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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

2

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

3

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

4

Total Quality Commissioning for HVAC Systems to Assure High Performance Throughout the Whole Life Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOTAL QUALITY COMMISSIONING FOR HVAC SYSTEMS TO ASSURE HIGH PERFORMANCE THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE LIFE CYCLE By: Grahame E. Maisey, P.E., and Beverly Milestone, LEED AP Building Services Consultants INTRODUCTION Current HVAC systems... are not coming close to approaching life cycle performance expectations for energy, operation and maintenance, occupant comfort and productivity and longevity. HVAC systems in buildings claiming to be sustainable, with integrated, energy conscious design...

Maisey, G.; Milestone, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A comparative application of the Repository Integration Program (RIP) to Total System Performance Assessment, 1991  

SciTech Connect

During Fiscal Year (FY) 1991 and FY 1992, Sandia National Laboratory and Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory were assigned the responsibility to generate initial Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) of the Yucca Mountain site. The analyses performed by these organizations (called TSPA-1991) are reported in Barnard et al(1992) and Eslinger et al. (1993). During this same time period, Golder Associates Inc. was assigned the task of generating a model capable of analyzing the total system performance of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The developed model, called Repository Integration Program (RIP), is documented in Kossik and Hachey (1993), Miller et al. (1993), and Golder Associates Inc. (1993). In FY 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of TSPA-2. Prior to initiating the next TSPA iteration, it was decided that it would be valuable to evaluate the applicability of RIP for use in this iteration. Therefore, analyses were conducted to compare the results generated by RIP to those reported in TSPA-1991. In particular, the aim was to generate a RIP input data set as equivalent as possible to that documented in Barnard et al. (1992) and to analyze the total system performance (as well as the performance of the individual subsystem components of the waste package/Engineered Barrier System (EBS), unsaturated gaseous flow and transport, unsaturated aqueous flow and transport, saturated flow and transport, and disruptive processes/events). The performance measure for comparison with the results of TSPA-1991 is the cumulative release of radionuclides to the accessible environment over a 10,000-year period following closure normalized to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) release limits specified in 40 CFR 191.

NONE

1993-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Jeff Tappen; M.A. Wasiolek; D.W. Wu; J.F. Schmitt

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

9

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Tappen, J. J.; Wasiolek, M. A.; Wu, D. W.; Schmitt, J. F.; Smith, A. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

10

USE OF ONE-ON ANALYSIS TO EVALUATE TOTAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of analyses of the hypothetical performance of the various configurations of selected natural and engineered elements of the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear-waste repository. These analyses were conducted upon the recommendation of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (NWTRB) regarding an alternative approach to investigate the identified natural and engineered barriers and associated processes with respect to the postclosure performance of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The analyses were conducted per Technical Work Plan (TWP) TWP-MGR-PA-000011 REV 00, Section 3.2.4, Task 2, which states that the task involves ''Identification of barriers that are important to repository performance:'' by means of ''one-on'' analyses to gain a better understanding of repository performance relative to previously identified barriers.'' The ''One-on Analysis'' was performed per Administrative Procedure AP-SIII.9Q. The NWTRB previously reviewed similar analyses conducted by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) (EPRI 2002 [158069]). The approach of the investigation was to simulate the hypothetical performance of the repository after an arbitrarily chosen successive addition of each of the selected natural and engineered barrier components and associated processes that provide for the overall safety of the repository. Because the repository system will behave as an integrated system, the combined interaction of all the processes and barriers identified in this report will provide the ultimate repository performance as indicated in various performance-assessment analyses for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) M&O 2000 [153246]; Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2001 [155950]; and Williams 2001 [157307]. The analyses presented in this report should not be construed as an indication, for the chosen additive sequence, of the relative importance on any one barrier or process. Rather, the results of these analyses provide an indication of the relative performance of those barriers and processes and an understanding of their contribution to the overall performance of the proposed repository system. The analyses in this report considered the nominal-performance scenario only, and did not address performance following unlikely disruptive events (e.g., volcanic activity) (10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 63.342).

G.J. Saulnier Jr.

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

11

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

12

Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process Final Report December 2001 This document is not an official copy and is for informational purposes only. CONTENTS Summary Objectives International perspective Recommendations for future assessments 1 Introduction 1.1 Background to the Yucca Mountain Project 1.2 Terms of reference, objectives and scope of the review 1.3 Conduct of the review 1.4 Organisation of this report 2 General Considerations 2.1 Regulatory perspective 2.2 Performance assessment rationale 2.3 General approach to performance assessment 2.4 Documentation 3 Sub-system methodology 3.1 Repository design

13

Overview of total system model used for the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A summary is presented for the total system model used to represent physical processes associated with the seven scenario classes (i.e., nominal conditions, early waste package (WP) failure, early drip shield (DS) failure, igneous intrusive events, igneous eruptive events, seismic ground motion events and seismic fault displacement events) considered in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The total system model estimates dose to an exposed individual resulting from radionuclide movement through the repository system and biosphere. Components of the total system model described in this presentation include models for (i) climate analysis, (ii) land surface infiltration and associated unsaturated zone flow, (iii) multi-scale thermal hydrology and engineered barrier system (EBS) thermal–hydrologic environment, (iv) EBS physical and chemical environment, (v) WP and DS degradation, (vi) drift seepage and drift wall condensation, (vii) waste form degradation and mobilization, (viii) water and radionuclide movement in the EBS and underlying unsaturated and saturated zones, (ix) radionuclide movement in the biosphere and resultant human exposure, and (x) processes specific to early WP and DS failures, intrusive and eruptive igneous events, and seismic ground motion and fault displacement events.

C.W. Hansen; J.T. Birkholzer; J. Blink; C.R. Bryan; Y. Chen; M.B. Gross; E. Hardin; J. Houseworth; R. Howard; R. Jarek; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P. Mariner; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; F.V. Perry; B. Robinson; D. Sassani; S.D. Sevougian; J.S. Stein; M. Wasiolek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Total solar house description and performance  

SciTech Connect

The initial attempt to apply the Total Solar concept to a residence in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, area is described. A very large storage capacity has made it possible to use only solar energy for meeting the heating, cooling and hot water needs for the entire year, with a parasitic power penalty of about 3500 kWh. Winter temperatures were maintained at 68/sup 0/F with 60/sup 0/F night setback, summer at 76/sup 0/F. Occupant intervention was negligible and passive overheat was minimized. The extra cost for the system, approximately $30,000 is readily amortized by the savings in purchased energy.

Starobin, L. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia); Starobin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

16

Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 01 $4,547,400 FY2002 $4,871,000 FY2003 $6,177,902 FY2004 $8,743,007 FY2005 $13,134,189 FY2006 $7,489,704 FY2007 $9,090,924 FY2008 $10,045,072 FY2009 $12,504,247 FY2010 $17,590,414 FY2011 $17,558,710 FY2012 $14,528,770 Cumulative Fee Paid $126,281,339 Cost Plus Award Fee DE-AC29-01AL66444 Washington TRU Solutions LLC Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: $8,743,007 Contract Period: $1,813,482,000 Fee Information Maximum Fee $131,691,744 Total Estimated Contract Cost: $4,547,400 $4,871,000 $6,177,902 October 2000 - September 2012 Minimum Fee $0 Fee Available EM Contractor Fee Site: Carlsbad Field Office - Carlsbad, NM Contract Name: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operations March 2013 $13,196,690 $9,262,042 $10,064,940 $14,828,770 $12,348,558 $12,204,247 $17,590,414 $17,856,774

17

Performance Tested Comfort Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales Allocation Tool...

18

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

19

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

20

Total Pollution Effect and Total Energy Cost per Output of Different Products for Polish Industrial System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years a broad use has been made of the indices of total energy requirements in the whole large production system corresponding to unit output of particular goods (Boustead I., Hancock G.F., 1979). The...

Henryk W. Balandynowicz

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

22

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

23

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

24

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

25

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

26

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

27

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

28

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

29

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

30

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

31

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

32

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

33

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

34

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

35

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

36

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

37

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

38

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

39

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

40

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

42

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

43

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

44

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

45

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

46

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

47

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

48

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

49

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

50

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

51

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

52

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

53

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

54

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

55

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

56

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

57

Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effective System Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark It is now generally recognized in the high performance computing community that peak performance does not adequately predict the usefulness of a system for a given set of applications. One of the first benchmarks designed to measure system performance in a real-world operational environment was NERSC's Effective System Performance (ESP) test. NERSC introduced ESP in 1999 with the hope that this test would be of use to system managers and would help to spur the community (both researchers and vendors) to improve system efficiency. The discussion below uses examples from the Cray T3E system that NERSC was operating in 1999. Improved MPP System Efficiency Equals Million-Dollar Savings

58

H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) (a) Total Compensation System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) (a) Total Compensation System The Contractor shall develop, implement and maintain formal policies, practices and procedures to be used in the administration of its compensation system consistent with FAR 31.205-6 and DEAR 970.3102-05-6; "Compensation for Personal Services" ("Total Compensation System"). DOE-approved standards, if any, shall be applied to the Total Compensation System. The Contractor's Total Compensation System shall be fully documented, consistently applied, and acceptable to the Contracting Officer. Periodic appraisals of contractor performance with respect to the Contractors' Total Compensation System will be conducted. (1) The description of the Contractor Employee Compensation Program should

59

Monitoring System Performance (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Requirements for a standard test to rate the durability of photovoltaic (PV) modules at system voltage are discussed.

Emery, K.; Smith, R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

OMEGA Extended Performance Laser System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at UR-LLE is close to that required for ignition to occur. #12;The OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) laserOMEGA Extended Performance Laser System R. L. McCrory University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser­18 February 2008 #12;OMEGA Extended Performance Laser System R.L. McCrory Laboratory for Laser Energetics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Optimizing performance of energy systems  

SciTech Connect

This book discusses optimizing performance of energy systems. Topics covered include a test station, heat flow integrator, microcomputer control of MIMIC operation, and microcomputer control of simulation operation.

Stricker, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Session 6: Systems operational performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three contributions were presented in this session: Tune and Orbit Feedbacks Performances: A User Perspective by Laurette Ponce , Beam Instrumentation Performance Overview by Mariusz Sapinski and LHC RF 2011 and beyond by Philippe Baudrenghien . This contribution recapitulates the outlooks given for 2012, the points to be followed up and the discussions originating in the “Systems Operational Performance” session.

Holzer, E B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

SES Performance Management System Plan Training | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management System Plan Training SES Performance Management System Plan Training Overview of the DOE SES Performance Management System. Senior Executive Service Performance...

64

A steady-state measurement system for total hemispherical emissivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A steady-state calorimetric technique was developed for measuring the total hemispherical emissivity of a conductive material. The system uses a thin strip of the conductive sample electrically heated by alternating current to high temperatures in a vacuum chamber. The emissivity was measured in a central region of the sample with an approximately uniform temperature distribution. Considering the influences of the gray body assumption, wire heat losses, effects of residual gas and conductive heat loss from the region to the rest of the strip, the emissivity was accurately determined by solving the inverse one-dimension steady-state heat transfer problem. The emissivities of various metal samples (nickel and 45# steel) were measured to verify the system accuracy. And the results were then analyzed to estimate the relative errors of emissivity arising from the gray body assumption, wire heat losses, effects of residual gas, non-uniform temperature distribution and the measurement uncertainty of emissivity. In the temperature range from 700 to 1300 K, the accuracy is acceptable for practical applications within the total measurement uncertainties of 1.1%. To increase the system applicability, some issues related to sample specifications, heating power control and temperature uniformity of sample test section were discussed. Thus, this system can provide accurate measurements of the total hemispherical emissivity of conductive samples at high temperatures.

Tairan Fu; Peng Tan; Chuanhe Pang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Sustained System Performance (SSP) Benchmark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustained System Sustained System Performance (SSP) Benchmark Sustained System Performance (SSP) Benchmark William T.C. Kramer, John M. Shalf, and Erich Strohmaier Background The NERSC Approach to Procurement Benchmarks The NERSC-5 SSP The NERSC-6 SSP The Effective System Performance (ESP) Metric Conclusion Notes Formal description of SSP A formal description of the SSP, including detailed formulae, is now available. This is a portion of the soon-to-be-published Ph.D. dissertation, Kramer, W.T.C., 2008, "PERCU: A Holistic Method for Evaluating High End Computing Systems," Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley. Background Most plans and reports recently discuss only one of four distinct purposes benchmarks are used. The obvious purpose is selection of a system from

66

Predicting System Performance with Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inexpensive way. We propose using Gaussian Processes for system performance predictions and explain the types of uncertainties included. As an example, we use a Gaussian Process to predict chilled water use and compare the results with Neural Network...

Yan, B.; Malkawi, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive...

68

Engineered Barrier System performance requirements systems study report. Revision 02  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the current design concept for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), in concert with the current understanding of the geologic setting to assess whether enhancements to the required performance of the EBS are necessary. The performance assessment calculations are performed by coupling the EBS with the geologic setting based on the models (some of which were updated for this study) and assumptions used for the 1995 Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The need for enhancements is determined by comparing the performance assessment results against the EBS related performance requirements. Subsystem quantitative performance requirements related to the EBS include the requirement to allow no more than 1% of the waste packages (WPs) to fail before 1,000 years after permanent closure of the repository, as well as a requirement to control the release rate of radionuclides from the EBS. The EBS performance enhancements considered included additional engineered components as well as evaluating additional performance available from existing design features but for which no performance credit is currently being taken.

Balady, M.A.

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

69

Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

systems performance studies - HIL components testing Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

70

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

71

RHIC BPM SYSTEM MODIFICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE.  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC beam position monitor (BPM) system provides independent average orbit and turn-by-turn (TBT) position measurements. In each ring, there are 162 measurement locations per plane (horizontal and vertical) for a total of 648 BPM planes in the RHIC machine. During 2003 and 2004 shutdowns, BPM processing electronics were moved from the RHIC tunnel to controls alcoves to reduce radiation impact, and the analog signal paths of several dozen modules were modified to eliminate gain-switching relays and improve signal stability. This paper presents results of improved system performance, including stability for interaction region beam-based alignment efforts. We also summarize performance of recently-added DSP profile scan capability, and improved million-turn TBT acquisition channels for 10 Hz triplet vibration, nonlinear dynamics, and echo studies.

SATOGATA, T.; CALAGA, R.; CAMERON, P.; ET AL.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

72

SGDP Storage System Performance Supplement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Energy Storage Projects Update Conference - DOE 2010 Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) November 3, 2010 Presenter: Jacquelyn Bean Organization: DOE-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through National Energy Technology Laboratory 1 Background 2 Metrics and Benefits Data Flow 3 Contact Information Table of Contents 1 4 Appendix NETL's role in SGDP metrics and benefits reporting 2 NETL Energy Delivery Technologies Division SGDP Technical Project Officers (TPOs) SGDP Principal Investigators (PIs) Project Management and Performance Data Analysis NETL Project Management Center's Analysis & Support Team Data Analysis Team (DAT) Lead Contractors: Booz Allen

73

Relationship of the HACCP system to Total Quality Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Webster’s Dictionary (1989) defines quality as ‘a degree of excellence or superiority in kind’. The American Society for Quality Control (ASQC, 1987) specifies that quality is ‘the totality of feat...

N. B. Webb; J. L. Marsden

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

THE TOTAL PETROLEUM SYSTEM--THE NATURAL FLUID NETWORK THAT CONSTRAINS THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PS THE TOTAL PETROLEUM SYSTEM--THE NATURAL FLUID NETWORK THAT CONSTRAINS THE ASSESSMENT Survey Click here or on this symbol in the toolbar to return. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WORLD PETROLEUM.................................................................................................................PS-2 Total Petroleum System

Laughlin, Robert B.

75

Performance Assessment Report Domain CHP System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance Assessment Report for the Domain CHP System November 2005 By Burns & McDonnell Engineering #12;Domain CHP System Performance Assessment Report for the Packaged Cooling, Heating and Power

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

76

Thermal and lighting performance of toplighting systems in the hot and humid climate of Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance of three toplighting systems were compared. For the thermal performance, total cooling loads, heat gains and losses, and interior temperature were evaluated. The lighting performance parameters examined were daylight factor, illuminance level...

Harntaweewongsa, Siritip

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Solar Resource and PV Systems Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Resource and PV Systems Performance at Selected Test Sites Prepared for the U.S. Department Subtask 11.1 Deliverables 2 and 4: Report on Solar Resource and PV Systems Performance at Selected Test agency thereof. #12;1 Solar Resource and PV Systems Performance at Selected Test Sites Contents 1

78

Total Measurement Uncertainty for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Segmented Gamma Scan Assay System  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an evaluation of the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) for the Canberra manufactured Segmented Gamma Scanner Assay System (SGSAS) as employed at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In this document, TMU embodies the combined uncertainties due to all of the individual random and systematic sources of measurement uncertainty. It includes uncertainties arising from corrections and factors applied to the analysis of transuranic waste to compensate for inhomogeneities and interferences from the waste matrix and radioactive components. These include uncertainty components for any assumptions contained in the calibration of the system or computation of the data. Uncertainties are propagated at 1 sigma. The final total measurement uncertainty value is reported at the 95% confidence level. The SGSAS is a gamma assay system that is used to assay plutonium and uranium waste. The SGSAS system can be used in a stand-alone mode to perform the NDA characterization of a container, particularly for low to medium density (0-2.5 g/cc) container matrices. The SGSAS system provides a full gamma characterization of the container content. This document is an edited version of the Rocky Flats TMU Report for the Can Scan Segment Gamma Scanners, which are in use for the plutonium residues projects at the Rocky Flats plant. The can scan segmented gamma scanners at Rocky Flats are the same design as the PFP SGSAS system and use the same software (with the exception of the plutonium isotopics software). Therefore, all performance characteristics are expected to be similar. Modifications in this document reflect minor differences in the system configuration, container packaging, calibration technique, etc. These results are supported by the Quality Assurance Objective (QAO) counts, safeguards test data, calibration data, etc. for the PFP SGSAS system. Other parts of the TMU analysis utilize various modeling techniques such as Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) and In Situ Object Counting Software (ISOCS).

WESTSIK, G.A.

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

79

An Adaptive Tree Code for Computing Total Potential Energy in Classical Molecular Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Adaptive Tree Code for Computing Total Potential Energy in Classical Molecular Systems Zhong, 2000 Abstract A tree code algorithm is presented for rapid computation of the total potential energy are presented for a variety of systems. Keywords: adaptive tree code; total potential energy; nonbonded

Duan, Zhong-Hui

80

Shared performance monitor in a multiprocessor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A performance monitoring unit (PMU) and method for monitoring performance of events occurring in a multiprocessor system. The multiprocessor system comprises a plurality of processor devices units, each processor device for generating signals representing occurrences of events in the processor device, and, a single shared counter resource for performance monitoring. The performance monitor unit is shared by all processor cores in the multiprocessor system. The PMU is further programmed to monitor event signals issued from non-processor devices.

Chiu, George; Gara, Alan G; Salapura, Valentina

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Waterflood control system for maximizing total oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system and method for determining optimal fluid injection pressure is based upon a model of a growing hydrofracture due to waterflood injection pressure. This model is used to develop a control system optimizing the injection pressure by using a prescribed injection goal coupled with the historical times, pressures, and volume of injected fluid at a single well. In this control method, the historical data is used to derive two major flow components: the transitional component, where cumulative injection volume is scaled as the square root of time, and a steady-state breakthrough component, which scales linearly with respect to time. These components provide diagnostic information and allow for the prevention of rapid fracture growth and associated massive water break through that is an important part of a successful waterflood, thereby extending the life of both injection and associated production wells in waterflood secondary oil recovery operations.

Patzek, Tadeusz Wiktor (Oakland, CA); Silin, Dimitriy Borisovich (Pleasant Hill, CA); De, Asoke Kumar (San Jose, CA)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

82

Photovoltaic System Performance Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Performance Basics System Performance Basics Photovoltaic System Performance Basics August 20, 2013 - 4:17pm Addthis Photovoltaic (PV) systems are usually composed of numerous solar arrays, which in turn, are composed of numerous PV cells. The performance of the system is therefore dependent on the performance of its components. Reliability The reliability of PV arrays is an important factor in the cost of PV systems and in consumer acceptance. However, the building blocks of arrays, PV cells, are considered "solid-state" devices with no moving parts and, therefore, are highly reliable and long-lived. Therefore, reliability measurements of PV systems are usually focused not on cells but on modules and whole systems. Reliability can be improved through fault-tolerant circuit design, which

83

Traffic Management System Performance November 11, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traffic Management System Performance November 11, 2002 David Levinson1 Wei Chen2 Department uses regression analysis to evaluate long-run traffic management system performance. Three important traffic management systems in the Twin Cities metro area - Ramp Metering, Variable Message Signs (VMS

Levinson, David M.

84

SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transformational Approach to Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Digg

85

INTEGRATED WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the results of an evaluation of the current Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) operation against design performance and a determination of short term and long term actions recommended to sustain IWTS performance.

SEXTON RA; MEEUWSEN WE

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

86

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Pholtovoltaic System Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pholtovoltaic System Performance Data Photo looking north-northwest at solar panels aligned in rows on the roof of a commercial building. The Terry Sanford Federal Building in...

87

Performance estimates for personnel access control systems  

SciTech Connect

Current performance estimates for personnel access control systems use estimates of Type I and Type II verification errors. A system performance equation which addresses normal operation, the insider, and outside adversary attack is developed. Examination of this equation reveals the inadequacy of classical Type I and II error evaluations which require detailed knowledge of the adversary threat scenario for each specific installation. Consequently, new performance measures which are consistent with the performance equation and independent of the threat are developed as an aid in selecting personnel access control systems.

Bradley, R. G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

AGILA: The Ateneo High Performance Computing System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Beowulf cluster is a low-cost parallel high performance computing system that uses commodity hardware components such as personal computers and standard Ethernet adapters and switches and runs on freely available software such as Linux and LAM-MPI. In this paper the development of the AGILA HPCS, which stands for the Ateneo GigaflopsRange Performance, Linux OS, and Athlon Processors High Performance Computing System, is discussed including its hardware and software configurations and performance evaluation. Keywords High-performance computing, commodity cluster computing, parallel computing, Beowulf-class cluster 1.

Rafael Salda Na; Felix P. Muga Ii; Jerrold J. Garcia; William Emmanuel; S. Yu

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from of work done by the field, W*= -W. Bring q1 from , W *= 0 since no electric F yet #12;Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from the work done by an external

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

90

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

91

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 2007 total system life cycle cost estimate includes the cost to research, construct and operate Yucca Mountain during a period of 150 years, from the beginning of the program in 1983 through closure and decommissioning in 2133. The new cost estimate of $79.3 billion, when updated to 2007 dollars comes to $96.2 billion, a 38 percent

92

High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-performance computer system installed at Lab High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory New high-performance computer system, called Wolf,...

93

Total Rewards At PNNL, we believe it's important to recognize and reward employee performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

essential to fulfilling our vision and mission. Total Rewards is PNNL's investment in you. It includes that our salaries are both externally competitive and internally equitable. Rewards & Recognition: In order with financial protection, up to $500,000, a

94

AGILA: The Ateneo High Performance Computing System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Beowulf cluster is a low-cost parallel high performance computing system that uses commodity hardware components such as personal computers and standard Ethernet adapters and switches and runs on freely available software such as Linux and LAM-MPI. In this paper the development of the AGILA HPCS, which stands for the Ateneo GigaflopsRange Performance, Linux OS, and Athlon Processors High Performance Computing System, is discussed including its hardware and software configurations and performance evaluation. Keywords High-performance computing, commodity cluster computing, parallel computing, Beowulf-class cluster 1. INTRODUCTION In the Philippines today, computing power in the range of gigaflops is not generally available for use in research and development. Conventional supercomputers or high performance computing systems are very expensive and are beyond the budgets of most university research groups especially in developing countries such as the Philippines. A lower cost option...

Rafael P. Saldaña; Felix P. Muga; II; Jerrold J. Garcia; William Emmanuel S. Yu; S. Yu

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Delivered Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Delivered Performance Predictions and Trends for RISC Applications Luke Cico (lcico@mc.com) Mark Merritt (mmerritt@mc.com) Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Chelmsford, MA 01824 #12;© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Goals of PresentationGoals of Presentation

Kepner, Jeremy

96

SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LBNL-47622 SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE Walker, I., Siegel, J ..................................................... 9 #12;3 ABSTRACT In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside of the simulations is that they are dynamic - which accounts for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect

97

Designing the lean enterprise performance measurement system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research contained in this thesis explores design attributes of the enterprise performance measurement system required for the transformation to the lean enterprise and its management. Arguments are made from the ...

Mahidhar, Vikram

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Performance evaluation of multiagent systems: communication criterion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many MultiAgent Systems (MAS) have been developed in various application domains such as computer networks, Internet, industrial applications, automation, process control, air traffic, robotic, simulation, etc. In spite of the rapid growth of the international ... Keywords: communication, graph theory, measurement, methodology, multiagent systems, performance evaluation

Faten Ben Hmida; Wided Lejouad Chaari; Moncef Tagina

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Co-simulation for performance prediction of integrated building and HVAC systems -An analysis of solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Co-simulation for performance prediction of integrated building and HVAC systems - An analysis performance simulation of buildings and heating, ventilation and air- conditioning (HVAC) systems can help, heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are responsible for 10%-60% of the total building

100

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement Improved System Performance and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

VERIFICATION OF THE TRIMBLE UNIVERSAL TOTAL STATION (UTS) PERFORMANCE FOR KINEMATIC APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

passive and active targets. The integrated EDM is a time-of-flight measuring system with two different channels. This technique removes measurement gaps during the EDM calibration routine. A third subsystem for the automatic target recognition and trace. Such verification is the fundamental key to machine control

102

Performances of photovoltaic water pumping systems: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a mathematical motor-pump model for photovoltaic (PV) applications which allow us to contribute in the studies of PV pumping sizing. The modelled motor-pump characteristic is flow rate-power (Q, P). The model is established for centrifugal pump (CP) coupled to DC motor. The non-linear relation between flow rate and solar power has been obtained experimentally in a first step and then used for performance prediction. The model proposed enabled us to simulate the electric and hydraulic performances of CP pumps versus the total water heads for different PV array configuration. The experimental data are obtained with our pumping test facility. The performances are calculated using the measured meteorological data of different sites located in Saudi Arabia. The size of the PV array is varied to achieve the optimum performance of the proposed system.

M. Benghanem

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Forced Air Systems in High Performance Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS IN FORCED AIR SYSTEMS IN HIGH PERFORMANCE HOMES Iain Walker (LBNL) Building America Meeting 2013 What are the issues? 1. Sizing  When is too small too small? 2. Distribution  Can we get good mixing at low flow? 3. Performance  Humidity Control  Part load efficiency  Blowers & thermal losses Sizing  Part-load - not an issue with modern equipment  Careful about predicted loads - a small error becomes a big problem for tightly sized systems  Too Low Capacity = not robust  Extreme vs. design days  Change in occupancy  Party mode  Recovery from setback Sizing  Conventional wisdom - a good envelope = easy to predict and not sensitive to indoor conditions  But..... Heating and cooling become discretionary - large variability depending on occupants

104

Coupled robot-flow injection analysis system for fully automated determination of total polyphenols in olive oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coupled robot-flow injection analysis system for fully automated determination of total polyphenols in olive oil ...

Jose A. Garcia-Mesa; M. Dolores Luque de Castro; Miguel Valcarcel

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Modeling Topaz-II system performance  

SciTech Connect

The US acquisition of the Topaz-11 in-core thermionic space reactor test system from Russia provides a good opportunity to perform a comparison of the Russian reported data and the results from computer codes such as MCNP (Ref. 3) and TFEHX (Ref. 4). The comparison study includes both neutronic and thermionic performance analyses. The Topaz II thermionic reactor is modeled with MCNP using actual Russian dimensions and parameters. The computation of the neutronic performance considers several important aspects such as the fuel enrichment and location of the thermionic fuel elements (TFES) in the reactor core. The neutronic analysis included the calculation of both radial and axial power distribution, which are then used in the TFEHX code for electrical performance. The reactor modeled consists of 37 single-cell TFEs distributed in a 13-cm-radius zirconium hydride block surrounded by 8 cm of beryllium metal reflector. The TFEs use 90% enriched [sup 235]U and molybdenum coated with a thin layer of [sup 184]W for emitter surface. Electrons emitted are captured by a collector surface with a gap filled with cesium vapor between the collector and emitter surfaces. The collector surface is electrically insulated with alumina. Liquid NaK provides the cooling system for the TFEs. The axial thermal power distribution is obtained by dividing the TFE into 40 axial nodes. Comparison of the true axial power distribution with that produced by electrical heaters was also performed.

Lee, H.H.; Klein, A.C. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

Even though new homes constructed with hydronic heat comprise only 3% of the market (US Census Bureau 2009), of the 115 million existing homes in the United States, almost 14 million of those homes (11%) are heated with steam or hot water systems according to 2009 US Census data. Therefore, improvements in hydronic system performance could result in significant energy savings in the US. When operating properly, the combination of a gas-fired condensing boiler with baseboard convectors and an indirect water heater is a viable option for high-efficiency residential space heating in cold climates. Based on previous research efforts, however, it is apparent that these types of systems are typically not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency. Furthermore, guidance on proper design and commissioning for heating contractors and energy consultants is hard to find and is not comprehensive. Through modeling and monitoring, CARB sought to determine the optimal combination(s) of components - pumps, high efficiency heat sources, plumbing configurations and controls - that result in the highest overall efficiency for a hydronic system when baseboard convectors are used as the heat emitter. The impact of variable-speed pumps on energy use and system performance was also investigated along with the effects of various control strategies and the introduction of thermal mass.

Arena, L.; Faakye, O.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fact Sheet: Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety (June 2014) Fact Sheet: Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety (June 2014) The...

108

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes This presentation is from the Building America...

109

Improving Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition Improving Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition This...

110

HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System -...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System - Building America Top Innovation HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System - Building America Top...

111

Totally tubular: the mystery behind function and origin of the brain ventricular system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Totally tubular: the mystery behind function and origin of the brain ventricular system Laura Anne School, 240 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA, USA A unique feature of the vertebrate brain is the ventricular by neu- roepithelium. While CSF is critical for both adult brain function and embryonic brain development

Lowery, Laura Anne

112

Performance prediction for short plant length systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plant length dependent performance is commonly observed when performing feedforward active noise control for broadband disturbances. This is primarily due to high levels of low?frequency noise and limited coherence between input and error sensors. These types of systems present trade?offs in choosing between performance output power requirements and plant length. An additional design opportunity exists in terms of balancing the levels of cancellation achieved over frequency. The selection of an error signal emphasis filter determining the frequency dependence of the cost function being minimized by the controller adaptation can be of critical importance. While several explanations for this type of behavior have been offered little work has been presented for quantifying performance limitations. A method based on calculation of Lagrange multipliers is presented for determining the optimal power limited solution of an FIR filter?based controller. This provides a useful tool for predicting the effects of emphasis filter design actuator limitations and plant length on performance. This prediction method and the associated trade?offs are illustrated using data from an HVAC fan.

Steven R. Popovich

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics :soldier fatigue.  

SciTech Connect

The military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives as can be seen in the Department of Defense's (DoD) Defense Modeling and Simulation Office's (DMSO) Master Plan (DoD 5000.59-P 1995). To this goal, the military is currently spending millions of dollars on programs devoted to HPM in various military contexts. Examples include the Human Performance Modeling Integration (HPMI) program within the Air Force Research Laboratory, which focuses on integrating HPMs with constructive models of systems (e.g. cockpit simulations) and the Navy's Human Performance Center (HPC) established in September 2003. Nearly all of these initiatives focus on the interface between humans and a single system. This is insufficient in the era of highly complex network centric SoS. This report presents research and development in the area of HPM in a system-of-systems (SoS). Specifically, this report addresses modeling soldier fatigue and the potential impacts soldier fatigue can have on SoS performance.

Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E.; Miller, Dwight Peter

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Flight Performance of the AKARI Cryogenic System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the flight performance of the cryogenic system of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI, which was successfully launched on 2006 February 21 (UT). AKARI carries a 68.5 cm telescope together with two focal plane instruments, Infrared Cameras (IRC) and Far Infrared Surveyor (FIS), all of which are cooled down to cryogenic temperature to achieve superior sensitivity. The AKARI cryogenic system is a unique hybrid system, which consists of cryogen (liquid helium) and mechanical coolers (2-stage Stirling coolers). With the help of the mechanical coolers, 179 L (26.0 kg) of super-fluid liquid helium can keep the instruments cryogenically cooled for more than 500 days. The on-orbit performance of the AKARI cryogenics is consistent with the design and pre-flight test, and the boil-off gas flow rate is as small as 0.32 mg/s. We observed the increase of the major axis of the AKARI orbit, which can be explained by the thrust due to thermal pressure of vented helium gas.

Takao Nakagawa; Keigo Enya; Masayuki Hirabayashi; Hidehiro Kaneda; Tsuneo Kii; Yoshiyuki Kimura; Toshio Matsumoto; Hiroshi Murakami; Masahide Murakami; Katsuhiro Narasaki; Masanao Narita; Akira Ohnishi; Shoji Tsunematsu; Seiji Yoshida

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures Christian Engelmann, Hong Ong trend in modern high performance computing (HPC) system architectures employs "lean" compute nodes) continue to reside on compute nodes. Key words: High Performance Computing, Middleware, Lean Compute Node

Engelmann, Christian

116

Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics.  

SciTech Connect

A Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was initiated in 2005 to investigate Human Performance Modeling in a System of Systems analytic environment. SAND2006-6569 and SAND2006-7911 document interim results from this effort; this report documents the final results. The problem is difficult because of the number of humans involved in a System of Systems environment and the generally poorly defined nature of the tasks that each human must perform. A two-pronged strategy was followed: one prong was to develop human models using a probability-based method similar to that first developed for relatively well-understood probability based performance modeling; another prong was to investigate more state-of-art human cognition models. The probability-based modeling resulted in a comprehensive addition of human-modeling capability to the existing SoSAT computer program. The cognitive modeling resulted in an increased understanding of what is necessary to incorporate cognition-based models to a System of Systems analytic environment.

Dixon, Kevin R.; Lawton, Craig R.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Longsine, Dennis E. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX); Forsythe, James Chris; Gauthier, John Henry; Le, Hai D.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Total and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building HVAC Systems Using Model Predictive Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combination of the total energy consumption and the peakalso reduces the total energy consumption of the occupancyTotal and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building

Maasoumy, Mehdi; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Measurement of the total energy of an isolated system by an internal observer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the situation in which an observer internal to an isolated system wants to measure the total energy of the isolated system (this includes his own energy, that of the measuring device and clocks used, etc...). We show that he can do this in an arbitrarily short time, as measured by his own clock. This measurement is not subjected to a time-energy uncertainty relation. The properties of such measurements are discussed in detail with particular emphasis on the relation between the duration of the measurement as measured by internal clocks versus external clocks.

S. Massar; S. Popescu

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Performance tuned radioisotope thermophotovoltaic space power system  

SciTech Connect

The trend in space exploration is to use many small, low-cost, special-purpose satellites instead of the large, high-cost, multipurpose satellites used in the past. As a result of this new trend, there is a need for lightweight, efficient, and compact radioisotope fueled electrical power generators. This paper presents an improved design for a radioisotope thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) space power system in the 10 W to 20 W class which promises up to 37.6 watts at 30.1{percent} efficiency and 25 W/kg specific power. The RTPV power system concept has been studied and compared to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) radioisotope, Stirling generators and alkali metal thermal electric conversion (AMTEC) generators (Schock, 1995). The studies indicate that RTPV has the potential to be the lightest weight, most efficient and most reliable of the three concepts. However, in spite of the efficiency and light weight, the size of the thermal radiator required to eliminate excess heat from the PV cells and the lack of actual system operational performance data are perceived as obstacles to RTPV acceptance for space applications. Between 1994 and 1997 EDTEK optimized the key converter components for an RTPV generator under Department of Energy (DOE) funding administered via subcontracts to Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) and EG&G Mound Applied Technologies Laboratory (Horne, 1995). The optimized components included a resonant micromesh infrared bandpass filter, low-bandgap GaSb PV cells and cell arrays. Parametric data from these components were supplied to OSC who developed and analyzed the performance of 100 W, 20 W, and 10 W RTPV generators. These designs are described in references (Schock 1994, 1995 and 1996). Since the performance of each class of supply was roughly equivalent and simply scaled with size, this paper will consider the OSC 20 W design as a baseline. The baseline 20-W RTPV design was developed by Schock, et al of OSC and has been presented elsewhere. The baseline design, centered around components and measured parametric data developed by EDTEK, Inc., promised an overall thermal-to-electric system output of 23 W at a conversion efficiency of 19{percent}, 1.92 kg system weight, and a specific power of 13.3 W/kg. The improved design reported herein promises up to 37.6 W at 30.1{percent} efficiency, 1.5 kg system weight, up to 25 W/kg specific power, a six-fold reduction in thermal radiator size over the baseline design, as well as a lower isotope temperature for greater safety. The six-fold reduction in thermal radiator size removes one of the greatest obstacles to applying RTPV in space missions. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Horne, W.E.; Morgan, M.D.; Saban, S.B. [EDTEK, Inc., 7082 South 220th Street, Kent, Washington 98032-1910 (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Microcomputer Analysis of Pumping System Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report details the total annual energy use, energy cost, total capital cost, and present worth of each control option. In addition, the payback period or the rate of return can be computed based on the savings realized from using the variable speed... report details the total annual energy use, energy cost, total capital cost, and present worth of each control option. In addition, the payback period or the rate of return can be computed based on the savings realized from using the variable speed...

Bierschenk, J. L.; Schmidt, P. S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wall System Innovations: Familiar Materials, Better Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Wall System Innovation Vladimir Kochkin Joseph Wiehagen April 2013 Wall Innovation Metrics  High R (thermal and air barrier)  High Performance  Durable, structural  Build-able  Low transition risk to builders  50% Building America Goal  ≈ R25+ (CZ 4 and higher) 2 Background  Technologies for high-R walls have been proposed and used for over 25 years  But real market penetration is very low  Often the last EE measure implemented by builders (e.g. E*) 3 Background  High-R wall solutions have not achieved a broad level of standardization and commonality  A large set of methods and materials entered the market  Multiple and conflicting details  Wall characteristics are more critical = RISK 4 New Home Starts -

122

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The webinar on Nov. 18, 2014, continued the series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits.

123

NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - High-Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Performance Computing and Analytics High-performance computing and analytic capabilities at the Energy Systems Integration Facility enable study and simulation of material...

124

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The webinar on Oct. 23, 2014 focused on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits.

125

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT? Emission Control System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission Control System for NOx and PM Emission Reduction in Retrofit Applications Part 1 Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission...

126

Performance of solar assisted heatpump systems in residential applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this experimental study, several solar-assisted heating and cooling configurations have beenconsidered for a basic system comprised of a two-speed heat pump, photovoltaic (PV) arrays, solar thermal collectors, and thermal storage. The objective of the study was to determine the performance of the PV arrays at decreased insolation, the effects of air preheat by solar thermal energy on heat pump operation, and cooling system performance under two different configurations. During the entire operation, the PV arrays converted 4.7 per cent (9.5 MWh) of the incident solar insolation to d.c. power, of which 54.6 per cent was used by the residence. This contributed 23.4 per cent of the total house electrical demand. The remaining 45.4 per cent of the output was fed to the utility, indicating the arrays and the heat pump were not properly sized with each other. Based on results from the winter heating operation, it is shown that for the particular heating system consdered, the best performance is attained when the solar heating is used alone. By using the heat pump as a booster, the remaining available solar energy left in the storage tank can be used with good seasonal performance factor. Summer cooling operation consisted of two sequential cooling configurations. In the first cooling test, the heat pump was operated to either the house or storage when the PV array generation level was greater than the energy demand of the heat pump and associated equipment. When the array output level was less than the cooling system demand, the operating strategy was that of an off-peak cooling operation to chill the water storage. Utilization of chilled water storage was not realized in the first cooling test because of the inherent inefficient design of the Tri-X coil. The capacity at low-speed heat pump operation was too small to effect significant cooling of the water loop; whereas high-speed heat pump operation in attempting to chill water (fan operation absent) caused frosting of the coil. The heat pump was utilized only to maintain chilled water storage in the second cooling test, without heat transfer through the Tri-X coil. Cooling system performance obtained in cooling test 2 using the Ametex exchanger was considerably improved over the test 2 performance with the Tri-X coil.

S. Kugle; S. Green; A. Haji-Sheikh; D.Y.S. Lou

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

C++ programming techniques for High Performance Computing on systems with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C++ programming techniques for High Performance Computing on systems with non-uniform memory access (including NUMA) without sacrificing performance. ccNUMA In High Performance Computing (HPC), shared- memory

Fiebig, Peter

128

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement Damodara Poojary, Jacques Nicole,...

129

Predicting Reservoir System Quality and Performance | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Predicting Reservoir System Quality and Performance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Predicting Reservoir System Quality and...

130

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California solar energy system performance evaluation, July 1980-June 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory site is an office building in California with an active solar energy system designed to supply from 23 to 33% of the space heating load and part of the hot water load. The solar heating system is equipped with 1428 square feet of flat-plate collectors, a 2000-gallon water storage tank, and two gas-fired boilers to supply auxiliary heat for both space heating and domestic hot water. Poor performance is reported, with the solar fraction being only 4%. Also given are the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and the coefficient of performance. The performance data are given for the collector, storage, solar water heating and solar space heating subsystems as well as the total system. Typical system operation and solar energy utilization are briefly described. The system design, performance evaluation techniques, weather data, and sensor technology are presented. (LEW)

Wetzel, P.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Advanced fenestration systems for improved daylight performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

daylighting designs is a lack of systems perspective that accounts for, and provides an integrated solution

Selkowitz, S.; Lee, E.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Improving Steam System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This sourcebook is designed to provide steam system users with a reference that describes the basic steam system components, outlines opportunities for energy and performance improvements, and discusses the benefits of a systems approach in identifying and implementing these improvement opportunities. The sourcebook is divided into three main sections: steam system basics, performance improvement opportunities, and where to find help.

133

Performance optimization for unmanned vehicle systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological advances in the area of unmanned vehicles are opening new possibilities for creating teams of vehicles performing complex missions with some degree of autonomy. Perhaps the most spectacular example of these ...

Le Ny, Jerome

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software Appears in the proceedings of the 4th,grosu,psehgal,sas,stoller,ezk}@cs.stonybrook.edu ABSTRACT Models of energy consumption and performance are necessary to understand and identify system. This paper considers the energy consumption and performance of servers running a relatively simple file

Zadok, Erez

135

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF INSULATING WINDOW SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient Use of Energy, New York (1975). Glaser, V.H.J. , "Energy Transport Control in Window Systems", Report ETR-1277-2, Stony Brook, New York, (

Selkowitz, Stephen E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Performance Modeling and Access Methods for Temporal Database Management Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implementation issues. Database systems with temporal support maintain history data on line together with current. Performance Modeling and Access Methods for Temporal Database Management Systems TR86-018 August. #12;Performance Modeling and Access Methods for Temporal Database Management Systems by Ilsoo Ahn

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

137

Improving Pumping System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry- Second Edition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This sourcebook is designed to provide pump system users with a reference that outlines opportunities for improving system performance. It is not meant to be a comprehensive technical text on pumping systems; rather, it provides practical guidelines and information to make users aware of potential performance improvements. Guidance on how to find more information and assistance is also included.

138

Improving Fan System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This sourcebook is designed to provide fan system users with a reference outlining opportunities to improve system performance. It is not intended to be a comprehensive technical text on improving fan systems, but rather a document that makes users aware of potential performance improvements, provides some practical guidelines, and details where the user can find more help.

139

Sensors for Safety & Performance Stationary Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for PEM Fuel Cell Vehicles · Interfacial Stability of Thin Film H2 Sensors · Sensors for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems · Micro-Machined Thin Film H2 Gas Sensors · Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Fuel Cell Monitoring #12;Discussion Points Barriers ·Cost ·Application ·Lifetime ·Flexibility ·Public

140

Design and performance of an ammonia measurement system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions. The task cannot be completed without equipment that can efficiently and accurately compare emissions. To complete this task, a measurement system was developed and performance tested to measure ammonia. Performance tests included uncertainty...

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The webinar will focus on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits. Presenters and specific topics for this webinar will be:

142

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The webinar will continue our series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits. Presenters and specific topics for this webinar...

143

Compiler-based Memory Optimizations for High Performance Computing Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Parallelism has always been the primary method to achieve higher performance. To advance the computational capabilities of state-of-the-art high performance computing systems, we continue to… (more)

Kultursay, Emre

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 1 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Buildings Technologies Program Date: September 30, 2011 ENERGY STAR ® Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 11:00 AM Eastern. There is no call in number. The audio will be sent through your computer speakers. All questions will be submitted via typing. Video of presenters Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 2 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 3 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Building America Program: Introduction Building Technologies Program Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes

145

Performance testing of small interconnected wind systems  

SciTech Connect

There is a need for performance information on small windmills intended for interconnected operation with utility distribution service. The owner or prospective buyer needs the data to estimate economic viability and service reliability, while the utility needs it to determine interconnection arrangements, maintain quality of power delivered by its line, and to answer customer inquiries. No existing testing program provides all the information needed, although the Rocky Flats test site comes close. To fill this need for Michigan, Consumers Power Company and the Michigan Electric Cooperative Association helped support a two-year program at Michigan State University involving extensive performance testing of an Enertech 1500 and a 4-kW Dakota with a Gemini inverter. The performance study suggested measurements necessary to characterize SWECS for interconnected operation. They include SWECS energy output to a-c line, miles of wind passing the rotor, var-hour metering for average var consumption, and recording watt, current, and voltmeters to assess SWECS output variability. Added instruments for waveform measurement (to assess power quality) are also needed. Typical data taken at the MSU test site are used to illustrate the techniques and preliminary data from a current project is given. Finally, conclusions about SWECS performance are listed.

Park, G.L.; Krauss, O.; Miller, J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Thermal Performance of Ferrocement Green Building System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

System must not only cope with strengths and flexibility requirements, but the insulation value is of high importance. In summer heat must be kept outside as much as possible. The great demands of electric power ...

Wail N. Al-Rifaie; Waleed K. Ahmed…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:January 2015 All...

148

System Performance and Safety Government and Industry Collaboration  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

pnnl.gov Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety Government and Industry Collaboration BRIEFING SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of...

149

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT? Emission Control System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2 Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission Control System for NOx and PM Emission Reduction in Retrofit Applications Part 2 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Johnson Matthey...

150

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation gives an overview of the status and FY09 accomplishments for the NREL Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Project.

Bennion, K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Performance characterization of integral imaging systems based on human vision  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The perceptual contrast threshold (PCT) surface is proposed for characterizing the systematic performance of integral imaging (InI) systems. The method to determine the PCT surface...

Wang, Xiaorui; He, Liyong; Bu, Qingfeng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT? Emission Control System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Johnson Matthey Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT EGRT (tm) (tm) Emission Control System Emission Control System for for NOx NOx and PM Emission and PM Emission Reduction in...

153

Improving Compressed Air System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This sourcebook is designed to provide compressed air system users with a reference that outlines opportunities for system performance improvements. It is not intended to be a comprehensive technical text on improving compressed air systems, but rather a document that makes compressed air system users aware of the performance improvement potential, details some of the significant opportunities, and directs users to additional sources of assistance.

154

SU?E?T?322: Evaluation of Total Body Irradiation Technique Using 20 Diodes In?Vivo Dosimetry System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate a new Total Body Irradiation (TBI) technique using CT planning by 20 diodes real time in?vivo dosimetry system.Material and Methods: TBI treatment is typically performed at extended SSD ( 3 to 4 meters) under high energy x?rays (6 MV). Lateral treatment results in a more convenient setup but less dose uniformity as compared with AP/PA treatment. This study evaluated a new TBI treatment which is performed at 2 meter distance AP/PA. Matched oblique field plan was created by Eclipse TPS with CT simulated data from PIXY phantom; using MLC for lung blocking. Field in Field technique was applied to improve dose uniformity. A steel attenuator with transmission factor 0.55 for 6MV photon field is used to reduce dose rate to 5–20 cGy/min while a 5mm thick Lexan sheet is placed about 20 cm above patient to increase skin dose. Patients will lay supine and prone on a movable bed. Three AP and PA fields were used to deliver prescribed dose. A 20?diodes SunNuclear in?vivo dosimetry system was used for monitoring dose at different sites. Diodes were calibrated with attenuator to accommodate energy spectrum change. SSD dose rate angular dependence of diodes were measured. RadCalc MU verification software was also tested for agreement with TPS and measured data. Results: Attenuator could reduce the dose rate to about 13 cGy/min. By averaging the entrance and exit reading the doses at patients anatomical mid?line were measured and found to have good agreement with TPS (within 7% difference). Two dry?runs have demonstrated that the TBI plan can achieve and intended dose uniformity better than 10%. The RadCalc verification program agreed with TPS on average within 3%. Conclusion: CT?image based and TPS generated TBI plan is feasible. Diodes are suitable for both the TBI technique testing and dose monitoring.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Operating Systems: The Problems Of Performance and Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating Systems: The Problems Of Performance and Reliability B. Randell University of Newcastle and reliability are amongst the most difficult that operating system designers and implementors have to face. This is particularly the case with generic operating systems, i.e., systems intended for use in many different versions

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

156

Machine Maintenance Integrated Performance Support System  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this partnership project were to develop a preventive maintenance checklist program, a troubleshooting system for the Vertical Turning Center (VTC)-5, an on-line manual, and to integrate these components with a custom browser that would run on the VTC-5 machine's controller and would support future internet/intranet delivery. Kingsbury provided subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. They also provided photographs, schematics, and CAD drawings, which AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) digitized for use in the final program. Information from The Kingsbury troubleshooting experts were interviewed regarding symptoms and root causes of system malfunctions This knowledge was captured and from it, fault trees were developed. These trees were then incorporated into the EPSS as a troubleshooting tool. The troubleshooting portion of the system presents simple questions to the machine operator in order to determine the likely cause or causes of malfunctions and then recommends systematic corrective actions. The on-line reference manual, covering operations and maintenance, provides text and illustrations to the machine operator in a traditional structure, but additionally offers the capability to search voluminous amounts of technical data and retrieve specific information on request. The maintenance portion of the EPSS includes checklists that are displayed daily, weekly, monthly, and annually, as appropriate, on the VTC-5 controller screen. The controller software is unavailable for machining parts until the machine tool operator goes through and checks off all of the checklist items. This project provided the team with a detailed understanding of the knowledge and information required to produce and support advanced machine tools. In addition, it resulted in the design and construction of a prototype VTC-5 EPSS containing all the logic and interfaces necessary to integrate operations and maintenance information from other Kingsbury machine tools.

Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

157

Daylighting performance of electrochromic glazing system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

52E 52E Lighting energy savings potential of split- pane electrochromic windows controlled for daylighting with visual comfort L.L. Fernandes Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory E.S. Lee Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory G. Ward Anyhere Software Windows and Envelope Materials Group Building Technology and Urban Systems Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division February 2013 Published in Energy and Buildings 61 (2013) 8-20 10.1016/j.enbuild.2012.10.057 ! DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of

158

Experimental performance evaluation of aerogel glazing systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy savings for heating, air conditioning and illuminating plants could be improved by innovative Transparent Insulation Materials (TIMs), which aim to optimize two opposite requirements: transparency and thermal insulation. Aerogel is one of the most promising materials for use in highly energy-efficient windows: in addition to the low thermal conductivity (down to 0.010 W/(m K) in evacuated conditions), a high solar energy and daylight transmittance is achieved. Eight samples were manufactured, by assembling several types of glass with monolithic and granular aerogel in the interspace. U-values slightly higher than 1 W/m2 K were obtained for all the samples. The monolithic aerogel introduced a better light transmittance (?v = 0.60) than granular one (?v = 0.27), while U-values were comparable in non-evacuated conditions. With respect to a conventional window (double glazing with a low-e layer), 55% reduction in heat losses was achieved by monolithic aerogel, with only a 25% reduction in light transmittance; for the granular systems, the reduction was about 25% in heat losses, but 66% in light transmission. In order to evaluate the aerogel employing in buildings, a prototype of an aluminum frame window with granular aerogel in interspace was realized. Thermal and acoustic properties of the prototype were evaluated according to the standards. The thermal transmittance of the innovative glazing system was little lower than 1 W/(m2 K) and it showed also good acoustic properties: the Rw index was 3 dB higher than the one of a conventional window with air in interspace.

C. Buratti; E. Moretti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

HPGMG 1.0: A Benchmark for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems Mark F. Adamsmetric for ranking high performance computing systems. HPLmetric for ranking high performance computing systems. When

Adams, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

INTERIOR DUCT SYSTEM DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

By removing air distribution and conditioning equipment from unconditioned spaces, homeowners stand to benefit substantially with respect to both energy savings and indoor air quality. Duct leakage introduces: Greater heating and cooling loads from air at extreme temperatures and humidity levels; Outside air and air from unconditioned spaces that may contain air borne contaminants, combustion gases, pollen, mold spores, and/or particles of building materials; and Higher whole-house infiltration/exfiltration rates. Exemplary studies conducted since 1990 have demonstrated the prevalence of duct leakage throughout the United States and measured energy savings of approximately 20% during both heating and cooling seasons from leakage reduction. These all dealt with duct leakage to and/or from unconditioned spaces. In the building science community, leakage within the conditioned space is generally presumed to eliminate the negative consequences of duct leakage with the exception of possibly creating pressure imbalances in the house which relates to higher infiltration and/or exfiltration. The practical challenges of isolating ducts and air handlers from unconditioned spaces require builders to construct an air-tight environment for the ducts. Florida Solar Energy Center researchers worked with four builders in Texas, North Carolina, and Florida who build a furred-down chase located either in a central hallway or at the edges of rooms as an architectural detail. Some comparison homes with duct systems in attics and crawl spaces were included in the test group of more than 20 homes. Test data reveals that all of the duct/AHU systems built inside the conditioned space had lower duct leakage to unconditioned spaces than their conventional counterparts; however, none of the homes was completely free of duct leakage to unconditioned spaces. Common problems included wiring and plumbing penetrations of the chase, failure to treat the chase as an air tight space, and misguided fresh air inlet design. Improvements were implemented by the Texas builder and retested in July. Results showed a 36% reduction in duct leakage, significant enough to warrant the builder adopting the new sealing procedure.

Janet E.R. Mcllvaine; David Beal; Philip Fairey

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Extensibility, Safety and Performance in the SPIN Operating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extensibility, Safety and Performance in the SPIN Operating System Brian N. Bershad Stefan Savage the motivation, architecture and per- formance of SPIN, an extensible operating system. SPIN provides change the operating system's interface and implementation. Extensions allow an application to specialize

Savage, Stefan

162

Performance-aware Energy Saving Mechanism in Interconnection Networks for Parallel Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The growing processing power of parallel computing systems require interconnection networks a higher level of complexity and higher performance, thus consuming more energy. Link components contributes a substantial proportion of the total energy consumption of the networks. Many researchers have proposed approaches to judiciously change the link speed as a function of traffic to save energy when the traffic is light. However, the link speed reduction incurs an increase in average packet latency, thus degrades network performance. This paper addresses that issue with a performance-aware energy saving mechanism. The simulation results show that the proposed mechanism outperforms the energy saving mechanisms in literature.

Hai Nguyen; Daniel Franco; Emilio Luque

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

International Space Station power module thermal control system hydraulic performance  

SciTech Connect

The International Space Station (ISS) uses four photovoltaic power modules (PVMs) to provide electric power for the US On-Orbit Segment. The PVMs consist of photovoltaic arrays (PVAs), orbit replaceable units (ORUs), photovoltaic radiators (PVRs), and a thermal control system (TCS). The PVM TCS function is to maintain selected PVM components within their specified operating ranges. The TCS consists of the pump flow control subassembly (PFCS), piping system, including serpentine tubing for individual component heat exchangers, headers/manifolds, fluid disconnect couplings (FQDCs), and radiator (PVR). This paper describes the major design requirements for the TCS and the results of the system hydraulic performance predictions in regard to these requirements and system component sizing. The system performance assessments were conducted using the PVM TCS fluid network hydraulic model developed for predicting system/component pressure losses and flow distribution. Hardy-Cross method of iteration was used to model the fluid network configuration. Assessments of the system hydraulic performance were conducted based on an evaluation of uncertainties associated with the manufacturing and design tolerances. Based on results of the analysis, it was concluded that all design requirements regarding system performance could be met. The hydraulic performance range, enveloping possible system operating parameter variations was determined.

Goldberg, V. [Boeing North American, Inc., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Managing variability in the IO performance of petascale storage systems.  

SciTech Connect

Significant challenges exist for achieving peak or even consistent levels of performance when using IO systems at scale. They stem from sharing IO system resources across the processes of single large-scale applications and/or multiple simultaneous programs causing internal and external interference, which in turn, causes substantial reductions in IO performance. This paper presents interference effects measurements for two different file systems at multiple supercomputing sites. These measurements motivate developing a 'managed' IO approach using adaptive algorithms varying the IO system workload based on current levels and use areas. An implementation of these methods deployed for the shared, general scratch storage system on Oak Ridge National Laboratory machines achieves higher overall performance and less variability in both a typical usage environment and with artificially introduced levels of 'noise'. The latter serving to clearly delineate and illustrate potential problems arising from shared system usage and the advantages derived from actively managing it.

Wolf, Matthew; Zheng, Fang; Klasky, Scott; Schwan, Karsten; Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald Fredrick, II; Liu, Qing; Kordenbrock, Todd

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

System Advisor Model: Flat Plate Photovoltaic Performance Modeling Validation Report  

SciTech Connect

The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software tool that performs detailed analysis of both system performance and system financing for a variety of renewable energy technologies. This report provides detailed validation of the SAM flat plate photovoltaic performance model by comparing SAM-modeled PV system generation data to actual measured production data for nine PV systems ranging from 75 kW to greater than 25 MW in size. The results show strong agreement between SAM predictions and field data, with annualized prediction error below 3% for all fixed tilt cases and below 8% for all one axis tracked cases. The analysis concludes that snow cover and system outages are the primary sources of disagreement, and other deviations resulting from seasonal biases in the irradiation models and one axis tracking issues are discussed in detail.

Freeman, J.; Whitmore, J.; Kaffine, L.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) The CPAR assesses a contractor's performance, both positive and negative, and provides a record on a given contract during a specified period of time. Each assessment must be based on objective data (or measurable, subjective data when objective data is not available) supportable by program and contract management data. The CPARS process is designed with a series of checks-and-balances to facilitate the objective and consistent evaluation of contractor performance. Both Government and contractor perspectives are captured on the CPAR form. The opportunity to review/comment on the CPAR by the designated Government and contractor personnel together makes a complete CPAR.

167

Commissioning and Performance Diagnostics for HVAC Control Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commissioning and Performance Diagnostics for HVAC Control Systems Commissioning and Performance Diagnostics for HVAC Control Systems Speaker(s): Ashish Singhal Date: December 20, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Philip Haves The presentation will focus on practical aspects of commissioning control loops in commercial HVAC systems and evaluating their routine performance. Simple and theoretically sound methods for diagnosing control performance will be presented that detect serious performance issues associated with control loops in modern buildings. The discussion will center on a new control loop commissioning tool that helps field personnel to quickly test, tune and troubleshoot control loops. In addition to the active tests for commissioning control loops, a suite of diagnostic algorithms are used in a

168

Benchmarking and Performance Based Rating System for Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benchmarking and Performance Based Rating System for Commercial Buildings Benchmarking and Performance Based Rating System for Commercial Buildings in India Speaker(s): Saket Sarraf Date: May 4, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Girish Ghatikar The Indian building sector has witnessed huge surge in interest in energy performance in the last decade. The 'intention' based codes like the national Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) and green building rating systems such as Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED-India) and Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment (GRIHA) have been the prime mechanisms to design and assess energy efficient buildings. However, they do not rate the 'achieved' energy performance of buildings over time or reward their performance through a continuous evaluation process.

169

Analysis of Photovoltaic System Energy Performance Evaluation Method  

SciTech Connect

Documentation of the energy yield of a large photovoltaic (PV) system over a substantial period can be useful to measure a performance guarantee, as an assessment of the health of the system, for verification of a performance model to then be applied to a new system, or for a variety of other purposes. Although the measurement of this performance metric might appear to be straight forward, there are a number of subtleties associated with variations in weather and imperfect data collection that complicate the determination and data analysis. A performance assessment is most valuable when it is completed with a very low uncertainty and when the subtleties are systematically addressed, yet currently no standard exists to guide this process. This report summarizes a draft methodology for an Energy Performance Evaluation Method, the philosophy behind the draft method, and the lessons that were learned by implementing the method.

Kurtz, S.; Newmiller, J.; Kimber, A.; Flottemesch, R.; Riley, E.; Dierauf, T.; McKee, J.; Krishnani, P.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Guidelines for reporting parabolic trough solar electric system performance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this activity is to develop a generic methodology which can be used to track and compare the performance of parabolic trough power plants. The approach needs to be general enough to work for all existing and future parabolic trough plant designs, provide meaningful comparisons of year to year performance, and allow for comparisons between dissimilar plant designs. The approach presented here uses the net annual system efficiency as the primary metric for evaluating the performance of parabolic trough power plants. However, given the complex nature of large parabolic trough plants, the net annual system efficiency by itself does not adequately characterize the performance of the plant. The approach taken here is to define a number of additional performance metrics which enable a more comprehensive understanding of overall plant performance.

Price, H.W.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Models Used to Assess the Performance of Photovoltaic Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization.

172

Terahertz imaging system performance model for concealed-weapon identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have developed a terahertz (THz) -band imaging system performance model...

Murrill, Steven R; Jacobs, Eddie L; Moyer, Steven K; Halford, Carl E; Griffin, Steven T; De Lucia, Frank C; Petkie, Douglas T; Franck, Charmaine C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy is hosting a webinar on Thursday, January 22, 2015 on the Systems Performance Advancement II: Component Metric Validation Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA)....

174

High Performance Computing Systems for Autonomous Spaceborne Missions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Future-generation space missions across the solar system to the planets, moons, asteroids, and comets may someday incorporate supercomputers both to expand the range of missions being conducted and to significantly reduce their cost. By performing science ...

Thomas Sterling; Daniel S. Katz; Larry Bergman

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Gas-Insulated Substation Performance in Brazilian System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work is based on a report developed in the Working Group 23–03 of CIGRÉ-Brazil [1], about gas-insulated substations performance in the Brazilian electric system from...

H. J. A. Martins; V. R. Fernandes; R. S. Jacobsen

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Performance of a boundary layer ingesting propulsion system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents an assessment of the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft propulsion system, with embedded engines, in the presence of aircraft fuselage boundary layer ingestion (BLI). The emphasis is on defining ...

Plas, Angélique (Angélique Pascale)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Improving Motor and Drive System Performance – A Sourcebook for Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This sourcebook outlines opportunities to improve motor and drive systems performance, including practical guidelines, energy efficiency assessment instructions, and referrals to other information and assistance such as software, videos, and training opportunities.

178

LES SYSTEMES DE MESURE DE PERFORMANCE EN COLLECTIVITES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LES SYSTEMES DE MESURE DE PERFORMANCE EN COLLECTIVITES TERRITORIALES : UN ECLAIRAGE A LA LECTURE progressive de la LOLF depuis 2002 représente la déclinaison en France des principes du New Public Management

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

179

High Performance Computing in Electrical Energy Systems Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents a review of the main application areas of high performance computing in electrical energy systems and introduces some results obtained with ... obtained with tests conducted using actual mod...

Djalma M. Falcao; Carmen L. T. Borges…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study details Marshall Space Flight Center's innovative technologies to improve water efficiency and cooling performance for one of its problematic cooling systems. The program saved the facility more than 800,000 gallons of water in eight months.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Quantitative training system assessments using General Systems Performance Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provides an overview of the concept of situational awareness and identifies the characteristics that are usually associated ivith a situationally aivare person. A. CBT Systems As ivas mentioned in Chapter I, there is considerable evidence [3, 4...

Kashyap, Sujatha

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software Zhichao Li, Radu Grosu, Priya Sehgal {zhicli,grosu,psehgal,sas,stoller,ezk}@cs.stonybrook.edu ABSTRACT Models of energy consumption that can balance out performance and energy use. This paper considers the energy consumption

Stoller, Scott

183

Use of a Machine Control & Guidance System Determination of Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Use of a Machine Control & Guidance System Determination of Performance Protection against. Dr. P. Rausch Why Machine Guidance? 1 Introduction Machine Guidance allows higher performance. Higher someone checking down below: 09.07.2008 3 ,,Machine control by shout and gesture". Planned Excavator Job

184

Analyzing and Improving MPI Communication Performance in Overcommitted Virtualized Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays, it is an important trend in the system domain to use the software-based virtualization technology to build the execution environments (e.g., Clouds) and serve high performance computing (HPC) applications. However, with the extra virtualization ... Keywords: virtualization, cloud, MPI, performance

Zhiyuan Shao; Qiang Wang; Xuejiao Xie; Hai Jin; Ligang He

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Sustainable Transportation Decision-Making: Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) and Total Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is to develop a Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) that will lead to more balanced decision-making in transportation investment and optimize the most sustainable high-speed rail (HSR) route. The decision support system developed here explicitly elaborates...

Kim, Hwan Yong

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

186

Residential photovoltaic flywheel storage system performance and cost  

SciTech Connect

A subscale prototype of a flywheel energy storage and conversion system for use with photovoltaic power systems of residential and intermediate load-center size has been designed, built and tested by MIT Lincoln Laboratory. System design, including details of such key components as magnetic bearings, motor generator, and power-conditioning electronics, are described. Performance results of prototype testing are given and indicate that this system is the equal of or superior to battery and inverter systems for the same application. Results of cost and user-worth analysis show that residential systems are economically feasible in stand-alone and in utility-interactive applications.

Hay, R.D.; Millner, A.R.; Jarvinen, P.O.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures  

SciTech Connect

A recent trend in modern high performance computing (HPC) system architectures employs ''lean'' compute nodes running a lightweight operating system (OS). Certain parts of the OS as well as other system software services are moved to service nodes in order to increase performance and scalability. This paper examines the impact of this HPC system architecture trend on HPC ''middleware'' software solutions, which traditionally equip HPC systems with advanced features, such as parallel and distributed programming models, appropriate system resource management mechanisms, remote application steering and user interaction techniques. Since the approach of keeping the compute node software stack small and simple is orthogonal to the middleware concept of adding missing OS features between OS and application, the role and architecture of middleware in modern HPC systems needs to be revisited. The result is a paradigm shift in HPC middleware design, where single middleware services are moved to service nodes, while runtime environments (RTEs) continue to reside on compute nodes.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Ong, Hong Hoe [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Health Care Reform Challenge: Creating a High Performance Healthcare System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Care Reform Challenge: Creating a High Performance Healthcare System Tom Simmer, MD Chief;The Challenge of Reform: Accountable Care Organizations (ACO) · ACO's are provider organizations health care delivery Organized Systems of Care Population focus for primary care physicians, hospitals

Finley Jr., Russell L.

189

Baker Construction, Cincinnati, Ohio. Solar energy system performance evaluation, October 1980-May 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Baker Construction site is a single family residence in Ohio with a passive solar heating system, which consists of 302 square feet of 62 degree sloped greenhouse glazing, a 35,500-pound concrete mass wall, 10,400-pound concrete slab floor, 20 phase change storage rods, six 1-kW electric baseboard heaters, and a wood stove. A solar fraction of 55% is reported. Also the solar savings ratio and conventional fuel savings are given. The performance of the greenhouse collector subsystem, the heat storage subsystem, and the space heating subsystem are summarized as well as total system performance. Energy savings and weather data are also included. The design of the system, performance evaluation techniques, and sensor technology are also presented. (LEW)

Spears, J.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Performance Evaluation of BPM System in SSRF Using PCA Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beam position monitor (BPM) system is of most importance in a light source. The capability of the BPM depends on the resolution of the system. The traditional standard deviation on the raw data method merely gives the upper limit of the resolution. Principal component analysis (PCA) had been introduced in the accelerator physics and it could be used to get rid of the actual signals. Beam related informations were extracted before the evaluation of the BPM performance. A series of studies had been made in Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) and PCA was proved as an effective and robust method in the performance evaluations of our BPM system.

Chen, Zhichu; Yan, Yingbing; Yuan, Renxian; Lai, Longwei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial load-shaping measures Title Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial load-shaping measures Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1988 Authors Akbari, Hashem, Mashuri Warren, Anibal De T. Almeida, Deborah J. Connell, and Jeffrey P. Harris Journal Energy Volume 13 Pagination 253-263 Abstract We have studied the use of industrial energy management and control systems (EMCSs) for monitoring the performance of electric load-shaping measures in three of California's most electricity-intensive and rapidly growing industrial sectors: food, plastics, and computing equipment and electronics. In this paper, we summarize current load-shaping strategies, report on the current use of EMCSs in selected industries, and recommend ways for electric utility companies to verify the potential of EMCSs for performance monitoring. We conclude that EMCSs can be used to collect and store data for evaluating industrial load shaping. Some sophisticated EMCSs are currently being used for this purpose, mostly in larger electronics firms. Most EMCSs now available need to be customized to monitor a particular facility. We also conclude that electric utility companies can encourage the use of EMCSs for performance monitoring by helping to educate their industrial customers about EMCSs, establishing protocols to standardize communication between EMCSs, and testing EMCSs with data-logging functions at demonstration sites.

192

A New Model to Simulate Energy Performance of VRF Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a new model to simulate energy performance of variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems in heat pump operation mode (either cooling or heating is provided but not simultaneously). The main improvement of the new model is the introduction of the evaporating and condensing temperature in the indoor and outdoor unit capacity modifier functions. The independent variables in the capacity modifier functions of the existing VRF model in EnergyPlus are mainly room wet-bulb temperature and outdoor dry-bulb temperature in cooling mode and room dry-bulb temperature and outdoor wet-bulb temperature in heating mode. The new approach allows compliance with different specifications of each indoor unit so that the modeling accuracy is improved. The new VRF model was implemented in a custom version of EnergyPlus 7.2. This paper first describes the algorithm for the new VRF model, which is then used to simulate the energy performance of a VRF system in a Prototype House in California that complies with the requirements of Title 24 ? the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The VRF system performance is then compared with three other types of HVAC systems: the Title 24-2005 Baseline system, the traditional High Efficiency system, and the EnergyStar Heat Pump system in three typical California climates: Sunnyvale, Pasadena and Fresno. Calculated energy savings from the VRF systems are significant. The HVAC site energy savings range from 51 to 85percent, while the TDV (Time Dependent Valuation) energy savings range from 31 to 66percent compared to the Title 24 Baseline Systems across the three climates. The largest energy savings are in Fresno climate followed by Sunnyvale and Pasadena. The paper discusses various characteristics of the VRF systems contributing to the energy savings. It should be noted that these savings are calculated using the Title 24 prototype House D under standard operating conditions. Actual performance of the VRF systems for real houses under real operating conditions will vary.

Hong, Tianzhen; Pang, Xiufeng; Schetrit, Oren; Wang, Liping; Kasahara, Shinichi; Yura, Yoshinori; Hinokuma, Ryohei

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Total and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building HVAC Systems Using Model Predictive Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inputs. The idea of modeling building thermal behavior usingThe detail of building thermal modeling is pre- sented in [Modeling and optimal control algorithm design for hvac systems in energy efficient buildings,’’

Maasoumy, Mehdi; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Title Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3383E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords air flow measurement, air leakage, blower power measurement, blowers, energy performance of buildings group, forced air systems, furnaces, indoor environment department, other, public interest energy research (pier) program, residential hvac Abstract This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit - indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called "ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823 "Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

195

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Title Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-44331 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Xu, Tengfang T., François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William J. Fisk, Jennifer A. McWilliams, Duo Wang, and Mark P. Modera Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 215-226 Abstract This paper presents major findings of a field study on the performance of five thermal distribution systems in four large commercial buildings. The five systems studied are typical single-duct or dual-duct constant air volume (CAV) systems and variable air volume (VAV) systems, each of which serves an office building or a retail building with floor area over 2,000 m2. The air leakage from ducts are reported in terms of effective leakage area (ELA) at 25 Pa reference pressure, the ASHRAE-defined duct leakage class, and air leakage ratios. The specific ELAs ranged from 0.7 to 12.9 cm2 per m2 of duct surface area, and from 0.1 to 7.7 cm2 per square meter of floor area served. The leakage classes ranged from 34 to 757 for the five systems and systems sections tested. The air leakage ratios are estimated to be up to one-third of the fan- supplied airflow in the constant-air-volume systems. The specific ELAs and leakage classes indicate that air leakage in large commercial duct systems varies significantly from system to system, and from system section to system section even within the same thermal distribution system. The duct systems measured are much leakier than the ductwork specified as "unsealed ducts" by ASHRAE. Energy losses from supply ducts by conduction (including convection and radiation) are found to be significant, on the scale similar to the losses induced by air leakage in the duct systems. The energy losses induced by leakage and conduction suggest that there are significant energy-savings potentials from duct-sealing and insulation practice in large commercial buildings

196

Models used to assess the performance of photovoltaic systems.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization. Energy storage plays an important role in reducing PV intermittency and battery storage models are used to understand the best configurations and technologies to store PV generated electricity. Other researcher's models used by SNL are discussed including some widely known models that incorporate algorithms developed at SNL. There are other models included in the discussion that are not used by or were not adopted from SNL research but may provide some benefit to researchers working on PV array performance, hybrid system models and energy storage. The paper is organized into three sections to describe the different software models as applied to photovoltaic performance, hybrid systems, and battery storage. For each model, there is a description which includes where to find the model, whether it is currently maintained and any references that may be available. Modeling improvements underway at SNL include quantifying the uncertainty of individual system components, the overall uncertainty in modeled vs. measured results and modeling large PV systems. SNL is also conducting research into the overall reliability of PV systems.

Stein, Joshua S.; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Four-axis micro measuring systems performance verification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article describes the performance verification of 3D optical measuring instruments integrating a rotational axis using an artifact. The goal is the performance verification of four-axis measuring systems for the full 3D acquisition of micro-geometric parts. This type of measurement has many potential applications, such as in micro-tool, micro-mold, or micro-device manufacturing. The artifact is as simple as possible to reduce manufacturing costs, ensure easy calibration, comply with the ISO 10360 standard and consider all volumetric error contributions. The artifact may be useful to both measuring system manufacturers and users to provide a measurement traceability path.

Giovanni Moroni; Stefano Petrò; Wahyudin P. Syam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Resilient Plant Monitoring System: Design, Analysis, and Performance Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Resilient monitoring systems are sensor networks that degrade gracefully under malicious attacks on their sensors, causing them to project misleading information. The goal of this paper is to design, analyze, and evaluate the performance of a resilient monitoring system intended to monitor plant conditions (normal or anomalous). The architecture developed consists of four layers: data quality assessment, process variable assessment, plant condition assessment, and sensor network adaptation. Each of these layers is analyzed by either analytical or numerical tools, and the performance of the overall system is evaluated using simulations. The measure of resiliency of the resulting system is evaluated using Kullback Leibler divergence, and is shown to be sufficiently high in all scenarios considered.

Humberto E. Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Semyon M. Meerkov; Maruthi T. Ravichandran

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Total analysis of surface structure and properties by UHV transfer system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) complex sample preparation and analysis system, which realizes a reliable surface science analyzing various characters on an identical surface. The system contains three sample-preparation-and-characterization chambers and five analysis chambers. They are (1) an electronic-properties-characterization chamber, (2) a magnetic-properties-characterization chamber, (3) an organic-molecule chamber, (4) UHV SEM, (5) a high-energy-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer, (6) a high-energy-resolution display-type spherical mirror analyzer, (7) a room-temperature (RT) STM, and (8) an optical-properties characterization chamber. A special sample holder is used with six electrodes on it, which enables accurate temperature measurement of a sample by connecting a thermocouple directly to the sample even if it is transferred. Four other electrodes can be used for construction of various circuits including evaporators. Some examples are shown.

Hiroshi Yamatani; Ken Hattori; Takahisa Matsuta; Takuji Ito; Tomohito Nohno; Madoka Hori; Yutaka Miyatake; Shigenori Konno; Tsukasa Tanaka; Yoji Hamada; Hiroshi Katagiri; Mikiharu Hibi; Toshiki Miyai; Mie Hashimoto; Keita Kataoka; Takeshi Tatsuta; Azusa N. Hattori; Naoto Higashi; Mitsunori Honda; Norifumi Masunaga; Hiroaki Mino; Shintaro Yasui; Janathul Nayeem; Tatsuya Shimizu; Nobuaki Takahashi; Yukako Kato; Chikako Sakai; Masashi Yoshimura; Sakura N. Takeda; Fumihiko Matsui; Hiroshi Daimon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

An investigation of simplified loss formula evaluation of total and incremental power system losses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program ~ a o o ~ o a o o o o e a o o 11 Incremental Transmission Loss Calculation . . . . . . o 13 The Transmission System ~ a ~ o o ~ ~ o o o o o o 14 IVa RESULTS e ~ o a ~ ~ a a ~ e a o a ~ e ~ o a o o o IQ V SUMMARY a o o o a ~ o ~ a o 0 o o o ~ 0..., 1 X II tf g tf ff tf lt 4 0o9 50/ System Load ? Per Cent of Peak 1o06 f 1. 05 0 Xo1. 04 0 e 5 1, 03 1. 02 Ir 5 F. 1o01 4 tI 1o0 III II 0. 99 5 FIGURE IVa Simplified Loss Formula Evaluation of Pen- alty Faotor ? Bus 1 All...

Malinowski, James Henry

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Performance analysis of mixed passive solar heating systems  

SciTech Connect

The various situations in which interactions between south-facing systems serving a single thermal zone may affect the performance of the mixture are discussed. In particular, the nature of direct gain interactions with unvented Trombe walls was explored using a detailed thermal network computer program. The results are compared with predictions from the simple design analysis procedures which neglect interactions. This comparison showed that system interactions can significantly improve the peformance of a mixture under certain conditions.

Wray, W.O.; Best, E.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Next Intelligent Systems  

SciTech Connect

Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Intelligent Systems presents research dedicated to the subject of performance evaluation and benchmarking of intelligent systems by drawing from the experiences and insights of leading experts gained both through theoretical development and practical implementation of intelligent systems in a variety of diverse application domains. This contributed volume offers a detailed and coherent picture of state-of-the-art, recent developments, and further research areas in intelligent systems. The chapters cover a broad range of applications, such as assistive robotics, planetary surveying, urban search and rescue, and line tracking for automotive assembly. Subsystems or components described in this book include human-robot interaction, multi-robot coordination, communications, perception, and mapping. Chapters are also devoted to simulation support and open source software for cognitive platforms, providing examples of the type of enabling underlying technologies that can help intelligent systems to propagate and increase in capabilities. Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Intelligent Systems serves as a professional reference for researchers and practitioners in the field. This book is also applicable to advanced courses for graduate level students and robotics professionals in a wide range of engineering and related disciplines including computer science, automotive, healthcare, manufacturing, and service robotics.

del Pobil, Angel [Jaume-I University; Madhavan, Raj [ORNL; Bonsignorio, Fabio [Heron Robots, Italy

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Thermal performance of an ammonia-water refrigeration system  

SciTech Connect

The conservation and efficient use of energy has led to alternate methods for air conditioning in buildings. Presently, two types of absorption air conditioning systems are widely used: the lithium-bromide-water system and the ammonia-water system. The first type is typically a water fired absorption chiller while the second one is a gas fired chiller. Some of the lithium-bromide-water systems use as a source of heat a stream of hot water supplied from solar collectors at a temperature level of the order of 95-100 {degrees}C. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibilities to use solar energy to operate an ammonia-water system and to predict its thermodynamic performance. The results indicate that it is feasible to use solar energy to operate an ammonia-water absorption-refrigeration system.

Manrique, J.A. (Inst. Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Dept. of Thermal Engineering, Monterrey, NL (MX))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

System-Level Virtualization for High Performance Computing Geoffroy Vallee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System-Level Virtualization for High Performance Computing Geoffroy Vall´ee Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA valleegr@ornl.gov Thomas Naughton Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA naughtont@ornl.gov Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN

Engelmann, Christian

205

High Performance Commercial Building Systems William L. Carroll  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy underHigh Performance Commercial Building Systems William L. Carroll Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley.2 ­ Retrofit Tools Task 2 HPBCS E2P2.2T3 LBNL - 57775 California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy

206

Methodology for assessing performance of waste management systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the methodology provided in this report is to select the optimal way to manage particular sets of waste streams from generation to disposal in a safe and cost-effective manner. The methodology described is designed to review the entire waste management system, assess its performance, ensure that the performance objectives are met, compare different LLW management alternatives, and select the optimal alternative. The methodology is based on decision analysis approach, in which costs and risk are considered for various LLW management alternatives, a comparison of costs, risks, and benefits is made, and an optimal system is selected which minimizes costs and risks and maximizes benefits. A ''zoom-lens'' approach is suggested, i.e., one begins by looking at gross features and gradually proceeds to more and more detail. Performance assessment requires certain information about the characteristics of the waste streams and about the various components of the waste management system. Waste acceptance criteria must be known for each component of the waste management system. Performance assessment for each component requires data about properties of the waste streams and operational and design characteristics of the processing or disposal components. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Meshkov, N.K.; Herzenberg, C.L.; Camasta, S.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Performance of Concurrent Rendezvous Systems with Complex Pipeline Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance of Concurrent Rendezvous Systems with Complex Pipeline Structures Real February 11, 1998 Abstract The term ``complex pipeline'' describes a set of tasks which process incoming data in a sequence, like a pipeline, but have various kinds of parallel execution steps coupled

Woodside, C. Murray

208

Performance Validation and Energy Analysis of HVAC Systems using Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that energy savings of between 15% and 40% could be made in commercial buildings by closer monitoring and supervision of energy-usage and related data. An earlier study by Kao and Pierce (1983) showed that sensor1 Performance Validation and Energy Analysis of HVAC Systems using Simulation Tim Salsbury and Rick

Diamond, Richard

209

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.emt-india.net/Book4/Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: "Energy Standards,Upgrade Requirements" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

210

May 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 1/20 Middleware in Modern High Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 1/20 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures Christian Engelmann1,2, Hong Ong1, Stephen L 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 2/20 Talk Outline

Engelmann, Christian

211

Energy Performance Testing of Asetek's RackCDU System at NREL's High Performance Computing Data Center  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we report on the first tests of Asetek's RackCDU direct-to-chip liquid cooling system for servers at NREL's ESIF data center. The system was simple to install on the existing servers and integrated directly into the data center's existing hydronics system. The focus of this study was to explore the total cooling energy savings and potential for waste-heat recovery of this warm-water liquid cooling system. RackCDU captured up to 64% of server heat into the liquid stream at an outlet temperature of 89 degrees F, and 48% at outlet temperatures approaching 100 degrees F. This system was designed to capture heat from the CPUs only, indicating a potential for increased heat capture if memory cooling was included. Reduced temperatures inside the servers caused all fans to reduce power to the lowest possible BIOS setting, indicating further energy savings potential if additional fan control is included. Preliminary studies manually reducing fan speed (and even removing fans) validated this potential savings but could not be optimized for these working servers. The Asetek direct-to-chip liquid cooling system has been in operation with users for 16 months with no necessary maintenance and no leaks.

Sickinger, D.; Van Geet, O.; Ravenscroft, C.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Standard Guide for Specifying Thermal Performance of Geothermal Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers power plant performance terms and criteria for use in evaluation and comparison of geothermal energy conversion and power generation systems. The special nature of these geothermal systems makes performance criteria commonly used to evaluate conventional fossil fuel-fired systems of limited value. This guide identifies the limitations of the less useful criteria and defines an equitable basis for measuring the quality of differing thermal cycles and plant equipment for geothermal resources. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Configurable Virtualized System Environments for High Performance Computing  

SciTech Connect

Existing challenges for current terascale high performance computing (HPC) systems are increasingly hampering the development and deployment efforts of system software and scientific applications for next-generation petascale systems. The expected rapid system upgrade interval toward petascale scientific computing demands an incremental strategy for the development and deployment of legacy and new large-scale scientific applications that avoids excessive porting. Furthermore, system software developers as well as scientific application developers require access to large-scale testbed environments in order to test individual solutions at scale. This paper proposes to address these issues at the system software level through the development of a virtualized system environment (VSE) for scientific computing. The proposed VSE approach enables ''plug-and-play'' supercomputing through desktop-to-cluster-to-petaflop computer system-level virtualization based on recent advances in hypervisor virtualization technologies. This paper describes the VSE system architecture in detail, discusses needed tools for VSE system management and configuration, and presents respective VSE use case scenarios.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Ong, Hong Hoe [ORNL; Vallee, Geoffroy R [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Title Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-53605 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Nance Matson Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the air-handler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

215

High performance control of harmonic instability from HVDC link system  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the usefulness of novel control method for HVDC link system which suffers from severe condition of low order harmonic. This control scheme is used the feedforward control method which is directly controlled dc current at dc link system. The studies of this paper are aimed to improving the dynamic response of HVdc link system in disturbances such as faults. To achieve those objectives, digital time domain simulations are employed by the electro magnetic transient program for dc system (EMTDC). This method results in stable recovery from faults at both rectifier and inverter terminal busbars for a HVdc system that is inherently unstable. It has been found to be robust and control performance has been enhanced.

Min, W.K.; Yoo, M.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Inst., Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Thermodynamic data management system for nuclear waste disposal performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

Thermodynamic property values for use in assessing the performance of a nuclear waste repository are described. More emphasis is on a computerized data base management system which facilitates use of the thermodynamic data in sensitivity analysis and other studies which critically assess the performance of disposal sites. Examples are given of critical evaluation procedures; comparison of apparent equilibrium constants calculated from the data base, with other work; and of correlations useful in estimating missing values of both free energy and enthalpy of formation for aqueous species. 49 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

Phillips, S.L.; Hale, F.V.; Siegel, M.D.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Seawater feed reverse osmosis preheating appraisal, Part II: system performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work evaluates the seawater feed Reverse Osmosis (RO) preheating system process. In this respect, the basic transport equations, which describe the system elements, are used for determining the performance of the process operating parameters and for assessing the feed preheating process. A seawater membrane, FTSW30HR-380, was used to perform this study. In Part I of the work, the leading element, which governs the whole system, was studied. Also, the limitations of the leading element operating parameters were determined. In the recent work, a computer program is developed using the RO-governing process equations to obtain the system design and projection for the seawater feed preheating assessment, which enabled the determination of the whole system by solving the system elements, one by one. Also, an evaluation of the power needed for freshwater production. The RO system feed preheating is studied for feed temperatures ranging from 15°C to 45°C. The study shows that the permeate salt concentration increases as the feed temperature increases and the system salt rejection decreases. The present study concluded that the permeate productivity decreases with the increase in the feed temperature. Results also show that the product's specific power consumption is dependent on the number of elements used, and energy recovery. In the case of the maximum available number of elements, it is found that the feed temperature increases as the specific power consumption increases, with or without brine pressure energy recovery. However, in the case of a constant number of elements, seven elements, the specific power consumption decreases as the feed temperature increases.

Aly Karameldin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Performance categorization of structures, systems & components and related issues  

SciTech Connect

Provisions of DOE-STD-1021-93 on performance categorization of structures, systems and components (SSCs) subjected to natural phenomena hazards (NPHs) are summarized. The interrelationship among safety classification of SSCs (per DOE 6430.1A and DOE 5480.30), facility hazard categorization/classification (per DOE 5481.1B and DOE 5480.23), and NPH performance categorization of SSCs (per DOE 5480.28 and DOE-STD-1021-93) is discussed. The compatibility between the safety goals in the Department of Energy Safety Policy, SEN-35-91, and the numerical NPH performance goals of DOE 5480.28, as presented in UCRL-ID-12612 (draft), is examined.

Hossain, Q.A.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Solar energy system performance evaluation, July 1979 through June 1980  

SciTech Connect

The Loudoun County site is the Charles S. Monroe Vocational Technical School in Leesburg, Virginia. The active solar energy system is designed to supply 26% of the domestic hot water demand. It is equipped with 1225 square feet of double glazed flat-plate collectors manufactured by Southwest Enertech, a 2056 gallon liquid storage tank located in the school's mechanical room, and a backup electric immersion heater, 2 stage, 20 kW per stage. The system performance for the period July 1979 through June 1980 is presented, and the meteorological conditions are included. (WHK)

Missal, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Real-time performance monitoring and management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

KMS fusion system resource accounting and performance measurement system for RSX11M V3. 2  

SciTech Connect

Version 3.2 of the KMS FUSION accounting system is aimed at providing the user of RSX11M V3.2 with a versatile tool for measuring the performance of the operating system, tuning the system, and providing sufficient usage statistics so that the system manager can implement chargeback accounting if it is required by the installation. Sufficient hooks are provided so that the intrepid user can expand the system substantially beyond what is currently provided.

Downward, J.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Residential commissioning to assess envelope and HVAC system performance  

SciTech Connect

Houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. For example, Walker et al. (1998a) found large variations in thermal distribution system efficiency, as much as a factor of two even between side-by-side houses with the same system design and installation crew. This and other studies (e.g., Jump et al. 1996) indicate that duct leakage testing and sealing can readily achieve a 25 to 30% reduction in installed cooling capacity and energy consumption. As another example, consider that the building industry has recognized for at least 20 years the substantial impact that envelope airtightness has on thermal loads, energy use, comfort, and indoor air quality. However, Walker et al. (1998a) found 50% variances in airtightness for houses with the same design and construction crews, within the same subdivision. A substantial reason for these problems is that few houses are now built or retrofitted using formal design procedures, most are field assembled from a large number of components, and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Solving the problems requires field performance evaluations of houses using appropriate and agreed upon procedures. Many procedural elements already exist in a fragmented environment; some are ready now to be integrated into a new process called residential commissioning (Wray et al. 2000). For example, California's Title 24 energy code already provides some commissioning elements for evaluating the energy performance of new houses. A house consists of components and systems that need to be commissioned, such as building envelopes, air distribution systems, cooling equipment, heat pumps, combustion appliances, controls, and other electrical appliances. For simplicity and practicality, these components and systems are usually evaluated individually, but we need to bear in mind that many of them interact. Therefore, commissioning must not only identify the energy and non-energy benefits associated with improving the performance of a component, it must also indicate how individual components interact in the complete building system. For this paper, we limit our discussion to diagnostics in areas of particular concern with significant interactions: envelope and HVAC systems. These areas include insulation quality, windows, airtightness, envelope moisture, fan and duct system airflows, duct leakage, cooling equipment charge, and combustion appliance backdrafting with spillage. The remainder of this paper first describes what residential commissioning is, its characteristic elements, and how one might structure its process. Subsequent sections describe a consolidated set of practical diagnostics that the building industry can use now. Where possible, we also discuss the accuracy and usability of these diagnostics, based on recent laboratory work and field studies. We conclude by describing areas in need of research and development, such as practical field diagnostics for envelope thermal conductance and combustion safety. There are several potential benefits for builders, consumers, code officials, utilities, and energy planners of commissioning houses using a consistent set of validated methods. Builders and/or commissioning agents will be able to optimize system performance and reduce consumer costs associated with building energy use. Consumers will be more likely to get what they paid for and builders can show they delivered what was expected. Code officials will be better able to enforce existing and future energy codes. As energy reduction measures are more effectively incorporated into the housing stock, utilities and energy planners will benefit through greater confidence in predicting demand and greater assurance that demand reductions will actually occur. Performance improvements will also reduce emissions from electricity generating plants and residential combustion equipment. Research to characterize these benefits is underway.

Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

226

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An advanced exhaust aftertreatment system developed to meet EPA 2010 and final Tier 4 emission regulations show substantial improvements in system performance while reducing system cost

227

High-performance Earth system modeling with NASA/GSFC’s Land Information System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Land Information System software (LIS; http://lis.gsfc.nasa.gov/, 2006) has been developed to support high-performance land surface modeling and data assimilation. LIS integrates parallel and distributed comp...

C. D. Peters-Lidard; P. R. Houser; Y. Tian…

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

On the performance of the base-stock inventory system under a compound Erlang demand distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we propose a new method for determining the optimal base-stock level in a single echelon inventory system where the demand is a compound Erlang process and the lead-time is constant. The demand inter-arrival follows an Erlang distribution and the demand size follows a Gamma distribution. The stock is controlled according to a continuous review base-stock policy where unfilled demands are backordered. The optimal base-stock level is derived based on a minimization of the total expected inventory cost. A numerical investigation is conducted to analyze the performance of the inventory system with respect to the different system parameters and also to show the outperformance of the approach that is based on the compound Erlang demand assumption as compared to the classical Newsboy approach. This work allows insights to be gained on stock control related issues for both slow and fast moving stock keeping units.

S. Saidane; M.Z. Babai; M.S. Aguir; O. Korbaa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Thermal and Power Challenges in High Performance Computing Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the thermal and power challenges in emerging high performance computing platforms. The advent of new sophisticated applications in highly diverse areas such as health, education, finance, entertainment, etc. is driving the platform and device requirements for future systems. The key ingredients of future platforms are vertically integrated (3D) die-stacked devices which provide the required performance characteristics with the associated form factor advantages. Two of the major challenges to the design of through silicon via (TSV) based 3D stacked technologies are (i) effective thermal management and (ii) efficient power delivery mechanisms. Some of the key challenges that are articulated in this paper include hot-spot superposition and intensification in a 3D stack, design/optimization of thermal through silicon vias (TTSVs), non-uniform power loading of multi-die stacks, efficient on-chip power delivery, minimization of electrical hotspots etc.

Venkat Natarajan; Anand Deshpande; Sudarshan Solanki; Arun Chandrasekhar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Performance contracting for parabolic trough solar thermal systems  

SciTech Connect

Several applications of solar energy have proven viable in the energy marketplace, due to competitive technology and economic performance. One example is the parabolic trough solar collectors, which use focused solar energy to maximize efficiency and reduce material use in construction. Technical improvements are complemented by new business practices to make parabolic trough solar thermal systems technically and economically viable in an ever widening range of applications. Technical developments in materials and fabrication techniques reduce production cost and expand applications from swimming pool heating and service hot water, to higher-temperature applications such as absorption cooling and process steam. Simultaneously, new financing mechanisms such as a recently awarded US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) indefinite quantity Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) facilitate and streamline implementation of the technology in federal facilities such as prisons and military bases.

Brown, H.; Hewett, R.; Walker, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, R.; May, K. [Industrial Solar Technology, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability.

Dinh, H.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

232

Diagnostics and performance evaluation of neutron monitoring system detectors  

SciTech Connect

Neutron monitoring detectors used in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) power range monitoring control systems are typically miniature fission chambers that remain in the core for many years. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) also utilize movable miniature fission chambers for neutron flux mapping during power operations. The baseline performance of the detectors must be established at the time of installation and retested periodically during the life of the detector to evaluate its suitability for continued use. This paper reports on the characteristics that the power range detectors typically exhibit at the beginning of life and describes the normal changes in characteristics that are expected to occur as the detector ages in the in-core environment. Deviations from the normal aging effects that may be revealed through periodic testing are described. Possible root causes for some deviations from the expected performance are discussed. In addition to the power range monitoring detectors, the neutron monitoring system also utilizes other fission chambers for source range or intermediate range neutron monitoring during startup, and neutron or gamma detectors for periodic sensitivity re-calibration of the power range monitoring detectors. Each of the detectors has function specific requirements that call for additional diagnostic testing methods to evaluate performance. Diagnostic tests such as Time Domain Reflectometry and Current vs. Voltage (IV) characterization provide useful information about the condition of the detector and the signal path that links the detector to the reactor monitoring and control system. Typical test results of properly functioning detectors are described and the significance of deviations from a normal result is discussed. (authors)

Kniss, T.; Doyle, J. [GE Energy, 8499 Darrow Rd., Twinsburg, OH 44087 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Inflow performance relationships for oil-water systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the wellbore. The inflow performance of the oil phase is therefore reduced by the evolution of free gas. The general flow equation foz saturated oil systems may be written as kh ro ~p 141. 2 [In(ze/rw) -0. 75+s+Dqo] )( B Pwf . . 10 Fetkovich5 suggested... in high rate wells. The empirical Eq. 11 was later substant. iated by Fetkovichs It can be written as [1- ( ? ) qo pwf 2 " qo max Pr 13 This equation contains two factors, qo max and n, that define the productivity of a particular well. These can...

Mukerji, Parijat

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

235

A high-performance workflow system for subsurface simulation  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface modeling applications typically neglect uncertainty in the conceptual models, past or future scenarios, and attribute most or all uncertainty to errors in model parameters. In this contribution, uncertainty in technetium-99 transport in a heterogeneous, deep vadose zone is explored with respect to the conceptual model using a next generation user environment called Akuna. Akuna provides a range of tools to manage environmental modeling projects, from managing simulation data to visualizing results from high-performance computational simulators. Core toolsets accessible through the user interface include model setup, grid generation, parameter estimation, and uncertainty quantification. The BC Cribs site at Hanford in southeastern Washington State is used to demonstrate Akuna capabilities. At the BC Cribs site, conceptualization of the system is highly uncertain because only sparse information is available for the geologic conceptual model, the physical and chemical properties of the sediments, and the history of waste disposal operations. Using the Akuna toolset to perform an analysis of conservative solute transport, significant prediction uncertainty in simulated concentrations is demonstrated by conceptual model variation. This demonstrates that conceptual model uncertainty is an important consideration in sparse data environments such as BC Cribs. It is also demonstrated that Akuna and the underlying toolset provides an integrated modeling environment that streamlines model setup, parameter optimization, and uncertainty analyses for high-performance computing applications.

Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Xingyuan; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Gosink, Luke J.; Keating, Elizabeth; Lansing, Carina; Moeglein, William AM; Murray, Christopher J.; Pau, George Shu Heng; Porter, Ellen A.; Purohit, Sumit; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Waichler, Scott R.

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

236

Transient performance of substation structures and associated grounding systems  

SciTech Connect

When lightning strikes an electric substation, large currents generated by the stroke flow in the above ground structures and grounding system and dissipate in the soil. The electromagnetic fields generated by such high currents may cause damage to equipment and may be dangerous to personnel working nearby. In this paper, the frequency and time domain performance of a substation subjected to a lightning strike is described and discussed. The computed scalar potentials, electric fields, and magnetic fields are presented graphically as a function of spatial coordinates, as a function of time and as a function of both. Two cases are considered. The first case examines the substation grounding system only, while the second case includes an above-ground structure as well. It is believed that the results of the second case have not been published before. A double exponential lightning surge current is injected at one corner of the substation. The response of the grounding system to the frequency domain electromagnetic spectrum of this signal is computed by a frequency domain electromagnetic field analysis software package. The temporal and spatial distributions of the electromagnetic fields inside and near the substation are obtained by an inverse Fourier transformation of all these responses. The presence of a soil with an arbitrary resistivity and permittivity is accurately taken into account. The analysis sheds some new light on the understanding of the effects which take place at the higher frequencies.

Dawalibi, F.P.; Xiong, W.; Ma, J. [Safe Engineering Services and Technologies Ltd., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Safe Engineering Services and Technologies Ltd., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Energy performance evaluation of fishing vessels by fuel mass flow measuring system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new fuel consumption monitoring system was set up for research purpose in order to evaluate the energy performance of fishing vessels under different operating conditions. The system has been tested on two semi-pelagic pair trawlers in the Adriatic Sea with an engine power of around 900 kW, and with length overall of around 30 m. Both vessels work with a gear of similar design and size, the differences between the two vessels are in the propeller design and the hull material: the first with a controllable pitch propeller (CPP) and a metal hull, the second with a fixed pitch propeller (FPP) and a wooden hull. The fuel monitoring system conceived at CNR-ISMAR Ancona (Italy) consists of two mass flow sensors, one multichannel recorder and one GPS data logger. The working time duration, the vessel speed, the total fuel consumption and the instant fuel rate were logged by the system. A typical commercial round trip for a semi-pelagic trawler consists of several fishing operations (steaming, trawling sailing, etc.). Fuel consumption rate and vessel speed data were used to identify energy performance under different vessel-operating conditions. The highest fuel demands were during the trawling (130 l/h at 4.4 kn) and the steaming (100–130 l/h at 11 kn) phases. Fuel savings of up to 15% could be obtained by reducing the navigation speed of half a knot.

Antonello Sala; Francesco De Carlo; Gabriele Buglioni; Alessandro Lucchetti

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System Performance Studies  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

METC/C-97/7278 METC/C-97/7278 Title: Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System Performance STudies Authors: George T. Lee (METC) Frederick A. Sudhoff (METC) Conference: Fuel Cells '96 Review Meeting Conference Location: Morgantown, West Virginia Conference Dates: August 20-21, 1996 Conference Sponsor: U.S. DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

239

Performance Parameters for Grid-Connected PV Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 B. Marion, J. Adelstein, and K. Boyle National Renewable Energy Laboratory H. Hayden, B. Hammond, T. Fletcher, B. Canada, and D. Narang Arizona Public Service Co. D. Shugar, H. Wenger, A. Kimber, and L. Mitchell PowerLight Corporation G. Rich and T. Townsend First Solar Prepared for the 31 st IEEE Photovoltaics Specialists Conference and Exhibition Lake Buena Vista, Florida January 3-7, 2005 February 2005 * NREL/CP-520-37358 Performance Parameters for Grid-Connected PV Systems

240

Performance analysis of PV pumping systems using switched reluctance motor drives  

SciTech Connect

A PV pumping system using switched reluctance motor (SRM) is thoroughly investigated in this work. This motor is supplied by a d.c. voltage through a simple switching circuit. This drive circuit is much simpler than the normal d.c./a.c. inverter required to supply the induction motor. The efficiency of this motor is considerably higher than that of the equivalent d.c. or induction motors. In addition, because of the simple construction, SRM is cheaper than these conventional drives. Because of the above advantages of the SRM, the proposed system has higher efficiency and lower cost as compared with other systems. A design example is studied in detail to explore the advantages of PV pumping systems based on this new drive. The study of the performance of the proposed system showed that the operating efficiency of the motor is about 85% during most of its working time. The matching efficiency between the PV array and the proposed system approaches 95%. The major part of the losses takes place in the pump and the riser pipes. This loss represents one-third of the total available energy. 21 refs., 10 figs.

Metwally, H.M.B. [Zagazig Univ. (Egypt)] [Zagazig Univ. (Egypt); Anis, W.R. [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt)] [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Engineering development of coal-fired high-performance power systems  

SciTech Connect

In Phase I of the project, a conceptual design of a coal-fired high performance power system was developed, and small scale R&D was done in critical areas of the design. The current Phase Of the project includes development through the pilot plant stage, and design of a prototype plant that would be built in Phase 3. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team of companies in this effort: AlliedSignal Aerospace Equipment Systems, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI), and Westinghouse Electric Corporation. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. The following goals have been identified that relate to the efficiency,emissions, costs and general operation of the system: total station efficiency of at least 4 percent on a higher heating value basis; emissions--NOx {lt} 0.06 lb/MMBtu, SOx {lt} 0.06 lb/MMBtu, particulates {lt} 0.003 lb/MMBtu; all solid wastes must be benign with regard to disposal; over 95 percent of the total heat input is ultimately from coal, with initial systems capable of using coal for at least 65 percent of the heat input; 10 percent lower cost of electricity relative to a modern coal-fired plant conforming to NSPS. The base case arrangement of the HIPPS cycle is a combined cycle plant, and is referred to as the All Coal HIPPS because it does not require any other fuels for normal operation. An alternative HIPPS cycle uses a ceramic air heater to heat the air to temperatures above what can be achieved with alloy tubes. This arrangement is referred to as the 35 percent natural gas HIPPS. 2 refs., 11 figs. 3 tabs.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Vision 21 applications of high performance power systems (HIPPS)  

SciTech Connect

The DOE/FETC-sponsored High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) program headed by United Technologies Research Center has defined an indirectly-fired, coal-based combined-cycle power system design that achieves over 47% efficiency (HHV) using current power system technology. Additionally, advanced technology HIPPS using Humid Air Turbine (HAT) cycle gas turbines have been projected to have efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). The HIPPS uses a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) to preheat combustion turbine air to 925 C--1,150 C in a radiator section located in the furnace slagging zone and in a convection section located in the downstream portion. Additional heat for the turbine, if required in the cycle, is added by special low-NOx gas-fired combustors. A HITAF design has been successfully tested at the desired temperatures at the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND. The HIPPS concept with its advanced metallic air heater is a valuable technology candidate for Vision 21, the DOE's evolving plan to utilize coal and other fossil fuels in energy complexes producing power, chemicals, process heat and other byproducts. The HIPPS could be combined with other high efficiency components such as high temperature fuel cells, e.g., the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), resulting in hybrid power systems having overall electrical efficiencies greater than 60% (HHV) with significant energy input from coal or other solid fuel. These power plants would have near zero emissions with projected power costs below current coal-fired systems. Emissions of CO{sub 2}, an important greenhouse gas, will be drastically reduced by the higher efficiencies of HIPPS-based cycles. A very important early introduction application could result from the fact that HIPPS can be an attractive repowering technology. This would allow Vision 21 based technology to be applied to those plants that seek to continue using coal and other alternative solid fuels to capture the economic benefits of their low energy costs. Here, HIPPS adds high efficiency; increased capacity; load following and dispatching flexibility; as well as important environmental benefits to sites having existing fuel and transmission infrastructure.

Robson, F.L.; Ruby, J.D.; Seery, D.J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Distribution System Voltage Performance Analysis for High-Penetration Photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the performance of commonly used distribution voltage regulation methods under reverse power flow.

Liu, E.; Bebic, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A System Degradation Study of 445 Systems Using Year-Over-Year Performance Index Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This graphic summarizes the results of a study conducted by the SunPower Corporation, to assess the median degradation of a large number of systems. This is important because solar investors need proof of low degradation. The study, a project under DOE's SunShot Initiative, makes use of year-over-year performance index change analysis, a powerful and practical technique for assessing the median degradation of a large fleet of systems, which in this case includes a sample of 445.

245

Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis  

SciTech Connect

A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Procedure for Measuring and Reporting the Performance of Photovoltaic Systems in Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides a standard method for measuring and characterizing the long-term energy performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems in buildings and the resulting implications to the building's energy use. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks for evaluating system performance and verifying that performance targets have been achieved. Uses may include comparison of performance with the design intent; comparison with other PV systems in buildings; economic analysis of PV systems in buildings; and the establishment of long-term performance records that enable maintenance staff to monitor trends in energy performance.

Pless, S.; Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.; Hayter, S.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system.

248

Railplug Ignition System for Enhanced Engine Performance and Reduced Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This Final Technical Report discusses the progress that was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project. The primary objectives of the project were to (1) develop an improved understanding of the spark ignition process, and (2) develop the railplug as an improved ignitor for large bore stationary natural gas engines. We performed fundamental experiments on the physical processes occurring during spark ignition and used the results from these experiments to aid our development of the most complete model of the spark ignition process ever devised. The elements in this model include (1) the dynamic response of the ignition circuit, (2) a chemical kinetics mechanism that is suitable for the reactions that occur in the plasma, (3) conventional flame propagation kinetics, and (4) a multi-dimensional formulation so that bulk flow through the spark gap can be incorporated. This model (i.e., a Fortran code that can be used as a subroutine within an engine modeling code such as KIVA) can be obtained from Prof. Ron Matthews at rdmatt{at}mail.utexas.edu or Prof. DK Ezekoye at dezekoye{at}mail.utexas.edu. Fundamental experiments, engine experiments, and modeling tasks were used to help develop the railplug as a new ignitor for large bore natural gas engines. As the result of these studies, we developed a railplug that could extend the Lean Stability Limit (LSL) of an engine operating at full load on natural gas from {phi} = 0.59 for operation on spark plugs down to {phi} = 0.53 using railplugs with the same delivered energy (0.7 J). However, this delivered energy would rapidly wear out the spark plug. For a conventional delivered energy (<0.05 J), the LSL is {phi} = 0.63 for a spark plug. Further, using a permanent magnet to aid the plasma movement, the LSL was extended to {phi} = 0.54 for a railplug with a delivered energy of only 0.15 J/shot, a typical discharge energy for commercial capacitive discharge ignition systems. Here, it should be noted that railplugs and the associated ignition circuit should not cost much more than a conventional spark ignition system. Additionally, it is believed that the railplug performance can be further improved via continued research and development.

DK Ezekoye; Matt Hall; Ron Matthews

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Improve Chilled Water System Performance, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program Chilled Water System Analysis Tool (CWSAT) can help optimize the performance of of industrial chilled water systems.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A scalable silicon photonic chip-scale optical switch for high performance computing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A scalable silicon photonic chip-scale optical switch for high performance computing systems-scale optical switch for scalable interconnect network in high performance computing systems. The proposed

Yoo, S. J. Ben

251

Parametric Investigation of the Performance of Solar Heating Systems with Rock Bed Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of solar air collector domestic heating systems with rock bed storage, as obtained from theoretical analysis, is...

W. L. Dutre; J. Vanheelen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Case Studies Comparing System Advisor Model (SAM) Results to Real Performance Data: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

NREL has completed a series of detailed case studies comparing the simulations of the System Advisor Model (SAM) and measured performance data or published performance expectations. These case studies compare PV measured performance data with simulated performance data using appropriate weather data. The measured data sets were primarily taken from NREL onsite PV systems and weather monitoring stations.

Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Sather, N.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Performance Evaluation of Surveillance Systems Under Varying Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/outdoor, different weather conditions (precipitation, wind, and brightness), different cameras of metrics. Visualization of the performance results has proven critical for understanding the weaknesses, as the weather varies, the seasons change, and the daily events unfold. Performance evaluation of automatic

Senior, Andrew

254

Performance of International Space Station Alpha electric power systems  

SciTech Connect

The International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) will be an Earth-orbiting laboratory in space. It will house experimental payloads, distribute resource utilities, and support human habitation for conducting research and science experiments in a microgravity environment. Electrical power is a major utility to support successful achievement of the mission goal. The ISSA United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) Electric Power System (EPS) power generation capability will vary with orbital parameters, natural and induced environment, and hardware aging/replacement throughout the ISSA life. Power capability will be further restricted by various assembly configurations during ISSA buildup, by various flight attitudes, by shadowing on the solar arrays, by EPS operational constraints, such as pointing accuracy, battery charging, as well as operating voltage setpoints, and by ISSA operational constraints either to avoid long-term solar array shadowing from the adjacent solar array or to accommodate ISSA maneuver during proximity operations with other space vehicles, mating, and departing. Design of the ISSA USOS EPS takes into consideration the various equipment degradation modes, operation constraints, and orbital conditions to make it compatible with the environments and to meet power, lifetime, and performance requirements.

Hill, R.; Lu, C.Y.; Padhye, V.; Hajela, G.; Hague, L. [Rockwell International, Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Division

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Tracking performance characterization and improvement of a piezoactuated micropositioning system based on an empirical index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motion tracking is an important problem in micropositioning systems dedicated to ultra-precision robotic micromanipulation. This paper investigates the periodic motion tracking performance of a micropositioning system based on an empirical tracking performance ... Keywords: Micromanipulator, Motion control, Performance characterization, Piezoelectric actuation, Robust control, System identification

Qingsong Xu; Yangmin Li

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

An AWGR based Low-Latency Optical Switch for Data Centers and High Performance Computing Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i An AWGR based Low-Latency Optical Switch for Data Centers and High Performance Computing Systems based optical switch for data centers and high performance computing systems that builds upon several for Data Centers and High Performance Computing Systems ..i ABSTRACT .....................................

Kolner, Brian H.

257

A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems proposes a framework for reliability and dynamic performance assessment of wind energy conversion systems--Reliability, Dynamic Performance, Wind Power, Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS), Doubly-Fed Induction Generator

Liberzon, Daniel

258

Performance investigation of thermal energy storage system with Phase Change Material (PCM) for solar water heating application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to harvest solar energy, thermal energy storage (TES) system with Phase Change Material (PCM) has been receiving greater attention because of its large energy storage capacity and isothermal behavior during charging and discharging processes. In the present experimental study, shell and tube TES system using paraffin wax was used in a water heating system to analyze its performance for solar water heating application. Energy and exergy including their cost analyses for the TES system were performed. Accordingly, total life cycle cost was calculated for different flow rates of the Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF). With 0.033 kg/min and 0.167 kg/min flow rates of water as HTF, energy efficiencies experienced were 63.88% and 77.41%, respectively, but in exergy analysis, efficiencies were observed to be about 9.58% and 6.02%, respectively. Besides, the total life cycle cost was predicted to be $ 654.61 for 0.033 kg/min flow rate, which could be reduced to $ 609.22 by increasing the flow rate to 0.167 kg/min. Therefore it can be summarized that total life cycle cost decreases with the increase of flow rate.

M.H. Mahfuz; M.R. Anisur; M.A. Kibria; R. Saidur; I.H.S.C. Metselaar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Preliminary Investigation into Solar Thermal Combi-system Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Solar thermal combi-systems use solar energy to provide thermal energy for space heating and domestic hot water. These systems come in many different designs and… (more)

Lee, Elizabeth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Total System Performance Assessment Code (TOSPAC); Volume 2, User`s guide: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

TOSPAC is a computer program that calculates partially saturated groundwater flow with the transport of water-soluble contaminants. TOSPAC Version 1 is restricted to calculations involving one-dimensional, vertical columns of one or more media. TOSPAC was developed to help answer questions surrounding the burial of toxic wastes in arid regions. Burial of wastes in arid regions is attractive because of generally low population densities and little groundwater flow, in the unsaturated zone, to disturb the waste. TOSPAC helps to quantify groundwater flow and the spread of contamination, offering an idea of what could happen in the distant future. Figure 1.1 illustrates the problem TOSPAC was designed to investigate. For groundwater flow, TOSPAC can provide saturations, velocities, and and travel tunes for water in the rock matrix or the fractures in the unsaturated zone. TOSPAC can determine how hydrologic conditions vary when the rate of infiltration changes. For contaminant transport, TOSPAC can compute how much of a contaminant is dissolved in the water and how it is distributed. TOSPAC can determine how fast the solute is moving and the shape of the concentration front. And TOSPAC can be used to investigate how much of the contaminant remains in the inventory of a repository, how much is adsorbed onto the soil or rock matrix, and how much reaches the water table. Effective use of TOSPAC requires knowledge in a number of diverse disciplines, including real groundwater flow and transport, the mathematical models of groundwater flow and transport, real-world data required for the models, and the numerical solution of differential equations. Equally important is a realization of the limitations intrinsic to a computer model of complex physical phenomena. This User`s Guide not only describes the mechanics of executing TOSPAC on a computer, but also examines these other topics.

Gauthier, J.H.; Dudley, A.L; Skinner, L.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, M.L.; Peters, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An integrated multivariate approach for performance assessment and optimisation of electricity transmission systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article introduces an integrated approach based on data envelopment analysis (DEA) and principal component analysis (PCA) for efficiency assessment, and optimisation in transmission systems that have been responsible for the transmission of electricity in Iran to show its applicability and superiority. Performance of 16 regional electricity companies was evaluated using the non-parametric technique of DEA. The result indicates that the performance of several companies is sub-optimal, suggesting the potential for significant cost reduction and reduction in employee number. The optimisation procedure in this article is followed from two different viewpoints, i.e. input efficiency and -cost. The result of DEA model is verified and validated by PCA through Spearman correlation experiment. Moreover, the proposed approach uses the measure-specific super-efficiency DEA model for sensitivity analysis to determine the critical inputs based on efficiency and cost allocation super-efficiency DEA model to determine the critical inputs based on cost. The unique feature of this study is utilisation of DEA model for assessment and determination of critical inputs and optimisation for the critical inputs from two different viewpoints, i.e. input-efficiency and -cost. This is the first study that introduces a total approach for performance assessment and optimisation of electricity transmission companies.

Ali Azadeh; Somayeh Ahmadi Movaghar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fuels Performance Group: Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems  

SciTech Connect

Describes R&D and analysis in advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum-based transportation fuels done by NREL's Fuels Performance Group.

Not Available

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Enhancing geothermal heat pump systems with parametric performance analyses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Parametric performance analyses and comparison of a basic geothermal heat pump, a heat pump cycle with motor cooling/refrigerant preheating, and a heat pump cycle utilizing… (more)

Self, Stuart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Runtime Support For Maximizing Performance on Multicore Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

symposium on Computer architecture, ISCA ’86, pages 414–423,symposium on Computer architecture, ISCA ’10, pages 270–279,High-Performance Computer Architecture ( HPCA), Austin, TX,

Pusukuri, Kishore Kumar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website: www.emt-india.netBook4Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentenergy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment...

267

System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Performance System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the installation of a data monitoring system to analyze the efficiency and performance of a large solar ventilation preheat (SVP) system. The system was installed at a Federal installation to reduce energy consumption and costs and to help meet Federal energy goals and mandates. SVP systems draw ventilation air in through a perforated metal solar collector with a dark color on the south side of a build-

268

Performance characteristics of a MW-class SOFC/GT hybrid system based on a commercially available gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ultimate purpose of a SOFC/GT hybrid system is for distributed power generation applications. Therefore, this study investigates the possible extension of a SOFC/GT hybrid system to multi-MW power cases. Because of the matured technology of gas turbines and their commercial availability, it was reasonable to construct a hybrid system with an off-the-shelf gas turbine. Based on a commercially available gas turbine, performance analysis was conducted to find the total appropriate power for the hybrid system with consideration of the maximum allowable cell temperature. In order to maintain high performance characteristics of the hybrid system during part-load operations, it was necessary to find the optimal control strategy for the system according to the change in power required. The results of the performance analysis for part-load conditions showed that supplied fuel and air must be changed simultaneously. Furthermore, in order to prevent performance degradation, it was found that both cell temperature and turbine inlet temperature must be maintained as close as possible to design-point conditions.

Tae Won Song; Jeong Lak Sohn; Tong Seop Kim; Sung Tack Ro

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Review of the design and performance features of hvdc systems connected to low short circuit ratio ac systems  

SciTech Connect

The design and performance of an HVdc system is significantly impacted by the relative strength of the ac system to which it is connected. In this paper, design and performance features of ten HVdc systems are discussed. All of these systems are connected to ac systems that are relatively weak compared to the rating of the dc system. Six of these systems are back-to-back, two are overhead lines, and two are undersea cable connections. AC and dc system interaction problems and how they are addressed in the design and specification of each of these systems, are described.

Thallam, R.S. (Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Adult Football Helmet Ratings A total of 10 adult football helmet models were evaluated using the STAR evaluation system for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adult Football Helmet Ratings May 2011 A total of 10 adult football helmet models were evaluated in this group #12;NR: Not Recommended Adams A2000 Pro Elite STAR Value: 1.700 Cost: $199.95 Adult Football Helmet Ratings May 2011 Note: Any player in any sport can sustain a head injury with even the very best

Lu, Chang

271

Simulation of energy performance of underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system represents a fan coil unit (FCU) system, consistingEnergy use intensity EUI Fan coil unit F CU HVAC electricityarea Fan powered terminal unit (with heating coil) used for

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Improving Steam System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

in Industrial Steam Systems Insulate Steam Distribution and Condensate Return Lines Advanced Manufacturing Home Key Activities Research & Development Projects Facilities...

274

Performance results from the operation of an MgO-base FGD system  

SciTech Connect

An MgO-base wet FGD system was constructed and demonstrated with localized technology. The total capital cost is 40% lower than overseas price. This FGD system was developed for a 130 tons per hour steam, coal-fired cogeneration plant and has reached more than 95% of desulfurization without using any additive in the slurry absorbent. In order to meet the current SO{sub 2} emission control and the stringent regulation in, the future, a duct bypassing the FGD system was directly connected to stack to regulate the emission of mixed flue gas with and without desulfurization. The plume opacity is also improved. The nickel-base alloy sheet, INCO alloy C-276, was utilized in part as lining material at the intersections of mixing of cold and hot flows to enhance the local corrosion resistance. A process for preparing magnesium hydroxide slurry from magnesium oxide powder is also demonstrated. Performance results were obtained including SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, bypass flue gas mixing, liquid-to-gas ratio effect, scrubber pressure drop, and slurry pH effect.

Wu, S.R.; Hsu, H.W.; Uen, T.W. [Energy and Resources Labs., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

High Performance Interconnect System Design for Future Chip Multiprocessors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constraints of power and area, and provide ultra low latencies and high throughput. In this research, we explore different techniques to design high performance NOC. First, existing NOCs mostly use Dimension Order Routing (DOR) to determine the route taken...

Wang, Lei

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

276

Performance analysis of supply and return fans for HVAC systems under different operating strategies of economizer dampers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HVAC systems and associated equipment consume a relatively large fraction of total building energy consumption, a significant portion of which is attributed to fan operation. The operation of economizer dampers when installed can cause high energy consumption in fans if they are not functioning in proper and optimal manner. This will mainly be due to the potential high pressure drops through those dampers and associated high total pressures that should be developed by supply and/or return fans. It is then necessary to ensure that a proper strategy to operate optimally the economizer dampers is implemented with minimum fan energy use. The paper examines several operation strategies of the economizer dampers and investigates their effects on the performance of both the supply and return fans in HVAC system. It also discusses a new operating strategy for economizer dampers that can lead to lower fan energy use. The strategies are evaluated by simulations for a typically existing HVAC system. Several factors such as the building locations, system characteristics, resistance in the duct where the dampers are installed, supply air temperature and economizer control, and minimum ventilation requirements are also considered during the evaluations. The results show that the way of the economizer dampers been controlled has a significant effect on fan performance and its energy use. The proposed strategy if properly implemented can provide fan energy saving in the range of 5–30%, depending mainly on the number of hours when the system operates in the free cooling mode, damper characteristics, and minimum outdoor air.

Nabil Nassif

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The evolution of total lightning and radar reflectivity characteristics of two mesoscale convective systems over Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) passed over the Houston Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network on 31 October 2005 and 21 April 2006. As the MCSs traverse the LDAR network, the systems slowly mature with a weakening convective line...

Hodapp, Charles Lee

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Engineering development of coal-fired high-performance power systems  

SciTech Connect

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolysis process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and after each experimental program has been completed, a larger scale pyrolyzer will be tested at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. The facility is equipped with a gas turbine and a topping combustor, and as such, will provide an opportunity to evaluate integrated pyrolyzer and turbine operation. This report addresses the areas of technical progress for this quarter. The char combustion tests in the arch-fired arrangement were completed this quarter. A total of twenty-one setpoints were successfully completed, firing both synthetically-made char, and char generated from the pyrolyzer tests performed at FWDC's pilot plant in Livingston, New Jersey. Construction is to begin next quarter to retrofit the CETF for additional HIPPS char combustion studies in a wall-fired configuration. Design of the char transfer system for the PSDF also progressed during this quarter. A number of arrangements have been developed to modify the existing N-Valve configuration. As an experimental test facility, the PSDF needs to maintain operating flexibility in order to test under a wide range of conditions. Although a new char transfer design is needed to support the HIPPS testing at the facility, the Second Generation PFB program will also utilize this system.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Improving Motor and Drive System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry  

SciTech Connect

This is one in a series of sourcebooks to assist industrial personnel in understanding and optimizing motors and motor-driven systems

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Improving Pumping System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition  

SciTech Connect

Prepared for the DOE Industrial Technologies Program, this sourcebook contains the practical guidelines and information manufacturers need to improve the efficiency of their pumping systems.

Not Available

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT? Emission Control System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* Doug Emig Emigd@JMUSA.com * Sougato Chatterjee Chatterjee@JMUSA.com * WWW.JMCSD.COM Johnson Matthey Diesel Emission Control Systems 380 Lapp Road Malvern, PA 19355...

282

BLACK-BOX MODELLING OF HVAC SYSTEM: IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCES OF NEURAL NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK-BOX MODELLING OF HVAC SYSTEM: IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCES OF NEURAL NETWORKS Eric FOCK Ile de La Réunion - FRANCE ABSTRACT This paper deals with neural networks modelling of HVAC systems of HVAC system can be modelled using manufacturer design data presented as derived performance maps

Boyer, Edmond

283

Impact of forecasting error on the performance of capacitated multi-item production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of forecasting error on the performance of capacitated multi-item production systems Jinxing multi-item production system under demand uncertainty and a rolling time horizon. The output from parameters, thus improving the performance of production systems. q 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Xie, Jinxing

284

Multi-Source Hydronic Heat Pump System Performance Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pump unit) with a central chilled water storage tank. The MSHHP system uses significantly less energy than a conventional HVAC system, and lowers peak demand by shifting required electrical energy consumption to lower-cost, off-peak and mid-peak rates...

Meckler, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Performance Projections of HPC Applications on Chip Multiprocessor (CMP) Based Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance projections of High Performance Computing (HPC) applications onto various hardware platforms are important for hardware vendors and HPC users. The projections aid hardware vendors in the design of future systems and help HPC users...

Shawky Sharkawi, Sameh Sh

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

286

6 - Engine brake performance in diesel engine system design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter provides a comprehensive theory on engine brake performance. It first discusses vehicle braking requirement and the impact on engine–vehicle matching in engine brake operation, followed by a comparison between engine brakes and drivetrain retarders. It then introduces drivetrain retarders in detail including their torque and cooling characteristics. The performance characteristics of exhaust brakes and compression brakes are elaborated including their mechanisms and the interactions with valvetrain, variable valve actuation (VVA) and turbocharger. The principles of engine brake design are introduced through comprehensive simulation analysis on engine thermodynamic cycles in braking operation. A braking gas recirculation (BGR) theory is developed.

Qianfan Xin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$ 3,422,994.00 $ 3,422,994.00 FY2011 4,445,142.00 $ FY2012 $ 5,021,951.68 FY2013 $ 3,501,670.00 FY2014 $0 FY2015 $0 FY2016 $0 FY2017 $0 FY2018 $0 FY2019 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $16,391,758 Wackenhut Services, Inc. DE-AC30-10CC60025 Contractor: Cost Plus Award Fee $989,000,000 Contract Period: Contract Type: January 2010 - December 2019 Contract Number: EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Contract Name: Comprehensive Security Services September 2013 Fee Information Maximum Fee $55,541,496 $5,204,095 $3,667,493 $5,041,415 Minimum Fee 0 Fee Available $5,428,947 $6,326,114

288

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Wastren-EnergX Mission Support LLC Contract Number: DE-CI0000004 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 128,879,762 Contract Period: December 2009 - July 2015 Fee Information...

289

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Period: Fee Information Maximum Fee Contract Type: Minimum Fee 91,085,394 74,386,573 Target Fee September 2002 - March 2017 Cost Plus Fixed FeeIncentive Fee 1,192,114,896...

290

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fee Paid 127,390,991 Contract Number: Fee Available Contract Period: Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 4,104,318,749 28,500,000 31,597,837 0 39,171,018 32,871,600 EM...

291

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- Oak Ridge, TN Contract Name: Transuranic Waste Processing Contract June, 2014 2,433,940 Cost Plus Award Fee 150,664,017 Fee Information Minimum Fee 2,039,246 Maximum Fee...

292

Total Estimated Contract Cost:) Performance Period Total Fee...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Washington Closure LLC DE-AC06-05RL14655 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Cost Plus Incentive Fee 2,251,328,348 Fee Information 0 Maximum Fee 337,699,252...

293

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analytical Services & Testing Contract June 2014 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Advanced Technologies & Labs International Inc. DE-AC27-10RV15051 Cost Plus Award Fee...

294

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Cumulative Fee Paid 22,200,285 Wackenhut Services, Inc. DE-AC30-10CC60025 Contractor: Cost Plus Award Fee 989,000,000 Contract Period: Contract Type: January 2010 - December...

295

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy Savers (EERE)

& Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number: DE-AC30-11CC40015 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee EM Contractor Fee June, 2014 Site: Portsmouth Paducah Project Office...

296

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Number: Contract Type: Contract Period: 0 Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Washington River Protection Solutions LLC DE-AC27-08RV14800 Cost Plus Award Fee 5,553,789,617 Fee Information...

297

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2011 - September 2015 June 2014 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Idaho Treatment Group LLC DE-EM0001467 Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Information 419,202,975 Contract Period:...

298

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 Fee Information Minimum Fee Maximum Fee June 2014 Contract Number: Cost Plus Incentive Fee Contractor: 3,245,814,927 Contract Period: EM Contractor Fee Site:...

299

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

0 Contractor: Bechtel National Inc. Contract Number: DE-AC27-01RV14136 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Maximum Fee* 595,123,540 Fee Available 102,622,325 10,714,819,974...

300

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DE-AM09-05SR22405DE-AT30-07CC60011SL14 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 357,223 597,797 894,699 EM Contractor Fee Site: Stanford Linear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

LLC (UCOR) DE-SC-0004645 April 29, 2011 - July 13, 2016 Contract Number: Maximum Fee Cost Plus Award Fee 16,098,142 EM Contractor Fee Site: Oak Ridge Office - Oak Ridge, TN...

302

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 4,104,318,749 28,500,000 31,597,837 0 39,171,018 32,871,600 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Contract Name:...

303

Assessment of passive safety system performance under gravity driven cooling system drain line break accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A generation III+ Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) which relies on natural circulation has evolved from earlier BWR designs by incorporating passive safety features to improve safety and performance. Natural circulation allows the elimination of emergency injection pump and no operator action or alternating current (AC) power supply. The generation III+ BWR's passive safety systems include the Automatic Depressurization System (ADS), the Suppression Pool (SP), the Standby Liquid Control System (SLCS), the Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS), the Isolation Condenser System (ICS) and the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). The ADS is actuated to rapidly depressurize the reactor leading to the GDCS injection. The large amount of water in the SP condenses steam from the reactor. The SLCS provides makeup water to the reactor. The GDCS injects water into the reactor by gravity head and provides cooling to the core. The ICS and the PCCS are used to remove the decay heat from the reactor. The objective of this paper is to analyze the response of passive safety systems under the Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). A GDCS Drain Line Break (GDLB) test has been conducted in the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA) which is scaled to represent the generation III+ BWR. The main results of PUMA GDLB test were that the reactor coolant level was well above the Top of Active Fuel (TAF) and the reactor containment pressure has remained below the design pressure. In particular, the containment maximum pressure (266 kPa) was 36% lower than the safety limit (414 kPa). The minimum collapsed water level (1.496 m) before the GDCS injection was 8% lower than the TAF (1.623 m) but it was ensured that two-phase water level was higher than the TAF with no core uncovery.

J. Lim; J. Yang; S.W. Choi; D.Y. Lee; S. Rassame; T. Hibiki; M. Ishii

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Performance Enhancement of the Automated Concrete Evaluation System (ACES)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this proposed research is to improve and expand the detection and analysis capabilities of the automated, concrete evaluation (ACE) system. MoDOT and Honeywell jointly developed this system. The focus of this proposed research will be on the following: Coordination of concrete imaging efforts with other states, Validation and testing of the ACE system on a broad range of concrete samples, and Identification and development of software and hardware enhancements. These enhancements will meet the needs of diverse users in the field of concrete materials, construction, and research.

Baumgart,C.W.; Cave,S.P.; Linder,K.E.

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation is from the Building America research team BA-PIRC webinar on September 30, 2011 providing informationprovide information about how to achieve energy savings from solar water heating, electric dedicated heat pump water heating, and gas tankless systems.

306

A Human Performance Modeling System for Process Safety Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that system designers and safety professionals know about this required time frame before operations are initiated. Specific research goals for this project include the following: * Estimating the standard time data for operators to take corrective actions...

Harputlu, Emrah 1986-

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Impact of Software Structure and Policy on CPU and Memory System Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating systems, when compared to application programs, have received disappointingly little benefit from the performance improvements of the most recent generation of microprocessors. This thesis used complete traces of software activity from a RISCbased uniprocessor to expose the dynamic behavior of operating system execution and explore the sources of poor performance. Traces from both Mach 3.0 and Ultrix implementations of UNIX permitted a study of performance differences between microkernel and monolithic implementations of the same operating system interface. The comparison showed that both system structure and policy implemented in the system have a significant impact on performance. Measurements of X11 workloads showed that memory system behavior for these large workloads differs significantly from the kinds of workloads traditionally used for performance analysis. Structural and behavioral similarities between large X11 workloads and the operating system are reflected in the...

J. Bradley Chen; Brian N. Bershad; Daniel P. Siewiorek; Thomas R. Gross

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hydrazine engine start system air start performance and controls sizing  

SciTech Connect

Hydrazine has been used as an energy source in many applications to fuel in-flight main engine starting. In a current application, an existing hydrazine engine start system (ESS) design was adapted to meet new fuel control requirements. This paper presents a brief system description, historical context, and the motivating factors for the hydrazine controls changes and three case studies of controls design and analysis from the ESS program. 4 refs.

Johnson, A.T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Biomass pyrolysis processes: performance parameters and their influence on biochar system benefits.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focuses on performance of biomass pyrolysis processes for use in biochar systems. Objectives are to understand the range of control of such processes… (more)

Brownsort, Peter A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

DETERMINING EMPLOYEE EXPOSURE TO ETHYLENE GLYCOL WHILE PERFORMING MAINTENANCE ON AN AIRCRAFT DEICING FLUID COLLECTION SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Air monitoring was performed on an aircraft deicing fluid collection system at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CNKIA). The goal of the study was to… (more)

CHAPMAN, DONALD RIVERS

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System- Building America Top Innovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

NREL’s Standard for Home Performance-Related Data Transfer (known as HPXML) facilitates smooth communication between program tracking systems and energy upgrade analysis software.

312

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior and performance of discrete fracture networks in geothermal systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior and performance of discrete fracture networks in geothermal systems presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

313

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

314

Register Closing Effects on Forced Air Heating System Performance  

SciTech Connect

Closing registers in forced air heating systems and leaving some rooms in a house unconditioned has been suggested as a method of quickly saving energy for California consumers. This study combined laboratory measurements of the changes in duct leakage as registers are closed together with modeling techniques to estimate the changes in energy use attributed to closing registers. The results of this study showed that register closing led to increased energy use for a typical California house over a wide combination of climate, duct leakage and number of closed registers. The reduction in building thermal loads due to conditioning only a part of the house was offset by increased duct system losses; mostly due to increased duct leakage. Therefore, the register closing technique is not recommended as a viable energy saving strategy for California houses with ducts located outside conditioned space. The energy penalty associated with the register closing technique was found to be minimized if registers furthest from the air handler are closed first because this tends to only affect the pressures and air leakage for the closed off branch. Closing registers nearer the air handler tends to increase the pressures and air leakage for the whole system. Closing too many registers (more than 60%) is not recommended because the added flow resistance severely restricts the air flow though the system leading to safety concerns. For example, furnaces may operate on the high-limit switch and cooling systems may suffer from frozen coils.

Walker, Iain S.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Corrosion performance of materials for advanced combustion systems  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that utilize coal as a feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces capable of operating at more elevated temperatures than those prevalent in current coal-fired power plants. The combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments necessitates development/application of advanced ceramic materials in these designs. This report characterizes the chemistry of coal-fired combustion environments over the wide temperature range that is of interest in these systems and discusses preliminary experimental results on several materials (alumina, Hexoloy, SiC/SiC, SiC/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, ZIRCONIA, INCONEL 677 and 617) with potential for application in these systems.

Natesan, K.; Yanez-Herrero, M.; Fornasieri, C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Analysis of the Diagnostic Methods of the Performance Failure of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Co ntrol Systems for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol. V-5-2 Analysis of the Diagnostic Methods of the Performance Failure of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems Lianyou LI Zhihong ZHANG Yong...

Li, L.; Zhang, Z.; Sun, Y.; Li, D.; Xie, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Modeling the Impact of Product Portfolio on the Economic and Environmental Performance of Recycling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hrough the development of a general model of electronics recycling systems, the effect of product portfolio choices on economic and environmental system performance is explored. The general model encompasses the three main ...

Dahmus, Jeffrey B.

318

Conservation of Energy Through The Use of a Predictive Performance Simulator of Operating Cooling Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemical treatment program for the prevention of corrosion, scale and deposit accumulations. Calgon has made available a computerized performance simulator of operating cooling water systems which reliably predicts system corrosion rates, percent scale...

Schell, C. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Case Study- The Challenge: Improving Sewage Pump System Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This case study looks at how Trumbull, Connecticut increased the energy and operating efficiency of its Reservoir Avenue sewage pump station. With the help of ITT Flygt Corporation, the town altered the existing pump system by adding a smaller pump and modifying the system control scheme. The changes reduced annual electricity consumption by almost 44 percent, or nearly 31,900 kWh, saving more than $2,600 per year. The $12,000 project had a simple payback of 4.6 years.

320

Corrosion performance of materials for advanced combustion systems  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that utilize coal as a feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces capable of operating at much higher temperatures than those in current coal-fired power plants. The combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments requires development and application of advanced ceramic materials for heat exchangers in these designs. This paper characterizes the chemistry of coal-fired combustion environments over the wide temperature range of interest in these systems and discusses some of the experimental results for several materials obtained from laboratory tests and from exposures in a pilot-scale facility.

Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Freeman, M.; Mathur, M. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Peripherally Placed Totally Implantable Venous-access Port Systems of the Forearm: Clinical Experience in 763 Consecutive Patients  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneously placed totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) of the forearm. Between January 2006 and October 2008, peripheral TIVAPs were implanted in 763 consecutive patients by ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. All catheters were implanted under local anesthesia and were tunneled subcutaneously. Indication, technical success, and complications were retrospectively analyzed according to Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) criteria. Presence of antibiotic prophylaxis, periprocedurally administered drugs (e.g., sedation), and laboratory results at the time of implantation were analyzed. Maintenance during the service interval was evaluated. In total, 327,499 catheter-days were analyzed. Technical success rate was 99.3%. Reasons for initial failure of implantation were either unexpected thrombosis of the subclavian vein, expanding tumor mass of the mediastinum, or failure of peripheral venous access due to fragile vessels. Mean follow-up was 430 days. There were 115 complications observed (15.1%, 0.03 per 100 catheter-days), of which 33 (4.3%) were classified as early (within 30 days from implantation) and 82 (10.7%) as late. Catheter-related venous thrombosis was found in 65 (8.5%) of 763 (0.02 per 100 catheter-days) TIVAPs. Infections were observed in 41 (5.4%) of 763 (0.01 per 100 catheter-days) devices. Other complications observed included dislocation of the catheter tip (0.8%), occlusion (0.1%), or rupture (0.1%) of the port catheter. Dislocated catheters were corrected during a second interventional procedure. In conclusion, implantation of percutaneously placed peripheral TIVAPs shows a high technical success rate and low risk of early complications when ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance are used. Late complications are observed three times as often as early complications.

Goltz, Jan P., E-mail: Goltz@roentgen.uni-wuerzburg.de; Scholl, Anne; Ritter, Christian O. [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology (Germany); Wittenberg, Guenther [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Bielefeld Gilead, Institute of Radiology (Germany); Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Commissioning : The Total Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that rely on electronic control. Very frequently these systems and design features have not performed as expected. This can result in energy-efficiency losses. occupant complaints about comfort, indoor air quality problems. high operating costs...

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Performance Simulation of a Dependable Distributed System Yinong Chen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. Availability, reliability and risk analysis were studied under Markov models in [7]. This work describes, including · Reliability: The property of continuity regarding service delivery. Reliability is denoted by R in safety-critical control and monitoring systems like nuclear reactors, flight control and traffic

Chen, Yinong

324

Enhancing complex system performance using discrete-event simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we utilize discrete-event simulation (DES) merged with human factors analysis to provide the venue within which the separation and deconfliction of the system/human operating principles can occur. A concrete example is presented to illustrate ... Keywords: discrete event simulation, potential capacity, queuing model

Glenn O. Allgood; Mohammed M. Olama; Joe E. Lake

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

ICLS performance specification SECTION 16512 -CLASSROOM LIGHTING SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This section specifies an integrated classroom lighting and control system that provides: 1. Single source control sensors, photo sensors (if specified herein), Relay Control Interface with Modular receptacles - GENERAL 1.1 RELATED DOCUMENTS A. Drawings and general provisions of the Contract, including General

326

A key review on performance improvement aspects of geothermal district heating systems and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with a comprehensive analysis and discussion of geothermal district heating systems and applications. In this regard, case studies are presented to study the thermodynamic aspects in terms of energy and exergy and performance improvement opportunities of three geothermal district heating systems, namely (i) Balcova geothermal district heating system (BGDHS), (ii) Salihli geothermal district heating system (SGDHS), and (iii) Gonen geothermal district heating system (GGDHS) installed in Turkey. Energy and exergy modeling of geothermal district heating systems for system analysis and performance evaluation are given, while their performances are evaluated using energy and exergy analysis method. Energy and exergy specifications are presented in tables. In the analysis, the actual system operational data are utilized. In comparison of the local three district heating systems with each other, it is found that the SGDHS has highest energy efficiency, while the GGDHS has highest exergy efficiency.

Leyla Ozgener; Arif Hepbasli; Ibrahim Dincer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A comparative study of municipal performance measurement systems in Ontario and Quebec, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is an analysis of the municipal performance measurement systems in Ontario and Quebec affecting about 2/3 of all Canadian citizens. The article describes these two systems; how the systems came to be, their goals, types of indicators, accountability and reporting requirements, data analysis, and requirements for performance reporting. After a discussion of the broad literature related to municipal performance measurement both globally and in Canada, the two cases are described in terms of political background, system components, measurement requirements, and reporting requirements. Analysis of these systems then follows comparing the two systems which are similar but unique in significant ways. This analysis has implications for these provinces as well as other jurisdictions with, or considering, mandated municipal performance systems.

Alicia M. Schatteman; Etienne Charbonneau

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Effects of system cycling, evaporator airflow, and condenser coil fouling on the performance of residential split-system air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS OF SYSTEM CYCLING, EVAPORATOR AIRFLOW, AND CONDENSER COIL FOULING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL SPLIT-SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONERS A Thesis by JEFFREY BRANDON DOOLEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... COIL FOULING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL SPLIT-SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONERS A Thesis by JEFFREY BRANDON DOOLEY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

Dooley, Jeffrey Brandon

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

329

ViperVM: a Runtime System for Parallel Functional High-Performance Computing on Heterogeneous Architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.henry@labri.fr Abstract The current trend in high-performance computing is to use het- erogeneous architectures (i-performance computer design has shifted from high-frequency multi-core architectures to heterogeneous archi- tecturesViperVM: a Runtime System for Parallel Functional High-Performance Computing on Heterogeneous

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

330

Development of a Beowulf-Class High Performance Computing System for Computational Science Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Beowulf cluster computing technology, the Ateneo High Performance Computing Group has developed a high performance computing system consisting of eight compute nodes. Called the AGILA HPCS this Beowulf cluster computer is designed for computational science applications. In this paper, we present the motivation for the AGILA HPCS and some results on its performance evaluation.

Rafael Saldaña; Jerrold Garcia; Felix Muga Ii; William Yu

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Well Performance Analysis for Low to Ultra-low Permeability Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering Well Performance... Analysis for Low to Ultra-Low Permeability Reservoir Systems Copyright 2010 Dilhan Ilk WELL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS FOR LOW TO ULTRA-LOW PERMEABILITY RESERVOIR SYSTEMS A Dissertation by DILHAN ILK Submitted to the Office...

Ilk, Dilhan

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

332

Computational performance of ultra-high-resolution capability in the Community Earth System Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the fourth release of the Community Climate System Model, the ability to perform ultra-high-resolution climate simulations is now possible, enabling eddy-resolving ocean and sea-ice models to be coupled to a finite-volume atmosphere model for a ... Keywords: Earth system modeling, Performance engineering, application optimization, climate modeling, high-resolution

John M. Dennis; Mariana Vertenstein; Patrick H. Worley; Arthur A. Mirin; Anthony P. Craig; Robert Jacob; Sheri Mickelson

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

PowerPack: Energy Profiling and Analysis of High-Performance Systems and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-based nodes, and then provide in-depth analyses of the energy consumption of parallel applications on clusters and energy are primary concerns in modern high- performance computing system design. Operational costs power and energy consumption in high-performance systems, including each component's electrical

334

Modeling and performance of a single-electron-beam two-FEL system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of a single electron beam to power a master oscillator and power amplifier was demonstrated in the Rocketdyne/Stanford experiment. This article concentrates on the performance of the downstream element under the assumption of higher performance upstream elements such as might be possible for the high-brightness systems being developed in the Los Alamos and Rocketdyne/Duke programs. The modeling covers the performance of the initial high-extraction efficiency system, the filtering, transport, and refocusing of electrons into a second wiggler, and the performance of the second system. The Rocketdyne 3D simulation code FELOPT was used in the FEL calculations.

Ralph A. Cover

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Design of a Multicriteria Performance Model for JIT systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elimination of waste with the participation of all levels of the organization, fr om the shop floor throughout the manager ial str ucture. Its intent is to develop the management process for designing and manufactur ing products so that the least resources... up the items needed fr om an upstream section. This is prefer able to the traditional system where an upstream section usually makes some lots of items and pushes them to the downstream section regardless of the work status at that section; thus...

Coulibaly, Soma

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Modeling the Performance of Engineered Systems for Closure and Near-Surface Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

performance cleanup closure performance cleanup closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange July 13-14, 2009 Modeling the Performance of Engineered Systems for Closure and Near-Surface Disposal - Overview and Focused Discussions David S. Kosson CRESP and Vanderbilt University Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting July 29, 2009 1 safety performance cleanup closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Agenda * Overview of DOE Performance Assessment Practices * Focused Discussions - Role of PA Process in Risk Communication and Decisions - Modeling Improvements - PA Assumption Validation - Uncertainty Evaluation - Evolving EPA Developments - Related IAEA Activities * Looking forward

338

Geometric effect on cooling power and performance of an integrated thermoelectric generation-cooling system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Geometric design of an integrated thermoelectric generation-cooling system is performed numerically using a finite element method. In the system, a thermoelectric cooler (TEC) is powered directly by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). Two different boundary conditions in association with the effects of contact resistance and heat convection on system performance are taken into account. The results suggest that the characteristics of system performance under varying TEG length are significantly different from those under altering TEC length. When the TEG length is changed, the entire behavior of system performance depends highly on the boundary conditions. On the other hand, the maximum distributions of cooling power and coefficient of performance (COP) are exhibited when the TEC length is altered, whether the hot surface of TEG is given by a fixed temperature or heat transfer rate. The system performance will be reduced once the contact resistance and heat convection are considered. When the lengths of TEG and TEC vary, the maximum reduction percentages of system performance are 12.45% and 18.67%, respectively. The numerical predictions have provided a useful insight into the design of integrated TEG–TEC systems.

Wei-Hsin Chen; Chien-Chang Wang; Chen-I Hung

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Spiral 2 cryogenic system overview: Design, construction and performance test  

SciTech Connect

The new particle accelerator project Spiral 2 at GANIL (“Grand Accélérateur d’Ions Lourds, i.e. National Large Heavy Ion Accelerator) in Caen (France) is a very large installation, intended to serve fundamental research in nuclear physics. The heart of the future machine features a superconductor linear accelerator, delivering a beam until 20Mev/A, which are then used to bombard a matter target. The resulting reactions, such as fission, transfer, fusion, etc. will generate billions of exotic nuclei. To achieve acceleration of the beam, 26 cavities which are placed inside cryomodules at helium cryogenic temperature will be used. AL-AT (Air Liquide Advanced Technologies) takes part to the project by supplying cryogenic plant. The plant includes the liquefier associated to its compressor station, a large dewar, a storage tank for helium gas and transfer lines. In addition, a helium recovery system composed of recovery compressor, high pressure storage and external purifier has been supplied. Customized HELIAL LF has been designed, manufactured and tested by AL-AT to match the refrigeration power need for the Spiral 2 project which is around 1300 W equivalent at 4.5 K.

Deschildre, C.; Bernhardt, J.; Flavien, G.; Crispel, S. [Air Liquide Advanced Technologies, Sassenage (France); Souli, M. [GANIL, Caen (France); Commeaux, C. [IPN, Orsay (France)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

340

Improving Steam System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition (Book) (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

Improving Steam System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry was developed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO), formerly the Industrial Technologies Program. AMO undertook this project as a series of sourcebook publications. Other topics in this series include: compressed air systems, pumping systems, fan systems, process heating and motor and drive systems. For more information about program resources, see AMO in the Where to Find Help section of this publication.

Not Available

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Development of a Model Specification for Performance MonitoringSystems for Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes the development of a model specification for performance monitoring systems for commercial buildings. The specification focuses on four key aspects of performance monitoring: (1) performance metrics; (2) measurement system requirements; (3) data acquisition and archiving; and (4) data visualization and reporting. The aim is to assist building owners in specifying the extensions to their control systems that are required to provide building operators with the information needed to operate their buildings more efficiently and to provide automated diagnostic tools with the information required to detect and diagnose faults and problems that degrade energy performance. The paper reviews the potential benefits of performance monitoring, describes the specification guide and discusses briefly the ways in which it could be implemented. A prototype advanced visualization tool is also described, along with its application to performance monitoring. The paper concludes with a description of the ways in which the specification and the visualization tool are being disseminated and deployed.

Haves, Philip; Hitchcock, Robert J.; Gillespie, Kenneth L.; Brook, Martha; Shockman, Christine; Deringer, Joseph J.; Kinney,Kristopher L.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Systems, methods and computer-readable media to model kinetic performance of rechargeable electrochemical devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes an electrochemical cell, monitoring hardware, and a computing system. The monitoring hardware samples performance characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The computing system determines cell information from the performance characteristics. The computing system also analyzes the cell information of the electrochemical cell with a Butler-Volmer (BV) expression modified to determine exchange current density of the electrochemical cell by including kinetic performance information related to pulse-time dependence, electrode surface availability, or a combination thereof. A set of sigmoid-based expressions may be included with the modified-BV expression to determine kinetic performance as a function of pulse time. The determined exchange current density may be used with the modified-BV expression, with or without the sigmoid expressions, to analyze other characteristics of the electrochemical cell. Model parameters can be defined in terms of cell aging, making the overall kinetics model amenable to predictive estimates of cell kinetic performance along the aging timeline.

Gering, Kevin L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Impact of PHEV Loads on the Dynamic Performance of Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additional load to the power systems [5]. According to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), PHEVsImpact of PHEV Loads on the Dynamic Performance of Power System F. R. Islam, H. R. Pota, M. A into the existing grid. This paper analyses the impact of PHEV loads on the dynamic behaviour of a power system

Pota, Himanshu Roy

344

A Framework for the Performance Evaluation of Operating System Emulators Joshua H. Shaffer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Framework for the Performance Evaluation of Operating System Emulators by Joshua H. Shaffer modern operating systems are capable of seamlessly coexisting in heterogeneous computing environments of an operating system, such as network protocols and file formats. However, application binaries remain

Perrone, Luiz Felipe

345

CLASS DEVIATION FINDINGS AND DETERMINATION Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS) Requirement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS) Requirement Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS) Requirement at Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 9.406-3(f)(1) and 9.407-3(e)(1) Findings 1. On March 23,2010, the FAR Council published a final rule in the Federal Register (75FR 14058), which amended FAR 9.4 to implement section 872 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for FISCAL Year 2009. Section 872 requires the establishment of a data system containing specific information on the integrity and performance of covered Federal agency contractors and grantees. The data system created for this purpose is entitled Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS), and it can be located at www.ppirs.gov and www.cpars.csd.disa.mil.

346

Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

High Performance Computing Update, June 2009 1. A meeting was held with users and potential users of high performance computing systems in April and this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Performance Computing Update, June 2009 1. A meeting was held with users and potential users of high performance computing systems in April and this considered a proposal from the Director and application "advice" and a core system to host and manage high performance computing nodes (or clusters

Sussex, University of

348

Real-Time Distribution Feeder Performance Monitoring, Advisory Control, and Health Management System  

SciTech Connect

New data collection system equipment was installed in Xcel Energy substations and data was collected from 6 substations and 20 feeders. During Phase I, ABB collected and analyzed 793 real-time events to date from 6 Xcel Energy substations and continues today. The development and integration of several applications was completed during the course of this project, including a model-based faulted segment identification algorithm, with very positive results validated with field-gathered data discussed and included in this report. For mostly underground feeders, the success rate is 90% and the overreach rate is 90%. For mostly overhead feeders, the success rate is 74% and the overreach rate is 50%. The developed method is producing very accurate results for mostly underground feeders. For mostly overhead feeders, due to the bad OMS data quality and varying fault resistance when arcing, the developed method is producing good results but with much room for improvement. One area where the algorithm can be improved is the accuracy for sub-cycle fault events. In these cases, the accuracy of the conventional signal processing methods suffers due to most of these methods being based on a one-cycle processing window. By improving the signal processing accuracy, the accuracy of the faulted segment identification algorithm will also improve significantly. ABB intends to devote research in this area in the near future to help solve this problem. Other new applications developed during the course of the project include volt/VAR monitoring, unbalanced capacitor switching detection, unbalanced feeder loading detection, and feeder overloading detection. An important aspect of the demonstration phase of the project is to show the ability to provide adequate “heads-up” time ahead of customer calls or AMI reports so that the operators are provided with the much needed time to collect information needed to address an outage. The advance notification feature of the demonstration system provides this time and helps accelerate service restoration ultimately. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this feature, a demo system using substation data alone was set up to compare the minutes saved over a period of 22 months for two feeders where the real-time notification system has been deployed. The metric used for performance assessment is the time difference between the actual outage time from the OMS versus the time the notification email was received on the operators desk. Over the period of 22 months, we have accumulated over 7600 minutes (32 hours) ahead of actual outage time compared to the OMS timestamps. The significance of this analysis is that it shows the potential to reduce the SAIDI minutes and directly impact utility performance in terms of outage duration. If deployed at scale, it would have a significant impact on system reliability. To put this number in perspective, it would be helpful to assign a dollar figure to the potential savings that could be realized. According to the host utility, the average cost for each customer-minute-out (CMO) is approximately $0.30 across the operating company. This includes both direct and indirect costs such as bad press. The outage data over the previous 4 years show that the average customer count on primary/tap level outages is about 56. Accordingly, the total minutes saved amounts to 425,600 CMOs on the average. This would in turn result in a potential cost savings figure of $127,680 for two feeders alone over the period of performance. This empirical evidence validates the strong value proposition of the project that was contemplated at the onset and its potential impact to reduce outage duration in support of DOE’s goal of 20%

Stoupis, James; Mousavi, Mirrasoul

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

350

Heating and cooling performance analysis of a ground source heat pump system in Southern Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines thermal performance of a ground source heat pump (GSHP) system. The GSHP system was installed in an office building in Nuremberg city of Germany. In order to evaluate system performance the GSHP system has been continuously monitored for 4 years. Heating and cooling performance of the GSHP system is analyzed based on the accumulated data. Major findings of this work include: (1) coefficient of performance (COP) is estimated to be 3.9 for a typical winter day and energy efficiency ratio (EER) is assessed to be 8.0 for a typical summer day. These results indicate that the GSHP system has a higher efficiency for building cooling than building heating. (2) For a long-term period, the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) of the GSHP system is observed to increase by 8.7% annually, whereas the seasonal COP is decreased by 4.0% over a 4-year period. The heating and cooling performance of the GSHP system migrates in opposite trend is caused by the unevenly distributed heating and cooling load of the building. This phenomenon deserves serious attention in the design of future GSHP systems in order to avoid the reducing of energy efficiency over long-term operation.

Jin Luo; Joachim Rohn; Manfred Bayer; Anna Priess; Lucas Wilkmann; Wei Xiang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

home performance program tracking home performance program tracking systems and energy upgrade analysis software. Many software platforms are available for recording the results of home energy audits for energy-efficiency upgrades and for analyzing home energy performance. Because states and utilities have adopted different tools for compiling and analyzing the data, home performance companies that participate in multiple utility programs or operate over multiple regions need proficiency in each of the reporting platforms used. The necessity of being fluent in multiple programs and of providing results in numerous platforms dramatically increases the home performance companies' information technology infrastructure and training costs. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has supported the

352

Solar energy system performance evaluation. Seasonal report for Fern Lansing, Lansing, Michigan  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Energy System was designed by Fern Engineering Company, Bourne, Massachusetts to provide space heating and domestic hot water preheating for a 1300 square foot single-family residence located in Lansing, Michigan. The Solar Energy System consists of a 278 square foot flat-plate air collector subsystem, a three 120-gallon tank storage subsystem, a 40 gallon domestic hot water tank subsystem, a liquid/air heat exchanger, an energy transport module, pumps, controls and heat transfer medium lines. Natural gas provides the auxiliary energy for the space heating (100,000 Btu/h) and hot water (70,000 Btu/h) subsystems. The system is shown schematically and has five modes of operation. Typical system operation, system operating sequence, performance assessment, system performance, subsystems performance (collector array, storage, hot water, space heating), operating energy, energy savings, and maintenance are discussed. A brief summary of all pertinent parameters is presented.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Performance Tools and APIs on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Tools and APIs Performance Tools and APIs Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) Rice HPC Toolkit IBM HPCT Mpip gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI High Level UPC API Low Level UPC API UPC Hardware BG/P dgemm Performance Tuning MPI on BGP Performance FAQs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Performance Tools and APIs on BG/P Systems MPI and OpenMP Options Tuning MPI on BGP Performance Tools Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) - Instruments applications and gathers information on timings, MPI activity, and hardware performance counter events Rice HPCToolkit- Performs sample based profiling of applications and

354

Secure and efficient high-performance PROOF-based cluster system for high-energy physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The particle detectors at the LHC produced about 25 PB data in a year, and the total size of data recorded on tape media at the CERN data center reached almost 100 PB in 2013. In order to preserve such a large-scale data safely and process them fast ... Keywords: Cluster system, High-energy physics, Large hadron collider, PROOF

Sang Un Ahn, Il Yeon Yeo, Sang Oh Park

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Remedial System Performance Improvement for the 200-ZP-1_PW-1 Operable Units at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Operations Review Report: Feasibility Study Strategies and Remedial System Performance Improvement for the 200- ZP-1/PW-1 Operable Units at Hanford Prepared for Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Office of Environmental Management February 9, 2007 i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters' Office of Environmental Management, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-22), performed a Remediation System Evaluation (RSE) of the 200-ZP-1/PW-1 groundwater pump and treat (P&T) system, as well as the vadose zone Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE) system at the Hanford

356

The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility Loads Speaker(s): Bert Phillips Date: November 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: James Lutz Bert Phillips will talk about the impact of forced air system blower performance on furnace or heating performance and on utility loads, and what can be done to reduce blower power requirements. He will also briefly discuss a ground source heat pump monitoring study that he just finished. Mr. Phillips is a registered Professional Engineer in three Canadian provinces and part owner of UNIES Ltd., an engineering firm in Winnipeg, Manitoba (60 miles straight north of the North Dakota/Minnesota border). He does research and HVAC system design and investigates

357

Critical processes and performance measures for patient safety systems in healthcare institutions: a Delphi study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation study presents a conceptual framework for implementing and assessing patient safety systems in healthcare institutions. The conceptual framework consists of critical processes and performance measures identified in the context...

Akins, Ralitsa B.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Building America Expert Meeting: Summary for Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for Residential Space Conditioning System Equipment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Science Consortium held an Expert Meeting on Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for Residential Space Conditioning System Equipment on April 26,l 2010 on the NIST campus in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

359

Structural Performance of a Full-Depth Precast Concrete Bridge Deck System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are experimentally and analytically investigated to assess the structural performance. Experimental loaddeformation behavior for factored AASHTO LRFD design load limits is examined followed by the collapse capacity of the panel-to-panel seam that exists in the system...

Mander, Thomas

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

360

Thermal Performance Characteristics of a Combined External Insulation System under Simulated Space Vehicle Operating Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main purpose of this investigation was to determine the long-term thermal performance characteristics, with liquid hydrogen, of an externally applied combined foam/multilayer insulation system under simulated...

F. J. Muller; P. L. Klevatt

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Development of HVAC System Performance Criteria Using Factorial Design and DOE-2 Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new approach is described for the development of Heating, Ventilating, and Air-conditioning (HVAC) System Performance Criteria for the Texas Building Energy Design Standard. This approach integrates a design of experimental methodology and DOE-2...

Hou, D.; Jones, J. W.; Hunn, B. D.; Banks, J. A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Biomass pyrolysis processes: performance parameters and their influence on biochar system benefits   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on performance of biomass pyrolysis processes for use in biochar systems. Objectives are to understand the range of control of such processes and how this affects potential benefits of pyrolysis biochar ...

Brownsort, Peter A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Modeling of Performance, Cost, and Financing of Concentrating Solar, Photovoltaic, and Solar Heat Systems (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

This poster, submitted for the CU Energy Initiative/NREL Symposium on October 3, 2006 in Boulder, Colorado, discusses the modeling, performance, cost, and financing of concentrating solar, photovoltaic, and solar heat systems.

Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christiansen, C.

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

364

Systems, methods and computer-readable media for modeling cell performance fade of rechargeable electrochemical devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes an electrochemical cell, monitoring hardware, and a computing system. The monitoring hardware periodically samples performance characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The computing system determines cell information from the performance characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The computing system also develops a mechanistic level model of the electrochemical cell to determine performance fade characteristics of the electrochemical cell and analyzing the mechanistic level model to estimate performance fade characteristics over aging of a similar electrochemical cell. The mechanistic level model uses first constant-current pulses applied to the electrochemical cell at a first aging period and at three or more current values bracketing a first exchange current density. The mechanistic level model also is based on second constant-current pulses applied to the electrochemical cell at a second aging period and at three or more current values bracketing the second exchange current density.

Gering, Kevin L

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

365

Improving Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This sourcebook describes basic process heating applications and equipment, and outlines opportunities for energy and performance improvements. It also discusses the merits of using a systems approach in identifying and implementing these improvement opportunities. It is not intended to be a comprehensive technical text on improving process heating systems, but serves to raise awareness of potential performance improvement opportunities, provides practical guidelines, and offers suggestions on where to find additional help.

366

Determination of useful performance parameters for the ALR8(SI) plutonium pit container system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF USEFUL PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS FOR THE ALRS(SI) PLUTONIUM PIT CONTAINER SYSTEM A Thesis by MARK ALAN PIERCE Submitted to the Office of Cnaduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2000 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene DETERMINATION OF USEFUL PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS FOR THE ALRS(SI) PLUTONIUM PIT CONTAINER SYSTEM A Thesis by MARK ALAN PIERCE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

Pierce, Mark Alan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Fact Sheet Available: Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety (June 2014)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet highlights the most recent activities and releases related to the protocol for measuring and expressing performance characteristics for energy storage systems. It covers the June 2014 revision and some of the more recent and upcoming work related to performance and safety.

368

The Europeanization of Health System Performance: The EUROCARE Study and Cancer Control in England  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into policy changes that strongly relate to the general direction of health care and public healthThe Europeanization of Health System Performance: The EUROCARE Study and Cancer Control in England and on the politics of measurement and performance to show how cancer control and health policy can undergo

Boyer, Edmond

369

Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2008  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Type: Maximum Fee 3,129,570 175,160 377,516 1,439,287 Fee Available 175,160 80,871 Accelerated Remediation Company (aRc) DE-AT30-07CC60013 Contractor: Contract Number:...

370

Performance testing and economic analysis of a photovoltaic flywheel energy storage and conversion system  

SciTech Connect

A subscale prototype of a flywheel energy storage and conversion system for use with photovoltaic power systems of residential and intermediate load-center size has been designed, built and tested by MIT Lincoln Laboratory. System design, including details of such key components as magnetic bearings, motor generator, and power conditioning electronics, is described. Performance results of prototype testing are given and indicate that this system is the equal of or superior to battery-inverter systems for the same application. Results of cost and user-worth analysis show that residential systems are economically feasible in stand-alone and in some utility-interactive applications.

Hay, R.D.; Millner, A.R.; Jarvinen, P.O.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Heat Transfer Performance and Piping Strategy Study for Chilled Water Systems at Low Cooling Loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of energy used in the commercial sector; commercial use is about 18.2% of the total energy used (EIA, 2010). Air conditioning is becoming more widely used in commercial buildings. The chilled water system is a very important component in large air....1 Simulation baseline Total face area / Face velocity 44 ft2 / 477.3 cfm Coil FH?FL 36 inch?88 inch Rows ? FPI 8 ? 11 Fin thickness / Material 0.008 inch / AL Tube outside diameter / Wall 5/8 inch / 0.025 inch Interior tube wall area Ai 759 ft2 Exterior...

Li, Nanxi 1986-

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

Cost and performance analysis of concentrating solar power systems with integrated latent thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Integrating TES (thermal energy storage) in a CSP (concentrating solar power) plant allows for continuous operation even during times when solar irradiation is not available, thus providing a reliable output to the grid. In the present study, the cost and performance models of an EPCM-TES (encapsulated phase change material thermal energy storage) system and HP-TES (latent thermal storage system with embedded heat pipes) are integrated with a CSP power tower system model utilizing Rankine and s-CO2 (supercritical carbon-dioxide) power conversion cycles, to investigate the dynamic TES-integrated plant performance. The influence of design parameters of the storage system on the performance of a 200 MWe capacity power tower CSP plant is studied to establish design envelopes that satisfy the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative requirements, which include a round-trip annualized exergetic efficiency greater than 95%, storage cost less than $15/kWht and LCE (levelized cost of electricity) less than 6 ¢/kWh. From the design windows, optimum designs of the storage system based on minimum LCE, maximum exergetic efficiency, and maximum capacity factor are reported and compared with the results of two-tank molten salt storage system. Overall, the study presents the first effort to construct and analyze LTES (latent thermal energy storage) integrated CSP plant performance that can help assess the impact, cost and performance of LTES systems on power generation from molten salt power tower CSP plant.

K. Nithyanandam; R. Pitchumani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

program tracking systems and program tracking systems and energy upgrade analysis software. Many software platforms are available for recording the results of home energy audits for energy-efficiency upgrades and for analyzing home energy performance. Because states and utilities have adopted different tools for compiling and analyzing the data, home performance companies that participate in multiple utility programs or operate over multiple regions need proficiency in each of the reporting platforms used. The necessity of being fluent in multiple programs and of providing results in numerous platforms dramatically increases the home performance companies' information technology infrastructure and training costs. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has supported the

374

Linear Performance Indices to Predict Oscillatory Stability Problems in Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Linear Performance Indices to Predict Oscillatory Stability Problems in Power Systems Claudio A is also presented to produce a linear profile for these indices. They are based on eigenvalue and singular-induced bifurcations, the lack of steady state solutions arises from system controls reaching limits (e.g. generator

Cañizares, Claudio A.

375

Lyapunov-based hybrid loops for stability and performance of continuous-time control systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We construct hybrid loops that augment continuous-time control systems. We consider a continuous-time nonlinear plant in feedback with a (possibly non stabilizing) given nonlinear dynamic continuous-time state feedback controller. The arising hybrid ... Keywords: Asymptotic controllability, Detectability, Hybrid systems, Lyapunov methods, Performance, Reset controllers

Christophe Prieur; Sophie Tarbouriech; Luca Zaccarian

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Kotzebue, Alaska (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Kotzebue, Alaska. Data provided for this project include wind turbine output, average wind speed, average net capacity factor, and optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

Baring-Gould, I.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF A ROBUST GPS/INS ATTITUDE SYSTEM FOR AUTOMOBILE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF A ROBUST GPS/INS ATTITUDE SYSTEM FOR AUTOMOBILE APPLICATIONS cars has led to a growing number of GPS applications in the automobile industry. In addition of an inexpensive and ro- bust attitude system based on GPS and inertial sensors, suitable for use in automobiles

Stanford University

378

Monitoring System for Testing the Performance of an Electric Vehicle Using Ultracapacitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring System for Testing the Performance of an Electric Vehicle Using Ultracapacitors Juan W. Dixon, Micah Ortúzar and Jorge Moreno Abstract A monitoring system for an Electric Vehicle, which uses of ultracapacitors in combination with batteries in electric vehicles. The efficiency gain is being monitored

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

379

Thermal Performance of Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems Containing Vacuum Insulation Panels  

SciTech Connect

A high-performance wall system is under development to improve wall thermal performance to a level of U-factor of 0.19 W/(m2 K) (R-30 [h ft2 F]/Btu) in a standard wall thickness by incorporating vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) into an exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Such a system would be applicable to new construction and will offer a solution to more challenging retrofit situations as well. Multiple design options were considered to balance the need to protect theVIPs during construction and building operation, while minimizing heat transfer through the wall system. The results reported here encompass an indepth assessment of potential system performances including thermal modeling, detailed laboratory measurements under controlled conditions on the component, and system levels according to ASTM C518 (ASTM 2010). The results demonstrate the importance of maximizing the VIP coverage over the wall face. The results also reveal the impact of both the design and execution of system details, such as the joints between adjacent VIPs. The test results include an explicit modeled evaluation of the system performance in a clear wall.

Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Carbary, Lawrence D [Dow Corning Corporation, Midland, MI

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A RESIDENTIAL GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM WITH ANTIFREEZE SOLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A RESIDENTIAL GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM WITH ANTIFREEZE SOLUTION M in a ground source heat pump system falls near or below 0o C, an antifreeze mixture must be used to prevent freezing in the heat pump. The antifreeze mixture type and concentration has a number of implications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Performance Metrics for Intelligent Systems Workshop March 20-22, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) - Smart Grid - Space Robotics - Medical & Healthcare Systems and Devices The Proceedings of Per) Workshop will be the eleventh in a series of workshops dedicated to defining measures and methodologies of evaluating performance of intelligent systems. Started in 2000, the PerMIS series focuses on applications

Perkins, Richard A.

382

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle System Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system using ASPEN. ASPEN is a steady-state chemical process-flow Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system. This study aims at developing a base case analysis

Frey, H. Christopher

383

TEAPOT: A Toolset for Evaluating Performance, Power and Image Quality on Mobile Graphics Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEAPOT: A Toolset for Evaluating Performance, Power and Image Quality on Mobile Graphics Systems present TEAPOT, a full system GPU sim- ulator, whose goal is to allow the evaluation of the GPUs metrics. Unlike prior GPU simulators, TEAPOT supports the OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0 API, so that it can simulate

Parcerisa, Joan-Manuel

384

WiSARDNET: A SYSTEM SOLUTION FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE IN SITU ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WiSARDNET: A SYSTEM SOLUTION FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE IN SITU ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING Zijiang Yang-temporal monitoring of environmental and ecosystems processes. WiSARDNet is a complete distributed sensing system. These features, combined with an energy-efficient hardware/software architecture and network protocol stack

385

Graz University of Technology Institute of High Voltage Engineering and System Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.hspt@tugraz.at u www.hspt.tugraz.at Institute of High Voltage Engineering and System Performance Test Laboratory systems Test of insulators, fittings and accessories Testing of high voltage equipment Impulse voltage and current tests On-site-test of medium voltage cables Electrical methods in environmental technology

386

Spearfish High School, Sparfish, South Dakota solar energy system performance evaluation, September 1980-June 1981  

SciTech Connect

Spearfish High School in South Dakota contains 43,000 square feet of conditioned space. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 57% of the space heating and 50% of the hot water demand. The system is equipped with 8034 square feet of flat plate collectors, 4017 cubic feet of rock bin sensible heat storage, and auxiliary equipment including 8 heat pumps, 6 of which are solar supplied and instrumented, air conditioning units, and natural-gas-fired boilers. Performance data are given for the system including the solar fraction, solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor and solar system coefficient of performance. Insolation, solar energy utilization and operation data are also given. The performance of the collector, storage, domestic hot water and space heating subsystems, the operating energy, energy savings, and weather conditions are also evaluated. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques and equations, site history, long-term weather data, sensor technology, and typical monthly data. (LEW)

Howard, B.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Coefficient of performance (COP) analysis of geothermal district heating systems (GDHSs): Salihli GDHS case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this survey is about to analyze the heating coefficient of performance (COP) of geothermal district heating systems. Actual system data are taken from the Salihli GDHS, Turkey. The collected data are quantified and illustrated in tables, particularly for a reference temperature for comparison purposes. In this study, firstly energy and COP analysis of the \\{GDHSs\\} is introduced and then Salihli GDHS coefficient of performance results is given as a case study. Moreover, this paper offers an interesting empirical study of certain geothermal systems.

Leyla Ozgener

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Functions within Radiance  

SciTech Connect

We describe two methods which rely on bidirectional scattering distribution functions (BSDFs) to model the daylighting performance of complex fenestration systems (CFS), enabling greater flexibility and accuracy in evaluating arbitrary assemblies of glazing, shading, and other optically-complex coplanar window systems. Two tools within Radiance enable a) efficient annual performance evaluations of CFS, and b) accurate renderings of CFS despite the loss of spatial resolution associated with low-resolution BSDF datasets for inhomogeneous systems. Validation, accuracy, and limitations of the methods are discussed.

Ward, Gregory; Mistrick, Ph.D., Richard; Lee, Eleanor; McNeil, Andrew; Jonsson, Ph.D., Jacob

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Solar Home Systems Performance in Rural Area in Aceh Case Study: Deah Mamplam Village, Aceh Besar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Evaluations of implemented Solar Home Systems (SHSs) almost never been carried out in Aceh. Most of SHS projects have been claimed to be failed despite there are no data explaining the failure. A study was performed to identify condition and performance of \\{SHSspost\\} installation in Deah Mamplam village, Aceh. After 6 years installation almost three-fourths of the systems are in good physical and operational condition although most are in temporary inoperative. The research demonstrated that the absence of program dissemination and user training prior to delivery and installation has contributed to the low awareness and knowledge of the system.

Hilda Mufiaty

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Performance of a high-speed switched reluctance starter/generator system using electronic position sensing  

SciTech Connect

A switched reluctance machine based system, whether a motor drive or a starter/generator, requires the rotor position to be determined to commutate at the correct instants. This paper compares the performance of a high-speed switched reluctance starter/generator (SR S/G) system when operating with a resolver to the performance when operating resolverless, or sensorless, using an electronic position sensing (EPS) subsystem for rotor position estimation. A brief overview of the SR S/G system is given, followed by the approach for sensorless system operation. Test results are given, and system efficiency is compared, for both approaches when operating both as a starter and as a generator. Minimal difference is seen in system efficiency, with peaks at over 75% for start-mode and at over 79% for generate mode, for both resolver-based and sensorless operation.

Jones, S.R.; Drager, B.T. [Sundstrand Aerospace, Rockford, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dinh Dinh (PI) National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 1, 2009 Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Objectives To assist the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in meeting cost, durability, and performance targets in the areas of fuel cell systems. The effort is focused on system-derived contaminants, but has a small component addressing "gaps" in the area of air contaminants. Premise System-derived contaminants can have negative effect on fuel cell performance. Current density (A/cm 2 ) 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 g ( SHE ) Average cell voltage after air oxidation exposure Average cell voltage as measured in vehicle

392

The parallel I/O architecture of the High Performance Storage System (HPSS)  

SciTech Connect

Rapid improvements in computational science, processing capability, main memory sizes, data collection devices, multimedia capabilities and integration of enterprise data are producing very large datasets (10s-100s of gigabytes to terabytes). This rapid growth of data has resulted in a serious imbalance in I/O and storage system performance and functionality. One promising approach to restoring balanced I/O and storage system performance is use of parallel data transfer techniques for client access to storage, device-to-device transfers, and remote file transfers. This paper describes the parallel I/O architecture and mechanisms, Parallel Transport Protocol, parallel FIP, and parallel client Application Programming Interface (API) used by the High Performance Storage System (HPSS). Parallel storage integration issues with a local parallel file system are also discussed.

Watson, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Coyne, R.A. [IBM Federal Systems Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Comparison of reliability performance of group connected and conventional HVDC transmission systems  

SciTech Connect

A group connected HVDC transmission scheme is a variant of the unit connection where instead of a single generator, a group of generators are directly connected to the converter. Studies conducted in the past indicated that significant cost reduction can be achieved using this scheme. This is mainly due to the elimination of many components which results in considerable capital and operating cost savings to the utility. Concerns regarding the reliability performance of unit connected schemes were raised, however, there has not been a detailed reliability study conducted. This paper addresses the reliability evaluation aspect of a group connected scheme and compares the reliability performance of the group connected scheme with that of the conventional common collector system. Reliability models for both schemes were developed using a hypothetical system model based on the Nelson River system. Practical system component outage data was used to examine the reliability performance of both schemes.

Kuruganty, S. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Annual measured performance of building-integrated solar energy systems in demonstration low-energy solar house  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the details of the output and efficiency of the annual performance of building-integrated solar energy systems for a solar water heating system and solar photovoltaic (PV) modules of a demonstration near-zero-energy solar house that was constructed on the campus of the Korea Institute of Energy Research. The thermal systems installed in the house were a solar water heating system with building-integrated solar collectors for water heating and for part of the space heating and a ground-coupled heat pump for space cooling and part of the space heating. Solar PV modules were installed on the roof of the house. The performance of these systems was monitored for more than 1 yr. The annual efficiencies of the building's integrated solar collectors and solar PV were 22.8% and 10.9% respectively. The total annual solar fraction of the solar heating system was 69.7% with an annual solar heat production of 248?kW h/m2. This paper also focuses on the efficiency of the house's solar storage based upon intentionally varied drainage of hot water from the storage tank. It was found that the thermal loss from the solar storage tank has a strong functional relationship with the thermal demand of the solar storage tank per unit volume. For example when the hot water consumption was reduced by half during September the thermal loss increased to more than 70% which would otherwise have been around 30%.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Performance Assessment of a Desiccant Cooling System in a CHP Application with an IC Engine  

SciTech Connect

Performance of a desiccant cooling system was evaluated in the context of combined heat and power (CHP). The baseline system incorporated a desiccant dehumidifier, a heat exchanger, an indirect evaporative cooler, and a direct evaporative cooler. The desiccant unit was regenerated through heat recovery from a gas-fired reciprocating internal combustion engine. The system offered sufficient sensible and latent cooling capacities for a wide range of climatic conditions, while allowing influx of outside air in excess of what is typically required for commercial buildings. Energy and water efficiencies of the desiccant cooling system were also evaluated and compared with those of a conventional system. The results of parametric assessments revealed the importance of using a heat exchanger for concurrent desiccant post cooling and regeneration air preheating. These functions resulted in enhancement of both the cooling performance and the thermal efficiency, which are essential for fuel utilization improvement. Two approaches for mixing of the return air and outside air were examined, and their impact on the system cooling performance and thermal efficiency was demonstrated. The scope of the parametric analyses also encompassed the impact of improving the indirect evaporative cooling effectiveness on the overall cooling system performance.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.; Slayzak, S.; Judkoff, R.; Schaffhauser, T.; DeBlasio, R.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems

397

Reducing the Carbon Footprint of Commercial Refrigeration Systems Using Life Cycle Climate Performance Analysis: From System Design to Refrigerant Options  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) analysis is used to estimate lifetime direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent gas emissions of various refrigerant options and commercial refrigeration system designs, including the multiplex DX system with various hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, the HFC/R744 cascade system incorporating a medium-temperature R744 secondary loop, and the transcritical R744 booster system. The results of the LCCP analysis are presented, including the direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent emissions for each refrigeration system and refrigerant option. Based on the results of the LCCP analysis, recommendations are given for the selection of low GWP replacement refrigerants for use in existing commercial refrigeration systems, as well as for the selection of commercial refrigeration system designs with low carbon dioxide equivalent emissions, suitable for new installations.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

System-of-systems iso-performance search to inform multi-actor policymaking to reduce aviation life cycle carbon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a system-of-systems formalism for modeling and analyzing multi-actor policymaking to achieve a global system objective. In contrast to a single optimal solution that aggregates objectives of actors, the concept of iso-performance ... Keywords: aviation life cycle emissions, iso-performance, multi-actor policymaking, system-of-systems

Datu B. Agusdinata; Daniel A. DeLaurentis

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Performance investigation of two geothermal district heating systems for building applications: Energy analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energetic performance of Balcova geothermal district heating system (BGDHS) and Salihli geothermal district heating system (SGDHS) installed in Turkey is investigated for building applications in this study. The essential components (e.g., pumps, heat exchangers) of these geothermal district heating systems are also included in the modeling. The present model is employed for system analysis and energetic performance evaluation of the geothermal district heating systems. Energy flow diagrams are drawn to exhibit the input and output energies and losses to the surroundings by using the 2003 and 2004 heating season actual data. In addition, energy efficiencies are studied for comparison purposes, and are found to be 39.36% for BGDHS and 59.31% for SGDHS, respectively.

Leyla Ozgener; Arif Hepbasli; Ibrahim Dincer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Fast Delivery Protocol for Total Order Broadcasting  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions of this report are: (1) Fast delivery protocol reduces the latency of message ordering for idle systems and keep comparable performances with communication history algorithms for busy systems; (2) The protocol optimizes the total ordering process by waiting for messages only from a subset of the machines in the group; and (3) The fast acknowledgment aggressively acknowledges total order messages to reduce the latency for idle system, and it is smart enough to hold the acknowledgments when the network communication is heavy.

Ou, Li [Tennessee Technological University; He, X. [Tennessee Technological University; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Opportunities for sustainable design and operation of cleanspaces: A case study on minienvironment system performance  

SciTech Connect

In order to identify and pursue energy efficiency opportunities associated with cleanrooms, it is necessary to understand the design and operation of cleanroom systems for specific contamination control requirements. With the industrial trend toward more stringent cleanliness class and tightening clean spaces, it is vital to understand the design of minienvironment and the operational performance of its systems. A good understanding of such system performance would help to identify opportunities in efficient energy end-use and wise allocation of resources associated with processes or productions that require minienvironments and cleanrooms. This report summarizes a case study on energy performance of a common minienvironment used in semiconductor industry, and discusses the opportunities in saving energy, in particular, the opportunities in achieving efficient operation and design that entails applications of minienvironments.

Xu, Tengfang

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Measurement-Based Evaluation of Installed Filtration System Performance in Single-Family Homes  

SciTech Connect

This guide discusses important study design issues to consider when conducting an on-site evaluation of filtration system performance. The two most important dichotomies to consider in developing a study protocol are (1) whether systems are being evaluated in occupied or unoccupied homes and (2) whether different systems are being compared in the same homes or if the comparison is between systems installed in different homes. This document provides perspective and recommendations about a suite of implementation issues including the choice of particle measurement devices, selection of sampling locations, ways to control and/or monitor factors and processes that can impact particle concentrations, and data analysis approaches.

Chan, Wanyu Rengie; Singer, Brett C.

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

403

Improving Cooling performance of the mechanical resonator with the two-level-system defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study cooling performance of a realistic mechanical resonator containing defects. The normal cooling method through an optomechanical system does not work efficiently due to those defects. We show by employing periodical $\\sigma_z$ pulses, we can eliminate the interaction between defects and their surrounded heat baths up to the first order of time. Compared with the cooling performance of no $\\sigma_z$ pulses case, much better cooling results are obtained. Moreover, this pulse sequence has an ability to improve the cooling performance of the resonator with different defects energy gaps and different defects damping rates.

Tian Chen; Xiang-Bin Wang

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

404

Building America Expert Meeting: Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Water heating represents a major residential energy end use, especially in highly efficient homes where space conditioning loads and energy use has been significantly reduced. Future efforts to reduce water heating energy use requires the development of an improved understanding of equipment performance, as well as recognizing system interactions related to the distribution system and the fixture use characteristics. By bringing together a group of water heating experts, we hope to advance the shared knowledge on key water heating performance issues and identify additional data needs that will further this critical research area.

405

Parasitic Effects of Grounding Paths on Common-Mode EMI Filter's Performance in Power Electronics Systems  

SciTech Connect

High-frequency common-mode (CM) electromagnetic-interference (EMI) noise is difficult to suppress in electronics systems. EMI filters are used to suppress CM noise, but their performance is greatly affected by the parasitic effects of the grounding paths. In this paper, the parasitic effects of the grounding paths on an EMI filter's performance are investigated in a motor-drive system. The effects of the mutual inductance between two grounding paths are explored. Guidelines for the grounding of CM EMI filters are derived. Simulations and experiments are finally carried out to verify the theoretical analysis.

Wang, Shuo [ORNL; Maillet, Yoann [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Wang, Fei [ORNL; Lai, Rixin [General Electric; Luo, Fang [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Boroyevich, Dushan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Testing of Passive Safety System Performance for Higher Power Advanced Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of NERI research on the testing of advanced passive safety performance for the Westinghouse AP1000 design. The objectives of this research were: (a) to assess the AP1000 passive safety system core cooling performance under high decay power conditions for a spectrum of breaks located at a variety of locations, (b) to compare advanced thermal hydraulic computer code predictions to the APEX high decay power test data and (c) to develop new passive safety system concepts that could be used for Generation IV higher power reactors.

brian G. Woods; Jose Reyes, Jr.; John Woods; John Groome; Richard Wright

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evaluating electronic waste recycling systems : the influence of physical architecture on system performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many different forms of electronic waste recycling systems now exist worldwide, and the amount of related legislation continues to increase. Numerous approaches have been proposed including landfill bans, extended producer ...

Fredholm, Susan (Susan A.)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Performance and Economic Analysis of Distributed Power Electronics in Photovoltaic Systems  

SciTech Connect

Distributed electronics like micro-inverters and DC-DC converters can help recover mismatch and shading losses in photovoltaic (PV) systems. Under partially shaded conditions, the use of distributed electronics can recover between 15-40% of annual performance loss or more, depending on the system configuration and type of device used. Additional value-added features may also increase the benefit of using per-panel distributed electronics, including increased safety, reduced system design constraints and added monitoring and diagnostics. The economics of these devices will also become more favorable as production volume increases, and integration within the solar panel?s junction box reduces part count and installation time. Some potential liabilities of per-panel devices include increased PV system cost, additional points of failure, and an insertion loss that may or may not offset performance gains under particular mismatch conditions.

Deline, C.; Marion, B.; Granata, J.; Gonzalez, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts.  

SciTech Connect

directly, rather than through simplified abstractions. It also a llows for complex representations of the source term, e.g., the explicit representation of many individual waste packages (i.e., meter - scale detail of an entire waste emplacement drift). This report fulfills the Generic Disposal System Analysis Work Packa ge Level 3 Milestone - Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts (M 3 FT - 1 4 SN08080 3 2 ).

Sevougian, S. David; Freeze, Geoffrey A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Gardner, William Payton [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Mariner, Paul [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Direct-Expansion Air-Conditioning System Performance in Low Humidity Applications: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRECT-EXPANSION AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM PERFORMANCE IN LOW HUMIDITY APPLICATIONS: A CASE STUDY MUKESH K. KHATTAR, P.E. DENNIS KEEBAUGH, P.E. Senior Systems Engineer Senior Research Engineer Florida Solar Energy Center Shenandoah Solar Center... warehouse. The flat gravel roof is exposed to sun. The 16' ceiling is insulated with two inch spray foam. Entrance to the warehouse is through sealed and insulated doors located on the west partition wall. The air -conditioning sys tem on this leased...

Khattar, M. K.; Keebaugh, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Performance of a Dynamically Controlled Inverter in a Photovoltaic System Interconnected with a Secondary Network Distribution System  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, a 300 kW{sub peak} photovoltaic (PV) system was installed on the rooftop of the Colorado Convention Center (CCC). The installation was unique for the electric utility, Xcel Energy, as it had not previously permitted a PV system to be interconnected on a building served by the local secondary network distribution system (network). The PV system was installed with several provisions; one to prevent reverse power flow, another called a dynamically controlled inverter (DCI), that curtails the output of the PV inverters to maintain an amount of load supplied by Xcel Energy at the CCC. The DCI system utilizes current transformers (CTs) to sense power flow to insure that a minimum threshold is maintained from Xcel Energy through the network transformers. The inverters are set to track the load on each of the three phases and curtail power from the PV system when the generated PV system current reaches 95% of the current on any phase. This is achieved by the DCI, which gathers inputs from current transformers measuring the current from the PV array, Xcel, and the spot network load. Preventing reverse power flow is a critical technical requirement for the spot network which serve this part of the CCC. The PV system was designed with the expectation that the DCI system would not curtail the PV system, as the expected minimum load consumption was historically higher than the designed PV system size. However, the DCI system has operated many days during the course of a year, and the performance has been excellent. The DCI system at the CCC was installed as a secondary measure to insure that a minimum level of power flows to the CCC from the Xcel Energy network. While this DCI system was intended for localized control, the system could also reduce output percent if an external smart grid control signal was employed. This paper specifically focuses on the performance of the innovative design at this installation; however, the DCI system could also be used for new s- art grid-enabled distribution systems where renewables power contributions at certain conditions or times may need to be curtailed.

Coddington, M. H.; Kroposki, B. D.; Basso, T.; Berger, D.; Crowell, K.; Hayes, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Performance Engineering of the Community Climate System Model (PECCSM) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Patrick H. Worley (Co-PI with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance computing systems. The CCSM has evolved recently to become a first-generation Earth system model, and has been renamed the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The CESM will be used to explore new science

414

Energy Consumption Reduction with Low Computational Needs in Multicore Systems with Energy-Performance Tradeoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Consumption Reduction with Low Computational Needs in Multicore Systems with Energy rules) in order to decrease the energy consumption. We proposed in a previous paper a robust control of the energy consumption. I. INTRODUCTION An energy-performance tradeoff is required in many em- bedded

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

415

Fact Sheet: Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety (June 2014)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet highlights the most recent activities and releases related to the protocol for measuring and expressing performance characteristics for energy storage systems. It covers the June 2014 revision to the protocol and some of the more recent and upcoming work related to safety.

416

XI. DIFFUSEGLOBAL CORRELATIONS: SEASONAL VARIATIONS Estimating the performance of a solar system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is measured on a horizontal surface and intensity on the tilted collector surface is calculated via a two39 XI. DIFFUSE­GLOBAL CORRELATIONS: SEASONAL VARIATIONS Estimating the performance of a solar system requires an accurate assessment of incident solar radiation. Ordinarily, solar radiation

Oregon, University of

417

Opportunities for Sustainable Design and Operation of Clean Spaces: A Case Study on Minienvironment System Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunities in efficient energy end-use and wise allocation of resources associated with processesLBNL-56312 Opportunities for Sustainable Design and Operation of Clean Spaces: A Case Study on Minienvironment System Performance Tengfang Xu 1. Background In order to identify and pursue energy efficiency

418

A Mesochronous Pipeline Scheme for High Performance Low Power Digital Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Mesochronous Pipeline Scheme for High Performance Low Power Digital Systems Suryanarayana B University Pullman, WA 99164-2752 Email: {statapud, jdelgado}geecs.wsu.edu Abstract- A mesochronous pipeline mesochronous pipeline over conventional pipeline architecture. in size (longer wires with increased parasitic

Delgado-Frias, José G.

419

The Performance Analysis on Fuel Injection System Failure for a Four-Stroke Marine Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The middle speed four stroke diesel engine has the advantages of small capacity, light in weight, capable to combustion poor fuel oil. In recent years, they have been used more comprehensive than before. Daihatsu 6PSHdM-26H diesel engine, which is a ... Keywords: 4-stroke medium-speed turbocharged marine diesel engine, Fuel injection system failure, delayed combustion, performance analysis

Jialiang Huang; Guohao Yang; Dan Wang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

SYSTEM PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUG 1979 SYSTEM PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP W. D. Richards W The development of the first prototype heat activated heat pump (HAHP) jointly sponsored by the Gas Research as a unitary heating and cooling product competing for the same market as is currently served by the gas year

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Present performance & future directions in two-photon addressed volumetric optical disk storage systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Present performance & future directions in two-photon addressed volumetric optical disk storage data storage is presented and future directions discussed. Influence of numerical aperture in a 3-D multi-layer optical data storage system is analyzed. Keywords: volumetric data storage, multi-layer data

Esener, Sadik C.

422

Performance-Oriented Drilling Fluids Design System with a Neural Network Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drilling fluids play a key role in the minimization of well bore problems when drilling oil or gas wells, usually the design of drilling fluids is depended on many experiments with experience. Rule-based and case-based reasoning drilling fluid system ... Keywords: artificial neural network, drilling fluid, performance-oriented

Yongbin Zhang; Yeli Li; Peng Cao

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Performance and Reliability of Non-Markovian Heterogeneous Distributed Computing Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance and Reliability of Non-Markovian Heterogeneous Distributed Computing Systems Jorge E-of-service (QoS), and service reliability associated with heterogeneous parallel and distributed computing-Markovian processes, distributed queuing theory, reliability, distributed computing, load balancing. Ã? 1 INTRODUCTION

Hayat, Majeed M.

424

Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems  

SciTech Connect

The Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems (PNNL-22010) was first issued in November 2012 as a first step toward providing a foundational basis for developing an initial standard for the uniform measurement and expression of energy storage system (ESS) performance. Its subsequent use in the field and review by the protocol working group and most importantly the users’ subgroup and the thermal subgroup has led to the fundamental modifications reflected in this update of the 2012 Protocol. As an update of the 2012 Protocol, this document (the June 2014 Protocol) is intended to supersede its predecessor and be used as the basis for measuring and expressing ESS performance. The foreword provides general and specific details about what additions, revisions, and enhancements have been made to the 2012 Protocol and the rationale for them in arriving at the June 2014 Protocol.

Conover, David R.; Crawford, Aladsair J.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Ferreira, Summer; Schoenwald, David

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reference Manual for the System Advisor Model's Wind Power Performance Model  

SciTech Connect

This manual describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM) wind power performance model. The model calculates the hourly electrical output of a single wind turbine or of a wind farm. The wind power performance model requires information about the wind resource, wind turbine specifications, wind farm layout (if applicable), and costs. In SAM, the performance model can be coupled to one of the financial models to calculate economic metrics for residential, commercial, or utility-scale wind projects. This manual describes the algorithms used by the wind power performance model, which is available in the SAM user interface and as part of the SAM Simulation Core (SSC) library, and is intended to supplement the user documentation that comes with the software.

Freeman, J.; Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Ferguson, T.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Performance prediction of a solar thermal energy system using artificial neural networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes in details an application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to predict the performance of a solar thermal energy system (STES) used for domestic hot water and space heating application. Experiments were conducted on the STES under a broad range of operating conditions during different seasons and Canadian weather conditions in Ottawa, over the period of March 2011 through December 2012 to assess the system performance. These experimental data were utilised for training, validating and testing the proposed ANN model. The model was applied to predict various performance parameters of the system, namely the preheat tank stratification temperatures, the heat input from the solar collectors to the heat exchanger, the heat input to the auxiliary propane-fired tank, and the derived solar fractions. The back-propagation learning algorithm with two different variants, the Levenberg–Marguardt (LM) and scaled conjugate gradient (SCG) algorithms were used in the network. It was found that the optimal algorithm and topology were the LM and the configuration with 10 inputs, 20 hidden and 8 output neurons/outputs, respectively. The preheat tank temperature and solar fraction predictions agreed very well with the experimental values using the testing data sets. The \\{ANNs\\} predicted the preheat water tank stratification temperatures and the solar fractions of the STES within less that ±3% and ±10% errors, respectively. The results confirmed the effectiveness of this method and provided very good accuracy even when the input data are distorted with different levels of noise. Moreover, the results of this study demonstrate that the ANN approach can provide high accuracy and reliability for predicting the performance of complex energy systems such as the one under investigation. Finally, this method can also be exploited as an effective tool to develop applications for predictive performance monitoring system, condition monitoring, fault detection and diagnosis of STES.

Wahiba Yaïci; Evgueniy Entchev

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Active charge/passive discharge solar heating systems: thermal analysis and performance comparisons  

SciTech Connect

This study analyzes the performance of active charge/passive discharge solar space heating systems. This type of system combines liquid-cooled solar collector panels with a massive integral storage component that passively heats the building interior by radiation and free convection. The TRNSYS simulation program is used to evaluate system performance and to provide input for the development of a simplified analysis method. This method, which provides monthly calculations of delivered solar energy, is based on Klein's Phi-bar procedure and data from hourly TRNSYS simulations. The method can be applied to systems using a floor slab, a structural wall, or a water tank as the storage component. Important design parameters include collector area and orientation, building heat loss, collector and heat-exchanger efficiencies, storage capacity, and storage-to-room coupling. Performance simulation results are used for comparisons with active and passive solar designs. Economic comparisons are based on these data and additional system features, such as cooling augmentation and integration of heating components with structural members.

Swisher, J.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Performance investigation of a solar heating system with underground seasonal energy storage for greenhouse application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reports the performance of a demonstrated 2304 m2 solar-heated greenhouse equipped with a seasonal thermal energy storage system in Shanghai, east China. This energy storage system utilises 4970 m3 of underground soil to store the heat captured by a 500 m2 solar collector in non-heating seasons through U-tube heat exchangers. During heating seasons, thermal energy is delivered by the heat exchange tubes placed on the plants shelves and the bare soil. The system can operate without a heat pump, which can save electricity consumption and further enhance the solar fraction. It was found that in the first operation year, 331.9 GJ was charged, and 208.9 GJ was later extracted for greenhouse space heating. No auxiliary heating equipment was installed so that solar energy covered all the heating loads directly or indirectly. It was demonstrated that this system was capable of maintaining an interior air temperature that was 13 °C higher than the ambient value when the latter temperature was ?2 °C at night. The ECOP (electrical coefficient of performance) of the first operation year was approximately 8.7, indicating a better performance than the common heat pump heating system.

J. Xu; Y. Li; R.Z. Wang; W. Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Performance investigation of a cogeneration plant with the efficient and compact heat recovery system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the performance investigation of a cogeneration plant equipped with an efficient waste heat recovery system. The proposed cogeneration system produces four types of useful energy namely: (i) electricity (ii) steam (iii) cooling and (iv) dehumidification. The proposed plant comprises a Capstone C30 micro-turbine which generates 24 kW of electricity a compact and efficient waste heat recovery system and a host of waste heat activated devices namely (i) a steam generator (ii) an absorption chiller (iii) an adsorption chiller and (iv) a multi-bed desiccant dehumidifier. The numerical analysis for the host of waste heat recovery system and thermally activated devices using FORTRAN power station linked to powerful IMSL library is performed to investigate the performance of the overall system. A set of experiments both part load and full load of micro-turbine is conducted to examine the electricity generation and the exhaust gas temperature. It is observed that energy utilization factor (EUF) could achieve as high as 70% while Fuel Energy Saving Ratio (FESR) is found to be 28%.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

3rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009, Nuremberg, Germany, March 30, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009 for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009, Nuremberg, Germany, March 30, 2009 Outline · Background work #12;3/193rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009

Engelmann, Christian

431

A Unified Multiple-Level Cache for High Performance Storage Systems Li Ou, Xubin (Ben) He, Martha J. Kosa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Unified Multiple-Level Cache for High Performance Storage Systems Li Ou, Xubin (Ben) He, Martha in high- performance storage systems to improve I/O performance. However, traditional cache management a unified cache (uCache) which uses both ex- clusive caching in L2 storage caches and cooperative client

He, Xubin "Ben"

432

A Dynamic Performance Analysis on CANDU Fuel Handling System for Operational Improvement  

SciTech Connect

The dynamic performance of the Fueling Machine (F/M) Heavy Water (D{sub 2}O) supply system for Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) was evaluated using Modular Modeling System (MMS) computer code. Parametric study has been carried out to investigate the effects of dual common set pressure and the position change rate of series valve on the dynamic behavior of common header pressure and common bleed valve position during the mode changes of supply pressure. The results show that the introduction of the series valve position demand curve and the dual common header set pressure is effective to attenuate the overshoot of common header pressure during mode changes. This does not lead any adverse effects on the system performance of supply pressure control and heavy water supply to F/M during the mode changes. The dynamic evaluation results of the F/M D{sub 2}O supply system will be used for the new control system parameter settings and help to relieve system operators' burdens during the system operation. (authors)

Jeong Mann Kim; Byung Ryul Jung [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc, 360 9 Mabuk Dong, Giheung-gu Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 449-713 (Korea, Republic of); Wan Kyu Park [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, 167 Samseong-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul 135-791 (Korea, Republic of)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The performance of UVGI Systems and its Limitation in Building Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The performance of UVGI Systems and its Limitation in Building Applications The performance of UVGI Systems and its Limitation in Building Applications Speaker(s): Minki Sung Date: August 20, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: William Fisk One of the main concerns for healthcare building design is how to prevent the dispersion of airborne infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. Moreover, it is suspected that fungi and bacteria growing in air handling units (AHUs) can also cause respiratory diseases in building occupants. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) systems have been known to have an apparent germicidal effect on infectious microbes and have been considered as a possible countermeasure. In this presentation, some results achieved from a series of laboratory and field experiments and numerical

434

High Pressure Water Jet System Performance Assessment Project A-2A  

SciTech Connect

Performance assessment for canister cleaning system in the KE Basin. Information obtained from this assessment will be used to design any additional equipment used to clean canisters. After thorough review of the design, maintenance history and operational characteristics of the 105 K East (KE) canister cleaning system, Bartlett recommends that the high pressure water jet system (HPWJS) be modified as outlined in section 5.0, and retained for future use. Further, it is recommended that Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project consider use of a graded approach for canister cleaning, based on individual canister type and characteristics. This approach would allow a simple method to be used on canisters not needing the more rigorous, high-pressure method. Justification is provided in section 5.0. Although Bartlett has provided some preliminary cost estimates, it is recommended that SNF Project perform a detailed cost-benefit analysis to weigh the alternatives presented.

FARWICK, C.C.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

435

Exploring Total Power Saving from High Temperature of Server Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Temperature Total system power (%) Cooling power (%)Total system power (%) Cooling power (%) JunctionTo simulate the cooling power consumption at different

Lai, Liangzhen; Chang, Chia-Hao; Gupta, Puneet

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Validation and performance of the LHC cryogenic system through commissioning of the first sector  

SciTech Connect

The cryogenic system [1] for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator is presently in its final phase of commissioning at nominal operating conditions. The refrigeration capacity for the LHC is produced using eight large cryogenic plants and eight 1.8 K refrigeration units installed on five cryogenic islands. Machine cryogenic equipment is installed in a 26.7-km circumference ring deep underground tunnel and are maintained at their nominal operating conditions via a distribution system consisting of transfer lines, cold interconnection boxes at each cryogenic island and a cryogenic distribution line. The functional analysis of the whole system during all operating conditions was established and validated during the first sector commissioning in order to maximize the system availability. Analysis, operating modes, main failure scenarios, results and performance of the cryogenic system are presented.

Serio, L.; Bouillot, A.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; /CERN; Chakravarty, A.; /Tata Inst.; Claudet, S.; /CERN; Gicquel, F.; /LBL, Berkeley; Gomes, P.; /CERN; Kumar, M.; Kush, P.K.; /Indore, Ctr. for Advanced Tech.; Millet, F.; Perin, A.; /CERN /Fermilab /Tata Inst. /CERN

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locating–dominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater [186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locating–total dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Natural phenomena hazards performance categorization criteria for structures, systems, and components. [Contains references  

SciTech Connect

Department of Energy (DOE) requires in DOE 5480.23 the use of a graded approach'' in performing safety analysis and evaluation of DOE facilities for normal operating and accident conditions, including accidents caused by natural phenomena hazard (NPH) events. DOE 5480.28 uses this graded approach'' and requires, for the purpose of NPH design and evaluation, placing the structures, systems, and components (SSCS) comprising the DOE facilities into five performance categories. This Standard provides the criteria to be used for such categorization of SSCs, and recommends systematic procedures to implement these criteria. It applies to all DOE facilities that are covered by DOE 5480.28. Basic categorization criteria have been provided to determine the preliminary performance category of SSCS. These criteria are based on the system safety classification and hazard categorization/classification data obtained from the application of DOE 5480.23, DOE-STD-1027-92, and the general design criteria (DOE 6430.1B) and safety design criteria (DOE 5480.30 and 5480.NNFDC) documents (these documents are under development). The final performance category is then determined considering applicable system interaction.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

440

High performance in low-flow solar domestic hot water systems  

SciTech Connect

Low-flow solar hot water heating systems employ flow rates on the order of 1/5 to 1/10 of the conventional flow. Low-flow systems are of interest because the reduced flow rate allows smaller diameter tubing, which is less costly to install. Further, low-flow systems result in increased tank stratification. Lower collector inlet temperatures are achieved through stratification and the useful energy produced by the collector is increased. The disadvantage of low-flow systems is the collector heat removal factor decreases with decreasing flow rate. Many solar domestic hot water systems require an auxiliary electric source to operate a pump in order to circulate fluid through the solar collector. A photovoltaic driven pump can be used to replace the standard electrical pump. PV driven pumps provide an ideal means of controlling the flow rate, as pumps will only circulate fluid when there is sufficient radiation. Peak performance was always found to occur when the heat exchanger tank-side flow rate was approximately equal to the average load flow rate. For low collector-side flow rates, a small deviation from the optimum flow rate will dramatically effect system performance.

Dayan, M.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Performance investigation of the Afyon geothermal district heating system for building applications: Exergy analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with an energy and exergy evaluation and modeling of geothermal district heating systems for their system analysis, performance evaluation and optimization. As a comprehensive case study, the Afyon geothermal district heating system (AFJET) in Afyon, Turkey is considered and actual thermal data are collected and employed for analysis. Using actual system data, an evaluation of the district heating system performance, energy and exergy efficiencies, and exergy destructions in the system are conducted in this regard. This study is also conducted to show how energy and exergy efficiencies of the \\{GDHSs\\} will change with the reference temperature and how exergy losses will affect by the temperature difference between the geothermal resource and the supply temperature of the district heating distribution network. In addition, the negative effects of discharge waters of the AFJET are presented. The energy and exergy efficiencies of the entire AFJET are found to be 37.59% and 47.54%, respectively. The results are expected to be helpful to researchers and engineers in the area.

Ali Keçeba?; Muhammet Kayfeci; Engin Gedik

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Performance Improvements to the Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A team headed by LANL and including many members from LLNL and NSTec LO and NSTec LAO fielded a neutron imaging system (NIS) at the National Ignition Facility at the start of 2011. The NIS consists of a pinhole array that is located 32.5 cm from the source and that creates an image of the source in a segmented scintillator 28 m from the source. The scintillator is viewed by two gated, optical imaging systems: one that is fiber coupled, and one that is lens coupled. While there are a number of other pieces to the system related to pinhole alignment, collimation, shielding and data acquisition, those pieces are discussed elsewhere and are not relevant here. The system is operational and has successfully obtained data on more that ten imaging shots. This remainder of this whitepaper is divided in five main sections. In Section II, we identify three critical areas of improvement that we believe should be pursued to improve the performance of the system for future experiments: spatial resolution, temporal response and signal-to-noise ratio. In Section III, we discuss technologies that could be used to improve these critical performance areas. In Section IV, we describe a path to evolve the current system to achieve improved performance with minimal impact on the ability of the system to operate on shots. In Section V, we discuss the abilities, scope and timescales of the current teams and the Commissariat energie atomique (CEA). In Section VI, we summarize and make specific recommendations for collaboration on improvements to the NIS.

Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Hatarik, R; Merrill, F E; Grim, G P; Wilde, C H; Wilson, D C; Landoas, O; Caillaud, T; Bourgade, J; Buckles, R A; Lee, J; Weiss, P B

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

443

Analysis of design and part load performance of micro gas turbine/organic Rankine cycle combined systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzes the design and part load performance of a power generation system combining a micro gas turbine (MGT) and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC). Design performances of cycles adopting several differe...

Joon Hee Lee; Tong Seop Kim

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Assessment of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from Scottish transitional waters Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(6), 959970 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from Scottish transitional waters This paper addresses the assessment of terrestrially derived organic carbon in sediments from two Scottish

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

445

DEVELOPMENT OF A LONG-TERM MONITORING SYSTEM TO EVALUATE COVER SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

Environmental remediation at the Fernald Environmental Management Project is nearing completion, but long-term technology needs continue to emerge at the site. Remote, real-time, autonomous monitoring technologies are needed to ensure the integrity of the site and its remedy systems once cleanup is complete. The Fernald Post Closure Stewardship Technology Project (PCSTP), through the work of the Integrating Stewardship Technology Team (ISTT), has selected technologies to address initial site needs. This paper will explore the monitoring requirements of the Fernald On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF), the parameters selected as critical for comprehensive long-term monitoring of the facility, and the process by which technologies were chosen to monitor those parameters.

Kumthekar, U.; Chiou, J. D.; Prochaska, M.; Benson, C. H.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

446

Knowledge system and method for simulating chemical controlled release device performance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A knowledge system for simulating the performance of a controlled release device is provided. The system includes an input device through which the user selectively inputs one or more data parameters. The data parameters comprise first parameters including device parameters, media parameters, active chemical parameters and device release rate; and second parameters including the minimum effective inhibition zone of the device and the effective lifetime of the device. The system also includes a judgemental knowledge base which includes logic for 1) determining at least one of the second parameters from the release rate and the first parameters and 2) determining at least one of the first parameters from the other of the first parameters and the second parameters. The system further includes a device for displaying the results of the determinations to the user.

Cowan, Christina E. (Richland, WA); Van Voris, Peter (Richland, WA); Streile, Gary P. (Richland, WA); Cataldo, Dominic A. (Kennewick, WA); Burton, Frederick G. (West Jefferson, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Performance analysis of an integrated CHP system with thermal and Electric Energy Storage for residential application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is the evaluation of the profitability of micro-CHP systems for residential application. An integrated CHP system composed of a prime mover, an Electric Energy Storage system, a thermal storage system and an auxiliary boiler has been considered. The study has been carried out taking into account a particular electrochemical storage system which requires also thermal energy, during its operation, for a better exploitation of the residual heat discharged by the prime mover. The prime mover could be a conventional Internal Combustion Engine or also an innovative system, such as fuel cell or organic Rankine cycle. An investigation of this integrated CHP system has been carried out, by means of an in-house developed calculation code, performing a thermo-economic analysis. This paper provides useful results, in order to define the optimum sizing of components of the integrated CHP system under investigation; the developed code allows also to evaluate the profitability and the primary energy saving with respect to the separate production of electricity and heat.

M. Bianchi; A. De Pascale; F. Melino

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Performance Evaluation for Modular, Scalable Cooling Systems with Hot Aisle Containment in Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSE): ratio of total cooling power to cooling provided, inGenerally, total modular cooling power demand was somewhathigher server loads. The cooling power demand decreased when

Adams, Barbara J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Performance Evaluation for Modular, Scalable Liquid-Rack Cooling Systems in Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSE): ratio of total cooling power to cooling transported,Generally, total modular cooling power demand stabilized atrack) in this study. The cooling power demand decreased when

Xu, TengFang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Meeting Summary for Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for Residential Space Conditioning System Equipment Expert Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report on the Expert Meeting for Final Report on the Expert Meeting for DIAGNOSTIC AND PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK FOR RESIDENTIAL SPACE CONDITIONING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT Building Science Corporation Industry Team 15 July 2010 Work Performed Under Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FC26-08NT00601 Submitted By: Building Science Corporation 30 Forest Street Somerville, MA 02143 Principal Investigators: Joseph W. Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng. ASHRAE Fellow Betsy Pettit, FAIA Phone Number: 978-589-5100 Fax Number: 978-589-5103 E-Mail: joe@buildingscience.com E-Mail: betsy@buildingscience.com Submitted To: U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory PM: Rob Martinez E-Mail: Rob.Martinez@NETL.DOE.GOV EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. Title: Final Report on the Expert Meeting for Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for

451

Developing Web?based Homework System to Evaluate Students’ Homework Performance and Physics Achievement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Web?based homework and assessment have been becoming widespread practice in physics courses. Although some disagreement whether this is an encouraging or uncertain growth for student learning there is inadequate research assessing the pedagogical effect of changing the medium from on paper hand?graded homework and assessment to web?based and computer?evaluated one. In this study web?based homework system is developed to assess students’ homework performance and physics achievement in introductory physics course. One of two identical sections of introductory physics course students received paper?based hand graded grouped homework while the other received the individual web?based homework. Then it is compared the two groups on conceptual performance measures by using Force Concept (FCI) test. No significant differences were found in students’ FCI test scores; while average homework performance scores were found significance that could be attributed to the homework method used in favor of paper?based homework group.

Ne?et Demirci

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Engineering Spectral Control Using Front Surface Filters for Maximum TPV Energy Conversion System Performance  

SciTech Connect

Energy conversion efficiencies of better than 23% have been demonstrated for small scale tests of a few thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells using front surface, tandem filters [1, 2]. The engineering challenge is to build this level of efficiency into arrays of cells that provide useful levels of energy. Variations in cell and filter performance will degrade TPV array performance. Repeated fabrication runs of several filters each provide an initial quantification of the fabrication variation for front surface, tandem filters for TPV spectral control. For three performance statistics, within-run variation was measured to be 0.7-1.4 percent, and run-to-run variation was measured to be 0.5-3.2 percent. Fabrication runs using a mask have been shown to reduce variation across interference filters from as high as 8-10 percent to less than 1.5 percent. Finally, several system design and assembly approaches are described to further reduce variation.

T Rahmlow, Jr; J Lazo-Wasem, E Gratrix; J Azarkevich; E Brown; D DePoy; D Eno; P Fourspring; J Parrington; R Mahorter; B Wernsman

2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

Engineering Spectral Control Using Front Surface Filters for Maximum TPV Energy Conversion System Performance  

SciTech Connect

Energy conversion efficiencies of better than 23% have been demonstrated for small scale tests of a few thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells using front surface, tandem filters [1,2]. The engineering challenge is to build this level of efficiency into arrays of cells that provide useful levels of energy. Variations in cell and filter performance will degrade TPV array performance. Repeated fabrication runs of several filters each provide an initial quantification of the fabrication variation for front surface, tandem filters for TPV spectral control. For three performance statistics, within-run variation was measured to be 0.7-1.4 percent, and run-to-run variation was measured to be 0.5-3.2 percent. Fabrication runs using a mask have been shown to reduce variation across interference filters from as high 8-10 percent to less than 1.5 percent. Finally, several system design and assembly approaches are described to further reduce variation.

TD Rahmlaw, Jr; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; JJ Azarkevich; EJ Brown; DM DePoy; DR Eno; PM Fourspring; JR Parrington; RG Mahorter; B Wernsman

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

454

System design and performance of a spiral groove gas seal for hydrogen service  

SciTech Connect

In the past, typical seal designs for low molecular weight gases, such as hydrogen, incorporated high pressure oil seal systems. Technology of the seventies and eighties produced a new concept - the spiral groove gas seal. This paper discusses the problems related to oil seal systems, as well as the design, application and performance of a dry gas seal. It also discusses the limitations encountered with the start-up and operation of a dry gas seal in a high pressure, oil-soluble mixture of light hydrocarbons. Results show how the spiral groove gas seal can handle adverse demands without seal failure.

Pecht, G.G.; Carter, D. (John Crane, Inc., Morton Grove, IL (USA) Marathon Petroleum Co., Robinson, IL (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Operation and performance of the new Fermilab Booster H- injection system  

SciTech Connect

The operation and performance of the new, 15 Hz, H{sup -} charge exchange injection system for the FNAL Booster is described. The new system installed in 2006 was necessary to allow injection into the Booster at up to 15 Hz. It was built using radiation hardened materials which will allow the Booster to reliably meet the high intensity and repetition rate requirements of the Fermilab's HEP program. The new design uses three orbit bump magnets (Orbumps) rather than the usual four and permits injection into the Booster without a septum magnet. Injection beam line modification and compensation for the quadrupole gradients of the Orbump magnets is discussed.

Lackey, J.; Garcia, F.G.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Dynamic performance of a STATCON at an HVDC inverter feeding a very weak AC system  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the dynamic performance of the advanced static var compensator or STATCON at a high voltage direct current (HVDC) converter terminal where the ac system has a very low short circuit ratio (SCR). The STATCON is based on a nine-level GTO thyristor inverter. The studies include operating characteristics of the STATCON under various ac and dc disturbances. The simulation results are compared with other types of reactive power compensation options available for such applications. It is shown that the STATCON has clear advantages over the other compensators, in areas such as; fault response time, voltage support ability, and dc recovery, while operating with very weak ac systems.

Zhuang, Y.; Menzies, R.W. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Nayak, O.B. [HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Turanli, H.M. [Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Experimental Investigation of the Power Generation Performance of Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Systems: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The extraction of energy from ocean waves has gained interest in recent years. The floating-point absorber (FPA) is one of the most promising devices among a wide variety of wave energy conversion technologies. Early theoretical studies mainly focused on understanding the hydrodynamics of the system and on predicting the maximum power that could be extracted by a heaving body. These studies evolve from the investigation of floating-body interactions in offshore engineering and naval architecture disciplines. To our best knowledge, no systematic study has been reported about the investigation of the power generation performance of an FPA with a close-to-commercial design. A series of experimental tests was conducted to investigate the power extraction performance of an FPA system.

Li, Y.; Yu, Y.; Epler, J.; Previsic, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

Kearney, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part I: Simplified Space Conditioning in Low Load Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America webinar, High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part I, on October 23, 2014.

460

Utility-scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass performance acceptance tests conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the NREL undertook the development of interim Guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here follow the general approach of the earlier NREL report on parabolic trough collector fields, but in this case are specifically written for power tower solar systems composed of a heliostat (reflector) field directing the sun's rays to a receiver (heat exchanger) on a high central tower. The working fluid in the tower receiver can be molten salt, water/steam, air, CO2, or other suitable fluids, each with its own particular attributes. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the inherently transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to use a performance projection model in the acceptance process. Two primary types of test runs are to be conducted. The first – the Short-Duration Steady-State Thermal Power Test (Power Test) – measures the thermal power output of the solar system under clear-sky conditions over a short period, during which thermal equilibrium and stable steady-state conditions exist, and compares the measured results to performance model projections for those conditions. The second test type – the Long-Duration Production (or Reliability) Test (Production Test)– is a continuous multi-day energy test that gathers multiple detailed daily thermal energy outputs and compares the results to projections from a performance model. Both clear-sky and partly cloudy conditions are acceptable. Additionally, the functionality of the solar system should be observed with regard to such items as daily startup, normal operation, standby and shutdown.

D. Kearney

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III  

SciTech Connect

This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: à thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; à NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); à coal providing >65% of heat input; à all solid wastes benign; à cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: à Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; à Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

NONE

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

462

Detailed thermal performance data on conventional and highly insulating window systems  

SciTech Connect

Data on window heat-transfer properties (U-value and shading coefficient (SC)) are usually presented only for a few window designs at specific environmental conditions. With the introduction of many new window glazing configurations (using low-emissivity coatings and gas fills) and the interest in their annual energy performance, it is important to understand the effects of window design parameters and environmental conditions on U and SC. This paper discusses the effects of outdoor temperature, wind speed, insolation, surface emittance, and gap width on the thermal performance of both conventional and highly insulating windows. Some of these data have been incorporated into the fenestration chapter of the ''ASHRAE Handbook - 1985 Fundamentals.'' The heat-transfer properties of multiglazed insulating window designs are also presented. These window systems include those having (1) one or more low-emittance coatings; (2) low-conductivity gas-fill or evacuated cavities; (3) a layer of transparent silica aerogel, a highly insulating microporous material; or (4) combinations of the above. Using the detailed building energy analysis program, DOE 2.1B, we show that these systems, which all maintain high solar transmittance, can add more useful thermal energy to a space than they lose, even in a northern climate. Thus, in terms of seasonal energy flows, these fenestration systems out-perform insulated walls or roofs.

Arasteh, D.; Selkowitz, S.; Hartmann, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Coal-Fueled Diesel Technology Assessment Study: systems performance and cost comparisons  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the performance of diesel engines operating on coal-based fuels and compares their power generation costs with those of corresponding oil-burning prime movers. Similar performance and cost comparisons are also presented for an alternative prime mover, the direct-fired gas turbine in both a simple-cycle and a regenerative-cycle configuration. The coal-based fuels under consideration include micronized coal, coal slurries, and coal-derived gaseous fuels. The study focuses on medium-speed diesel engines for locomotive, marine, small stationary power, and industrial cogeneration applications in the 1000 to 10,000 kW size range. This report reviews the domestic industrial and transportation markets for medium-speed engines currently using oil or gas. The major problem areas involving the operation of these engines on coal-based fuels are summarized. The characteristics of available coal-based fuels are discussed and the costs of various fuels are compared. Based on performance data from the literature, as well as updated cost estimates originally developed for the Total Energy Technology Alternatives Studies program, power generation costs are determined for both oil-fueled and coal-fueled diesel engines. Similar calculations are also performed for direct-fired gas turbines. The calculations illustrate the sensitivity of the power generation cost to the associated fuel cost for these prime movers. The results also show the importance of reducing the cost of available coal-based fuels, in order to improve the economic competitiveness of coal-fueled prime movers relative to engines operating on oil or gas. 50 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

Holtz, R.E.; Krazinski, J.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

DOE`s high performance power systems program: Development of advanced coal-fired combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect

Coal currently provides more than one third of the world`s electricity and more than one half of the US`s electricity. However, for coal to be the fuel of choice in the future, highly efficient, environmentally acceptable, and economically competitive, coal-fired power plants are needed. The US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center, under its High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) Program, has two contracts in place, one with Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and one with United Technologies Research Center, to develop advanced power generation systems. Based on an indirectly fired cycle, HIPPS uses a combined cycle for power generation at efficiencies of 47--50% (HHV) with superior environmental performance (1/10 of New Source Performance Standards) and a lower cost-of-electricity (10% reduction relative to current coal-fired plants). HIPPS, scheduled to be ready for commercialization by the year 2005, could provide a solution to the anticipated worldwide demand for clean, efficient electricity generation. In this paper, the two HIPPS designs are reviewed and on-going research is discussed.

Ruth, L.; Plasynski, S.; Shaffer, F. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Modeling and dynamic performance evaluation of target capture in robotic systems  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a dynamic system consisting of a robot manipulator and a target is analyzed. The target is considered in a general way as a dynamic subsystem having finite mass and moments of inertia (e.g., a rigid body or a second robot). The situation investigated is when the robot establishes interaction with the target in such a way that it intercepts and captures a reference element of the target. The analysis of target capture is divided into three phases in terms of time: the precapture, free motion (finite motion); the transition from free to constrained motion in the vicinity of interception and capture (impulsive motion); and the postcapture, constrained motion (finite motion). The greatest attention is paid to the analysis of the phase of transition, the impulsive motion, and dynamics of the system. Based on the use of impulsive constraints and the Jourdainian formulation of analytical dynamics, a novel approach is proposed for the dynamic modeling of target capture by a robot manipulator. The proposed approach is suitable to handle both finite and impulsive motions in a common analytical framework. Based on the dynamic model developed and using a geometric representation of the system's dynamics, a detailed analysis and a performance evaluation framework are presented for the phase of transition. Both rigid and structurally flexible models of robots are considered. For the performance evaluation analyses, two main concepts are proposed and corresponding performance measures are derived. These tools may be used in the analysis, design, and control of time-varying robotic systems. The dynamic system of a three-link robot arm capturing a rigid body is used to illustrate the material presented.

Koevecses, J.; Cleghorn, W.L.; Fenton, R.G.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Energy modeling of photovoltaic thermal systems with corrugated unglazed transpired solar collectors – Part 2: Performance analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper is the second of two companion papers focused on energy modeling and performance analysis of building-integrated photovoltaic thermal (PV/T) systems with corrugated unglazed transpired solar collectors (UTCs). In Part 1, energy models are presented for two configurations: UTC only and UTC with PV panels. The models predict the energy output of the system for different weather and system design conditions and are validated using measured data from an outdoor test facility. In this paper (Part 2), the system performance is evaluated based on data drawn from the literature and simulations with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and energy models. The analysis includes parameters that are unique for this system, such as the corrugation geometry and the collector orientation. Validated, high resolution CFD simulations are used to study the impact of plate orientation and incident turbulence intensity, based on the comparison of exterior and interior Nusselt (Nu) number and the cavity exit air temperature, as well as the PV surface temperature when \\{UTCs\\} are integrated with PV panels. It is found that for configurations with UTC only, both exterior and interior convective heat transfer is enhanced in the ‘vertical’ installation, while similar results were obtained for increased incident turbulence intensity levels. However, only minor influences from these two parameters are observed for \\{UTCs\\} with PV panels. The energy model is used to investigate the optimal geometry for both configurations. It is found that parameters such as slope length and corrugation wavelength have the most significant impact on UTC performance while the wavelength and PV panel height have the largest effect for \\{UTCs\\} with PV panels.

Siwei Li; Panagiota Karava

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In this project, researchers from the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team worked with industry partners to develop hydronic system designs that would address performance issues and result in higher overall system efficiencies and improved response times.

468

A building life-cycle information system for tracking building performance metrics  

SciTech Connect

Buildings often do not perform as well in practice as expected during pre-design planning, nor as intended at the design stage. While this statement is generally considered to be true, it is difficult to quantify the impacts and long-term economic implications of a building in which performance does not meet expectations. This leads to a building process that is devoid of quantitative feedback that could be used to detect and correct problems both in an individual building and in the building process itself. One key element in this situation is the lack of a standardized method for documenting and communicating information about the intended performance of a building. This paper describes the Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS); designed to manage a wide range of building related information across the life cycle of a building project. BLISS is based on the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) developed by the International Alliance for Interoperability. A BLISS extension to th e IFC that adds classes for building performance metrics is described. Metracker, a prototype tool for tracking performance metrics across the building life cycle, is presented.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Recent Photovoltaic Performance Data in the USA (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents performance data from nearly 50,000 Photovoltaic systems totaling 1.7 Gigawatts installed capacity in the USA from 2009 to 2012. 90% of the systems performed to within 10% or better of expected performance. Only 2-4% of the data indicate issues significantly affecting the system performance. Special causes of underperformance and their impacts are delineated by reliability category. Delays and interconnections dominate project-related issues particularly in the first year, but total less than 0.5% of all systems. Hardware-related issues are dominated by inverter problems totaling less than 0.4% and underperforming modules to less than 0.1%.

Jordan, D.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Engineering development of coal-fired high-performance power systems. Technical report, July - September 1996  

SciTech Connect

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, AlliedSignal Aerospace Equipment Systems, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase I of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolyzation process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). It is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/airheater where steam and gas turbine air are indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and then a pilot plant with integrated pyrolyzer and char combustion systems will be tested. In this report, progress in the pyrolyzer pilot plant preparation is reported. The results of extensive laboratory and bench scale testing of representative char are also reported. Preliminary results of combustion modeling of the char combustion system are included. There are also discussions of the auxiliary systems that are planned for the char combustion system pilot plant and the status of the integrated system pilot plant.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

472

Weathering performance of industrial atmospheric coating systems in the Arabian Gulf  

SciTech Connect

The performance and durability of a number of industrial coating systems have been studied for two and a half years at five weathering sites in the industrial belt of Shuaiba Area, Kuwait, in the Arabian Gulf. The outdoor weathering performance of eleven coating systems was related to the prevailing industrial atmospheric conditions, and comparison made to their behavior under laboratory accelerated conditions. The coating systems studied included acrylic enamel, micaceous iron oxide epoxy, alkyd enamel, alkyd gloss, chlorinated rubber, polyurethane, and water-based acrylic. Experience in Kuwait has shown that with the longer hours of strong sunshine and ambient temperatures, as well as the chemical content of the atmosphere (e.g. O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X}, NH{sub 3}, Cl), dust retention and sandstorm, degrading of coatings has tended to be faster than in Western countries which most of these generic coating system were developed. Two accelerated test methods were used to evaluate the protective properties of the above mentioned coatings when applied to steel panels.

Carew, J.; Al-Hashem, A.; Riad, W.T. [Kuwait Inst. for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait). Materials Application Dept.; Othman, M. [Shuaiba Area Authority, Safat (Kuwait); Islam, M. [Cortest Columbus Technologies Inc., OH (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

473

Improving the dynamic performance of a complex AC/DC system by HVDC control modifications  

SciTech Connect

The power system of Hydro-Quebec has a peak load of approximately 27 GW. The great distance between the production sites and the load centers introduces stability limitations, which is the reason why the Quebec grid cannot be economically synchronized (through ac transmission with limited capacity) with the U.S. northeastern network. Power exports are therefore dependent on the use of HVDC links of which Hydro-Quebec now possesses five, for a capacity of over 2600 MW. Such a capacity will again soon increase. At the moment, the Chateauguay scheme has the largest HVDC capacity. It transfers 1000 MW by means of two Back-to-Back converter blocks. Various automatic control systems are installed on the Chateauguay scheme owing to the fact that a single circuit of a 765 kV ac line transmits the output of both the HVDC converter stations as well as the output from Beauharnois hydro generating station. Such controls have performed satisfactorily since 1984. However, a remarkable improvement of the overall ac/dc system dynamic performance can be gained by making certain modifications in some of these HVDC system controls. This paper presents the salient features of such control modifications, currently under consideration, using the results of an investigation by digital and analogue simulations that demonstrate the achieved improvements.

Hammad, A.E. (ABB Power Systems, Baden (CH)); Gagnon, J. (Hydro Quebec, Montreal (CA)); McCallum, D. (IREQ, Montreal (CA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The performance of minisupercomputers: Alliant, Convex, and SCS (Scientific Computer Systems)  

SciTech Connect

Recently several computers have appeared whose architectures feature many, if not all, of the characteristics of supercomputers, but whose electronic technology uses less expensive and more readily available components. Such machines have been labeled ''minisupercomputers.'' Currently, this class of computers includes those manufactured by Convex, Alliant, and Scientific Computer Systems (SCS). The strategy of these minisupercomputer vendors is to produce a machine that may not provide as much absolute performance as the high-end supercomputers, but exhibits a comparable or better price-performance ratio. While it is not the goal of this paper to comment on the specific price effectiveness of any particular machine, we believe that a proper evaluation of the minisupercomputers should include price data. This paper presents a detailed performance comparison of the Convex C-1, Alliant FX/8, and SCS-40 minisupercomputers. While the Convex C-1 is functionally similar to the CRAY-1 supercomputer, the SCS-40 actually emulates a CRAY X-MP/2, running the same instruction set and providing CRAY X-MP software. The Alliant series of machines are multiprocessors, containing up to eight processors (called computational elements, or CEs) that can run separate processes or cooperate on a single application. The Alliant system also includes a compiler that automatically attempts to partition a code for concurrent execution on several processors. In the first sections of this paper, the single processor performance of the FX/8 is compared with that of the C-1 and the SCS-40, as well as with a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 8600. In a later section, the parallel processing performance of the FX/8 is described. 21 refs.

Wasserman, H.J.; Simmons, M.L.; Lubeck, O.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

ACTIVE FILTER HARDWARE DESIGN & PERFORMANCE FOR THE DIII-D PLASMA CONTROL SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 The digital plasma control system (PCS), currently in operation on the DIII-D tokamak, requires inputs from a large number of sensors. Due to the nature of the digitizers and the relative noisy environment from which these signals are derived, each of the 32 signals must be conditioned via an active filter. Two different types of filters, Chebyshev and Bessel with fixed frequencies: 100 Hz Bessel was used for filtering the motional Stark effect diagnostic data. 800 Hz Bessel was designed to filter plasma control data and 1200 Hz Chebyshev is used with closed loop control of choppers. The performance of the plasma control system is greatly influenced by how well the actual filter responses match the software model used in the control system algorithms. This paper addresses the various issues facing the designer in matching the electrical design with the theoretical.

SELLERS,D; FERRON,J.R; WALKER,M.L; BROESCH,J.D

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Performance prediction of micro-CHP systems using simple virtual operating cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a general methodology to roughly estimate in advance the actual performance of ?-CHP (micro Combined Heat and Power) systems in one year of operation, by means of limited information on the CHP prime mover efficiency and emission factors in selected set points and by means of a simplified prediction model of the operating cycle. The carried out analysis has been applied to several market-available and under development ?-CHP units of different technologies (Internal Combustion Engines, Micro Gas Turbines, Organic Rankine Cycles, Stirling, Thermo Photo Voltaic, Fuel Cell), operated under a hypothetical virtual operating cycle. The virtual cycle is obtained in this paper on the basis of the year thermal demand of a domestic user, assuming thermal load following of the CHP system. The methodology can be generalized to different applications and different management logics of the CHP system.

M. Bianchi; A. De Pascale; F. Melino; A. Peretto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Performance of a cryogenic system prototype for the XENON1T Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed an efficient cryogenic system with heat exchange and associated gas purification system, as a prototype for the XENON1T experiment. The XENON1T detector will use about 3 ton of liquid xenon (LXe) at a temperature of 175K as target and detection medium for a dark matter search. In this paper we report results on the cryogenic system performance focusing on the dynamics of the gas circulation-purification through a heated getter, at flow rates above 50 Standard Liter per Minute (SLPM). A maximum flow of 114 SLPM has been achieved, and using two heat exchangers in parallel, a heat exchange efficiency better than 96% has been measured.

Elena Aprile; Ran Budnik; Bin Choi; Hugo Contreras; Karl Giboni; Luke Goetzke; Rafael Lang; Kyungeun Lim; Antonio melgarejo; Petr Shagin

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

478

Experimental performances of a battery thermal management system using a phase change material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Li-ion batteries are leading candidates for mobility because electric vehicles (EV) are an environmentally friendly mean of transport. With age, Li-ion cells show a more resistive behavior leading to extra heat generation. Another kind of problem called thermal runway arises when the cell is too hot, what happens in case of overcharge or short circuit. In order to evaluate the effect of these defects at the whole battery scale, an air-cooled battery module was built and tested, using electrical heaters instead of real cells for safety reasons. A battery thermal management system based on a phase change material is developed in that study. This passive system is coupled with an active liquid cooling system in order to initialize the battery temperature at the melting of the PCM. This initialization, or PCM solidification, can be performed during a charge for example, in other words when the energy from the network is available.

Charles-Victor Hémery; Franck Pra; Jean-François Robin; Philippe Marty

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Performance and cost of automotive fuel cell systems with ultra-low platinum loadings.  

SciTech Connect

An automotive polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system with ultra-low platinum loading (0.15 mg-Pt cm{sup -2}) has been analyzed to determine the relationship between its design-point efficiency and the system efficiency at part loads, efficiency over drive cycles, stack and system costs, and heat rejection. The membrane electrode assemblies in the reference PEFC stack use nanostructured, thin-film ternary catalysts supported on organic whiskers and a modified perfluorosulfonic acid membrane. The analyses show that the stack Pt content can be reduced by 50% and the projected high-volume manufacturing cost by >45% for the stack and by 25% for the system, if the design-point system efficiency is lowered from 50% to 40%. The resulting penalties in performance are a <1% reduction in the system peak efficiency; a 2-4% decrease in the system efficiency on the urban, highway, and LA92 drive cycles; and a 6.3% decrease in the fuel economy of the modeled hybrid fuel-cell vehicle on the combined cycle used by EPA for emission and fuel economy certification. The stack heat load, however, increases by 50% at full power (80 kW{sub e}) but by only 23% at the continuous power (61.5 kW{sub e}) needed to propel the vehicle on a 6.5% grade at 55 mph. The reduced platinum and system cost advantages of further lowering the design-point efficiency from 40% to 35% are marginal. The analyses indicate that thermal management in the lower efficiency systems is very challenging and that the radiator becomes bulky if the stack temperature cannot be allowed to increase to 90-95 C under driving conditions where heat rejection is difficult.

Ahluwalia, R.; Wang, X.; Kwon, K.; Rousseau, A.; Kalinoski, J.; James, B.; Marcinkoski, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE); (Directed Technologies Inc.); (ED)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Effects of different operating conditions of Gonen geothermal district heating system on its annual performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, the effects of different operating conditions of the Gonen geothermal district heating system (GDHS) on its annual energy and exergy performance are investigated. The system parameters such as temperature, pressure and flow rate are monitored by using fixed and portable measuring instruments over a one-year period. Thus the main differences in the annual system operation are detected. The measurements show that the Gonen GDHS has six different operating cases depending on the outside temperature throughout the year. The energy and exergy analysis of the system is carried out for each case using the actual system parameters at the corresponding reference temperatures, which are 3.86, 7.1, 8.88, 11.83, 15.26 and 20.4 °C. The highest and lowest energy (57.32%, 35.64%) and exergy (55.76%, 41.42%) efficiencies of the overall system are calculated at the reference temperatures of 15.26 °C and 3.86 °C, respectively. Besides, taking the six case-based energy and exergy analyses into account, the annual average energy and exergy efficiencies are determined to be 45.24% and 47.33%, respectively.

Asiye Aslan; Bedri Yüksel; Tu?rul Akyol

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z