosing and exactly locat? ing the problem. Two very important factors exist that are taken into account in order to obtain a reliable diagnosis and to be able to give suitable medical treatment. One of them is the volume of blood that the heart pumps

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Analysis of photovoltaic total energy systems for single family residential applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance and cost-effectiveness of three photovoltaic total energy system concepts designed to meet the thermal and electrical demands of a typical single family house are compared. The three photovoltaic total energy system concepts considered are: (1) All-photovoltaic systems. Passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels provide electricity to meet both electrical and thermal demands. (2) Separate-panel systems. Solar thermal panels provide thermal energy, while passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels serve the purely electric demand. (3) Combined thermal/electric panel systems. Water-cooled photovoltaic panels provide both thermal energy (transported by cooling water) and electrical energy to meet the separate thermal and electrical demands. Additional passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels are added, as required, to meet the electrical demand. The thermal demand is assumed to consist of the energy required for domestic hot water and space heating, while the electrical demand includes the energy required for baseload power (lights, appliances, etc.) plus air conditioning. An analysis procedure has been developed that permits definition of the panel area, electrical and/or thermal storage capacity, and utility backup energy level that, in combination, provide the lowest annual energy cost to the homeowner for each system concept for specified assumptions about costs and system operations. The procedure appears capable of being used to approximately any size system using solar collectors, as well as in any application where the thermal and/or electrical demand is being provided by solar energy, with utility or other conventional backup. This procedure has been used to provide results for homes located in Phoenix, Arizona, and Madison, Wisconsin, and to evaluate the effects of array and backup power costs and the desirability of selling excess electrical energy back to the utility. (WHK)

Chobotov, V.; Siegel, B.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transformational Approach to Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Digg

122

System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)...

123

Hyperaudience : designing performance systems for audience inclusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define the concept of the Hyperaudience and a unique approach towards designing real-time interactive performance systems: the design of these systems encourages audience participation and augments the experience of ...

Van Troyer, Akito

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Photovoltaic System Performance Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the system is therefore dependent on the performance of its components. Reliability The reliability of PV arrays is an important factor in the cost of PV systems and in consumer...

125

RHIC sextant test: Accelerator systems and performance  

SciTech Connect

One sextant of the RHIC Collider was commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the performance of the accelerator systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. We also describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems performance and their impact on the planning for RHIC installation and commissioning.

Pilat, F.; Trbojevic, D.; Ahrens, L. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Solar Resource and PV Systems Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Resource and PV Systems Performance at Selected Test Sites Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-06NT Subtask 11.1 Deliverables 2 and 4: Report on Solar Resource and PV Systems Performance at Selected Test

127

AGILA: The Ateneo High Performance Computing System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Beowulf cluster is a low-cost parallel high performance computing system that uses commodity hardware components such as personal computers and standard Ethernet adapters and switches and runs on freely available software such as Linux and LAM-MPI. In this paper the development of the AGILA HPCS, which stands for the Ateneo GigaflopsRange Performance, Linux OS, and Athlon Processors High Performance Computing System, is discussed including its hardware and software configurations and performance evaluation. Keywords High-performance computing, commodity cluster computing, parallel computing, Beowulf-class cluster 1.

Rafael Salda Na; Felix P. Muga Ii; Jerrold J. Garcia; William Emmanuel; S. Yu

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Improving sensornet performance by separating system configuration from system logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many sensor network protocols are self-configuring, but independent self-configuration at different layers often results in suboptimal performance. We present Chi, a full-system configuration architecture that separates system logic from system configuration. ...

Niclas Finne; Joakim Eriksson; Nicolas Tsiftes; Adam Dunkels; Thiemo Voigt

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Photovoltaic system performance assessment for 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Region Experiment Station staff analyzed the performance, operation, and maintenance of five flat-plate photovoltaic plants for the calendar year 1988. These plants are: city of Austin's single-axis tracking system in Austin, Texas; the ARCO Solar, Inc., two-axis tracking system near Hesperia, California; Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) PV1 and PV2 single-axis tracking systems in Sacramento County, California; Florida Power Corporation's Solar Progress fixed-tilt amorphous silicon PV array in Orlando, Florida; and Detroit Edison's fixed-tilt amorphous silicon system in Rochester, Michigan. The performance of each system was determined from hourly data recorded by the data acquisition system at each site. This means that the system performance presented in this report is dependent on the availability and accuracy of the data acquisition system. System operators provided operation, maintenance, and repair data. These activities were categorized and unscheduled operation and maintenance costs were determined. When possible, the performance and reliability of these systems are compared with prior years' performance to provide a long-term perspective on the operation of PV systems. 17 refs., 100 figs., 117 tabs.

Rosenthal, A.L. (Southwest Technology Development Inst., Las Cruces, NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

132

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 2007 total system life cycle cost estimate includes the cost to research, construct and operate Yucca Mountain during a period of 150 years, from the beginning of the program in 1983 through closure and decommissioning in 2133. The new cost estimate of $79.3 billion, when updated to 2007 dollars comes to $96.2 billion, a 38 percent

133

AGILA: The Ateneo High Performance Computing System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Beowulf cluster is a low-cost parallel high performance computing system that uses commodity hardware components such as personal computers and standard Ethernet adapters and switches and runs on freely available software such as Linux and LAM-MPI. In this paper the development of the AGILA HPCS, which stands for the Ateneo GigaflopsRange Performance, Linux OS, and Athlon Processors High Performance Computing System, is discussed including its hardware and software configurations and performance evaluation. Keywords High-performance computing, commodity cluster computing, parallel computing, Beowulf-class cluster 1. INTRODUCTION In the Philippines today, computing power in the range of gigaflops is not generally available for use in research and development. Conventional supercomputers or high performance computing systems are very expensive and are beyond the budgets of most university research groups especially in developing countries such as the Philippines. A lower cost option...

Rafael P. Saldaa; Felix P. Muga; II; Jerrold J. Garcia; William Emmanuel S. Yu; S. Yu

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

SIMS Prototype System 4: performance test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results obtained during testing of a self-contained, preassembled air type solar system, designed for installation remote from the dwelling, to provide space heating and hot water are presented. Data analysis is included which documents the system performance and verifies the suitability of SIMS Prototype System 4 for field installation.

Not Available

1978-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

135

SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LBNL-47622 SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE Walker, I., Siegel, J ..................................................... 9 #12;3 ABSTRACT In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside of the simulations is that they are dynamic - which accounts for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect

136

Advanced fenestration systems for improved daylight performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of daylight to replace or supplement electric lighting in commercial buildings can result in significant energy and demand savings. High performance fenestration systems area necessary, but not sufficient, element of any successful daylighting design that reduces lighting energy use. However, these savings may be reduced if the fenestration systems impose adverse thermal loads. In this paper, we review the state of the art of several advanced fenestration systems which are designed to maximize the energy-saving potential of daylighting, while improving comfort and visual performance at an "affordable" cost. We first review the key performance issues that successful fenestration systems must address, and then review several classes of fenestration systems intended to meet those performance needs. The systems are reviewed in two categories: static and dynamic. Static systems include not only glazings, such as spectrally-selective and holographic glazings, but specialized designs of light-shelves and light-pipes, while dynamic systems cover automatically-operated Venetian blinds and electrochromic glazings. We include a discussion of the research directions in this area, and how these efforts might lead to static and dynamic hardware and system solutions that fulfill the multiple roles that these systems must play in terms of energy efficiency, comfort, visual performance, health, and amenity in future buildings.

Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Intelligent Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To design and develop capable, dependable, and affordable intelligent systems, their performance must be measurable. Scientific methodologies for standardization and benchmarking are crucial for quantitatively evaluating the performance of emerging robotic and intelligent systems technologies. There is currently no accepted standard for quantitatively measuring the performance of these systems against user-defined requirements; and furthermore, there is no consensus on what objective evaluation procedures need to be followed to understand the performance of these systems. The lack of reproducible and repeatable test methods has precluded researchers working towards a common goal from exchanging and communicating results, inter-comparing system performance, and leveraging previous work that could otherwise avoid duplication and expedite technology transfer. Currently, this lack of cohesion in the community hinders progress in many domains, such as manufacturing, service, healthcare, and security. By providing the research community with access to standardized tools, reference data sets, and open source libraries of solutions, researchers and consumers will be able to evaluate the cost and benefits associated with intelligent systems and associated technologies. In this vein, the edited book volume addresses performance evaluation and metrics for intelligent systems, in general, while emphasizing the need and solutions for standardized methods. To the knowledge of the editors, there is not a single book on the market that is solely dedicated to the subject of performance evaluation and benchmarking of intelligent systems. Even books that address this topic do so only marginally or are out of date. The research work presented in this volume fills this void by drawing from the experiences and insights of experts gained both through theoretical development and practical implementation of intelligent systems in a variety of diverse application domains. The book presents a detailed and coherent picture of state-of-the-art, recent developments, and further research areas in intelligent systems.

Madhavan, Raj [ORNL; Messina, Elena [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Tunstel, Edward [JHU Applied Physics Laboratory

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

APC: a performance metric of memory systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the infamous "memory wall" problem and a drastic increase in the number of data intensive applications, memory rather than processor has become the leading performance bottleneck of modern computing systems. Evaluating and understanding memory ... Keywords: measurement methodology, memory metric, memory performance measurement

Xian-He Sun; Dawei Wang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

On the Calibration and Performance of an Instrument for Measuring Total Water Mixing Ratio in Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An instrument which measures the total water mixing ratio in cloud has been calibrated to an accuracy of 0.1 g kg?1 in the presence of liquid water contents ranging up to 7 g kg?1. Evaporation occurs in a labyrinth of heated plates and the ...

C. E. Coulman; M. A. Parker

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The NERSC Sustained System Performance (SSP) Metric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most plans and reports recently discuss only one of four distinct purposes benchmarks are used. The obvious purpose is selection of a system from among its competitors, something that is the main focus of this paper. This purpose is well discussed in many workshops and reports. The second use of benchmarks is validating the selected system actually works the way expected once it arrives. This purpose may be more important than the first reason. The second purpose is particularly key when systems are specified and selected based on performance projections rather than actual runs on the actual hardware. The third use of benchmarks, seldom mentioned, is to assure the system performs as expected throughout its lifetime1, (e.g. after upgrades, changes, and regular use.) Finally, benchmarks are used to guide system designs, something covered in detail in a companion paper from Berkeley's Institute for Performance Studies (BIPS).

Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Strohmaier, Erich

2005-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Vitrification Facility integrated system performance testing report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of component and system performance testing associated with the Vitrification Facility (VF) following construction turnover. The VF at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass form for eventual disposal in a federal repository. Following an initial Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) Program and subsequent conversion of test stand equipment into the final VF, a testing program was executed to demonstrate successful performance of the components, subsystems, and systems that make up the vitrification process. Systems were started up and brought on line as construction was completed, until integrated system operation could be demonstrated to produce borosilicate glass using nonradioactive waste simulant. Integrated system testing and operation culminated with a successful Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and Department of Energy (DOE) approval to initiate vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) on June 19, 1996. Performance and integrated operational test runs conducted during the test program provided a means for critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the vitrification system. Test data taken for each Test Instruction Procedure (TIP) was used to evaluate component performance against system design and acceptance criteria, while test observations were used to correct, modify, or improve system operation. This process was critical in establishing operating conditions for the entire vitrification process.

Elliott, D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

High Performance Commercial Fenestration Framing Systems  

SciTech Connect

A major objective of the U.S. Department of Energy is to have a zero energy commercial building by the year 2025. Windows have a major influence on the energy performance of the building envelope as they control over 55% of building energy load, and represent one important area where technologies can be developed to save energy. Aluminum framing systems are used in over 80% of commercial fenestration products (i.e. windows, curtain walls, store fronts, etc.). Aluminum framing systems are often required in commercial buildings because of their inherent good structural properties and long service life, which is required from commercial and architectural frames. At the same time, they are lightweight and durable, requiring very little maintenance, and offer design flexibility. An additional benefit of aluminum framing systems is their relatively low cost and easy manufacturability. Aluminum, being an easily recyclable material, also offers sustainable features. However, from energy efficiency point of view, aluminum frames have lower thermal performance due to the very high thermal conductivity of aluminum. Fenestration systems constructed of aluminum alloys therefore have lower performance in terms of being effective barrier to energy transfer (heat loss or gain). Despite the lower energy performance, aluminum is the choice material for commercial framing systems and dominates the commercial/architectural fenestration market because of the reasons mentioned above. In addition, there is no other cost effective and energy efficient replacement material available to take place of aluminum in the commercial/architectural market. Hence it is imperative to improve the performance of aluminum framing system to improve the energy performance of commercial fenestration system and in turn reduce the energy consumption of commercial building and achieve zero energy building by 2025. The objective of this project was to develop high performance, energy efficient commercial fenestration framing systems, by investigating new technologies that would improve the thermal performance of aluminum frames, while maintaining their structural and life-cycle performance. The project targeted an improvement of over 30% (whole window performance) over conventional commercial framing technology by improving the performance of commercial framing systems.

Mike Manteghi; Sneh Kumar; Joshua Early; Bhaskar Adusumalli

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Monitoring SLAC High Performance UNIX Computing Systems  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the effectiveness and efficiency of computers is important when working with high performance systems. The monitoring of such systems is advantageous in order to foresee possible misfortunes or system failures. Ganglia is a software system designed for high performance computing systems to retrieve specific monitoring information. An alternative storage facility for Ganglia's collected data is needed since its default storage system, the round-robin database (RRD), struggles with data integrity. The creation of a script-driven MySQL database solves this dilemma. This paper describes the process took in the creation and implementation of the MySQL database for use by Ganglia. Comparisons between data storage by both databases are made using gnuplot and Ganglia's real-time graphical user interface.

Lettsome, Annette K.; /Bethune-Cookman Coll. /SLAC

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Comparative cost analyses: total flow vs other power conversion systems for the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource  

SciTech Connect

Cost studies were done for Total Flow, double flash, and multistage flash binary systems for electric Energy production from the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource. The purpose was to provide the Department of energy's Division of Geothermal Energy with information by which to judge whether to continue development of the Total Flow system. Results indicate that the Total Flow and double flash systems have capital costs of $1,135 and $1,026 /kW with energy costs of 40.9 and 39.7 mills/kW h respectively. The Total Flow and double flash systems are not distinguishable on a cost basis alone; the multistage flash binary system, with capital cost of $1,343 /kW and energy cost of 46.9 mills/kW h, is significantly more expensive. If oil savings are considered in the total analysis, the Total Flow system could save 30% more oil than the double flash system, $3.5 billion at 1978 oil prices.

Wright, G.W.

1978-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

145

Comparative cost analyses: total flow vs other power conversion systems for the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost studies were done for Total Flow, double flash, and multistage flash binary systems for electric Energy production from the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource. The purpose was to provide the Department of energy's Division of Geothermal Energy with information by which to judge whether to continue development of the Total Flow system. Results indicate that the Total Flow and double flash systems have capital costs of $1,135 and $1,026 /kW with energy costs of 40.9 and 39.7 mills/kW h respectively. The Total Flow and double flash systems are not distinguishable on a cost basis alone; the multistage flash binary system, with capital cost of $1,343 /kW and energy cost of 46.9 mills/kW h, is significantly more expensive. If oil savings are considered in the total analysis, the Total Flow system could save 30% more oil than the double flash system, $3.5 billion at 1978 oil prices.

Wright, G.W.

1978-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

Total Lightning Characteristics Relative to Radar and Satellite Observations of Oklahoma Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of regional very high frequency (VHF) Lightning Mapping Arrays (LMAs) makes it possible to begin analyzing trends in total lightning characteristics in ensembles of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Flash initiations observed by the ...

Jeffrey A. Makowski; Donald R. MacGorman; Michael I. Biggerstaff; William H. Beasley

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Relaxed Eddy Accumulation System for Measuring Surface Fluxes of Total Gaseous Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system was designed to continuously measure total gaseous mercury (TGM) fluxes over a forest canopy. TGM concentration measurements were measured at 5-min intervals with a Tekran model 2537A mercury analyzer ...

Jesse O. Bash; David R. Miller

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Performance analysis of memory hierachies in high performance systems  

SciTech Connect

This thesis studies memory bandwidth as a performance predictor of programs. The focus of this work is on computationally intensive programs. These programs are the most likely to access large amounts of data, stressing the memory system. Computationally intensive programs are also likely to use highly optimizing compilers to produce the fastest executables possible. Methods to reduce the amount of data traffic by increasing the average number of references to each item while it resides in the cache are explored. Increasing the average number of references to each cache item reduces the number of memory requests. Chapter 2 describes the DLX architecture. This is the architecture on which all the experiments were performed. Chapter 3 studies memory moves as a performance predictor for a group of application programs. Chapter 4 introduces a model to study the performance of programs in the presence of memory hierarchies. Chapter 5 explores some compiler optimizations that can help increase the references to each item while it resides in the cache.

Yogesh, A.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

PERFORMANCE OF THE AGS TRANSITION JUMP SYSTEM.  

SciTech Connect

The transition jump system has been indispensable to the high intensity proton operation of the AGS complex. Nevertheless, transition crossing remains one of the major hurdles as the accelerator complex intensity is pushed upward. To enhance the performance of the system ''quadrupole pumping'' in the Booster is used to minimize the necessary longitudinal dilution of the beam on the AGS injection porch. During the transition jump sextupole correctors at strategic locations are pulsed to minimize the effects of the chromatic non-linearity of the jump system. The available instrumentation for diagnosing the performance of the system will be described, along with installed hardware to counter the non-linear effects of the transition jump system.

AHRENS,L.A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; VAN ASSELT,W.K.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

Quantitative training system assessments using General Systems Performance Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of computers for imparting education and training is rapidly gaining widespread acceptance. There is considerable evidence in literature to show that computer-based training (CBT) can lower training costs and shorten the time taken to complete training. Although considerable work has been done in the area of development of computer-based training systems, there has been little work done in the domain of assessing the effectiveness of using computer-based methods for the purposes of training. Furthermore, performance evaluations of CBT systems to date have been performed using ad-hoc, context-specific methods. There is thus a need to provide a uniform basis for performance assessments of computer-based training systems. This thesis presents a quantitative approach to the problem of performance assessments of CBT systems, using a theoretical framework known as General Systems Performance Theory. We believe the approach presented in this thesis can be used to provide a quantitative characterization of the performance of any training system in any training domain. The thesis also demonstrates the proposed approach by applying it to evaluate the performance of a set of training systems towards achieving the goal of training situational awareness skills.

Kashyap, Sujatha

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Total least squares in fuzzy system identification: An application to an industrial engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy models have proved to be a powerful tool for the identification of nonlinear dynamic systems. Their generic nonlinear model representation is particularly useful if information about the structure of the nonlinearity is available. ... Keywords: Gas engine, Identification algorithms, Local model networks, Nonlinear system identification, Steady-state constraints, Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy models, Total least squares

Stefan Jakubek; Christoph Hametner; Nikolaus Keuth

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Performance comparison of streak camera recording systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Streak camera based diagnostics are vital to the inertial confinement fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories. Performance characteristics of various readout systems coupled to an EGG-AVO streak camera were analyzed and compared to scaling estimates. The purpose of the work was to determine the limits of the streak camera performance and the optimal fielding conditions for the Amador Valley Operations (AVO) streak camera systems. The authors measured streak camera limitations in spatial resolution and sensitivity. Streak camera limits on spatial resolution are greater than 18 lp/mm at 4% contrast. However, it will be difficult to make use of any resolution greater than this because of high spatial frequency variation in the photocathode sensitivity. They have measured a signal to noise of 3,000 with 0.3 mW/cm{sup 2} of 830 nm light at a 10 ns/mm sweep speed. They have compared lens coupling systems with and without micro-channel plate intensifiers and systems using film or charge coupled device (CCD) readout. There were no conditions where film was found to be an improvement over the CCD readout. Systems utilizing a CCD readout without an intensifier have comparable resolution, for these source sizes and at a nominal cost in signal to noise of 3, over those with an intensifier. Estimates of the signal-to-noise for different light coupling methods show how performance can be improved.

Derzon, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Diagnostics and Target Experiment Dept.; Barber, T. [K-tech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Summary of photovoltaic system performance models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to provide a detailed overview of photovoltaics (PV) performance modeling capabilities that have been developed during recent years for analyzing PV system and component design and policy issues. A set of 10 performance models have been selected which span a representative range of capabilities from generalized first-order calculations to highly specialized electrical network simulations. A set of performance modeling topics and characteristics is defined and used to examine some of the major issues associated with photovoltaic performance modeling. Next, each of the models is described in the context of these topics and characteristics to assess its purpose, approach, and level of detail. Then each of the issues is discussed in terms of the range of model capabilities available and summarized in tabular form for quick reference. Finally, the models are grouped into categories to illustrate their purposes and perspectives.

Smith, J. H.; Reiter, L. J.

1984-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Forced Air Systems in High Performance Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS IN FORCED AIR SYSTEMS IN HIGH PERFORMANCE HOMES Iain Walker (LBNL) Building America Meeting 2013 What are the issues? 1. Sizing  When is too small too small? 2. Distribution  Can we get good mixing at low flow? 3. Performance  Humidity Control  Part load efficiency  Blowers & thermal losses Sizing  Part-load - not an issue with modern equipment  Careful about predicted loads - a small error becomes a big problem for tightly sized systems  Too Low Capacity = not robust  Extreme vs. design days  Change in occupancy  Party mode  Recovery from setback Sizing  Conventional wisdom - a good envelope = easy to predict and not sensitive to indoor conditions  But..... Heating and cooling become discretionary - large variability depending on occupants

155

Co-simulation for performance prediction of integrated building and HVAC systems -An analysis of solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Co-simulation for performance prediction of integrated building and HVAC systems - An analysis performance simulation of buildings and heating, ventilation and air- conditioning (HVAC) systems can help, heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are responsible for 10%-60% of the total building

156

Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

Even though new homes constructed with hydronic heat comprise only 3% of the market (US Census Bureau 2009), of the 115 million existing homes in the United States, almost 14 million of those homes (11%) are heated with steam or hot water systems according to 2009 US Census data. Therefore, improvements in hydronic system performance could result in significant energy savings in the US. When operating properly, the combination of a gas-fired condensing boiler with baseboard convectors and an indirect water heater is a viable option for high-efficiency residential space heating in cold climates. Based on previous research efforts, however, it is apparent that these types of systems are typically not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency. Furthermore, guidance on proper design and commissioning for heating contractors and energy consultants is hard to find and is not comprehensive. Through modeling and monitoring, CARB sought to determine the optimal combination(s) of components - pumps, high efficiency heat sources, plumbing configurations and controls - that result in the highest overall efficiency for a hydronic system when baseboard convectors are used as the heat emitter. The impact of variable-speed pumps on energy use and system performance was also investigated along with the effects of various control strategies and the introduction of thermal mass.

Arena, L.; Faakye, O.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE`s Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billion cost savings for the single-repository system in comparison with the two-repository system is due to the elimination of $3 billion for second-repository development and $7 billion for the second-repository facility. These savings are offset by $2 billion in additional costs at the first repository and $1 billion in combined higher costs for the MRS facility and transportation. 55 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Functions within Radiance Title Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex...

159

Simulation of residential HVAC system performance  

SciTech Connect

In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside conditioned space. This leads to significant energy losses and poor occupant comfort due to conduction and air leakage losses from the air distribution ducts. In addition, cooling equipment performance is sensitive to air flow and refrigerant charge that have been found to be far from manufacturers specifications in most systems. The simulation techniques discussed in this paper were developed in an effort to provide guidance on the savings potentials and comfort gains that can be achieved by improving ducts (sealing air leaks) and equipment (correct air-flow and refrigerant charge). The simulations include the complex air flow and thermal interactions between duct systems, their surroundings and the conditioned space. They also include cooling equipment response to air flow and refrigerant charge effects. Another key aspect of the simulations is that they are dynamic--which accounts for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect of cycle length on energy and comfort performance.

Walker, I.S.; Siegel, J.A.; Degenetais, G.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Performance of the ALICE VZERO system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALICE is an LHC experiment devoted to the study of strongly interacting matter in proton--proton, proton--nucleus and nucleus--nucleus collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. The ALICE VZERO system, made of two scintillator arrays at asymmetric positions, one on each side of the interaction point, plays a central role in ALICE. In addition to its core function as a trigger, the VZERO system is used to monitor LHC beam conditions, to reject beam-induced backgrounds and to measure basic physics quantities such as luminosity, particle multiplicity, centrality and event plane direction in nucleus-nucleus collisions. After describing the VZERO system, this publication presents its performance over more than four years of operation at the LHC.

ALICE Collaboration

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Performance of the ATLAS Trigger System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS Trigger System reduces the event rate from the bunch-crossing rate of $40 \\rm \\ MHz$ to an average recording rate of $200 \\rm \\ Hz$ by selecting high-$p_{T}$ physics events. The ATLAS Trigger is composed of three levels. The first level (L1) is implemented in custom-built electronics, the two-stage High Level Trigger (HLT) is implemented in software executed on large computing farms. The L1 consists of calorimeter, muon and forward triggers to identify electron, photon, jet and muon candidates, as well as event features such as missing transverse energy. These inputs are used by the L1 Central Trigger to generate an L1 Accept (L1A) decision. L1A and timing information is sent to all sub-detectors and summary information is sent to the subsequent levels of the Trigger System. In this paper the performance of the ATLAS Trigger System in 2010 and 2011 is presented.

Gabaldon, C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial load-shaping measures Title Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial...

163

Total System Cost Analysis of Master-Slave Multi-super-Hypercube DX-tree Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years the area of High Performance Computing (HPC) has received an outstanding support both from the users as well as the computer system designers. This support is mainly due to the increase of the complexity and density of the data processing ... Keywords: DX-Tree architecture, XTree architecture, cost analysis, high performance computing, super-hypercube architecture

Hamid Abachi

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Stirling total energy systems study. Final report, May 15, 1976--June 13, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The application of Stirling cycle prime movers to total energy power generation systems was investigated. Electrical, heating, and cooling demand profiles for a typical residential complex, hospital, and office building were studied, and alternative Stirling total energy systems were conceptualized for each site. These were analyzed in detail and contrasted with purchased-power systems for these sites to determine fuel-energy savings and investment attractiveness. The residential complex and hospital would be excellent candidates for total energy systems, and prime movers in the 1000 kW output range would be required. Stirling engines with so large an output have not been built to date, although there would be no fundamental technical barrier to prevent this. However, careful consideration must be given to the following technological decision areas before arriving at a final design, if its potential is to be realized: engine configuration, hotside heat exchange interface, engine control system, internal gas seals, and advanced coal combustion technology. The principal advantage of a Stirling prime mover in this application, in view of national concern over present and future dependence on oil, is that it could utilize low-grade liquid fuels and coal.

Lehrfeld, D.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study  

SciTech Connect

The current study was undertaken to evaluate the performance of a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) oxygen plant to provide oxygen for industrial combustion applications. PSA oxygen plants utilize a molecular sieve material to separate air into an oxygen rich product stream and a nitrogen rich exhaust stream. These plants typically produce 90-95% purity oxygen and are located in close proximity to the point of use. In contrast, high purity (99.999%) oxygen is produced by the distillation of liquid air at a remote plant and is usually transported to the point of use either as a cryogenic liquid in a tank trailer or as a high pressure gas via pipeline. In this study, experiments were performed to the test PSA system used in conjunction with an A'' burner and comparisons were made with the results of the previous study which utilized high purity liquid oxygen. 4 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Delano, M.A. (Union Carbide Industrial Gases, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (USA)); Kwan, Y. (Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Institutional applications of solar total-energy systems. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conceptual designs are presented for thermal and photovoltaic solar total energy (STE) systems optimized to have the lowest possible life-cycle costs. An analysis is made of the market for STE systems, synthesizing the results of interviews with institutional-sector decision-makers and representatives of utilities, component manufacturers, architect/engineers, contractors, and labor unions. The operation and outputs of the market model developed to estimate potential STE system sales and resultant energy savings are presented. Outlined are the preliminary guidelines for selecting sites and conducting the planned federal demonstration program. (LEW)

None

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was initiated in 2005 to investigate Human Performance Modeling in a System of Systems analytic environment. SAND2006-6569 and SAND2006-7911 document interim results from this effort; this report documents the final results. The problem is difficult because of the number of humans involved in a System of Systems environment and the generally poorly defined nature of the tasks that each human must perform. A two-pronged strategy was followed: one prong was to develop human models using a probability-based method similar to that first developed for relatively well-understood probability based performance modeling; another prong was to investigate more state-of-art human cognition models. The probability-based modeling resulted in a comprehensive addition of human-modeling capability to the existing SoSAT computer program. The cognitive modeling resulted in an increased understanding of what is necessary to incorporate cognition-based models to a System of Systems analytic environment.

Dixon, Kevin R.; Lawton, Craig R.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Longsine, Dennis E. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX); Forsythe, James Chris; Gauthier, John Henry; Le, Hai D.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Integration of project management and systems engineering: Tools for a total-cycle environmental management system  

SciTech Connect

An expedited environmental management process has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This process is one result of the Lockheed Martin commitment to the US Department of Energy to incorporate proven systems engineering practices with project management and program controls practices at the INEEL. Lockheed Martin uses a graded approach of its management, operations, and systems activities to tailor the level of control to the needs of the individual projects. The Lockheed Martin definition of systems engineering is: ``Systems Engineering is a proven discipline that defines and manages program requirements, controls risk, ensures program efficiency, supports informed decision making, and verifies that products and services meet customer needs.`` This paper discusses: the need for an expedited environmental management process; how the system was developed; what the system is; what the system does; and an overview of key components of the process.

Blacker, P.B.; Winston, R.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Measured Performance of Energy-Efficient Computer Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to explore the potential performance of both Energy Star computers/printers and add-on control devices individually, and their expected savings if collectively applied in a typical office building in a hot and humid climate. Recent surveys have shown that the use of personal computer systems in commercial office buildings is expanding rapidly. The energy consumption of such a growing end-use also has a significant impact on the total building power demand. In warmer climates, office equipment energy use has important implications for building cooling loads as well as those directly associated with computing tasks. Recently, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed an Energy Star (ES) rating system intended to endorse more efficient equipment. To research the comparative performance of conventional and low-energy computer systems, four Energy Star computer systems and two computer systems equipped with energy saving devices were monitored for power demand. Comparative data on the test results are summarized. In addition, a brief analysis uses the DOE-2.1E computer simulation to examine the impact of the test results and HVAC interactions if generically applied to computer systems in a modern office building in Florida's climate.

Floyd, D. B.; Parker, D. S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures Christian Engelmann, Hong Ong trend in modern high performance computing (HPC) system architectures employs "lean" compute nodes) continue to reside on compute nodes. Key words: High Performance Computing, Middleware, Lean Compute Node

Engelmann, Christian

171

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING SOFTWARE: THE HDDA DAGH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING SOFTWARE: THE HDDA DAGH INFRASTRUCTURE systems implementing high performance computing applications. The example which drives the creation in the context of high performance computing software. Applicationof these principleswill be seen

Parashar, Manish

172

Advanced fenestration systems for improved daylight performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system efficacy of a daylighting system will vary with theupon the specifics of daylighting system. Skylighted systemsabove, we believe that daylighting systems continue to have

Selkowitz, S.; Lee, E.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

PERFORMANCE OF THE DIII-D SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A271 PERFORMANCE OF THE DIII-D SYSTEM. Three 110 GHz gyrotrons with nominal output power of 1 MW each have been installed and are operational on the DIII-D tokamak. All three gyrotrons were built by Communications and Power Industries (CPI). The CPI gyrotrons utilize a single disc CVD (chemical-vapor-deposition) diamond window that employs water cooling around the edge of the disc. Calculations predict that the CVD diamond window should be capable of full 1 MW cw operation, which is supported by IR camera measurements that show the window reaching equilibrium after 2.5 s. All gyrotrons are connected to the tokamak by low-loss-windowless evacuated transmission line using circular corrugated waveguide for propagation in the HE{sub 11} mode. Each waveguide system incorporates a two-mirror launcher, which can steer the rf beam poloidally from the center to the outer edge of the plasma. Results obtained using the DIII-D ECH systems will be reported.

CALLIS,RW; KAJIWARA,K; LOHR,J; GORELOV,YA; PONCE,D

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 1. System criteria and design description. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume documents the preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas. Current system, subsystem, and component designs are described and additional studies which support selection among significant design alternatives are presented. Overall system requirements which form the system design basis are presented. These include program objectives; performance and output load requirements; industrial, statutory, and regulatory standards; and site interface requirements. Material in this section will continue to be issued separately in the Systems Requirements Document and maintained current through revision throughout future phases of the project. Overall system design and detailed subsystem design descriptions are provided. Consideration of operation and maintenance is reflected in discussion of each subsystem design as well as in an integrated overall discussion. Included are the solar collector subsystem; the thermal storage subsystem, the power conversion sybsystem (including electrical generation and distribution); the heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystems; overall instrumentation and control; and the STES building and physical plant. The design of several subsystems has progressed beyond the preliminary stage; descriptions for such subsystems are therefore provided in more detail than others to provide complete documentation of the work performed. In some cases, preliminary design parameters require specific verificaton in the definitive design phase and are identified in the text. Subsystem descriptions will continue to be issued and revised separately to maintain accuracy during future phases of the project. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A probabilistic total system approach to the simulation of complex environmental systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GoldSim is a powerful and flexible Windows-based computer program for carrying out probabilistic simulations of complex systems to support management and decision-making in engineering, science and business. The program is highly graphical, highly extensible, ...

Rick Kossik; Ian Miller

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Conceptual design of a 5x CPC for solar total energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design of a nontracking collector for a solar total energy system are described. Sandia Laboratories has responsibility for the evaluation of concentrating collectors in a total energy test bed. A Rankine cycle turbine, generator, controls, thermal storage, and air conditioning equipment have been installed and checked out. The thermal energy for the facility is to be provided by a large (approximately 800 m/sup 2/) concentrating collector field. At present a portion of the area is installed as E-W oriented linear parabolic troughs. Three additional concepts for the remaining area have been selected--a fixed mirror-moving receiver system, fixed receiver-moving reflector slats, and a two-axis tracking parabolic dish. All four systems use diurnal tracking and have the reflecting surfaces exposed to the elements. Argonne National Laboratory has been working on the development of non-tracking concentrators for high temperature operation. The recent experimental results indicate that a 5x CPC collector with only 12 adjustments per year could effectively compete with the systems presently being considered. These collectors would be enclosed under a protective cover glass, eliminating many of the problems with dirt, etc. A conceptual design of a CPC collector system is presented.

Cole, R; Schertz, W W; Teagan, W P

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Wall System Innovations: Familiar Materials, Better Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Wall System Innovation Vladimir Kochkin Joseph Wiehagen April 2013 Wall Innovation Metrics  High R (thermal and air barrier)  High Performance  Durable, structural  Build-able  Low transition risk to builders  50% Building America Goal  ≈ R25+ (CZ 4 and higher) 2 Background  Technologies for high-R walls have been proposed and used for over 25 years  But real market penetration is very low  Often the last EE measure implemented by builders (e.g. E*) 3 Background  High-R wall solutions have not achieved a broad level of standardization and commonality  A large set of methods and materials entered the market  Multiple and conflicting details  Wall characteristics are more critical = RISK 4 New Home Starts -

178

Performance of the ATLAS trigger system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS trigger has been used very successfully to collect collision data during 2009-2011 LHC running at centre of mass energies between 900 GeV and 7 TeV. The three-level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. The first level uses custom electronics to reject most background collisions, in less than 2.5 us, using information from the calorimeter and muon detectors. The upper two trigger levels are software-based triggers. The trigger system selects events by identifying signatures of muon, electron, photon, tau lepton, jet, and B meson candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. We give an overview of the performance of these trigger selections based on extensive online running during the 2011 LHC run and discuss issues encountered during 2011 operations. Distributions of key selection variables are shown calculated at the different trigger levels and are compared with of...

Casadei, D; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Advanced fenestration systems for improved daylight performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.E. Selkowitz. Advanced Optical Daylighting Systems: LightAdvanced Fenestration Systems Based on the analysis presented above, we believe that daylighting systems

Selkowitz, S.; Lee, E.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement.

Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert. (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); Sahm, Aaron (University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Crawford, Clark (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S. (Emcore, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High-performance commercial building systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

High-performance commercial building systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC and other industry partners have assisted directly in this effort

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for...

184

Enterprise performance measurement system : metric design framework and tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing metric selection methodologies and performance measurement frameworks provide practicing managers with good checklists and tools to evaluate and design their enterprise performance measurement systems (EPMS) and ...

Teo, Kai Siang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness: Lake County study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief summary is given of the results of a previously reported study designed to evaluate the costs and viability of combined thermodynamic and biologic cycles in a system known as the Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness (TERSA). This conceptual system involved the combined geothermally assisted activities of greenhouse crop and mushroom growing, fish farming, and biogas generation in an integrated biologic system such that the waste or by-products of each subsystem cycle were recovered to service input needs of companion cycles. An updated direct use geothermal system based on TERSA that is viable for implementation in Lake County is presented. Particular consideration is given to: location of geothermal resources, availability of land and irrigation quality water, compatibility of the specific direct use geothermal activities with adjacent and local uses. Private interest and opposition, and institutional factors as identified. Factors relevant to local TERSA implementation are discussed, followed by sites considered, selection criteria, site slection, and the modified system resulting. Particular attention is paid to attempt to make clear the process followed in applying this conceptual design to the specific task of realistic local implementation. Previous publications on geothermal energy and Lake County are referenced where specific details outside the scope of this study may be found. (JGB)

Fogleman, S.F.; Fisher, L.A.; Black, A.R.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Homepage: High-Performance Computing Systems, HPC-3: High-Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1188 667-5243 Fax: 667-7665 MS T080 Computing Solutions that work for you High-Performance Computing Systems The High-Performance Computing Systems Group provides production...

187

High-performance commercial building systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC engineers and operators to optimize energy performance of buildings; and Develop simulation-based test and optimization

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Introduction to the TAU Performance System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

participation through the development ­ ANL's ALCF INCITE Performance Workshop ­ Jülich's Blue Gene/P Porting

Kemner, Ken

189

High-performance commercial building systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Energy and Maintenance Management. Villafana, L. and C.Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Coefficient offrom computerized maintenance management systems (CMMS) and

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Performance analysis of hybrid liquid desiccant solar cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the coefficient of performance (COP) of a hybrid liquid desiccant solar cooling system. This hybrid cooling system includes three sections: 1) conventional (more)

Zhou, Zhipeng (Joe Zoe)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Final report. Volume 2. Technical  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program was to assess the feasibility of using solar energy to provide a significant fraction of the energy needs of commercial buildings that have energy demands greater than 200 kWe. This volume of the final report discusses the approach employed to develop: (1) STES concept configurations and component data, (2) commercial buildings application data, and (3) computer simulation programs for evaluating various STES concept-commercial buildings applications. Various solar thermal and photovoltaic solar total energy systems (STES) configurations were considered. Concurrently, data on commercial buildings (e.g., categories, energy demand, demographic population, etc.) were developed and used to define six model building configurations which could be used as representative commercial buildings within six various regions (12 specific sites) of the United States. The six configurations included four building types (a low rise office building, a large retail store, a medium-size shopping center and a large shopping center) typifying current building designs. The remaining two configurations used the large shopping center model except that the energy demand was changed to reflect future building designs. The STESEP Computer Code was developed for a quick evaluation method for tradeoffs related to (1) cascading of thermal power conversion systems, (2) determination of optimum collector sizes and operating conditions (make or buy decisions for auxiliary energy), and (3) comparison of solar total energy concepts in various parts of the country and in various types of commercial buildings to assess their future economic potential for various economic scenarios. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

C++ programming techniques for High Performance Computing on systems with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C++ programming techniques for High Performance Computing on systems with non-uniform memory access (including NUMA) without sacrificing performance. ccNUMA In High Performance Computing (HPC), shared- memory

Sanderson, Yasmine

193

Towards a multi-dimensional project Performance Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the difficulty of controlling a complex project caused by the great number of performance indicators. The problem studied is how to allow project managers to better control the performance of their projects. From a literature review ... Keywords: Decision Support Systems, Multiple criteria analysis, Performance Measurement System, Project management, Project performance

Matthieu Lauras; Guillaume Marques; Didier Gourc

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 3. Conceptual designs and market analyses. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to assess the feasibility of using solar energy to provide a significant fraction of the energy needs of commercial buildings that have energy demands greater than 200 kWe. The STES concept trade studies, sensitivity parameters, performance characteristics, and selected concepts are discussed. Market penetration rate estimates are provided, and technology advancements and utilization plans are discussed. Photovoltaic STES configurations and Rankine cycle thermal STES systems are considered. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A survey of computer systems for expressive music performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a survey of research into automated and semiautomated computer systems for expressive performance of music. We will examine the motivation for such systems and then examine the majority of the systems developed over the last 25 years. To highlight ... Keywords: Music performance, computer music, generative performance, machine learning

Alexis Kirke; Eduardo Reck Miranda

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Building Performance Monitoring, Control, and Information Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are of critical importance in achieving optimal low-energy building performance. Advanced monitoring and control technologies with high energy saving potential are widely...

197

Performance of Integrated Systems of Automated Roller Shade Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

032011 Keywords automated roller shade systems, daylight responsive dimming systems, daylighting, Integrated systems, photoelectric controls Abstract Daylight responsive...

198

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 1. Summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology has been developed by Atomics International under contract to the Department of Energy to define the applicability of solar total energy systems (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., retail stores, shopping centers, offices, etc.) in the United States. Candidate STES concepts were selected to provide on-site power generation capability, as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. Each concept was evaluated on the basis of its cost effectiveness (i.e., as compared to other concepts) and its ability to ultimately penetrate and capture a significant segment of this market, thereby resulting in a saving of fossil fuel resources. The photovoltaic STES appears favorable for applications under 800 kWe; whereas the organic Rankine STES would be more cost effective for larger energy demand applications. Initial penetration of these systems are expected to occur in the northeast for large shopping centers in the 1990 to 2000 time period. Such systems could provide about 0.8 to 1.8 quads (8 x 10/sup 14/ to 1.8 x 10/sup 15/ Btu) of energy per year for commercial applictions by the year 2010.

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California solar energy system performance evaluation, July 1980-June 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory site is an office building in California with an active solar energy system designed to supply from 23 to 33% of the space heating load and part of the hot water load. The solar heating system is equipped with 1428 square feet of flat-plate collectors, a 2000-gallon water storage tank, and two gas-fired boilers to supply auxiliary heat for both space heating and domestic hot water. Poor performance is reported, with the solar fraction being only 4%. Also given are the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and the coefficient of performance. The performance data are given for the collector, storage, solar water heating and solar space heating subsystems as well as the total system. Typical system operation and solar energy utilization are briefly described. The system design, performance evaluation techniques, weather data, and sensor technology are presented. (LEW)

Wetzel, P.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Photovoltaic System Performance Assessment for 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance data from five utility-grade photovoltaic power plants demonstrate not only that plants generally operate well but also that recent designs have resolved problems afflicting earlier installations.

1990-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Simulation of residential HVAC system performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

house in 16 California climate zones. The typical (base)weather data include all 16 climate Zones for the state ofwere performed for climate zones from 8 to 15 because other

Walker, I.S.; Siegel, J.A.; Degenetais, G.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A HIGH PERFORMANCE/LOW COST ACCELERATOR CONTROL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOW COST ACCELERATOR CONTROL SYSTEM S. Hagyary, J. Glat H.LOW COST ACCELERATOR CONTROL SYSTEM S. Magyary, J. Glatz, H.a high performance computer control system tailored to the

Magyary, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Solar energy system performance evaluation: Aratex Services, Inc. , Industrial Laundry, Fresno, California, November 1977--May 1978  

SciTech Connect

An operational summary of how the solar energy system installed at ARATEX Services Inc., an industrial laundry located in Fresno, California, performed during the report period is provided. This analysis is made by evaluation of measured system performance and by comparison of measured climatic data with long term average climatic conditions. Performance of major subsystems is also presented to illustrate their operation. Included are: a brief system description, review of actual system performance during the report period, analysis of performance based on evaluation of meteorological load and operational conditions, and an overall discussion of results. Monthly values of average daily insolation and average ambient temperature measured at the ARATEX site are presented. Also presented are the long-term, average monthly values for these climatic parameters. The ARATEX system collected an average of 67 million Btu of solar energy per month. The available solar radiation was 75 percent of the long term average. The use of both a solar energy and heat recovery system at ARATEX has combined to reduce the total load of a system without heat recovery by approximately 45 percent. The solar energy system alone contributed 16 percent of the total hot water load at the site. Damage to the Lexan covers on fourteen of the total 140 collectors was reported. This damage is believed to have been caused by winds.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Comparing maintenance costs of geothermal heat pump systems with other HVAC systems: Preventive maintenance actions and total maintenance costs  

SciTech Connect

Total annual heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) maintenance costs were determined for 20 schools in the Lincoln, Nebraska, Public School District. Each school examined provides cooling to over 70% of its total floor area and relies on one of the following heating and cooling systems to provide the majority of space conditioning: vertical-bore, geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), air-cooled chiller with gas-fired hot water boiler (ACC/GHWB), or water-cooled chiller with gas-fired steam boiler (WCC/GSB). A precursor to this study examined annual costs associated with repair, service, and corrective maintenance activities tracked in a work order database. This follow-up study examines costs associated with preventive maintenance (PM) activities conducted by the district. Annual PM costs were 5.87 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (63.14 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 7.14 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (76.86 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 9.82 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (105.39 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/ GSB, and 12.65 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (136.30 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. The results of the two analyses are combined to produce an estimate of total annual maintenance costs, by system type, for the 20 schools. Total annual maintenance costs were 8.75 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (94.20 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 9.27 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (99.76 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 13.54 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (145.49 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GSB, and 18.71 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (201.61 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. It should be noted that these costs represent only the trends seen in the maintenance database of the Lincoln School District. Because of differences in the number of schools using each system type, varying equipment age, and the small total number of schools included in the study, the maintenance costs presented here may not be representative of the maintenance costs seen for similar equipment in other locations.

Martin, M.A.; Madgett, M.G.; Hughes, P.J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Performance Systems Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type CRADA Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration Partnership Year 2005 Link to project description http:www.nrel.govnewspress...

206

Performance Excellence: A Systems Approach and Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Make value. stream flow. ... Data-driven and results-oriented, leading to: tracking systems (eg, control charts, scorecards, rolled throughput yield charts) ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Functions within Radiance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

software, windows, daylighting systems, shading systems,daylighting performance of complex fenestration systems (daylighting performance of complex fenestration systems (

Ward, Gregory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems.  

SciTech Connect

The High Performance Linpack (HPL), or Top 500, benchmark [1] is the most widely recognized and discussed metric for ranking high performance computing systems. However, HPL is increasingly unreliable as a true measure of system performance for a growing collection of important science and engineering applications. In this paper we describe a new high performance conjugate gradient (HPCG) benchmark. HPCG is composed of computations and data access patterns more commonly found in applications. Using HPCG we strive for a better correlation to real scientific application performance and expect to drive computer system design and implementation in directions that will better impact performance improvement.

Heroux, Michael Allen; Dongarra, Jack. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Performance testing of small interconnected wind systems  

SciTech Connect

There is a need for performance information on small windmills intended for interconnected operation with utility distribution service. The owner or prospective buyer needs the data to estimate economic viability and service reliability, while the utility needs it to determine interconnection arrangements, maintain quality of power delivered by its line, and to answer customer inquiries. No existing testing program provides all the information needed, although the Rocky Flats test site comes close. To fill this need for Michigan, Consumers Power Company and the Michigan Electric Cooperative Association helped support a two-year program at Michigan State University involving extensive performance testing of an Enertech 1500 and a 4-kW Dakota with a Gemini inverter. The performance study suggested measurements necessary to characterize SWECS for interconnected operation. They include SWECS energy output to a-c line, miles of wind passing the rotor, var-hour metering for average var consumption, and recording watt, current, and voltmeters to assess SWECS output variability. Added instruments for waveform measurement (to assess power quality) are also needed. Typical data taken at the MSU test site are used to illustrate the techniques and preliminary data from a current project is given. Finally, conclusions about SWECS performance are listed.

Park, G.L.; Krauss, O.; Miller, J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Relay Performance During Major System Disturbances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractPower systems in the United States and abroad experienced several wide-area disturbances in the last 15 years including the largest blackout on August 14, 2003, in the Midwest

Demetrios Tziouvaras; Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Performance evaluation of cleanroom environmental systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilize three common designs: a) Fan-tower with pressurized-design at early stage of the project, and by adopting fans andheat from fan operation. Like optimizing system design and

Xu, Tengfang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Transmission System Reliability Performance Metrics Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transmission availability has become the significant indicator of overall transmission system operational health, due to increased utilization of the transmission system, growth of deregulated energy wholesale markets, and decreased investment in new transmission assets. Availability trends reflect the increasing dependence upon transmission assets from a technical and market perspective. Presently availability metrics lack comparability due to the non-standardization of underlying data collection method...

2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Performance Evaluation of Phasor Measurement Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After two decades of phasor network deployment, phasor measurements are now available at many major substations and power plants. The North American SynchroPhasor Initiative (NASPI), supported by both the US Department of Energy and the North American Electricity Reliability Council (NERC), provides a forum to facilitate the efforts in phasor technology in North America. Phasor applications have been explored and some are in todays utility practice. IEEE C37.118 Standard is a milestone in standardizing phasor measurements and defining performance requirements. To comply with IEEE C37.118 and to better understand the impact of phasor quality on applications, the NASPI Performance and Standards Task Team (PSTT) initiated and accomplished the development of two important documents to address characterization of PMUs and instrumentation channels, which leverage prior work (esp. in WECC) and international experience. This paper summarizes the accomplished PSTT work and presents the methods for phasor measurement evaluation.

Huang, Zhenyu; Kasztenny, Bogdan; Madani, Vahid; Martin, Kenneth E.; Meliopoulos, Sakis; Novosel, Damir; Stenbakken, Jerry

2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

Performance monitoring strategies for effective running of commercial refrigeration systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refrigeration systems often represent the largest electricity consumers in the supermarkets. Therefore there is a clear need for running these systems effectively. Performance monitoring uses different techniques to determine the actual system state. ... Keywords: COP, FDD, energy monitoring, performance measure, refrigeration

Martin Hrn?r; Petr Stluka

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

High-performance verification of large concurrent systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-performance verification of large concurrent systems Elbie taKrpska Ph.D. Thesis VU University Systems Ph.D. Thesis Elzbieta Krepska VU University Amsterdam, 2012 #12;This research was funded by the VU. #12;VRIJE UNIVERSITEIT TOWARDS BIG BIOLOGY: HIGH-PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION OF LARGE CONCURRENT SYSTEMS

Bal, Henri E.

216

Compiler-based Memory Optimizations for High Performance Computing Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Parallelism has always been the primary method to achieve higher performance. To advance the computational capabilities of state-of-the-art high performance computing systems, we continue to (more)

Kultursay, Emre

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 1 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Buildings Technologies Program Date: September 30, 2011 ENERGY STAR ® Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 11:00 AM Eastern. There is no call in number. The audio will be sent through your computer speakers. All questions will be submitted via typing. Video of presenters Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 2 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 3 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Building America Program: Introduction Building Technologies Program Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes

218

On the performance of ejector refrigeration systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design characteristics of an ejector refrigeration system using R134a with fixed cooling capacity and fixed inlet temperatures of the external fluids at the inlet of the generator, the condenser and the evaporator are presented for different pressures ... Keywords: COP, R-134a, computer simulation, finite size thermodynamics

Abdelouahid Dahmani; Zine Aidoun; Nicolas Galanis

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The ATLAS Trigger System Commissioning and Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS trigger has been used very successfully to collect collision data during 2009 and 2010 LHC running at centre of mass energies of 900 GeV, 2.36 TeV, and 7 TeV. This paper presents the ongoing work to commission the ATLAS trigger with proton collisions, including an overview of the performance of the trigger based on extensive online running. We describe how the trigger has evolved with increasing LHC luminosity and give a brief overview of plans for forthcoming LHC running.

A. Hamilton

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation gives an overview of the status and FY09 accomplishments for the NREL Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Project.

Bennion, K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal control is a critical factor in power electronics equipment. NREL aims to integrate and improve thermal system performance in power electronics.

Bennion, K.

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

222

NREL PV System Performance and Standards Technical Progress  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a brief overview of the status and accomplishments during Fiscal Year (FY)2004 of the Photovoltaic (PV) System Performance & Standards Subtask, which is part of PV Systems Engineering Project (a joint NREL-Sandia project).

Osterwald, C. R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Dynamic Performance Validation in the Western Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information, in all its forms, is the key to the reliable and economic performance of large power systems. This paper describes the efforts underway to meet the dynamic information needs of the western power transmission system.

Hauer, John F.; Beshir, Mo; Mittelstadt, Bill

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Measured Off-Grid LED Lighting System Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market in Western Kenya: LED Alternatives and Consumerfor Emerging Off-grid White-LED Illumination Systems forReport #4 Measured Off-Grid LED Lighting System Performance

Granderson, Jessica

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Machine Maintenance Integrated Performance Support System  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this partnership project were to develop a preventive maintenance checklist program, a troubleshooting system for the Vertical Turning Center (VTC)-5, an on-line manual, and to integrate these components with a custom browser that would run on the VTC-5 machine's controller and would support future internet/intranet delivery. Kingsbury provided subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. They also provided photographs, schematics, and CAD drawings, which AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) digitized for use in the final program. Information from The Kingsbury troubleshooting experts were interviewed regarding symptoms and root causes of system malfunctions This knowledge was captured and from it, fault trees were developed. These trees were then incorporated into the EPSS as a troubleshooting tool. The troubleshooting portion of the system presents simple questions to the machine operator in order to determine the likely cause or causes of malfunctions and then recommends systematic corrective actions. The on-line reference manual, covering operations and maintenance, provides text and illustrations to the machine operator in a traditional structure, but additionally offers the capability to search voluminous amounts of technical data and retrieve specific information on request. The maintenance portion of the EPSS includes checklists that are displayed daily, weekly, monthly, and annually, as appropriate, on the VTC-5 controller screen. The controller software is unavailable for machining parts until the machine tool operator goes through and checks off all of the checklist items. This project provided the team with a detailed understanding of the knowledge and information required to produce and support advanced machine tools. In addition, it resulted in the design and construction of a prototype VTC-5 EPSS containing all the logic and interfaces necessary to integrate operations and maintenance information from other Kingsbury machine tools.

Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

High performance solar desiccant cooling system: performance evaluations and research recommendations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of the current status of solar desiccant cooling and makes recommendations for continued research to develop high performance systems competitive with conventional cooling systems. Solid desiccant, liquid desiccant, and hybrid systems combining desiccant dehumidifiers with vapor compressor units are considered. Currently, all desiccant systems fall somewhat short of being competitive with conventional systems. Hybrid systems appear to have the greatest potential in the short term. Solid systems are close to meeting performance goals. Development of high performance solid desiccant dehumidifiers based on parallel passage designs should be pursued. Liquid system collector/generators and efficient absorbers should receive attention. Model development is also indicated. Continued development by hybrid systems is directly tied to the above work.

Schlepp, D.R.; Schultz, K.J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement. Large photovoltaic systems are typically developed as projects which supply electricity to a utility and are owned by independent power producers. Obtaining financing at favorable rates and attracting investors requires confidence in the projected energy yield from the plant. In this paper, various performance models for projecting annual energy yield from Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) systems are assessed by comparing measured system output to model predictions based on measured weather and irradiance data. The results are statistically analyzed to identify systematic error sources.

Stein, Joshua S.; Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert. (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); Sahm, Aaron (University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Crawford, Clark (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S. (Emcore, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fenestration System Performance Research, Testing, and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE was and is instrumental to NFRC's beginning and its continued success. The 2005 to 2009 funding enables NFRC to continue expanding and create new, improved ratings procedures. Research funded by the US DOE enables increased fenestration energy rating accuracy. International harmonization efforts supported by the US DOE allow the US to be the global leader in fenestration energy ratings. Many other governments are working with the NFRC to share its experience and knowledge toward development of their own national fenestration rating process similar to the NFRC's. The broad and diverse membership composition of NFRC allows anyone with a fenestration interest to come forward with an idea or improvement to the entire fenestration community for consideration. The NFRC looks forward to the next several years of growth while remaining the nation's resource for fair, accurate, and credible fenestration product energy ratings. NFRC continues to improve its rating system by considering new research, methodologies, and expanding to include new fenestration products. Currently, NFRC is working towards attachment energy ratings. Attachments are blinds, shades, awnings, and overhangs. Attachments may enable a building to achieve significant energy savings. An NFRC rating will enable fair competition, a basis for code references, and a new ENERGY STAR product category. NFRC also is developing rating methods to consider non specular glazing such as fritted glass. Commercial applications frequently use fritted glazing, but no rating method exists. NFRC is testing new software that may enable this new rating and contribute further to energy conservation. Around the world, many nations are seeking new energy conservation methods and NFRC is poised to harmonize its rating system assisting these nations to better manage and conserve energy in buildings by using NFRC rated and labeled fenestration products. As this report has shown, much more work needs to be done to continues research to improve existing ratings and develop new ones. NFRC needs to continue the work it has begun in several nations to implement the NFRC rating system that has been introduced. Many nations are eager to accept the expertise NFRC can offer to achieve energy conservation goals. NFRC looks forward to a continues partnership with the US Department of Energy to cooperatively achieve both.

Jim Benney

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Daylighting performance of electrochromic glazing system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

52E 52E Lighting energy savings potential of split- pane electrochromic windows controlled for daylighting with visual comfort L.L. Fernandes Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory E.S. Lee Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory G. Ward Anyhere Software Windows and Envelope Materials Group Building Technology and Urban Systems Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division February 2013 Published in Energy and Buildings 61 (2013) 8-20 10.1016/j.enbuild.2012.10.057 ! DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of

230

INTERIOR DUCT SYSTEM DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND PERFORMANCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By removing air distribution and conditioning equipment from unconditioned spaces, homeowners stand to benefit substantially with respect to both energy savings and indoor air quality. Duct leakage introduces: Greater heating and cooling loads from air at extreme temperatures and humidity levels; Outside air and air from unconditioned spaces that may contain air borne contaminants, combustion gases, pollen, mold spores, and/or particles of building materials; and Higher whole-house infiltration/exfiltration rates. Exemplary studies conducted since 1990 have demonstrated the prevalence of duct leakage throughout the United States and measured energy savings of approximately 20% during both heating and cooling seasons from leakage reduction. These all dealt with duct leakage to and/or from unconditioned spaces. In the building science community, leakage within the conditioned space is generally presumed to eliminate the negative consequences of duct leakage with the exception of possibly creating pressure imbalances in the house which relates to higher infiltration and/or exfiltration. The practical challenges of isolating ducts and air handlers from unconditioned spaces require builders to construct an air-tight environment for the ducts. Florida Solar Energy Center researchers worked with four builders in Texas, North Carolina, and Florida who build a furred-down chase located either in a central hallway or at the edges of rooms as an architectural detail. Some comparison homes with duct systems in attics and crawl spaces were included in the test group of more than 20 homes. Test data reveals that all of the duct/AHU systems built inside the conditioned space had lower duct leakage to unconditioned spaces than their conventional counterparts; however, none of the homes was completely free of duct leakage to unconditioned spaces. Common problems included wiring and plumbing penetrations of the chase, failure to treat the chase as an air tight space, and misguided fresh air inlet design. Improvements were implemented by the Texas builder and retested in July. Results showed a 36% reduction in duct leakage, significant enough to warrant the builder adopting the new sealing procedure.

Janet E.R. Mcllvaine; David Beal; Philip Fairey

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

Case history study of total energy system at Western Mall Shopping Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Western Mall Total Energy Plant in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, serves an enclosed mall shopping center of 462,000 ft/sup 2/. The plant provides most of the mall and tenants with electricity, space-heating, and air-conditioning services from a natural gas-fueled engine-generator plant with hot water heat recovery, supplementary gas-fueled boiler, and absorption water chiller. Heating load served by the plant is calculated to be 15,000,000 Btu at -30/sup 0/F winter design condition with 70/sup 0/F space temperature. Maximum observed cooling load at 100/sup 0/F, 75/sup 0/ W.B. outdoor conditions is about 750 tons of refrigeration. Engine heat is recovered in a water system operated at 210 to 240/sup 0/F; an auxiliary scotch marine type, firetype gas-fueled boiler provides up to 14,000,000 Btu/h or supplementary heat. Energy customers have recently begun to exercise considerable control over their uses of electricity with more careful operation of lighting and appliances and with some replacement of illumination devices with more-efficient equipment. It is concluded that central heating and air-conditioning facilities provide the owner with an assured means for serving the shopping center, regardless of which energy source is most economical or least available. The hot and chilled water can be obtained from gas fuel as at present, from fuel oil, propane, all electric, or coal firing. Adapting the conversion equipment is difficult only for coal because of the space requirement for storage and handling that fuel. The power-generating capacity in place is an asset that should be used to serve the tenants because it reduces the public utility company need for expanded capacity. (MCW)

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A Novel Thermodynamic Performance Evaluation Method for Trigeneration System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To get reasonable and reliable index of performance of combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP) system, a new performance evaluation method of the system, the comprehensive efficiency, is proposed. The method is based on energy, exergy and anergy analyses. ... Keywords: trigeneration, evaluation method, energy grade factor, anergy's equivalent available coefficient, energy, exergy

Ge Bin; Zhang Junli

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A ten year review of performance of photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents data compiled by the Photovoltaic Design Assistance Center at Sandia National Laboratories from more than eighty field tests performed at over thirty-five photovoltaic systems in the United States during the last ten years. The recorded performance histories, failure rates, and degradation of post-Block IV modules and balance-of-system (BOS) components are described in detail.

Rosenthal, A.L.; Durand, S.J. [Southwest Technology Development Inst., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Thomas, M.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Towards semantic performance measurement systems for supply chain management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The literature on Supply Chain Management (SCM) supports the integration of key business processes, including the performance management process, in order to increase the performance within and between the organisations. Nevertheless, the lack of proper ... Keywords: SCOR, business process management, ontology engineering, performance measurement systems, supply chain management

Artturi Nurmi; Thierry Moyaux; Valrie Botta-Genoulaz

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

U-drumwave: an interactive performance system for drumming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we share our experience of applying the modern multimedia technologies to the traditional performing art in a drumming performance project, U-Drumwave. By deploying an interactive system on the drumming stage, the audience will see augmented ... Keywords: drumming performance, interactive art, spatial AR

Yin-Tzu Lin; Shuen-Huei Guan; Yuan-Chang Yao; Wen-Huang Cheng; Ja-Ling Wu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Performance of Integrated Systems of Automated Roller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daylight responsive dimming systems have been used in few buildings to date because they require improvements to improve reliability. The key underlying factor contributing to poor performance is the variability of the ratio of the photosensor signal to daylight workplane illuminance in accordance with sun position, sky condition, and fenestration condition. Therefore, this paper describes the integrated systems between automated roller shade systems and daylight responsive dimming systems with an improved closed-loop proportional control algorithm, and the relative performance of the integrated systems and single systems. The concept of the improved closed-loop proportional control algorithm for the integrated systems is to predict the varying correlation of photosensor signal to daylight workplane illuminance according to roller shade height and sky conditions for improvement of the system accuracy. In this study, the performance of the integrated systems with two improved closed-loop proportional control algorithms was compared with that of the current (modified) closed-loop proportional control algorithm. In the results, the average maintenance percentage and the average discrepancies of the target illuminance, as well as the average time under 90percent of target illuminance for the integrated systems significantly improved in comparison with the current closed-loop proportional control algorithm for daylight responsive dimming systems as a single system.

Park, Byoung-Chul; Choi, An-Seop; Jeong, Jae-Weon; Lee, Eleanor S.

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

237

The effect of load parameters on system thermal performance  

SciTech Connect

The effects of load size, load profile and hot water set temperature on system thermal performance are investigated in order to determine the relative importance of these design parameters in sizing a solar water heating system. The WATSUN IV computer program was used to introduce various load sizes, load profiles and set temperatures to a base model. The results indicate that variations in load size have a significant effect on the thermal performance of the system. However, variations in load profile and hot water set temperature seem to have no significant effect on system performance.

Vakili, M.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Spray energy release (SER) approach to analyzing spray system performance  

SciTech Connect

Spray-cooling systems for thermal power plants are more controllable, cheaper to construct and operate, and equal in thermal performance when compared with other cooling systems. In order to achieve a reliable method for predicting the performance of an open atmosphere spray cooling system, a mathematical model is developed using the energy release of the spray (SER), knowledge of the spray distribution, and a spray mixing parameter. Empirical data for a single spray is obtained and used to predict the performance of the whole spray field. Both a small and a large spray system were used to check the validity of the model. Good agreement was found in both cases. (LCL)

Chen, K.H.; Trezek, G.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Total Lightning Signatures of Thunderstorm Intensity over North Texas. Part II: Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total lightning data from the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR II) research network in addition to cloud-to-ground flash data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and data from the DallasFort Worth, Texas, Weather ...

Scott M. Steiger; Richard E. Orville; Lawrence D. Carey

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A performance data network for solar process heat systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar process heat (SPH) data network has been developed to access remote-site performance data from operational solar heat systems. Each SPH system in the data network is outfitted with monitoring equipment and a datalogger. The datalogger is accessed via modem from the data network computer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The dataloggers collect both ten-minute and hourly data and download it to the data network every 24-hours for archiving, processing, and plotting. The system data collected includes energy delivered (fluid temperatures and flow rates) and site meteorological conditions, such as solar insolation and ambient temperature. The SPH performance data network was created for collecting performance data from SPH systems that are serving in industrial applications or from systems using technologies that show promise for industrial applications. The network will be used to identify areas of SPH technology needing further development, to correlate computer models with actual performance, and to improve the credibility of SPH technology. The SPH data network also provides a centralized bank of user-friendly performance data that will give prospective SPH users an indication of how actual systems perform. There are currently three systems being monitored and archived under the SPH data network: two are parabolic trough systems and the third is a flat-plate system. The two trough systems both heat water for prisons; the hot water is used for personal hygiene, kitchen operations, and laundry. The flat plate system heats water for meat processing at a slaughter house. We plan to connect another parabolic trough system to the network during the first months of 1996. We continue to look for good examples of systems using other types of collector technologies and systems serving new applications (such as absorption chilling) to include in the SPH performance data network.

Barker, G.; Hale, M.J.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Commissioning and performance of the BNL EBIS LLRF system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) LLRF system utilizes the RHIC LLRF upgrade platform to achieve the required functionality and flexibility. The LLRF system provides drive to the EBIS high-level RF system, employs I-Q feedback to provide required amplitude and phase stability, and implements a cavity resonance control scheme. The embedded system provides the interface to the existing Controls System, making remote system control and diagnostics possible. The flexibility of the system allows us to reuse VHDL codes, develop new functionalities, improve current designs, and implement new features with relative ease. In this paper, we will discuss the commissioning process, issues encountered, and performance of the system.

Yuan, S.; Smith, K.S.; Hayes, T.; Severino, F.; Harvey, M.; Narayan, G.; Zaltsman, A.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

242

Process for predicting structural performance of mechanical systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for predicting the structural performance of a mechanical system represents the mechanical system by a plurality of surface elements. The surface elements are grouped according to their location in the volume occupied by the mechanical system so that contacts between surface elements can be efficiently located. The process is well suited for efficient practice on multiprocessor computers.

Gardner, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Hendrickson, Bruce A. (Albuquerque, NM); Plimpton, Steven J. (Albuquerque, NM); Attaway, Stephen W. (Cedar Crest, NM); Heinstein, Martin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Vaughan, Courtenay T. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Long-Term Performance of the SERF PV Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides the changes in performance ratings of two photovoltaic (PV) systems located on the roof of the Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF) building at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. For the period of May 1994 to April 2002, the performance rating of the two PV systems decreased at the rate of 1% per year. Most of the changes in performance rating are attributed to changes in the performance of the PV arrays. But about a fifth of the observed changes were from the inverter not tracking the peak-power as effectively as the PV arrays aged.

Marion, B.; Adelstein, J.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Performance Technology for Tera-Class Parallel Computers: Evolution of the TAU Performance System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this project, we proposed to create new technology for performance observation and analysis of large-scale tera-class parallel computer systems and applications in this project.

Allen D. Malony

2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

245

Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

System Advisor Model: Flat Plate Photovoltaic Performance Modeling Validation Report  

SciTech Connect

The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software tool that performs detailed analysis of both system performance and system financing for a variety of renewable energy technologies. This report provides detailed validation of the SAM flat plate photovoltaic performance model by comparing SAM-modeled PV system generation data to actual measured production data for nine PV systems ranging from 75 kW to greater than 25 MW in size. The results show strong agreement between SAM predictions and field data, with annualized prediction error below 3% for all fixed tilt cases and below 8% for all one axis tracked cases. The analysis concludes that snow cover and system outages are the primary sources of disagreement, and other deviations resulting from seasonal biases in the irradiation models and one axis tracking issues are discussed in detail.

Freeman, J.; Whitmore, J.; Kaffine, L.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Commissioning and Performance Diagnostics for HVAC Control Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commissioning and Performance Diagnostics for HVAC Control Systems Commissioning and Performance Diagnostics for HVAC Control Systems Speaker(s): Ashish Singhal Date: December 20, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Philip Haves The presentation will focus on practical aspects of commissioning control loops in commercial HVAC systems and evaluating their routine performance. Simple and theoretically sound methods for diagnosing control performance will be presented that detect serious performance issues associated with control loops in modern buildings. The discussion will center on a new control loop commissioning tool that helps field personnel to quickly test, tune and troubleshoot control loops. In addition to the active tests for commissioning control loops, a suite of diagnostic algorithms are used in a

248

Benchmarking and Performance Based Rating System for Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benchmarking and Performance Based Rating System for Commercial Buildings Benchmarking and Performance Based Rating System for Commercial Buildings in India Speaker(s): Saket Sarraf Date: May 4, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Girish Ghatikar The Indian building sector has witnessed huge surge in interest in energy performance in the last decade. The 'intention' based codes like the national Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) and green building rating systems such as Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED-India) and Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment (GRIHA) have been the prime mechanisms to design and assess energy efficient buildings. However, they do not rate the 'achieved' energy performance of buildings over time or reward their performance through a continuous evaluation process.

249

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) The CPAR assesses a contractor's performance, both positive and negative, and provides a record on a given contract during a specified period of time. Each assessment must be based on objective data (or measurable, subjective data when objective data is not available) supportable by program and contract management data. The CPARS process is designed with a series of checks-and-balances to facilitate the objective and consistent evaluation of contractor performance. Both Government and contractor perspectives are captured on the CPAR form. The opportunity to review/comment on the CPAR by the designated Government and contractor personnel together makes a complete CPAR.

250

Analysis of Photovoltaic System Energy Performance Evaluation Method  

SciTech Connect

Documentation of the energy yield of a large photovoltaic (PV) system over a substantial period can be useful to measure a performance guarantee, as an assessment of the health of the system, for verification of a performance model to then be applied to a new system, or for a variety of other purposes. Although the measurement of this performance metric might appear to be straight forward, there are a number of subtleties associated with variations in weather and imperfect data collection that complicate the determination and data analysis. A performance assessment is most valuable when it is completed with a very low uncertainty and when the subtleties are systematically addressed, yet currently no standard exists to guide this process. This report summarizes a draft methodology for an Energy Performance Evaluation Method, the philosophy behind the draft method, and the lessons that were learned by implementing the method.

Kurtz, S.; Newmiller, J.; Kimber, A.; Flottemesch, R.; Riley, E.; Dierauf, T.; McKee, J.; Krishnani, P.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Analysis of the seasonal performance of hybrid desiccant cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simulation model for the liquid desiccant component of a hybrid system was developed. An analysis of experimental test data was conducted. The liquid desiccant component was examined and the sensitivity of its seasonal performance to changes in principal component variables was identified. Seasonal simulations were performed on different operation modes of a hybrid liquid desiccant cooling system. The results were analyzed in terms of estimated operational costs and compared to the equivalent cost estimation of a conventional cooling system. The study showed that the investigated liquid desiccant configuration usually will not lower the costs of operation. A suggestion of an improved system is made.

Sick, F.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Commissioning and Performance Diagnostics for HVAC Control Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commissioning and Performance Diagnostics for HVAC Control Systems Speaker(s): Ashish Singhal Date: December 20, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

253

High Performance Computing Systems for Autonomous Spaceborne Missions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future-generation space missions across the solar system to the planets, moons, asteroids, and comets may someday incorporate supercomputers both to expand the range of missions being conducted and to significantly reduce their cost. By performing science ...

Thomas Sterling; Daniel S. Katz; Larry Bergman

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Computer system performance problem detection using time series models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer systems require monitoring to detect performance anomalies such as runaway processes, but problem detection and diagnosis is a complex task requiring skilled attention. Although human attention was never ideal for this task, as networks of computers ...

Peter Hoogenboom; Jay Lepreau

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Guidelines for reporting parabolic trough solar electric system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this activity is to develop a generic methodology which can be used to track and compare the performance of parabolic trough power plants. The approach needs to be general enough to work for all existing and future parabolic trough plant designs, provide meaningful comparisons of year to year performance, and allow for comparisons between dissimilar plant designs. The approach presented here uses the net annual system efficiency as the primary metric for evaluating the performance of parabolic trough power plants. However, given the complex nature of large parabolic trough plants, the net annual system efficiency by itself does not adequately characterize the performance of the plant. The approach taken here is to define a number of additional performance metrics which enable a more comprehensive understanding of overall plant performance.

Price, H.W.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Design of an Enterprise Dynamic Performance Simulation and Analysis System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many problems in enterprise running faced by managers can be resolved by simulation of the corresponding system dynamics model. It is often desirable to forecasting enterprise running in the next period. And managers hope to find the reason quickly if ... Keywords: dynamic performance, simulation, sensitivity, diagnose, performance optimization

Zheng Li; Yueting Chai; Yi Liu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume III, conceptual design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the work described in this volume was to conceptualize suitable designs for solar total energy systems for the following residential market segments: single-family detached homes, single-family attached units (townhouses), low-rise apartments, and high-rise apartments. Conceptual designs for the total energy systems are based on parabolic trough collectors in conjunction with a 100 kWe organic Rankine cycle heat engine or a flat-plate, water-cooled photovoltaic array. The ORC-based systems are designed to operate as either independent (stand alone) systems that burn fossil fuel for backup electricity or as systems that purchase electricity from a utility grid for electrical backup. The ORC designs are classified as (1) a high temperature system designed to operate at 600/sup 0/F and (2) a low temperature system designed to operate at 300/sup 0/F. The 600/sup 0/F ORC system that purchases grid electricity as backup utilizes the thermal tracking principle and the 300/sup 0/F ORC system tracks the combined thermal and electrical loads. Reject heat from the condenser supplies thermal energy for heating and cooling. All of the ORC systems utilize fossil fuel boilers to supply backup thermal energy to both the primary (electrical generating) cycle and the secondary (thermal) cycle. Space heating is supplied by a central hot water (hydronic) system and a central absorption chiller supplies the space cooling loads. A central hot water system supplies domestic hot water. The photovoltaic system uses a central electrical vapor compression air conditioning system for space cooling, with space heating and domestic hot water provided by reject heat from the water-cooled array. All of the systems incorporate low temperature thermal storage (based on water as the storage medium) and lead--acid battery storage for electricity; in addition, the 600/sup 0/F ORC system uses a therminol-rock high temperature storage for the primary cycle. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Highlights of the solar total energy systems, distributed collector systems, and research and development projects. Semiannual review, 26-27 January 1976, Atlanta, Georgia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The highlights of the ERDA Solar Thermal Branch Semiannual Review held in Atlanta, Georgia, on January 26-27, 1976, are presented. Status and plans for Total Energy Systems, Distributed Collectors, and Research and Development Projects are reviewed. (WHK)

Latta, A.F.

1976-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

259

Reedy Creek Utilities, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, solar energy system performance evaluation, December 1979-March 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Reedy Creek solar system operated moderately well during the December 1979 through March 1980 heating season. The overall performance of the system was below estimated design performance but the solar system still supplied 47% of the building conditioning loads. The thermal performance is summarized. The system failed to reach design performance levels in the cooling subsystem. Since the cooling load of 40.24 million Btu was nearly three times larger than the space heating and domestic hot water loads of 14.44 million Btu, the overall system performance was significantly reduced. Although collected solar energy exceeds the system load in most months, the solar fraction is necessarily less than 100% due to the normal operating inefficiencies of pumps, heat exchanger, and particularly the absorption chiller. At Reedy Creek, excessive storage losses, presumably due to high storage temperatures, further degrade system performance. Collector array efficiency based on the total incident solar radiation was 11%. This was significantly lower than the 14% collector array efficiency for the 1979 heating season.

Logee, T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Building America System Performance Test Practices: Part 1 -- Photovoltaic Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report outlines the short-term field testing used by Building America staff and includes a report on the results of an example test of a PV system with battery storage on a home in Tucson, Arizona. This report is not intended as a general recommended test procedure for wide distribution. It is intended to document current practices in Building America to inform program stakeholders and stimulate further discussion. Building America staff intend to apply this procedure until relevant standards for testing PV modules are completed.

Barker, G.; Norton, P.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Development of HVAC System Performance Criteria Using Factorial Design and DOE-2 Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new approach is described for the development of Heating, Ventilating, and Air-conditioning (HVAC) System Performance Criteria for the Texas Building Energy Design Standard. This approach integrates a design of experimental methodology and DOE-2 simulation to identify the effects of control parameters on HVAC system energy performance. Three new criteria - transport, plant, and system performance factors-are used as measures of system performance. The procedure has been applied to the development of criteria for a variable-air-volume (VAV) and a constant-air-volume (CAV) system in three Texas climates. The results show that the air distribution system pressure loss, cooling coil exit temperature set-pint, operation of an economizer, and use of dead band controls have significant effects on air transport energy use and total system performance. The selection of control strategies and set-points have a clear impact on energy use. There is also a great energy-saving potential of converting from a CAV to a VAV system.

Hou, D.; Jones, J. W.; Hunn, B. D.; Banks, J. A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Frontiers of Performance Analysis on Leadership-Class Systems  

SciTech Connect

The number of cores in high-end systems for scientific computing are employing is increasing rapidly. As a result, there is an pressing need for tools that can measure, model, and diagnose performance problems in highly-parallel runs. We describe two tools that employ complementary approaches for analysis at scale and we illustrate their use on DOE leadership-class systems.

Fowler, R J; Adhianto, L; de Supinski, B R; Fagan, M; Gamblin, T; Krentel, M; Mellor-Crummey, J; Schulz, M; Tallent, N

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

High Performance Commercial Building Systems Francis Rubinstein, LBNL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Lighting, Envelope and Daylighting Project 2.1 - Lighting Controls Task 2.1.3 ­ Advanced Sensor Task 2High Performance Commercial Building Systems Francis Rubinstein, LBNL Pete Pettler, Vistron LLC fabrication of two key components of the IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System

264

Polycrystalline thin-film module and system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Module and System Performance and Engineering Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts in-situ technical evaluations of photovoltaic (PV) modules and systems (arrays). These evaluations on module/array performance and stability are conducted at the NREL Photovoltaic Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) in Golden, CO. The modules and arrays are located at 39.7{degree}N latitude, 105.2{degree}W longitude, and at 1,782 meters elevation. Currently, two polycrystalline thin-film technologies are the focus of the research presented here. The module structures are copper indium diselenide (CIS) from Siemens Solar Industries and cadmium telluride (CdTe) from Solar Cells, Inc. The research team is attempting to correlate individual module performance with array performance for these two polycrystalline thin-film technologies. This is done by looking at module and array performance over time. Also, temperature coefficients are determined at both the module and array level. Results are discussed.

Strand, T.; Kroposki, B.; Hansen, R.; Mrig, L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The NetLogger Methodology for High Performance Distributed Systems Performance Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe a methodology that enables the real-time diagnosis of performance problems in complex high-performance distributed systems. The methodology includes tools for generating precision event logs that can be used to provide detailed end-to-end application and system level monitoring; a Java agent-based system for managing the large amount of logging data; and tools for visualizing the log data and real-time state of the distributed system. The authors developed these tools for analyzing a high-performance distributed system centered around the transfer of large amounts of data at high speeds from a distributed storage server to a remote visualization client. However, this methodology should be generally applicable to any distributed system. This methodology, called NetLogger, has proven invaluable for diagnosing problems in networks and in distributed systems code. This approach is novel in that it combines network, host, and application-level monitoring, providing a complete view of the entire system.

Tierney, Brian; Johnston, William; Crowley, Brian; Hoo, Gary; Brooks, Chris; Gunter, Dan

1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

266

Performance of Kepler GTX Titan GPUs and Xeon Phi System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NVIDIA's new architecture, Kepler improves GPU's performance significantly with the new streaming multiprocessor SMX. Along with the performance, NVIDIA has also introduced many new technologies such as direct parallelism, hyper-Q and GPU Direct with RDMA. Apart from other usual GPUs, NVIDIA also released another Kepler 'GeForce' GPU named GTX Titan. GeForce GTX Titan is not only good for gaming but also good for high performance computing with CUDA. Nevertheless, it is remarkably cheaper than Kepler Tesla GPUs. We investigate the performance of GTX Titan and find out how to optimize a CUDA code appropriately for it. Meanwhile, Intel has launched its new many integrated core (MIC) system, Xeon Phi. A Xeon Phi coprocessor could provide similar performance with NVIDIA Kepler GPUs theoretically but, in reality, it turns out that its performance is significantly inferior to GTX Titan.

Hwancheol Jeong; Weonjong Lee; Jeonghwan Pak; Kwang-jong Choi; Sang-Hyun Park; Jun-sik Yoo; Joo Hwan Kim; Joungjin Lee; Young Woo Lee

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

267

Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial load-shaping measures Title Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial load-shaping measures Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1988 Authors Akbari, Hashem, Mashuri Warren, Anibal De T. Almeida, Deborah J. Connell, and Jeffrey P. Harris Journal Energy Volume 13 Pagination 253-263 Abstract We have studied the use of industrial energy management and control systems (EMCSs) for monitoring the performance of electric load-shaping measures in three of California's most electricity-intensive and rapidly growing industrial sectors: food, plastics, and computing equipment and electronics. In this paper, we summarize current load-shaping strategies, report on the current use of EMCSs in selected industries, and recommend ways for electric utility companies to verify the potential of EMCSs for performance monitoring. We conclude that EMCSs can be used to collect and store data for evaluating industrial load shaping. Some sophisticated EMCSs are currently being used for this purpose, mostly in larger electronics firms. Most EMCSs now available need to be customized to monitor a particular facility. We also conclude that electric utility companies can encourage the use of EMCSs for performance monitoring by helping to educate their industrial customers about EMCSs, establishing protocols to standardize communication between EMCSs, and testing EMCSs with data-logging functions at demonstration sites.

268

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Title Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-44331 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Xu, Tengfang T., François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William J. Fisk, Jennifer A. McWilliams, Duo Wang, and Mark P. Modera Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 215-226 Abstract This paper presents major findings of a field study on the performance of five thermal distribution systems in four large commercial buildings. The five systems studied are typical single-duct or dual-duct constant air volume (CAV) systems and variable air volume (VAV) systems, each of which serves an office building or a retail building with floor area over 2,000 m2. The air leakage from ducts are reported in terms of effective leakage area (ELA) at 25 Pa reference pressure, the ASHRAE-defined duct leakage class, and air leakage ratios. The specific ELAs ranged from 0.7 to 12.9 cm2 per m2 of duct surface area, and from 0.1 to 7.7 cm2 per square meter of floor area served. The leakage classes ranged from 34 to 757 for the five systems and systems sections tested. The air leakage ratios are estimated to be up to one-third of the fan- supplied airflow in the constant-air-volume systems. The specific ELAs and leakage classes indicate that air leakage in large commercial duct systems varies significantly from system to system, and from system section to system section even within the same thermal distribution system. The duct systems measured are much leakier than the ductwork specified as "unsealed ducts" by ASHRAE. Energy losses from supply ducts by conduction (including convection and radiation) are found to be significant, on the scale similar to the losses induced by air leakage in the duct systems. The energy losses induced by leakage and conduction suggest that there are significant energy-savings potentials from duct-sealing and insulation practice in large commercial buildings

269

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Title Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3383E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords air flow measurement, air leakage, blower power measurement, blowers, energy performance of buildings group, forced air systems, furnaces, indoor environment department, other, public interest energy research (pier) program, residential hvac Abstract This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit - indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called "ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823 "Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

270

Impact of desiccant degradation on desiccant cooling system performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of open-cycle desiccant cooling systems depends on several factors, some of which can change beyond manufacturers' specifications. For example, the desiccant sorption process may degrade with time on exposure to airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. Desiccant degradation can reduce the performance of a dehumidifier and thus the performance of desiccant cooling systems. Using computer simulations and recent experimental data on silica gel, the impact of degradation was evaluated. Hypothetical degradations of desiccants with Type 1 moderate isotherms were also simulated. Depending on the degree and type of desiccant degradation, the decrease in thermal coefficient of performance (COP) and cooling capacity of the system was 10% to 35%. The 35% loss in system performance occurs when desiccant degradation is considered worst case. The simulations showed that the COP, and to a lesser degree the cooling capacity of these degraded systems, could be improved by increasing the rotational speed of the dehumidifier. It is shown that easy engineering solutions might be available for some types of degradations. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Penney, T.R.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

LARGO hot water system thermal performance test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance tests and results on the LARGO Solar Hot Water System under natural environmental conditions are presented. Some objectives of these evaluations are to determine the amount of energy collected, the amount of energy delivered to the household as contributed by solar power supplied to operate the system and auxiliary power to maintain tank temperature at proper level, overall system efficiency and to determine temperature distribution within the tank. The tests and evaluation were performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center solar test facility. The Solar Hot Water system is termed a ''Dump-type'' because of the draining system for freeze protection. The solar collector is a single glazed flat plate. An 82-gallon domestic water heater is provided as the energy storage vessel. Water is circulated through the collector and water heater by a 5.3 GPM capacity pump, and control of the pump motor is achieved by a differential temperature controller.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Baker Construction, Cincinnati, Ohio. Solar energy system performance evaluation, October 1980-May 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baker Construction site is a single family residence in Ohio with a passive solar heating system, which consists of 302 square feet of 62 degree sloped greenhouse glazing, a 35,500-pound concrete mass wall, 10,400-pound concrete slab floor, 20 phase change storage rods, six 1-kW electric baseboard heaters, and a wood stove. A solar fraction of 55% is reported. Also the solar savings ratio and conventional fuel savings are given. The performance of the greenhouse collector subsystem, the heat storage subsystem, and the space heating subsystem are summarized as well as total system performance. Energy savings and weather data are also included. The design of the system, performance evaluation techniques, and sensor technology are also presented. (LEW)

Spears, J.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Develop and test fuel cell powered on-site integrated total energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design, fabrication and testing of a 25kW phosphoric acid fuel cell system aimed at stationary applications, and the technology development underlying that system. The 25kW fuel cell ran at rated power in both the open and closed loop mode in the summer of 1988. Problems encountered and solved include acid replenishment leakage, gas cross-leakage and edge-leakage in bipolar plates, corrosion of metallic cooling plates and current collectors, cooling groove depth variations, coolant connection leaks, etc. 84 figs., 7 tabs.

Kaufman, A.; Werth, J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Conceptual design study on incorporating a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into an operating total energy system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design study on incorporating a pyrolysis unit into an existing total energy plant are presented. The objectives of this study were to examine the institutional, technical and economic factors affecting the incorporation of a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant. The Indian Creek total energy plant is described. Results of the conceptual design are presented. A survey of the availability of waste materials and a review of health and safety ordinances are included. The technical aspects of the pyrolysis system are discussed, including the results of the review of facilities requirements for the pyrolysis unit, the analysis of necessary system modification, and an estimate of the useful energy contribution by the pyrolysis unit. Results of the life-cycle cost analysis of the pyrolysis unit are presented. The major conclusions are that: there appears to be no institutional or technical barriers to constructing a waste pyrolysis unit at the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant; pyrolysis gas can be consumed in the engines and the boilers by utilizing venturi mixing devices; the engines can consume only 5% of the output of the 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit; Therefore, consumption of pyrolysis gas will be controlled by boiler energy demand patterns; a waste pyrolysis unit is not cost effective at the current natural gas price of $0.90/10/sup 6/ Btu; and pyrolysis is economically attractive at natural gas prices above $3.00/10/sup 6/ Btu.

None

1976-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

275

Generic CSP Performance Model for NREL's System Advisor Model: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The suite of concentrating solar power (CSP) modeling tools in NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM) includes technology performance models for parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish-Stirling systems. Each model provides the user with unique capabilities that are catered to typical design considerations seen in each technology. Since the scope of the various models is generally limited to common plant configurations, new CSP technologies, component geometries, and subsystem combinations can be difficult to model directly in the existing SAM technology models. To overcome the limitations imposed by representative CSP technology models, NREL has developed a 'Generic Solar System' (GSS) performance model for use in SAM. This paper discusses the formulation and performance considerations included in this model and verifies the model by comparing its results with more detailed models.

Wagner, M. J.; Zhu, G.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Performance of the ATLAS Trigger System in 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and heavy ion collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=2.76 TeV were produced by the LHC and recorded using the ATLAS experiment's trigger system in 2010. The LHC is designed with a maximum bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz and the ATLAS trigger system is designed to record approximately 200 of these per second. The trigger system selects events by rapidly identifying signatures of muon, electron, photon, tau lepton, jet, and B meson candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. An overview of the ATLAS trigger system, the evolution of the system during 2010 and the performance of the trigger system components and selections based on the 2010 collision data are shown. A brief outline of plans for the trigger system in 2011 is presented

Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; ?kesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amors, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; ?sman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, Joo; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jrg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Performance of the ATLAS Trigger System in 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV and heavy ion collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 2.76 TeV were produced by the LHC and recorded using the ATLAS experiment's trigger system in 2010. The LHC is designed with a maximum bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz and the ATLAS trigger system is designed to record approximately 200 of these per second. The trigger system selects events by rapidly identifying signatures of muon, electron, photon, tau lepton, jet, and B meson candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. An overview of the ATLAS trigger system, the evolution of the system during 2010 and the performance of the trigger system components and selections based on the 2010 collision data are shown. A brief outline of plans for the trigger system in 2011 is presented

The ATLAS Collaboration

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Preliminary estimates of the total-system cost for the restructured program: An addendum to the May 1989 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 - a fee levied on electricity generated and sold by commercial nuclear power plants - is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The costs contained in this report represent a preliminary analysis of the cost impacts associated with the Secretary of Energy`s Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program issued in November 1989. The major elements of the restructured program announced in this report which pertain to the program`s life-cycle costs are: a prioritization of the scientific investigations program at the Yucca Mountain candidate site to focus on identification of potentially adverse conditions, a delay in the start of repository operations until 2010, the start of limited waste acceptance at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility in 1998, and the start of waste acceptance at the full-capability MRS facility in 2,000. Based on the restructured program, the total-system cost for the system with a repository at the candidate site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $26 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $34 to $35 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) requiring disposal. 17 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Models used to assess the performance of photovoltaic systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization. Energy storage plays an important role in reducing PV intermittency and battery storage models are used to understand the best configurations and technologies to store PV generated electricity. Other researcher's models used by SNL are discussed including some widely known models that incorporate algorithms developed at SNL. There are other models included in the discussion that are not used by or were not adopted from SNL research but may provide some benefit to researchers working on PV array performance, hybrid system models and energy storage. The paper is organized into three sections to describe the different software models as applied to photovoltaic performance, hybrid systems, and battery storage. For each model, there is a description which includes where to find the model, whether it is currently maintained and any references that may be available. Modeling improvements underway at SNL include quantifying the uncertainty of individual system components, the overall uncertainty in modeled vs. measured results and modeling large PV systems. SNL is also conducting research into the overall reliability of PV systems.

Stein, Joshua S.; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A scalable high-performance I/O system  

SciTech Connect

A significant weakness of many existing parallel supercomputers is their lack of high-performance parallel I/O. This weakness has prevented, in many cases, the full exploitation of the true potential of MPP systems. As part of a joint project with IBM, we have designed a parallel I/O system for an IBM SP system that can provide sustained I/O rates of greater than 160 MB/s from collections of compute nodes to archival disk and peak transfer rates that should exceed 400 MB/s from compute nodes to I/O servers. This testbed system is being used for a number of projects, first it will provide a high-performance experimental I/O system for traditional computational science applications, second it will b used as an I/O software and development environment for new parallel I/O algorithms and operating systems support, and third it will be used as the foundation for a number of new projects designed to develop enabling technology for the National Information Infrastructure. This report describes the system under development at Argonne National Laboratory, provides some preliminary performance results, and outlines future experiments and directions.

Henderson, M.; Nickless, B.; Stevens, R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Total cost of 46-Mw Borax cogen system put at $30M  

SciTech Connect

The cogeneration system, designed around a W-251B gas turbine power plant exhausting into a Deltak waste heat boiler to produce ''free'' process steam from the gas turbine exhaust, is discussed. The design includes water injection for NO/sub x/ control, self-cleaning inlet air filters, evaporative coolers, supercharger, and supplementary firing of the waste heat boiler. Once the system is operational Borax will be able to generate all of the electricity needed for on-site operations and a large share of process steam needs--plus still have 22-23 Mw surplus electric power to sell, so that the installation should pay for itself in less than 5 years of service.

de Biasi, V.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Preliminary Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification  

SciTech Connect

This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. A list of system specified components and ancillary components are included in Section 1.2. The TAD canister, in conjunction with specialized overpacks will accomplish a number of functions in the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Some of these functions will be accomplished at purchaser sites where commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) is stored, and some will be performed within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) transportation and disposal system. This document contains only those requirements unique to applications within Department of Energy's (DOE's) system. DOE recognizes that TAD canisters may have to perform similar functions at purchaser sites. Requirements to meet reactor functions, such as on-site dry storage, handling, and loading for transportation, are expected to be similar to commercially available canister-based systems. This document is intended to be referenced in the license application for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). As such, the requirements cited herein are needed for TAD system use in OCRWM's disposal system. This document contains specifications for the TAD canister, transportation overpack and aging overpack. The remaining components and equipment that are unique to the OCRWM system or for similar purchaser applications will be supplied by others.

C.A Kouts

2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fort Hood solar total energy project: technical support and systems integration. Third semiannual report, May 1, 1979-October 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work on the Fort Hood STES which was planned by DOE as a Large Scale Experiment for the Solar Total Energy Program is described. The history of the design evolution and management of the project which began in 1973 is summarized. The project was discontinued by DOE in December 1979. Supporting studies underway at the time are reported including: (1) reassessment of energy loads, (2) revised system concept, (3) plant sizing calculations, and (4) insolation variation measurement planning. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fort Hood solar total energy project. Technical support and systems integration. First semiannual report, May 1-October 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress on the design of a Solar Total Energy System which will supply a significant portion of the energy requirements of a troop housing complex at Fort Hood, Texas, is described. Selection and sizing of the distributed collector field are discussed, and parabolic trough collector technology is reviewed. Energy load measurements and insolation models for the Fort Hood site are described. Technical project support efforts are reviewed. (WHK)

None,

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Performance Evaluation of a Bedside Cardiac SPECT System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the initial performance evaluation of a bedside cardiac PET/SPECT system. The system was designed to move within a hospital to image critically-ill patients, for example, those in intensive care unit (ICU) or emergency room settings, who cannot easily be transported to a conventional SPECT or PET facility. The system uses two compact (25 cm times 25 cm) detectors with pixilated NaI crystals and position sensitive PMTs. The performance is evaluated for both 140 keV (Tc-99m) and 511 keV (F-18) emitters with the system operating in single photon counting (SPECT) mode. The imaging performance metrics for both 140 keV and 511 keV included intrinsic energy resolution, spatial resolution (intrinsic, system, and reconstructed SPECT), detection sensitivity, count rate capability, and uniformity. Results demonstrated an intrinsic energy resolution of 31% at 140 keV and 23% at 511 keV, a planar intrinsic spatial resolution of 5.6 mm full width half-maximum (FWHM) at 140 keV and 6.3 mm FWHM at 511 keV, and a sensitivity of 4.15 countsmiddotmuCi-1 ldr s-1 at 140 keV and 0.67 counts ldr muCi-1 ldr s-1 at 511 keV. To further the study, a SPECT acquisition using a dynamic cardiac phantom was performed, and the resulting reconstructed images are presented.

M.T. Studenski, D.R. Gilland, J.G. Parker, B. Hammond, S. Majewski, A.G. Weisenberger, V. Popov

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Performance comparison of absorption and desiccant solar cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling systems are required to operate over a wide range of outdoor and load conditions; however, the performance of solar cooling components is often specified and compared at a typical design point such as ARI conditions. A method is presented to directly compare the performance of different desiccant and absorption cooling systems by using psychrometric analysis of air distribution cycles under a range of outdoor conditions that systems encounter over a year. Using analysis of cooling load distributions for a small commercial office building in Miami and Phoenix a seasonal COP is calculated for each system. The heat input can be provided by solar or by an auxiliary heat source, such as natural gas.

Warren, M.L.; Wahlig, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

New technology trends for improved IGCC system performance  

SciTech Connect

The application of gas turbine technology to IGCC systems requires careful consideration of the degree and type of integration used during the system design phase. Although gas turbines provide the primary output and efficiency gains for IGCC systems, as compared with conventional coal-fired power generation systems, they are commercially available only in specific size ranges. Therefore, it is up to the IGCC system designer to optimize the IGCC power plant within the required output, efficiency, and site conditions by selecting the system configuration carefully, particularly for air separation unit (ASU) integration incorporated with oxygen blown gasification systems. An IGCC system, based on a generic, entrained flow, oxygen blown gasification system and a GE STAG 109FA combined cycle has been evaluated with varying degrees of ASU integration, two fuel equivalent heating values and two gas turbine firing temperatures to provide net plant output and efficiency results. The data presented illustrate the system flexibility afforded by variation of ASU integration and the potential performance gains available through the continued use of gas turbine advances. Emphasis is placed on system design choices that favor either low initial investment cost or low operating cost for a given IGCC system output.

Anand, A.K.; Cook, C.S.; Corman, J.C. [GE Power Generation, Schenectady, NY (United States); Smith, A.R. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Demonstration of dissociated methanol as an automotive fuel: system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of system performance testing of an automotive system devised to provide hydrogen-rich gases to an internal combustion engine by dissociating methanol on board the vehicle. The dissociation of methanol absorbs heat from the engine exhaust and increases the lower heating value of the fuel by 22%. The engine thermal efficiency is increased by raising the compression ratio and burning with excess air.

Finegold, J. G.; Karpuk, M. E.; McKinnon, J. T.; Passamaneck, R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Performance analysis of mixed passive solar heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The various situations in which interactions between south-facing systems serving a single thermal zone may affect the performance of the mixture are discussed. In particular, the nature of direct gain interactions with unvented Trombe walls was explored using a detailed thermal network computer program. The results are compared with predictions from the simple design analysis procedures which neglect interactions. This comparison showed that system interactions can significantly improve the peformance of a mixture under certain conditions.

Wray, W.O.; Best, E.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Sustainable Transportation Decision-Making: Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) and Total Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a new infrastructure facility requires a significant amount of time and expense. This is particularly true for investments in transportation for their longstanding and great degree of impact on society. The scope of time and money involved does not mean, however, we only focus on the economies of scale and may ignore other aspects of the built environment. To this extent, how can we achieve a more balanced perspective in infrastructure decision-making? In addition, what aspects should be considered when making more sustainable decisions about transportation investments? These two questions are the foundations of this study. This dissertation shares its process in part with a previous research project Texas Urban Triangle (TUT). Although the TUT research generated diverse variables and created possible implementations of spatial decision support system (SDSS), the methodology still demands improvement. The current method has been developed to create suitable routes but is not designed to rank or make comparisons. This is admittedly one of the biggest shortfalls in the general SDSS approach, but is also where I see as an opportunity to make alternative interpretation more comprehensive and effective. The main purpose of this dissertation is to develop a Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) that will lead to more balanced decision-making in transportation investment and optimize the most sustainable high-speed rail (HSR) route. The decision support system developed here explicitly elaborates the advantages and disadvantages of a transportation corridor in three particular perspectives: construction (fixed costs); operation (maintenance costs); and externalities (social and environmental costs), with a specific focus on environmental externalities. Considering more environmental features in rail routing will offset short-term economic losses and creates more sustainable environments in long-term infrastructure planning.

Kim, Hwan Yong

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A New Method to Evaluate Human-Robot System Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key issues in space exploration is that of deciding what space tasks are best done with humans, with robots, or a suitable combination of each. In general, human and robot skills are complementary. Humans provide as yet unmatched capabilities ... Keywords: analysis, human-robot systems, performance, robotics

G. Rodriguez; C. R. Weisbin

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Understanding performance in coliseum, an immersive videoconferencing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coliseum is a multiuser immersive remote teleconferencing system designed to provide collaborative workers the experience of face-to-face meetings from their desktops. Five cameras are attached to each PC display and directed at the participant. From ... Keywords: 3D virtual environments, Telepresence, network applications, performance measurement, streaming media, videoconferencing, view synthesis

H. Harlyn Baker; Nina Bhatti; Donald Tanguay; Irwin Sobel; Dan Gelb; Michael E. Goss; W. Bruce Culbertson; Thomas Malzbender

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Performance of amorphous silicon photovoltaic systems, 1985--1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the performance of commercial amorphous silicon modules used in photovoltaic power systems from 1985 through 1989. Topics discussed include initial degradation, reliability, durability, and effects of temperature and solar irradiance on peak power and energy production. 6 refs., 18 figs.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.emt-india.net/Book4/Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: "Energy Standards,Upgrade Requirements" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

295

Instrumentation for Evaluating PV System Performance Losses from Snow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When designing a photovoltaic (PV) system for northern climates, the prospective installation should be evaluated with respect to the potentially detrimental effects of snow preventing solar radiation from reaching the PV cells. The extent to which snow impacts performance is difficult to determine because snow events also increase the uncertainty of the solar radiation measurement, and the presence of snow needs to be distinguished from other events that can affect performance. This paper describes two instruments useful for evaluating PV system performance losses from the presence of snow: (1) a pyranometer with a heater to prevent buildup of ice and snow, and (2) a digital camera for remote retrieval of images to determine the presence of snow on the PV array.

Marion, B.; Rodriguez, J.; Pruett, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Integrated Hygrothermal Performance of Building Envelopes and Systems in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In hot and humid climates the interior and exterior environmental loads that building envelopes must respond to are larger than many other climatic conditions. Moisture-originated failures in low-rise residential buildings have put a significant pressure to change construction codes in North America. Solutions to moisture induced problems may be difficult when several interacting mechanisms of moisture transport are present. A new approach to building envelope durability assessment has been introduced in North America; a moisture engineering approach. This requires system information about the wall systems as constructed along with aging characteristics coupled with advanced modeling that 0 term allow the designer to predict the Iong-term performances of building envelope systems. This permits the comparison and ranking of individual building envelope systems with respect to total hygrothermal performance. Critical information can be obtained by investigating the one to one relationships of a building envelope to interior and exterior environments, however, the total behavior of the actual whole building is not accounted for. This paper goes one step further, by incorporating the individual hygrothermal performances of all walls, roof, floor and mechanical systems. The direct and indirect coupling of the building envelope and indoor environment with HVAC system are included in the analysis. The full house hygrothermal performance of an aerated concrete wall system are examined for a hot and humid climate. The hour by hour drying potential of each system was then numerically analyzed using weather conditions of Miami (hot and humid climate). The results clearly demonstrate the limited drying potential for the wall system in that climate. Furthermore, the selected exterior thermal insulation strategies and interior vapor control strategies in this study clearly show the critical behavior of the full house with respect to drying initial construction moisture. The results show the importance of the total hygrothermal behavior of the whole house to the coupling between the various envelope parts, interior and exterior environments and HVAC system. From these results moisture control strategies are identified for the whole house hygrothermal performance.

Karagiozis, A. N.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Thermal performance assessment of an advanced glazing system  

SciTech Connect

The four different techniques which were used to test an advanced, four-pane glazing system and standard double-glazed unit are described. The results from each test are compared. Where agreement is not good, explanations are suggested. The advanced glazing system was found to have a U-value of 0.9 W/m[sup 2] K and a shading coefficient of 0.48. The glazing simulation models WINDOW (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, Berkeley, CA, US) and MULTB (Pilkington Glass, U.K.) were used to predict glazing performance. Simulation of the two glazing systems which were experimentally assessed allows comparison between models, and between predicted and measured performance. Agreement was within the error bands associated with each assessment. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Robinson, P. (Architectural Association, London (United Kingdom)); Littler, J. (Univ. of Westminster, London (United Kingdom))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Open-cycle OTEC system performance analysis. [Claude cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An algorithm developed to calculate the performance of Claude-Cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems is described. The algorithm treats each component of the system separately and then interfaces them to form a complete system, allowing a component to be changed without changing the rest of the algorithm. Two components that are subject to change are the evaporator and condenser. For this study we developed mathematical models of a channel-flow evaporator and both a horizontal jet and spray director contact condenser. The algorithm was then programmed to run on SERI's CDC 7600 computer and used to calculate the effect on performance of deaerating the warm and cold water streams before entering the evaporator and condenser, respectively. This study indicates that there is no advantage to removing air from these streams compared with removing the air from the condenser.

Lewandowski, A.A.; Olson, D.A.; Johnson, D.H.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Performances of Induction System for Nanosecond Mode Operation  

SciTech Connect

An induction system comprises an array of single turn pulse transformers. Ferromagnetic cores of transformers are toroids that are stacked along the longitudinal core axis. Another name for this array is a fraction transformer or an adder. The primary and secondary windings of such a design have one turn. The step up mode is based on the number of primary pulse sources. The secondary windings are connected in series. Performances of such a system for the nanosecond range mode operation are different in comparison to the performances of traditional multi-turn pulse transformers, which are working on a 100+ nanosecond mode operation. In this paper, the author discusses which aspects are necessary to take into account for the high power nanosecond fractional transformer designs. The engineering method of the nanosecond induction system design is presented.

Krasnykh, Anatoly; /SLAC

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

300

Design and performance of an ammonia measurement system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ammonia emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs) have recently come under increased scrutiny. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has come under increased pressure from special interest groups to regulate ammonia. Regulation of ammonia is very difficult because every facility has different manure management practices. Different management practices lead to different emissions for every facility. Researchers have been tasked by industry to find best management practices to reduce emissions. The task cannot be completed without equipment that can efficiently and accurately compare emissions. To complete this task, a measurement system was developed and performance tested to measure ammonia. Performance tests included uncertainty analysis, system response, and adsorption kinetics. A measurement system was designed for measurement of gaseous emissions from ground level area sources (GLAS) in order to sample multiple receptors with a single sensor. This multiplexer may be used in both local and remote measurement systems to increase the sampling rate of gaseous emissions. The increased data collection capacity with the multiplexer allows for nearly three times as many samples to be taken in the same amount of time while using the same protocol for sampling. System response analysis was performed on an ammonia analyzer, a hydrogen sulfide analyzer, and tubing used with flux chamber measurement. System responses were measured and evaluated using transfer functions. The system responses for the analyzers were found to be first order with delay in auto mode. The tubing response was found to be a first order response with delay. Uncertainty analysis was performed on an ammonia sampling and analyzing system. The system included an analyzer, mass flow controllers, calibration gases, and analog outputs. The standard uncertainty was found to be 443 ppb when measuring a 16 ppm ammonia stream with a 20 ppm span. A laboratory study dealing with the adsorption kinetics of ammonia on a flux chamber was performed to determine if adsorption onto the chamber walls was significant. The study found that the adsorption would not significantly change the concentration of the output flow 30 minutes after a clean chamber was exposed to ammonia concentrations for concentrations above 2.5 ppm.

Boriack, Cale Nolan

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Title Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-53605 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Nance Matson Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the air-handler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

302

System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical briefing to report the outcomes of a data monitoring effort to determine the nature of solar vent preheat system performance problems at a U.S. military installation. The analysis reports up-to-date research and findings regarding system design, helping to clarify the issue as a factor of system design, rather than a shortcoming of SVP systems.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

May 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 1/20 Middleware in Modern High Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 1/20 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures Christian Engelmann1,2, Hong Ong1, Stephen L 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 2/20 Talk Outline

Engelmann, Christian

304

Reviewing real-time performance of nuclear reactor safety systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining real-time performance of computer-based safety systems used in nuclear power plants. Three areas of guidance are covered in this report. The first area covers how to determine if, when, and what prototypes should be required of developers to make a convincing demonstration that specific problems have been solved or that performance goals have been met. The second area has recommendations for timing analyses that will prove that the real-time system will meet its safety-imposed deadlines. The third area has description of means for assessing expected or actual real-time performance before, during, and after development is completed. To ensure that the delivered real-time software product meets performance goals, the paper recommends certain types of code-execution and communications scheduling. Technical background is provided in the appendix on methods of timing analysis, scheduling real-time computations, prototyping, real-time software development approaches, modeling and measurement, and real-time operating systems.

Preckshot, G.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Feasibility of a driver performance data acquisition system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) envisions many future situations in which the effectiveness and consequences of new intelligent vehicle-highway systems technologies will need to be studied in actual production vehicles. Such studies will enable evaluations in vehicles which are familiar to drivers. These studies would be future enhanced by the availability of an instrumentation package that can be easily installed in these vehicles to enable specific vehicle configurations of interest to be evaluated, thereby increasing the variety of vehicle options that are available for study. Ideally, an approach is needed that would allow data collection from a variety of vehicle models and types, and would address the issue of driver familiarity. Such an approach is embodied in the concept of a driver performance data acquisition system that could be installed in a wide range of vehicles within a relatively short period of time. As a universally adaptable system, it would provide researchers with the ability to manually input data as well as directly record information on driver, vehicle, roadway, and environmental parameters. Furthermore, it would enable the measurement of driver performance in the driver`s own vehicle, thereby ensuring vehicle familiarity. In addition, it would be possible to measure driver performance in relation to any vehicle design characteristic at relatively little expense and effort, and would make it easy to update existing models of driver/vehicle behavior to reflect performance characteristics in vehicles of current manufacture.

Carter, R.J.; Spelt, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Goodman, M.J. [National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Crash Avoidance Research

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A standardized approach to PV system performance model validation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PV performance models are used to predict how much energy a PV system will produce at a given location and subject to prescribed weather conditions. These models are commonly used by project developers to choose between module technologies and array designs (e.g., fixed tilt vs. tracking) for a given site or to choose between different geographic locations, and are used by the financial community to establish project viability. Available models can differ significantly in their underlying mathematical formulations and assumptions and in the options available to the analyst for setting up a simulation. Some models lack complete documentation and transparency, which can result in confusion on how to properly set up, run, and document a simulation. Furthermore, the quality and associated uncertainty of the available data upon which these models rely (e.g., irradiance, module parameters, etc.) is often quite variable and frequently undefined. For these reasons, many project developers and other industry users of these simulation tools have expressed concerns related to the confidence they place in PV performance model results. To address this problem, we propose a standardized method for the validation of PV system-level performance models and a set of guidelines for setting up these models and reporting results. This paper describes the basic elements for a standardized model validation process adapted especially for PV performance models, suggests a framework to implement the process, and presents an example of its application to a number of available PV performance models.

Stein, Joshua S.; Jester, Terry (Hudson Clean Energy Partners); Posbic, Jean (BP Solar); Kimber, Adrianne (First Solar); Cameron, Christopher P.; Bourne, Benjamin (SunPower Corporation)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Thermodynamic data management system for nuclear waste disposal performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic property values for use in assessing the performance of a nuclear waste repository are described. More emphasis is on a computerized data base management system which facilitates use of the thermodynamic data in sensitivity analysis and other studies which critically assess the performance of disposal sites. Examples are given of critical evaluation procedures; comparison of apparent equilibrium constants calculated from the data base, with other work; and of correlations useful in estimating missing values of both free energy and enthalpy of formation for aqueous species. 49 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

Phillips, S.L.; Hale, F.V.; Siegel, M.D.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Solar energy system performance evaluation - final report for Honeywell OTS 45, Salt River Project, Phoenix, Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 45) at Salt River Project in Phoenix, Arizona, based on the analysis of data collected between April 1981 and March 31, 1982. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 45 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 8208 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 2500-gallon thermal storage tank; two 25-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted water chillers; a forced-draft cooling tower; and associated piping, pumps, valves, controls and heat rejection equipment. The solar system has eight basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics. Based on the instrumented test data monitored and collected during the 8 months of the Operational Test Period, the solar system collected 1143 MMBtu of thermal energy of the total incident solar energy of 3440 MMBtu and provided 241 MMBtu for cooling and 64 MMBtu for heating. The projected net annual electrical energy savings due to the solar system was approximately 40,000 kWh(e).

Mathur, A K

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Multi-Source Hydronic Heat Pump System Performance Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extensive independent evaluation recently was completed of the Multi-Source Hydronic Heat Pump (MSHHP) system, a proprietary heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system developed by Meckler Systems Group. The MSHHP tests were conducted on a unique test bed designed and constructed by National Technical Systems (NTS) through a research and development grant program funded by Southern California Edison Company. This paper outlines testing methods and results, including evaluations of peak power and energy savings allowed by the innovative system. The main difference between the MSHHP and a conventional HVAC system is use of a chilled water "diversity" cooling loop interconnecting air to water coils (located at each water source heat pump unit) with a central chilled water storage tank. The MSHHP system uses significantly less energy than a conventional HVAC system, and lowers peak demand by shifting required electrical energy consumption to lower-cost, off-peak and mid-peak rates. Lower heat pump capacities are a main feature of the MSHHP. This is accomplished by pre-cooling return air from the zone space, a process that also allows the heat pump to operate at a higher Coefficient of Performance (COP), thereby contributing to further energy savings.

Meckler, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume II, energy requirements. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project analyzed the application of solar total energy systems to appropriate segments of the residential sector and determined their market penetration potential. This volume covers the work done on energy requirements definition and includes the following: (1) identification of the single-family and multi-family market segments; (2) regionalization of the United States; (3) electrical and thermal load requirements, including time-dependent profiles; (4) effect of conservation measures on energy requirements; and (5) verification of simulated load data with real data.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Simplified design guide for estimating photovoltaic flat array and system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Simplified, non-computer based methods are presented for predicting photovoltaic array and system performance. The array performance prediction methods are useful for calculating the potential output of passively cooled, flat, south facing max-power tracked arrays. A solar/weather data base for 97 different US and US affiliated stations is provided to aid in these calculations. Also, performance estimates can be made for photovoltaic systems (array, battery, power conditioner) that are backed-up by non-solar reserves capable of meeting the load when the solar system cannot. Such estimates can be made for a total of 41 different sinusoidal, unimodal, and bimodal diurnal load profiles from appropriate graphs included. These allow easy determination of the fraction of the load met by the solar photovoltaic system as a function of array size and (dedicated) battery storage capacity. These performance graphs may also be used for systems without battery storage. Use of array manufacturer's specification sheet data is discussed. Step-by-step procedures, along with suggested worksheets, are provided for carrying out the necessary calculations.

Evans, D.L.; Facinelli, W.A.; Koehler, L.P.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Computational Human Performance Modeling For Alarm System Design  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of new technologies like adaptive automation systems and advanced alarms processing and presentation techniques in nuclear power plants is already having an impact on the safety and effectiveness of plant operations and also the role of the control room operator. This impact is expected to escalate dramatically as more and more nuclear power utilities embark on upgrade projects in order to extend the lifetime of their plants. One of the most visible impacts in control rooms will be the need to replace aging alarm systems. Because most of these alarm systems use obsolete technologies, the methods, techniques and tools that were used to design the previous generation of alarm system designs are no longer effective and need to be updated. The same applies to the need to analyze and redefine operators alarm handling tasks. In the past, methods for analyzing human tasks and workload have relied on crude, paper-based methods that often lacked traceability. New approaches are needed to allow analysts to model and represent the new concepts of alarm operation and human-system interaction. State-of-the-art task simulation tools are now available that offer a cost-effective and efficient method for examining the effect of operator performance in different conditions and operational scenarios. A discrete event simulation system was used by human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop a generic alarm handling model to examine the effect of operator performance with simulated modern alarm system. It allowed analysts to evaluate alarm generation patterns as well as critical task times and human workload predicted by the system.

Jacques Hugo

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Thermal performance of concrete masonry unit wall systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New materials, modern building wall technologies now available in the building marketplace, and unique, more accurate, methods of thermal analysis of wall systems create an opportunity to design and erect buildings where thermal envelopes that use masonry wall systems can be more efficient. Thermal performance of the six masonry wall systems is analyzed. Most existing masonry systems are modifications of technologies presented in this paper. Finite difference two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer modeling and unique methods of the clear wall and overall thermal analysis were used. In the design of thermally efficient masonry wall systems is t to know how effectively the insulation material is used and how the insulation shape and its location affect the wall thermal performance. Due to the incorrect shape of the insulation or structural components, hidden thermal shorts cause additional heat losses. In this study, the thermal analysis of the clear wall was enriched with the examination of the thermal properties of the wall details and the study of a quantity defined herein the Thermal Efficiency of the insulation material.

Kosny, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Solar energy system performance evaluation, July 1979 through June 1980  

SciTech Connect

The Loudoun County site is the Charles S. Monroe Vocational Technical School in Leesburg, Virginia. The active solar energy system is designed to supply 26% of the domestic hot water demand. It is equipped with 1225 square feet of double glazed flat-plate collectors manufactured by Southwest Enertech, a 2056 gallon liquid storage tank located in the school's mechanical room, and a backup electric immersion heater, 2 stage, 20 kW per stage. The system performance for the period July 1979 through June 1980 is presented, and the meteorological conditions are included. (WHK)

Missal, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Real-time performance monitoring and management system  

SciTech Connect

A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

User characteristics and performance with automated mobile phone systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of individual differences (such as gender and attitude towards mobile phone use in public places) on the usability of a speech-activated mobile city guide service in various context of use ... Keywords: cell phones, context of use, evaluation, gender, individual differences, mobile communications, mobile phone services, mobile phones, performance, private locations, public locations, public use, system design, usability, user characteristics

Mark Howell; Steve Love; Mark Turner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Performance comparison between air and liquid residential solar heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons of system performance for the flat plate liquid-heating system in CSU Solar House I, the evacuated-tube collector system in Solar House I, and the flat plate air-heating system in CSU Solar House II are described for selected months of the 1976 and 1977 heating seasons. Only space and domestic water heating data are compared. The flat plate air- and liquid-heating collectors operating with complete heating systems have nearly equal efficiencies when based upon solar flux while the collector fluids are flowing, but approximately 40% more energy is collected during a heating season with the air-heating system because the air system operates over a longer period of the day. On the basis of short-term data, the evacuated tube collector array on Solar House I is about 27% more efficient than the flat plate air-heating collector array on Solar House II based on gross roof area occupied by the collectors and manifolds.

Karaki, S.; Duff, W.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

319

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Third quarterly progress report, November 1, 1976--January 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of Solar Total Energy System (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., office buildings, shopping centers, retail stores, etc.) in the United States is investigated. Candidate solar-thermal and solar-photovoltaic concepts are considered for providing on-site electrical power generation as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. The solar-thermal concepts include the use of solar concentrators (distributed or central-receiver) for collection of the thermal energy for conversion to electricity by means of a Rankine-cycle or Brayton-cycle power-conversion system. Recoverable waste heat from the power-generation process is utilized to help meet the building thermal-energy demand. Evaluation methodology is identified to allow ranking and/or selection of the most cost-effective concept for commercial-building applications.

Not Available

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Second quarterly progress report, August 1, 1976--October 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report investigates the application of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., office buildings, shopping centers, retail stores, etc.) in the United States. Candidate solar thermal and solar photovoltaic concepts are considered for providing on-site electrical power generation as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. The solar thermal concepts include the use of solar concentrators (distributed or central receiver) for collection of the thermal energy for conversion to electricity by means of a Rankine cycle or Brayton cycle power conversion system. Recoverable waste heat from the power generation process is utilized to help meet the building thermal energy demand. Evaluation methodology is identified to allow ranking and/or selection of the most cost-effective concept for commercial building applications.

Not Available

1977-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Performance of the Keck Observatory adaptive optics system  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the adaptive optics (AO) system at the W.M. Keck Observatory is characterized. The authors calculate the error budget of the Keck AO system operating in natural guide star mode with a near infrared imaging camera. By modeling the control loops and recording residual centroids, the measurement noise and band-width errors are obtained. The error budget is consistent with the images obtained. Results of sky performance tests are presented: the AO system is shown to deliver images with average Strehl ratios of up to 0.37 at 1.58 {micro}m using a bright guide star and 0.19 for a magnitude 12 star.

van Dam, M A; Mignant, D L; Macintosh, B A

2004-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Performance of the intense pulsed neutron source accelerator system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility has now been operating in a routine way for outside users since November 1, 1981. From that date through December of 1982, the accelerator system was scheduled for neutron science for 4500 hours. During this time the accelerator achieved its short-term goals by delivering about 380,000,000 pulses of beam totaling over 6 x 10/sup 20/ protons. The changes in equipment and operating practices that evolved during this period of intense running are described. The intensity related instability threshold was increased by a factor of two and the accelerator beam current has been ion source limited. Plans to increase the accelerator intensity are also described. Initial operating results with a new H/sup -/ ion source are discussed.

Potts, C.; Brumwell, F.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Thermal and lighting performance of toplighting systems in the hot and humid climate of Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study evaluated the potential of toplighting systems in the hot and humid tropics by using Bangkok, Thailand (latitude 13.7?°N) as a test location. The analysis tested both the thermal and lighting performance of three toplighting systems. Toplighting, designed for use in one-story buildings or on the top floor of taller buildings, yields a uniformly distributed light throughout a space. However, in lower latitude locations, where there is no heating period, heat gain is a critical design issue since it significantly affects the annual energy consumption of the building. Accordingly, the decision to use toplighting in these locations needs to be carefully examined before any design considerations occur. In this study, the thermal and lighting performance of three toplighting systems were compared. For the thermal performance, total cooling loads, heat gains and losses, and interior temperature were evaluated. The lighting performance parameters examined were daylight factor, illuminance level, light distribution, and uniformity. EnergyPlus was used as the thermal analysis tool, and RADIANCE, along with a physical scale model, was used as the lighting performance analysis tool. The sky conditions tested were overcast, clear sky, and intermediate sky. Results have shown that, for locations with hot and humid climates with variable sky conditions such as Bangkok, Thailand, the roof monitors perform better than the other two systems in terms of the thermal and lighting performance. With similar cooling loads, the roof monitor provides better illuminance uniformity than the skylights and lightscoops, with adequate illuminance level (at mostly higher than 500 lux).

Harntaweewongsa, Siritip

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Enhanced Performance Assessment System (EPAS) for carbon sequestration.  

SciTech Connect

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is an option to mitigate impacts of atmospheric carbon emission. Numerous factors are important in determining the overall effectiveness of long-term geologic storage of carbon, including leakage rates, volume of storage available, and system costs. Recent efforts have been made to apply an existing probabilistic performance assessment (PA) methodology developed for deep nuclear waste geologic repositories to evaluate the effectiveness of subsurface carbon storage (Viswanathan et al., 2008; Stauffer et al., 2009). However, to address the most pressing management, regulatory, and scientific concerns with subsurface carbon storage (CS), the existing PA methodology and tools must be enhanced and upgraded. For example, in the evaluation of a nuclear waste repository, a PA model is essentially a forward model that samples input parameters and runs multiple realizations to estimate future consequences and determine important parameters driving the system performance. In the CS evaluation, however, a PA model must be able to run both forward and inverse calculations to support optimization of CO{sub 2} injection and real-time site monitoring as an integral part of the system design and operation. The monitoring data must be continually fused into the PA model through model inversion and parameter estimation. Model calculations will in turn guide the design of optimal monitoring and carbon-injection strategies (e.g., in terms of monitoring techniques, locations, and time intervals). Under the support of Laboratory-Directed Research & Development (LDRD), a late-start LDRD project was initiated in June of Fiscal Year 2010 to explore the concept of an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS) for carbon sequestration and storage. In spite of the tight time constraints, significant progress has been made on the project: (1) Following the general PA methodology, a preliminary Feature, Event, and Process (FEP) analysis was performed for a hypothetical CS system. Through this FEP analysis, relevant scenarios for CO{sub 2} release were defined. (2) A prototype of EPAS was developed by wrapping an existing multi-phase, multi-component reservoir simulator (TOUGH2) with an uncertainty quantification and optimization code (DAKOTA). (3) For demonstration, a probabilistic PA analysis was successfully performed for a hypothetical CS system based on an existing project in a brine-bearing sandstone. The work lays the foundation for the development of a new generation of PA tools for effective management of CS activities. At a top-level, the work supports energy security and climate change/adaptation by furthering the capability to effectively manage proposed carbon capture and sequestration activities (both research and development as well as operational), and it greatly enhances the technical capability to address this national problem. The next phase of the work will include (1) full capability demonstration of the EPAS, especially for data fusion, carbon storage system optimization, and process optimization of CO{sub 2} injection, and (2) application of the EPAS to actual carbon storage systems.

Wang, Yifeng; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; McNeish, Jerry A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dewers, Thomas A.; Hadgu, Teklu; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Performance, problems, and expectations of concentrator photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The photovoltaic cell or solar cell can be used to convert sunlight directly into electrical energy and its relatively simple construction and absence of moving parts make these devices attractive for terrestrial power generation applications. The primary problem preventing large-scale application is the very high cost of solar cell arrays. For example, the most advanced solar cell is the silicon cell and, currently in the United States, silicon solar arrays cost about $15,000 per peak kilowatt in moderately large quantities. One approach to reducing the cost of solar cell arrays is to concentrate sunlight on the cells and increase the specific output power density of the cells. In this approach, expensive solar cell area is replaced by, hopefully, less expensive reflective or refractive concentrator materials. The United States Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) is supporting a program to develop concentrator photovoltaic systems with the primary objective to develop low-cost reliable systems for widespread terrestrial applications. The specific long-term cost goal for these systems is $500 per peak kilowatt by 1982. The most promising solar cell systems for concentrator applications are silicon and galium arsenide and these materials have received the most attention to date in the ERDA program. Design, preliminary performance testing results, and cost estimates for concentrator photovoltaic systems are discussed.

Burgess, E.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Performance Analysis of a Flash-Crowd Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dr. Guillaume PierreFlash-crowds are a growing obstacle to the further expansion of the Internet. One of the solutions to this problem is to replicate the most popular documents to different web servers and to redirect client requests to these replicas. In this thesis we present a performance analysis of a flash-crowd management system based on RaDaR. We adjust the architecture of RaDaR to focus more on adaptability rather than scalability, to give the system a better chance against a flash-crowd by using algorithms from another system by the same authors, ACDN. Because existing benchmarks do not show realistic behavior, we first propose our own synthetic benchmark. Finally we use the benchmark tool to replay requests from a trace of an actual flash-crowd. Our results are three-fold: first we show how to dimension a RaDaR-like system. Second, we demonstrate based on a synthetic benchmark as well as a trace-based benchmark that the RaDaR-like system adjusts to a flash-crowd in a timely and efficient fashion. Finally, we identify an inherent instability in the replica placement

Reinoud Esser

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Parallel application-level behavioral attributes for performance and energy management of high-performance computing systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Run time variability of parallel applications continues to present significant challenges to their performance and energy efficiency in high-performance computing (HPC) systems. When run times are extended and unpredictable, application developers perceive ... Keywords: Performance and energy management, Performance measurement, Run time attributes

Jeffrey J. Evans; Charles E. Lucas

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Performance of active solar domestic hot water heating systems. Comparative report, 1979-1980 season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most recent composite results of analysis performed by Vitro Laboratories of solar hot water heating data for selected hot water sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) are presented. Results presented have been developed on the basis of analysis of instrumented sites monitored through 1979-1980. A total of 45 sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) were examined for this study. Eighteen of these were selected for in-depth treatment because of the availability of valid long term data. System descriptions, schematic diagrams and energy flow diagrams for these 18 sites are presented in Appendices A, B, and C, respectively. (WHK)

Cramer, M.A.; Kendall, P.W.; Rosenbusch, J.M.; Weinstein, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Performance control strategies for oil-fired residential heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported of a study of control system options which can be used to improve the combustion performance of residential, oil-fired heating equipment. Two basic control modes were considered in this program. The first is service required'' signals in which an indication is provided when the flame quality or heat exchanger cleanliness have degraded to the point that a service call is required. The second control mode is excess-air trim'' in which the burner would essentially tune itself continuously for maximum efficiency. 35 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

Butcher, T.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

SPACE4CLOUD: a tool for system performance and costevaluation of cloud systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud Computing is assuming a relevant role in the world of web applications and web services. Cloud technologies allow to build dynamic systems which are able to adapt their performance to workload fluctuations delegating to the Cloud Provider the intensive ... Keywords: cloud computing, model-driven software development, performance prediction

Davide Franceschelli; Danilo Ardagna; Michele Ciavotta; Elisabetta Di Nitto

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with ``conventional`` HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with conventional'' HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system performance evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Performance verification tests of an integrated heat pipe-thermal energy storage system have been conducted. This system is being developed as a part of an Organic Rankine Cycle-Solar Dynamic Power System (ORC-SDPS) receiver for future space stations. The integrated system consists of potassium heat pipe elements that incorporate thermal energy storage (TES) canisters within the vapor space along with an organic fluid (toluene) heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. During the insolation period of the earth orbit, solar energy is delivered to the surface of the heat pipe elements of the ORC-SDPS receiver and is internally transferred by the potassium vapor for use and storage. Part of the thermal energy is delivered to the heater tube and the balance is stored in the TES units. During the eclipse period of the orbit, the stored energy in the TES units is transferred by the potassium vapor to the toluene heater tube. A developmental heat pipe element was fabricated that employs axial arteries and a distribution wick connecting the wicked TES units and the heater to the solar insolation surface of the heat pipe. Tests were conducted to verify the heat pipe operation and to evaluate the heat pipe/TES units/heater tube operation by interfacing the heater unit to a heat exchanger.

Keddy, E.; Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

ATU/Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Military Large-Scale Experiment (LSE-1): system design and support activities. Final report, November 23, 1976-November 30, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The ATU/Fort Hood Solar Total Energy System will include a concentrating solar collector field of several acres. During periods of direct insolation, a heat-transfer fluid will be circulated through the collector field and thus heated to 500 to 600/sup 0/F. Some of the fluid will be circulated through a steam generator to drive a turbine-generator set; additional fluid will be stored in insulated tanks for use when solar energy is not available. The electrical output will satisfy a portion of the electrical load at Fort Hood's 87,000 Troop Housing Complex. Heat extracted from the turbine exhaust in the form of hot water will be used for space heating, absorption air conditioning, and domestic water heating at the 87,000 Complex. Storage tanks for the hot water are also included. The systems analysis and program support activities include studies of solar availability and energy requirements at Fort Hood, investigation of interfacing LSE-1 with existing energy systems at the 87,000 Complex, and preliminary studies of environmental, health, and safety considerations. An extensive survey of available concentrating solar collectors and modifications to a computerized system simulation model for LSE-1 use are also reported. Important program support activities are military liaison and information dissemination. The engineering test program reported involved completion of the Solar Engineering Test Module (SETM) and extensive performance testing of a single module of the linear-focusing collector.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

COOLING FAN AND SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upcoming emissions regulations (Tiers 3, 4a and 4b) are imposing significantly higher heat loads on the cooling system than lesser regulated machines. This work was a suite of tasks aimed at reducing the parasitic losses of the cooling system, or improving the design process through six distinct tasks: 1. Develop an axial fan that will provide more airflow, with less input power and less noise. The initial plan was to use Genetic Algorithms to do an automated fan design, incorporating forward sweep for low noise. First and second generation concepts could not meet either performance or sound goals. An experienced turbomachinery designer, using a specialized CFD analysis program has taken over the design and has been able to demonstrate a 5% flow improvement (vs 10% goal) and 10% efficiency improvement (vs 10% goal) using blade twist only. 2. Fan shroud developments, using an 'aeroshroud' concept developed at Michigan State University. Performance testing at Michigan State University showed the design is capable of meeting the goal of a 10% increase in flow, but over a very narrow operating range of fan performance. The goal of 10% increase in fan efficiency was not met. Fan noise was reduced from 0 to 2dB, vs. a goal of 5dB at constant airflow. The narrow range of fan operating conditions affected by the aeroshroud makes this concept unattractive for further development at this time 3. Improved axial fan system modeling is needed to accommodate the numbers of cooling systems to be redesigned to meet lower emissions requirements. A CFD fan system modeling guide has been completed and transferred to design engineers. Current, uncontrolled modeling practices produce flow estimates in some cases within 5% of measured values, and in some cases within 25% of measured values. The techniques in the modeling guide reduced variability to the goal of + 5% for the case under study. 4. Demonstrate the performance and design versatility of a high performance fan. A 'swept blade mixed flow' fan was rapid prototyped from cast aluminum for a performance demonstration on a small construction machine. The fan was mounted directly in place of the conventional fan (relatively close to the engine). The goal was to provide equal airflow at constant fan speed, with 75% of the input power and 5 dB quieter than the conventional fan. The result was a significant loss in flow with the prototype due to its sensitivity to downstream blockage. This sensitivity to downstream blockage affects flow, efficiency, and noise all negatively, and further development was terminated. 5. Develop a high efficiency variable speed fan drive to replace existing slipping clutch style fan drives. The goal for this task was to provide a continuously variable speed fan drive with an efficiency of 95%+ at max speed, and losses no greater than at max speed as the fan speed would vary throughout its entire speed range. The process developed to quantify the fuel savings potential of a variable speed fan drive has produced a simple tool to predict the fuel savings of a variable speed drive, and has sparked significant interest in the use of variable speed fan drive for Tier 3 emissions compliant machines. The proposed dual ratio slipping clutch variable speed fan drive can provide a more efficient system than a conventional single ratio slipping clutch fan drive, but could not meet the established performance goals of this task, so this task was halted in a gate review prior to the start of detailed design. 6. Develop a cooling system air filtration device to allow the use of automotive style high performance heat exchangers currently in off road machines. The goal of this task was to provide a radiator air filtration system that could allow high fin density, louvered radiators to operate in a find dust application with the same resistance to fouling as a current production off-road radiator design. Initial sensitivity testing demonstrated that fan speed has a significant impact on the fouling of radiator cores due to fine dusts, so machines equipped with continuously variabl

Ronald Dupree

2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

High-performance dehumidifier for solar desiccant cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced-design, one-tenth-scale dehumidifier for use in residential solar desiccant-cooling systems has been built and tested. The new dehumidifier was designed using a parallel-passage geometry, where air flows through channels formed by walls coated with fine-ground silica gel desiccant. This concept has a high heat and mass transfer effectiveness and promises to double the coefficient of performance of the desiccant cooling system to 1.1 kW cooling output/kW thermal input. The parallel-passage design was found to have very low pressure drop, typically 20 Pa (.08 in. water) at design conditions. The low fan power required to drive such low pressure drop components indicates that electrical COP's in the range of 8.0 to 8.2 kW cooling output/kW electrical input are possible. Results presented include parametric studies of the effect of conditions such as temperature and humidity and design parameters such as desiccant particle size and channel spacing on dehumidifier performance.

Schlepp, D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Performance Modeling of a Solar Driven Absorption Cooling System for Carnegie Mellon University's Intelligent Workplace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Robert L. Preger Intelligent Workplace (IW) is a 650 m2 (7,000 ft2) living laboratory of office space at Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA). The IW is involved in a project to develop, install, and test an effective solar thermal system for space heating and cooling. The proposed energy supply system configuration includes integrated compound parabolic concentrator (ICPC), a hot storage tank, a gas fired auxiliary heater, a steam generator, a steam driven absorption chiller and fan coils. A TRNSYS predictive model has been programmed and used to evaluate the performance of the system throughout a summer season. The effects on performance and on costs have been explored for various design variables and operating conditions. The performance calculations indicate that: - the 16.17 kW (55.2 kBtu/hr, 4.5 tons) absorption chiller is adequate to meet the IW south cooling requirements - 30-40m2 collectors can supply from 55 to 65% of the heat required to drive the chiller - estimated heat losses from the system can reach about 20-30% of the total heat collected.

Masson, S. V.; Qu, M.; Archer, D. H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Effectiveness of information systems in supply chain performance: a system dynamics study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organisations are streamlining their supply chains through successful deployment of Information Technology (IT) to succeed in today's global marketplace. Advances in information and communications technologies have made the availability of ... Keywords: ICT, SCM, automobile industry, automotive supply chains, change management, communications, data accuracy, delivery speed, information systems, information technology tools, process integration, simulation, supply chain management, supply chain performance, system dynamics

Ashish Agarwal; Ravi Shankar; Purnendu Mandal

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

342

Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability.

Dinh, H.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

343

The New York Times headquarters daylighting mockup: Monitored performance of the daylighting control system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not valid because the daylighting system was not providingperformance of the daylighting control system E.S. Lee ,performance of two daylighting control systems installed in

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Thermal performance of residential duct systems in basements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many unanswered questions about the typical effects of duct system operation on the infiltration rates and energy usage of single- family residences with HVAC systems in their basements. In this paper, results from preliminary field studies and computer simulations are used to examine the potential for improvements in efficiency of air distribution systems in such houses. The field studies comprise thermal and flow measurements on four houses in Maryland. The houses were found to have significant envelope leakage, duct leakage, and duct conduction losses. Simulations of a basement house, the characteristics of which were chosen from the measured houses, were performed to assess the energy savings potential for basement house. The simulations estimate that a nine percent reduction in space conditioning energy use is obtained by sealing eighty percent of the duct leaks and insulating ducts to an R-value of 0.88 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (5{degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) where they are exposed in the basement. To determine the maximum possible reduction m energy use, simulations were run with all ducts insulated to 17.6 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (100 {degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) and with no duct leakage. A reduction of energy use by 14% is obtained by using perfect ducts instead of nominal ducts.

Treidler, B.; Modera, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Transient performance of substation structures and associated grounding systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When lightning strikes an electric substation, large currents generated by the stroke flow in the above ground structures and grounding system and dissipate in the soil. The electromagnetic fields generated by such high currents may cause damage to equipment and may be dangerous to personnel working nearby. In this paper, the frequency and time domain performance of a substation subjected to a lightning strike is described and discussed. The computed scalar potentials, electric fields, and magnetic fields are presented graphically as a function of spatial coordinates, as a function of time and as a function of both. Two cases are considered. The first case examines the substation grounding system only, while the second case includes an above-ground structure as well. It is believed that the results of the second case have not been published before. A double exponential lightning surge current is injected at one corner of the substation. The response of the grounding system to the frequency domain electromagnetic spectrum of this signal is computed by a frequency domain electromagnetic field analysis software package. The temporal and spatial distributions of the electromagnetic fields inside and near the substation are obtained by an inverse Fourier transformation of all these responses. The presence of a soil with an arbitrary resistivity and permittivity is accurately taken into account. The analysis sheds some new light on the understanding of the effects which take place at the higher frequencies.

Dawalibi, F.P.; Xiong, W.; Ma, J. [Safe Engineering Services and Technologies Ltd., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Electronic Performance Support Systems: Comparison Of Types Of Integration Levels On Performance Outcomes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Selecting appropriate performance improvement interventions is a critical component of a comprehensive model of performance improvement. Intervention selection is an interconnected process involving analysis of (more)

Phillips, Sharon A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System Performance Studies  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

METC/C-97/7278 METC/C-97/7278 Title: Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System Performance STudies Authors: George T. Lee (METC) Frederick A. Sudhoff (METC) Conference: Fuel Cells '96 Review Meeting Conference Location: Morgantown, West Virginia Conference Dates: August 20-21, 1996 Conference Sponsor: U.S. DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

348

Performance Parameters for Grid-Connected PV Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 B. Marion, J. Adelstein, and K. Boyle National Renewable Energy Laboratory H. Hayden, B. Hammond, T. Fletcher, B. Canada, and D. Narang Arizona Public Service Co. D. Shugar, H. Wenger, A. Kimber, and L. Mitchell PowerLight Corporation G. Rich and T. Townsend First Solar Prepared for the 31 st IEEE Photovoltaics Specialists Conference and Exhibition Lake Buena Vista, Florida January 3-7, 2005 February 2005 * NREL/CP-520-37358 Performance Parameters for Grid-Connected PV Systems

349

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

SciTech Connect

This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit ? indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called"ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823"Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Delp, William W.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Design of high performance frequency synthesizers in communication systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frequency synthesizer is a key building block of fully-integrated wireless communication systems. Design of a frequency synthesizer requires the understanding of not only the circuit-level but also of the transceiver system-level considerations. This dissertation presents a full cycle of the synthesizer design procedure starting from the interpretation of standards to the testing and measurement results. A new methodology of interpreting communication standards into low level circuit specifications is developed to clarify how the requirements are calculated. A detailed procedure to determine important design variables is presented incorporating the fundamental theory and non-ideal effects such as phase noise and reference spurs. The design procedure can be easily adopted for different applications. A BiCMOS frequency synthesizer compliant for both wireless local area network (WLAN) 802.11a and 802.11b standards is presented as a design example. The two standards are carefully studied according to the proposed standard interpretation method. In order to satisfy stringent requirements due to the multi-standard architecture, an improved adaptive dual-loop phase-locked loop (PLL) architecture is proposed. The proposed improvements include a new loop filter topology with an active capacitance multiplier and a tunable dead zone circuit. These improvements are crucial for monolithic integration of the synthesizer with no off-chip components. The proposed architecture extends the operation limit of conventional integerN type synthesizers by providing better reference spur rejection and settling time performance while making it more suitable for monolithic integration. It opens a new possibility of using an integer-N architecture for various other communication standards, while maintaining the benefit of the integer-N architecture; an optimal performance in area and power consumption.

Moon, Sung Tae

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Impact assessment and performance targets for lighting and envelope systems  

SciTech Connect

Electric lighting loads and cooling from solar heat gains and from lights are the two largest components of peak demand in commercial buildings. The most cost effective demand side management solutions are generally those that directly reduce or eliminate these loads. Existing technologies can provide modest reductions, however they are typically applied an a piecemeal manner that yields less than optimal results. The full potential of existing technologies will be realized when they are commercially available in an integrated package easily specifiable by architects and engineers. Emerging technologies can also be developed to provide even greater savings and extend the savings over a greater portion of the building floor area. This report assesses achievable energy and peak demand performance in California commercial buildings with technologies available today and in the future. We characterize energy performance over a large range of building envelope and lighting conditions, both through computer simulation models and through case study measured data, and subsequently determine reasonable energy targets if building design were further optimized with integrated systems of current or new technologies. Energy targets are derived from the study after consideration of industry priorities, design constraints, market forces, energy code influence, and the state of current building stock.

Sullivan, R.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Improving Building Energy System Performance by Continuous Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The term Continuous Commissioning (CC) was first used by engineers at the Energy Systems Lab (ESL) at Texas A&M University to describe an ongoing process which improves the operation of buildings using measured hourly energy use and environmental data. The first buildings to undergo a continuous commissioning process were in the Texas LoanSTAR program [Liu, et al, 1994, Claridge, et al, 1994]. These buildings had been retrofitted with various energy efficiency improvements, and measured hourly data were available to verify that the retrofits were performing as desired, and to analyze the overall building performance. The ESL engineers, using hourly data, site visits, and ESL-developed software [Liu and Claridge 1995], then worked with the facility engineers to fine-tune the building operation. These efforts were so successful that another 15 to 30% of the annual building energy cost was saved ~ and these were in buildings that supposedly had all cost effective retrofits and operating improvements already implemented [Liu 1996].

Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Performance and Transient Behaviour of MGT based Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a preliminary overview of the multiplicity of solutions for the set up and operation of energy conversion systems based on micro-gas turbines, this paper outlines the method for performance evaluation under both steady state and transient conditions. The cycle analysis aims at the evaluation of thermal efficiency and energy saving indices under different fuelling conditions and with variably recuperated cycle. The subsequent component matching simulation extends the MGT analysis to the offdesign conditions and it leads to the definition of methods for an efficient fulfilment of variable external loads. Finally, the study of some typical transient developments, of both the full-to-part and the part-tofull load type, introduces to the problem of defining proper fuel control laws as to prevent excesses in both energy consumption and component stresses and instabilities. 1. FOREWORDS The micro-gas turbine based energy conversion systems represent one of the most recently developed devices for power generation also for cogeneration application. The set up of an efficient MGT based power plant usually exploits the well established manufacturers experience in the field of industrial gas turbines but also requires specifically studies to be addressed to the specific problems involving the smallscale

R. Tuccillo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Performance and Improvements of the ATLAS Jet Trigger System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the harsh conditions of the LHC, with proton bunches colliding every 50 ns and up to 40 pp interactions per bunch crossing, the ATLAS trigger system has to be flexible to maintaining an unbiased efficiency for a wide variety of physics studies while providing a fast rejection of non-interesting events. Jets are the most commonly produced objects at the LHC, essential for many physics measurements that range from precise QCD studies to searches for New Physics beyond the Standard Model, or even unexpected physics signals. The ATLAS jet trigger is the primary mean for selecting events with high pT jets and its good performance is fundamental to achieve the physics goals of ATLAS. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in three levels, the first one (L1) being hardware based, with a 2 ?s latency, and the two following ones (called collectively High Level Triggers or HLT) being softwared based with larger processing times. It was designed to work in a Region of Interest (RoI) based approach, where the second lev...

Conde Muino, P; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Advanced high performance steam systems for industrial cogeneration: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Advanced steam conditions of 1500/sup 0/F and 1500 psig have been shown to offer a major positive economic impact and a dramatic improvement in cogeneration system performance. In a back pressure steam turbine system, electricity production increases by 80%, and the return on investment improves by 60%. For a 35% extraction turbine, the electricity production increases 28% and the return increases by 34%. Designs of a 1500/sup 0/F modular steam generator and two sizes of matching steam turbines have been completed. The steam generator module uses all Alloy 800 tubes except for two superheater rows of Inconel 617. Its design is based on current production Alloy 800 once-through steam generators currently being introduced into cogeneration combined cycles. A test loop is currently evaluating candidate steam generator tube materials and steam turbine materials at 1500/sup 0/F and 1500 psig. To date, 4000 hours of operation of this loop have been accumulated. The candidate metals after operation in 1500/sup 0/F and 1500 psig steam showed no surface distress. Trade-off studies have been completed on the high temperature steam turbine. Tangential, radial, and axial turbine configurations have been designed and evaluated. The stress analyses of the 1500/sup 0/F steam turbines show that the machine can be operated at 1500/sup 0/F and 1500 psig for over ten years without component replacement when using rotor hub cooling to maintain disk bore temperatures in the 900/sup 0/F range. When applied in back pressure steam, extraction steam, and combined cycle systems the ''1500/sup 0/F steam technology building blocks'' provide full coverage of industrial cogeneration from 4 MW to 25 MW in a single gas turbine and steam turbine installation. A twelve-inch diameter tangential flow turbine has also been designed which is optimum in the 1 to 3 MW power range.

Duffy, T.E.; Schneider, P.H.; Campbell, A.H.; Evensen, O.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inResidentialSpaceConditioning Systems. Canadianin residential space conditioning systems. Keywords:in residential space conditioning systems. This standard

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Distribution System Voltage Performance Analysis for High-Penetration Photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the performance of commonly used distribution voltage regulation methods under reverse power flow.

Liu, E.; Bebic, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system.

359

Railplug Ignition System for Enhanced Engine Performance and Reduced Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This Final Technical Report discusses the progress that was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project. The primary objectives of the project were to (1) develop an improved understanding of the spark ignition process, and (2) develop the railplug as an improved ignitor for large bore stationary natural gas engines. We performed fundamental experiments on the physical processes occurring during spark ignition and used the results from these experiments to aid our development of the most complete model of the spark ignition process ever devised. The elements in this model include (1) the dynamic response of the ignition circuit, (2) a chemical kinetics mechanism that is suitable for the reactions that occur in the plasma, (3) conventional flame propagation kinetics, and (4) a multi-dimensional formulation so that bulk flow through the spark gap can be incorporated. This model (i.e., a Fortran code that can be used as a subroutine within an engine modeling code such as KIVA) can be obtained from Prof. Ron Matthews at rdmatt{at}mail.utexas.edu or Prof. DK Ezekoye at dezekoye{at}mail.utexas.edu. Fundamental experiments, engine experiments, and modeling tasks were used to help develop the railplug as a new ignitor for large bore natural gas engines. As the result of these studies, we developed a railplug that could extend the Lean Stability Limit (LSL) of an engine operating at full load on natural gas from {phi} = 0.59 for operation on spark plugs down to {phi} = 0.53 using railplugs with the same delivered energy (0.7 J). However, this delivered energy would rapidly wear out the spark plug. For a conventional delivered energy (<0.05 J), the LSL is {phi} = 0.63 for a spark plug. Further, using a permanent magnet to aid the plasma movement, the LSL was extended to {phi} = 0.54 for a railplug with a delivered energy of only 0.15 J/shot, a typical discharge energy for commercial capacitive discharge ignition systems. Here, it should be noted that railplugs and the associated ignition circuit should not cost much more than a conventional spark ignition system. Additionally, it is believed that the railplug performance can be further improved via continued research and development.

DK Ezekoye; Matt Hall; Ron Matthews

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat production (assuming 75% total efficiency for fuel cell) kWhdaycow 4 Finished compost Cubic yardsyear cow 3.32 Electricity required for digester operation kWhcowday 1...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Coal-fired high performance power generating system  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of > 47% thermal efficiency; NO[sub x] SO [sub x] and Particulates < 25% NSPS; Cost of electricity 10% lower; coal > 65% of heat input and all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW[sub e] combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. Most of this report discusses the details of work on these components, and the R D Plan for future work. The discussion of the combustor designs illustrates how detailed modeling can be an effective tool to estimate NO[sub x] production, minimum burnout lengths, combustion temperatures and even particulate impact on the combustor walls. When our model is applied to the long flame concept it indicates that fuel bound nitrogen will limit the range of coals that can use this approach. For high nitrogen coals a rapid mixing, rich-lean, deep staging combustor will be necessary. The air heater design has evolved into two segments: a convective heat exchanger downstream of the combustion process; a radiant panel heat exchanger, located in the combustor walls; The relative amount of heat transferred either radiatively or convectively will depend on the combustor type and the ash properties.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Dynamic Thermal Management for High-Performance Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal-aware design of disk drives is important because high temperatures can cause reliability problems. Dynamic Thermal Management (DTM) techniques have been proposed to operate the disk at the average case temperature, rather than at the worse case by modulating the activities to avoid thermal emergencies. The thermal emergencies can be caused by unexpected events, such as fan-breaks, increased inlet air temperature, etc. One of the DTM techniques is a delay-based approach that adjusts the disk seek activities, cooling down the disk drives. Even if such a DTM approach could overcome thermal emergencies without stopping disk activity, it suffers from long delays when servicing the requests. Thus, in this chapter, we investigate the possibility of using a multispeed disk-drive (called dynamic rotations per minute (DRPM)) that dynamically modulates the rotational speed of the platter for implementing the DTM technique. Using a detailed performance and thermal simulator of a storage system, we evaluate two possible DTM policies (- time-based and watermark-based) with a DRPM disk-drive and observe that dynamic RPM modulation is effective in avoiding thermal emergencies. However, we find that the time taken to transition between different rotational speeds of the disk is critical for the effectiveness of the DRPM based DTM techniques.

Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Gurumurthi, Dr Sudhanva [University of Virginia; Sivasubramaniam, Anand [Pennsylvania State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Concentration system performance degradation in the aftermath of Mount Pinatubo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major volcanic eruptions occur every few years, but most have little effect on solar radiation or climate. However, in the last ten years two volcanoes have decreased solar radiation and influenced weather at a level that might be expected at the frequency of about once a century. The Mexican volcano El Chichon and the Philippine volcano Mount Pinatubo put 6 and 20 million metric tons of SO{sub 2} in the stratosphere, respectively. SO{sub 2} is converted into H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, which mixes with water to produce aerosol. Since there is no weather in the stratosphere and the aerosol is small, these aerosol particles remain suspended until coagulation and sedimentation bring them to the troposphere where they are removed by normal wet and dry deposition processes. The extinction in the direct solar irradiance from El Chichon was found to peak during the winter of 1983 at about 11% for northern, mid latitudes. Mount Pinatubo`s peak extinction during 1992 was about 15%. Data from four northern, mid-latitude sites are examined to compare the direct consequences of the volcano`s eruption on the performance of concentrating solar energy systems and the indirect effects that may be associated with Mount Pinatubo`s perturbation of the weather.

Michalsky, J.J.; Perez, R.; Seals, R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center; Ineichen, P. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Groupe de Physique Appliquee

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Predicting Performance Impact of DVFS for Realistic Memory Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) can make modern processors more power and energy efficient if we can accurately predict the effect of frequency scaling on processor performance. State-of-the-art DVFS performance predictors, however, fail ...

Rustam Miftakhutdinov; Eiman Ebrahimi; Yale N. Patt

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Power and performance analysis of GPU-accelerated systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphics processing units (GPUs) provide significant improvements in performance and performance-per-watt as compared to traditional multicore CPUs. This energy-efficiency of GPUs has facilitated the use of GPUs in many application domains. Albeit energy ...

Yuki Abe; Hiroshi Sasaki; Martin Peres; Koji Inoue; Kazuaki Murakami; Shinpei Kato

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

32kg: performance systems for a post-digital age  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Why is a seemingly mundane issue such as airline baggage allowance of great significance in regards to the performance practice of electronic music? This paper discusses how a performance practice has evolved that seeks to question the binary and corporate ... Keywords: DIY, bastardisation, dirty electronics, eBay, live electronics, modular, performance, portability, post-digital, punktronics

John Richards

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Isolation points: Creating performance-robust enterprise systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article explores a performance isolation-based approach to creating robust distributed applications. For each application, the approach is to understand the performance dependencies that pervade it and then impose constraints on the possible spread ... Keywords: Autonomic computing, dynamic behavior, performance isolation

Mohamed S. Mansour; Karsten Schwan; Sameh Abdelaziz

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Residential passive solar systems: regional sensitivity to system performance costs, and alternative prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic potential of two passive space heating configurations are analyzed. These are a masonry thermal storage wall (Trombe) and a direct gain system - both with night insulation. A standard tract home design for each of the two passive systems is being used throughout the analysis to allow interregional comparisons. The economic performance of these two systems is evaluated on a regional basis (223 locations) throughout the United States. For each of the two conventional energy types considered (electricity and natural gas), sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine the impact of alternative fuel price escalation rates and solar costs upon feasibility of the two solar systems. Cost goals for solar system prices are established under one set of future fuel prices and stated economic conditions. (MOW)

Kirschner, C.; Ben-David, S.; Roach, F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Assessing the performance of human-automation collaborative planning systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning and Resource Allocation (P/RA) Human Supervisory Control (HSC) systems utilize the capabilities of both human operators and automated planning algorithms to schedule tasks for complex systems. In these systems, ...

Ryan, Jason C. (Jason Christopher)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Solar domestic hot water system inspection and performance evaluation handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reference source and procedures are provided to a solar technician for inspecting a solar domestic hot water system after installation and for troubleshooting the system during a maintenance call. It covers six generic DHW systems and is designed to aid the user in identifying a system type, diagnosing a system's problem, and then pinpointing and evaluating specific component problems. A large amount of system design and installation information is also included.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Improve Chilled Water System Performance, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program Chilled Water System Analysis Tool (CWSAT) can help optimize the performance of of industrial chilled water systems.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A Study of Target Frequency Bond for Frequency Control Performance Score Calculations in an Isolated System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Power system frequency is one of the key performance indices of system operation. Abnormal frequency deviations would incur negative impacts to power equipments and service (more)

Lee, Hung-hsi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Procedure for Measuring and Reporting the Performance of Photovoltaic Systems in Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides a standard method for measuring and characterizing the long-term energy performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems in buildings and the resulting implications to the building's energy use. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks for evaluating system performance and verifying that performance targets have been achieved. Uses may include comparison of performance with the design intent; comparison with other PV systems in buildings; economic analysis of PV systems in buildings; and the establishment of long-term performance records that enable maintenance staff to monitor trends in energy performance.

Pless, S.; Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.; Hayter, S.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Procedure for Measuring and Reporting the Performance of Photovoltaic Systems in Buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This procedure provides a standard method for measuring and characterizing the long-term energy performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems in buildings and the resulting implications to the building's energy use. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks for evaluating system performance and verifying that performance targets have been achieved. Uses may include comparison of performance with the design intent; comparison with other PV systems in buildings; economic analysis of PV systems in buildings; and the establishment of long-term performance records that enable maintenance staff to monitor trends in energy performance.

Pless, S.; Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.; Hayter, S.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The CI-FLOW Project: A System for Total Water Level Prediction from the Summit to the Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Coastal and Inland Flooding Observation and Warning (CI-FLOW) project is to prototype new hydrometeorologic techniques to address a critical NOAA service gap: routine total water level predictions for tidally influenced watersheds. ...

Suzanne Van Cooten; Kevin E. Kelleher; Kenneth Howard; Jian Zhang; Jonathan J. Gourley; John S. Kain; Kodi Nemunaitis-Monroe; Zac Flamig; Heather Moser; Ami Arthur; Carrie Langston; Randall Kolar; Yang Hong; Kendra Dresback; Evan Tromble; Humberto Vergara; Richard A Luettich Jr.; Brian Blanton; Howard Lander; Ken Galluppi; Jessica Proud Losego; Cheryl Ann Blain; Jack Thigpen; Katie Mosher; Darin Figurskey; Michael Moneypenny; Jonathan Blaes; Jeff Orrock; Rich Bandy; Carin Goodall; John G. W. Kelley; Jason Greenlaw; Micah Wengren; Dave Eslinger; Jeff Payne; Geno Olmi; John Feldt; John Schmidt; Todd Hamill; Robert Bacon; Robert Stickney; Lundie Spence

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Performance analysis of a framed ALOHA system with diversity frequency hopping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the performance of a framed ALOHA system that employs slow frequency-hopping techniques. A new strategy that employs diversity transmission (multiple frequency-hopping) techniques to enhance the performance of a framed ALOHA system ...

In-Hang Chung; Ming-Ching Yen

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Investigating Operating System Noise in Extreme-Scale High-Performance Computing Systems using Simulation  

SciTech Connect

Hardware/software co-design for future-generation high-performance computing (HPC) systems aims at closing the gap between the peak capabilities of the hardware and the performance realized by applications (application-architecture performance gap). Performance profiling of architectures and applications is a crucial part of this iterative process. The work in this paper focuses on operating system (OS) noise as an additional factor to be considered for co-design. It represents the first step in including OS noise in HPC hardware/software co-design by adding a noise injection feature to an existing simulation-based co-design toolkit. It reuses an existing abstraction for OS noise with frequency (periodic recurrence) and period (duration of each occurrence) to enhance the processor model of the Extreme-scale Simulator (xSim) with synchronized and random OS noise simulation. The results demonstrate this capability by evaluating the impact of OS noise on MPI_Bcast() and MPI_Reduce() in a simulated future-generation HPC system with 2,097,152 compute nodes.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Total System Performance Assessment Code (TOSPAC); Volume 2, User`s guide: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOSPAC is a computer program that calculates partially saturated groundwater flow with the transport of water-soluble contaminants. TOSPAC Version 1 is restricted to calculations involving one-dimensional, vertical columns of one or more media. TOSPAC was developed to help answer questions surrounding the burial of toxic wastes in arid regions. Burial of wastes in arid regions is attractive because of generally low population densities and little groundwater flow, in the unsaturated zone, to disturb the waste. TOSPAC helps to quantify groundwater flow and the spread of contamination, offering an idea of what could happen in the distant future. Figure 1.1 illustrates the problem TOSPAC was designed to investigate. For groundwater flow, TOSPAC can provide saturations, velocities, and and travel tunes for water in the rock matrix or the fractures in the unsaturated zone. TOSPAC can determine how hydrologic conditions vary when the rate of infiltration changes. For contaminant transport, TOSPAC can compute how much of a contaminant is dissolved in the water and how it is distributed. TOSPAC can determine how fast the solute is moving and the shape of the concentration front. And TOSPAC can be used to investigate how much of the contaminant remains in the inventory of a repository, how much is adsorbed onto the soil or rock matrix, and how much reaches the water table. Effective use of TOSPAC requires knowledge in a number of diverse disciplines, including real groundwater flow and transport, the mathematical models of groundwater flow and transport, real-world data required for the models, and the numerical solution of differential equations. Equally important is a realization of the limitations intrinsic to a computer model of complex physical phenomena. This User`s Guide not only describes the mechanics of executing TOSPAC on a computer, but also examines these other topics.

Gauthier, J.H.; Dudley, A.L; Skinner, L.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, M.L.; Peters, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

2010 Performance Metrics for Intelligent Systems (PerMIS'10) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Intelligent systems for Hazardous Environments (eg nuclear remediation); Smart Grid; Space Robotics; Medical & Healthcare. Past Workshops. ...

2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

2012 Performance Metrics for Intelligent Systems (PerMIS'12) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Intelligent Transportation Systems; Defense and Security; Emergency Response ... and Robots for Hazardous Environments (eg nuclear remediation); ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Performance measures framework for unmanned systems (PerMFUS): models for contextual metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the development of the Performance Measures Framework for Unmanned Systems (PerMFUS), we have established a multiple-axis performance metrics model for the unmanned systems (UMS). This model characterizes the UMS performance requirements by the missions ... Keywords: ALFUS, HSI, UMS, autonomy, collaboration, communication, contextual autonomy, contextual metrics, energy, environment, goal, human-system interaction, measure, metrics, mission, mobility, perception, performance, power, robot, sensing, task, terminology, test, unmanned system

Hui-Min Huang; Elena Messina; Adam Jacoff; Robert Wade; Michael McNair

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Effects of position and number of relevant documents retrieved on users' evaluations of system performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information retrieval research has demonstrated that system performance does not always correlate positively with user performance, and that users often assign positive evaluation scores to search systems even when they are unable to complete tasks successfully. ... Keywords: Search performance, precision, presentation of search results, ranking, satisfaction, user evaluation of performance

Diane Kelly; Xin Fu; Chirag Shah

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Case Studies Comparing System Advisor Model (SAM) Results to Real Performance Data: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

NREL has completed a series of detailed case studies comparing the simulations of the System Advisor Model (SAM) and measured performance data or published performance expectations. These case studies compare PV measured performance data with simulated performance data using appropriate weather data. The measured data sets were primarily taken from NREL onsite PV systems and weather monitoring stations.

Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Sather, N.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Energy based performance tuning for large scale high performance computing systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognition of the importance of power in the field of High Performance Computing, whether it be as an obstacle, expense or design consideration, has never been greater and more pervasive. In response to this challenge, we exploit the unique power measurement ... Keywords: energy efficiency, frequency scaling, high performance computing (HPC), power

James H. Laros, III; Kevin T. Pedretti; Suzanne M. Kelly; Wei Shu; Courtenay T. Vaughan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fuels Performance Group: Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems  

SciTech Connect

Describes R&D and analysis in advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum-based transportation fuels done by NREL's Fuels Performance Group.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Fuels Performance Group: Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes R&D and analysis in advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum-based transportation fuels done by NREL's Fuels Performance Group.

Not Available

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Performance of the Community Earth System Model | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Name of Publication Source: (SC), 2011 International Conference - High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis Type of Publication: conference paper...

388

High Performance Computing Systems Integration, HPC-5: HPC: LANL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fax: 664-0172 MS B272 Latest in cluster technologies New technology in High Performance Computing and Simulation HPC-5 provides advanced research, development, testing, and...

389

Geographic Information Systems Applications on an ATM-Based Distributed High Performance Computing System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We present a distributed geographic information system (DGIS) built on a distributed high performance computing environment using a number of software infrastructural building blocks and computational resources interconnected by an ATM-based broadband network. Archiving, access and processing of scientific data are discussed in the context of geographic and environmental applications with special emphasis on the potential for local-area weather, agriculture, soil and land management products. Software technologies such as tiling and caching techniques can be used to optimise storage requirements and response time for applications requiring very large data sets such as multi-channel satellite data. Distributed High Performance Computing hardware technology underpins our proposed system. In particular, we discuss the capabilities of a distributed hardware environment incorporating: high bandwidth communications networks such as Telstra's Experimental Broadband Network (EBN); large capa...

November Hawick

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

PMPS(3): a performance model of parallel systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an open performance model framework PMPS(n) and a realization of this framework PMPS(3), including memory, I/O and network, are presented and used to predict runtime of NPB benchmarks on P4 cluster. The experimental results demonstrates ... Keywords: I/O, convolution methods, parallel, performance model

Chen Yong-ran; Qi Xing-yun; Qian Yue; Dou Wen-hua

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Molecular Dynamics Simulations on High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The acceleration of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using high-performance reconfigurable computing (HPRC) has been much studied. Given the intense competition from multicore and GPUs, there is now a question whether MD on HPRC can be competitive. ... Keywords: FPGA-based coprocessors, application acceleration, bioinformatics, biological sequence alignment, high performance reconfigurable computing

Matt Chiu; Martin C. Herbordt

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Integrating automobile multiple intelligent warning systems : performance and policy implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligent driver warning systems can be found in many high-end vehicles on the road today, which will likely rapidly increase as they become standard equipment. However, introducing multiple warning systems into vehicles ...

Ho, Angela Wei Ling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Transmission System Performance Analysis for High-Penetration Photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is an assessment of the potential impact of high levels of penetration of photovoltaic (PV) generation on transmission systems. The effort used stability simulations of a transmission system with different levels of PV generation and load.

Achilles, S.; Schramm, S.; Bebic, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Performance FAQs on BG/Q Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blue GeneQ Versus Blue GeneP MiraCetusVesta IntrepidChallengerSurveyor Decommissioning of BGP Systems and Resources Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System...

395

Comparative Performance of Two Reversing Bowen Ratio Measurement Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the results of a comparative experiment between two Bowen ratio measurement systems conducted at the Petawawa National Forestry Institute, Chalk River, Ontario, in 1985. Both systems interchange the positions of the ...

J. H. McCaughey; D. W. Mullins; M. Publicover

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Proceedings of the Workshop on Performance Metrics for Intelligent Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As software and hardware become increasingly interwoven, new opportunities and challenges emerge. The field of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) - hybrid networked cyber and engineered physical elements co-designed to create adaptive and predictive systems ...

Elena Messina; Raj Madhavan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Performance Metrics for Intelligent Systems (PerMIS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and partnerships, dissemination of ideas, and future collaborations in an ... measures in various domains, eg,; Intelligent transportation systems; ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

398

Fuel cell/gas turbine system performance studies  

SciTech Connect

Because of the synergistic effects (higher efficiencies, lower emissions) of combining a fuel cell and a gas turbine into a power generation system, many potential system configurations were studied. This work is focused on novel power plant systems by combining gas turbines, solid oxide fuel cells, and a high-temperature heat exchanger; these systems are ideal for the distributed power and on- site markets in the 1-5 MW size range.

Lee, G.T.; Sudhoff, F.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

High Performance Commercial Building Systems Clifford C. Federspiel, Luis Villafana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for energy and maintenance management. It uses a common database system for all components and an open of California, Berkeley 2 School of Information Management and Systems, University of California, Berkeley ABSTRACT In this paper, we describe the design of a user interface for energy and maintenance systems

400

High Performance Commercial Building Systems California Energy Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

double- skin facade systems. These window strategies involve balancing daylighting and solar heat gains or interior shading systems combined with daylighting controls to re- duce cooling and lighting loads. 1 Systems with Daylighting Controls With Venetian blinds, the modes of operation include tilt angle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ANN and ANFIS models for performance evaluation of a vertical ground source heat pump system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to demonstrate the comparison of an artificial neural network (ANN) and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for the prediction performance of a vertical ground source heat pump (VGSHP) system. The VGSHP system using ... Keywords: Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system, Coefficient of performance, Ground source heat pump, Membership functions, Vertical heat exchanger

Hikmet Esen; Mustafa Inalli

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

LARGO hot water system long range thermal performance test report. Addendum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test procedure used and the test results obtained during the long range thermal performance tests of the LARGO Solar Hot Water System under natural environmental conditions are presented. Objectives of these tests were to determine the amount of energy collected, the amount of power required for system operation, system efficiency temperature distribution and system performance degradation.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Performance System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the installation of a data monitoring system to analyze the efficiency and performance of a large solar ventilation preheat (SVP) system. The system was installed at a Federal installation to reduce energy consumption and costs and to help meet Federal energy goals and mandates. SVP systems draw ventilation air in through a perforated metal solar collector with a dark color on the south side of a build-

404

Using Acid Number as a Leading Indicator of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning System Performance  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a literature review to assess the acidity characteristics of the older mineral oil and newer polyolester (POE) refrigeration systems as well as to evaluate acid measuring techniques used in other non-aqueous systems which may be applicable for refrigeration systems. Failure in the older chlorofluorocarbon/hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CFC/HCFC) / mineral oil systems was primarily due to thermal degradation of the refrigerant which resulted in the formation of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids. These are strong mineral acids, which can, over time, severely corrode the system metals and lead to the formation of copper plating on iron surfaces. The oil lubricants used in the older systems were relatively stable and were not prone to hydrolytic degradation due to the low solubility of water in oil. The refrigerants in the newer hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)/POE systems are much more thermally stable than the older CFC/HCFC refrigerants and mineral acid formation is negligible. However, acidity is produced in the new systems by hydrolytic decomposition of the POE lubricants with water to produce the parent organic acids and alcohols used to prepare the POE. The individual acids can therefore vary but they are generally C5 to C9 carboxylic acids. Organic acids are much weaker and far less corrosive to metals than the mineral acids from the older systems but they can, over long time periods, react with metals to form carboxylic metal salts. The salts tend to accumulate in narrow areas such as capillary tubes, particularly if residual hydrocarbon processing chemicals are present in the system, which can lead to plugging. The rate of acid production from POEs varies on a number of factors including chemical structure, moisture levels, temperature, acid concentration and metals. The hydrolysis rate of reaction can be reduced by using driers to reduce the free water concentration and by using scavenging chemicals which react with the system acids. Total acid number (TAN), which includes both mineral acids and organic acids, is therefore a useful indicator which can be used to monitor the condition of the system in order to perform remedial maintenance, when required, to prevent system failure. The critical TAN value is the acid level at which remedial action should be taken to prevent the onset of rapid acid formation which can result in system failure. The level of 0.05 mg KOH/g of oil was established for CFC/mineral oil systems based on analysis of 700 used lubricants from operating systems and failed units. There is no consensus within the refrigeration industry as to the critical TAN value for HFC/POE systems, however, the value will be higher than the CFC/mineral oil systems critical TAN value because of the much weaker organic acids produced from POE. A similar study of used POE lubricants should be performed to establish a critical TAN limit for POE systems. Titrimetric analysis per ASTM procedures is the most commonly used method to determine TAN values in lubricants in the refrigeration industry and other industries dealing with lubricating oils. For field measurements, acid test kits are often used since they provide rapid, semi-quantitative TAN results.

Dennis Cartlidge; Hans Schellhase

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Microarchitecture parameter selection to optimize system performance under process variation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design variability due to within-die and die-to-die process variations has the potential to significantly reduce the maximum operating frequency and the effective yield of high-performance microprocessors in future process technology generations. This ...

Xiaoyao Liang; David Brooks

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Parameter estimation for performance models of distributed application systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance engineering of distributed applications requires models that capture contention for both hardware and software resources. Layered queueing models have been proposed for modeling distributed applications but they require model parameters ...

Jerome Rolia; Vidar Vetland

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Extreme Benchmark Suite : measuring high-performance embedded systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Extreme Benchmark Suite (XBS) is designed to support performance measurement of highly parallel "extreme" processors, many of which are designed to replace custom hardware implementations. XBS is designed to avoid many ...

Gerding, Steven (Steven Bradley)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Performance Assessment of an Integrated Cooling/Dehumidification System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews dehumidification technologies appropriate for residential and commercial building applications with a focus on technologies and system configurations that allow dedicated dehumidification to complement other air conditioning systems, such as direct expansion. One such new technology was tested and is reported on here, the Munters DryCool HD, a small to medium central dehumidifier designed for integration into a ducted air conditioning system. This unit uses both Direct Expansion (DX) ...

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

Solar window collection and distribution module system. Final performance report  

SciTech Connect

The construction and monitoring of a solar window collection and distribution system are presented. One complete window module was purchased and assembled, including: the glass, the window frames, sealants, grills, vents and a mechanical damper device. Monitoring of the system operation was limited to measuring inside air temperature, outside air temperature, and circulation temperatures through the window module systems, as well as the actual tinted glass surface temperature. The system has produced a reduction in glare, fading of furniture, and control of solar gains to a building structure.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Instrumentation for Evaluating PV System Performance Losses from Snow: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes the use of a pyranometer with a heater and a digital camera to determine losses related to snow for PV systems located at National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Marion, B.; Rodriguez, J.; Pruett, J.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Benchmarking and Performance Based Rating System for Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and green building rating systems such as Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED-India) and Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment (GRIHA) have been the prime...

412

Characterizing I/O performance on leadership-class systems |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HPC production applications. Initially run at the IBM Blue Gene systems at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Darshan recently was adapted by Argonne researchers,...

413

Improving Pumping System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prepared for the DOE Industrial Technologies Program, this sourcebook contains the practical guidelines and information manufacturers need to improve the efficiency of their pumping systems.

Not Available

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Improving Motor and Drive System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry  

SciTech Connect

This is one in a series of sourcebooks to assist industrial personnel in understanding and optimizing motors and motor-driven systems

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Power Shape Monitoring System (PSMS), Volume 1: Overview and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 1 provides an overview of the first-generation power shape monitoring system (PSMS) for BWRs, which has been undergoing field testing at the Oyster Creek nuclear plant. The system's functional requirements and its hardware and software are described. The accuracy of the Oyster Creek PSMS is evaluated--specifically, its power prediction capabilities.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Toward a Performance/Resilience Tool for Hardware/Software Co-Design of High-Performance Computing Systems  

SciTech Connect

xSim is a simulation-based performance investigation toolkit that permits running high-performance computing (HPC) applications in a controlled environment with millions of concurrent execution threads, while observing application performance in a simulated extreme-scale system for hardware/software co-design. The presented work details newly developed features for xSim that permit the injection of MPI process failures, the propagation/detection/notification of such failures within the simulation, and their handling using application-level checkpoint/restart. These new capabilities enable the observation of application behavior and performance under failure within a simulated future-generation HPC system using the most common fault handling technique.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL] [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Voting Systems Performance and Test Standards: An Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). This overview serves as a companion document for understanding and interpreting both Volume I, the performance provisions of the Standards, and Volume II, the testing specifications. Background The program to develop) produced a joint report, Effective Use of Computing Technology in Vote Tallying. This report concluded

Rivest, Ronald L.

419

Toward Codesign in High Performance Computing Systems - 06386705...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

s f o r t h i s w o r k . 7 . R E F E R E N C E S 1 J . A n g e t a l . High Performance Computing: From Grids and Clouds to Exascale, c h a p t e r E x a s c a l e C o m p u...

420

Performance in Planning Smart Systems for the Access Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvements in system technologies continue apace with new developments in software methods arguably outstripping even the breakneck progress in hardware power described by Moores Law. The software developments are timely, ...

D. E. Asumu; J. Mellis

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Residential commissioning to assess envelope and HVAC system performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

qualitatively during air-sealing work to assess progresssealing or for separation of the supply and return systems at the airby poor sealing or seal failure during the test. Air leakage

Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Performance modeling of daylight integrated photosensor-controlled lighting systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some building energy codes now require the incorporation of daylight into buildings and automatic photosensor-controlled switching or dimming of the electric lighting system in areas that receive daylight. This paper describes enhancements to the open-source ...

Richard G. Mistrick; Craig A. Casey

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Performance and scalability evaluation of the Ceph parallel file system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceph is an emerging open-source parallel distributed file and storage system. By design, Ceph leverages unreliable commodity storage and network hardware, and provides reliability and fault-tolerance via controlled object placement and data replication. ...

Feiyi Wang, Mark Nelson, Sarp Oral, Scott Atchley, Sage Weil, Bradley W. Settlemyer, Blake Caldwell, Jason Hill

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Summary - Remedial System Performance Improvement for the 200...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plateau. The primary contaminant of concern (COC) is CT and to a lesser extent technetium-99 (Tc-99). The groundwater extraction system consists of ten wells with capacity of...

425

Optical Interconnections within Modern High-performance Computing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical technologies are ubiquitous in telecommunications networks and systems, providing multiple wave-length channels of transport at 2.5-10 Gbps data rates over single fiber-optic cables. Market pressures continue to drive the number of wavelength ...

Howard Davidson; Rick Lytel; Nyles Nettleton; Theresa Sze

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

System Advisor Model: Flat Plate Photovoltaic Performance Modeling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the technology and system design. To be accessible by the financial community, the impact of variations in energy yield must also flow through to financial metrics, such as the...

427

Performance Comparison of Residential Hot Water Systems; Period of Performance: January 30, 2001 through July 29, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A laboratory test experiment was conducted to measure the energy performance of two different types of water heaters--electric storage tank and demand (tankless)--in two types of plumbing distribution systems--copper piping in a tree configuration and cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) piping in a parallel configuration. Two water-usage patterns were used in the week-long experiments and in the annual simulations: one representing a high-usage home and the other representing a low-usage home. Results of weekly performance testing and annual simulations of electric water-heating systems are presented.

Wiehagen, J.; Sikora, J. L.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$ 3,422,994.00 $ 3,422,994.00 FY2011 4,445,142.00 $ FY2012 $ 5,021,951.68 FY2013 $ 3,501,670.00 FY2014 $0 FY2015 $0 FY2016 $0 FY2017 $0 FY2018 $0 FY2019 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $16,391,758 Wackenhut Services, Inc. DE-AC30-10CC60025 Contractor: Cost Plus Award Fee $989,000,000 Contract Period: Contract Type: January 2010 - December 2019 Contract Number: EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Contract Name: Comprehensive Security Services September 2013 Fee Information Maximum Fee $55,541,496 $5,204,095 $3,667,493 $5,041,415 Minimum Fee 0 Fee Available $5,428,947 $6,326,114

429

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15,763,807 Contractor: 93,591,118 Fee Available Contract Period: Contract Type: URSCH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) DE-SC-0004645 April 29, 2011 - July 13, 2016 Contract...

430

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fee September, 2013 Site: Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Contract Name: Operation of DUF6 Contractor: Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number:...

431

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

357,223 597,797 894,699 EM Contractor Fee Site: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Contract Name: SLAC Environmental Remediation December 2012 1,516,646 Fee Available...

432

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fee 0 May 2011 - September 2015 June 2013 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Idaho Treatment Group LLC DE-EM0001467 Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Information 419,202,975...

433

Proposed guidelines for reporting performance of a solar dish/Stirling electric generation system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental performance data from dish/Stirling system testing can be analyzed to generate a system performance model. An approach to developing an experimentally based performance model of a dish/Stirling system is given. Two methods for analyzing the experimental data are described. To provide information that will permit comparison of dish/Stirling systems, it is necessary to define many of the details involved in calculating system performance data such as the net system output and system solar-to-electric efficiency. This paper describes a set of guidelines for these calculations, based on past experience, especially with the Vanguard dish/Stirling system. Also presented are a set of rating conditions at which a maximum value for system efficiency can be calculated. Comparison between systems of their rated peak solar-to-electric efficiency is made possible when these rating conditions are in common use by manufacturers and testing agencies.

Stine, W.B. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (US). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Powell, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management System Requirements Document More Documents & Publications Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 FY 2007 Total...

435

BLACK-BOX MODELLING OF HVAC SYSTEM: IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCES OF NEURAL NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK-BOX MODELLING OF HVAC SYSTEM: IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCES OF NEURAL NETWORKS Eric FOCK Ile de La Réunion - FRANCE ABSTRACT This paper deals with neural networks modelling of HVAC systems of HVAC system can be modelled using manufacturer design data presented as derived performance maps

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

436

Scientific data services: a high-performance I/O system with array semantics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As high-performance computing approaches exascale, the existing I/O system design is having trouble keeping pace in both performance and scalability. We propose to address this challenge by adopting database principles and techniques in parallel I/O ... Keywords: data services, database systems, file systems

Kesheng Wu; Surendra Byna; Doron Rotem; Arie Shoshani

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

High-Performance Interconnects and Computing Systems: Quantitative Studies A thesis submitted to the Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. To measure and to predict the performance of parallel computer systems, parallel benchmarks are designedHigh-Performance Interconnects and Computing Systems: Quantitative Studies By Ying Qian A thesis characteristics, parallel programming paradigms used by the applications, and the machine system's architecture

Afsahi, Ahmad

438

Performance Requirements for Tools for Live Work on HVDC Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research on tools for live work (LW) that may be used for work on live high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) lines. There is very little detailed information on the performance of these tools when used on HVDC lines because these tools were initially developed for use on AC lines. This report is an account of EPRIs continuing research to fill this knowledge gap.BackgroundThe principles of DC LW and fiberglass reinforced ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

Java Performance for Scientific Applications on LLNL Computer Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Languages in use for high performance computing at the laboratory--Fortran (f77 and f90), C, and C++--have many years of development behind them and are generally considered the fastest available. However, Fortran and C do not readily extend to object-oriented programming models, limiting their capability for very complex simulation software. C++ facilitates object-oriented programming but is a very complex and error-prone language. Java offers a number of capabilities that these other languages do not. For instance it implements cleaner (i.e., easier to use and less prone to errors) object-oriented models than C++. It also offers networking and security as part of the language standard, and cross-platform executables that make it architecture neutral, to name a few. These features have made Java very popular for industrial computing applications. The aim of this paper is to explain the trade-offs in using Java for large-scale scientific applications at LLNL. Despite its advantages, the computational science community has been reluctant to write large-scale computationally intensive applications in Java due to concerns over its poor performance. However, considerable progress has been made over the last several years. The Java Grande Forum [1] has been promoting the use of Java for large-scale computing. Members have introduced efficient array libraries, developed fast just-in-time (JIT) compilers, and built links to existing packages used in high performance parallel computing.

Kapfer, C; Wissink, A

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

440

Debris Removal Project K West Canister Cleaning System Performance Specification  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 2,300 metric tons Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are currently stored within two water filled pools, the 105 K East (KE) fuel storage basin and the 105 K West (KW) fuel storage basin, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The SNF Project is responsible for operation of the K Basins and for the materials within them. A subproject to the SNF Project is the Debris Removal Subproject, which is responsible for removal of empty canisters and lids from the basins. Design criteria for a Canister Cleaning System to be installed in the KW Basin. This documents the requirements for design and installation of the system.

FARWICK, C.C.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Corrosion performance of materials for advanced combustion systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that utilize coal as a feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces capable of operating at much higher temperatures than those in current coal-fired power plants. The combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments requires development and application of advanced ceramic materials for heat exchangers in these designs. This paper characterizes the chemistry of coal-fired combustion environments over the wide temperature range of interest in these systems and discusses some of the experimental results for several materials obtained from laboratory tests and from exposures in a pilot-scale facility.

Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Freeman, M.; Mathur, M. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Predictability of the Performance of an Ensemble Forecast System: Predictability of the Space of Uncertainties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of an ensemble prediction system is inherently flow dependent. This paper investigates the flow dependence of the ensemble performance with the help of linear diagnostics applied to the ensemble perturbations in a small local ...

Elizabeth Satterfield; Istvan Szunyogh

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Safety, visibility, and performance in a wide-area file system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As mobile clients travel, their costs to reach home filing services change, with serious performance implications. Current file systems mask these performance problems by reducing the safety of updates, their visibility, or both. This is the result of ...

Minkyong Kim; Landon P. Cox; Brian D. Noble

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The effect of expansion-ratio limitations on positive-displacement, total-flow geothermal power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined steam-turbine/positive-displacement engine (PDE) geothermal power systems are analyzed thermodynamically and compared with optimized reference flash-steam plants. Three different configurations of combined systems are considered. Treated separately are the cases of self-flowing and pumped wells. Two strategies are investigated that help overcome the inherent expansion-ratio limitation of PDE's: pre-flashing and pre-mixing. Parametrically-obtained results show the required minimum PDE efficiency for the combined system to match the reference plant for various sets of design conditions.

DiPippo, R.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Measured Performance of California Buydown Program Residential PV Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, on average, 62 percent of nominal DC module size. For non-tracking systems, average annual energy production annual energy production per unit of nominal DC module size is approximately 1,100 kWh/year. Both Economic Research, Inc. Sanford Miller, California Energy Commission ABSTRACT More than two thousand small

446

IR System Evaluation Why do we perform evaluation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fallout = b / (b+d) = F Generality = (a+c) / (a+ b + c +d) = G GR/[GR+(1-G)F] = [(a+c)/(a+ b + c +d precision after having retrieved v ranks Fv fallout after having retrieved v ranks Commonly used measure .167 R .5 .75 1 Rnorm Interpretation: How much better is the system compared to worst case (Fallout

Raghavan, Vijay

447

Packaged residential active-solar space-conditioning system. Appendix E. System performance monitoring. Final subcontract report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the testing of four solar space heating systems that had cost and performance characteristics equalling or exceeding competing conventional heating systems. Design concepts for these systems were solicited from the solar industry and field tested by Vitro Corporation. The designers of the four prototype systems were: Calmac Manufacturing Corporation, Contemporary Systems, Inc., Honeywell Inc., and Trident Energy Systems. Vitro Corporation reports the results of field test performance for the four packaged space heating systems. Their review presents the primary performance factors for all systems, comparing them to the best National Solar Data Network (NSDN) space heating systems. Performance factors evaluated and reported on were: collection subsystem efficiency, collector array operational efficiency, percentage of incident solar delivered to loads, collector coefficients of performance, system coefficients of performance, percent collected solar to load, and solar energy to loads/ft/sup 2/ collector/day. The data indicate that these packaged space heating systems compare well with the most recent National Solar Data Network systems.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Performance Evaluation of Standby Safety Systems Due to Independent and Common Cause Failures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the safety systems in Cana- dian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) [2] to be 10-3 . When Two (SDS2), in CANDU NPPs, both of which adopt 2-out-of-3 systems but use totally different mechanisms-out-of-3 and 2- out-of-4 systems. 1) 2-out-of-3 System: In CANDU NPPs, there are ten reactor

Lewis, Greg

449

Handling Overload Conditions In High Performance Trustworthy Information Retrieval Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web search engines retrieve a vast amount of information for a given search query. But the user needs only trustworthy and high-quality information from this vast retrieved data. The response time of the search engine must be a minimum value in order to satisfy the user. An optimum level of response time should be maintained even when the system is overloaded. This paper proposes an optimal Load Shedding algorithm which is used to handle overload conditions in real-time data stream applications and is adapted to the Information Retrieval System of a web search engine. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm enables a web search engine to provide trustworthy search results to the user within an optimum response time, even during overload conditions.

Ramachandran, Sumalatha; Paulraj, Sujaya; Ramaraj, Vetriselvi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450