Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive...

2

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost...

3

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 2007 total system life cycle cost estimate includes the cost to research, construct and operate Yucca Mountain during a period of 150 years, from the beginning of the program in 1983 through closure and decommissioning in 2133. The new cost estimate of $79.3 billion, when updated to 2007 dollars comes to $96.2 billion, a 38 percent

4

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

5

Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE`s Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billion cost savings for the single-repository system in comparison with the two-repository system is due to the elimination of $3 billion for second-repository development and $7 billion for the second-repository facility. These savings are offset by $2 billion in additional costs at the first repository and $1 billion in combined higher costs for the MRS facility and transportation. 55 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Preliminary estimates of the total-system cost for the restructured program: An addendum to the May 1989 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 - a fee levied on electricity generated and sold by commercial nuclear power plants - is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The costs contained in this report represent a preliminary analysis of the cost impacts associated with the Secretary of Energy`s Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program issued in November 1989. The major elements of the restructured program announced in this report which pertain to the program`s life-cycle costs are: a prioritization of the scientific investigations program at the Yucca Mountain candidate site to focus on identification of potentially adverse conditions, a delay in the start of repository operations until 2010, the start of limited waste acceptance at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility in 1998, and the start of waste acceptance at the full-capability MRS facility in 2,000. Based on the restructured program, the total-system cost for the system with a repository at the candidate site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $26 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $34 to $35 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) requiring disposal. 17 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Combined cycle total energy system  

SciTech Connect

A system is described for the co-generation of steam and electricity comprising: a source of gaseous fuel, a source of air, means for mixing the fuel and air to form a relatively lean fuel/air mixture, a gas turbine, a first fuel/air mixture compressor directly driven by the turbine, a second fuel/air mixture compressor driven by the turbine for further compressing the fuel/air mixture, a catalytic burner between the second compressor and gas turbine, a motor/generator, a steam turbine, means coupling the gas turbine, motor/generator, first and second compressors and steam turbine to one another, a source of water, a steam boiler connected to the source of water and to the exhaust system of the gas turbine, a steam economizer connected to the boiler, a steam superheater in heat exchange relationship with the exhaust system of the gas turbine disposed between the economizer and the steam turbine, and controllable means for bypassing superheated steam from the superheater around the steam turbine to maximize steam or electric power output of the system selectively.

Joy, J.R.

1986-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

9

A Total Energy & Water Quality Management System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a generic model for an energy and water quality management system for the water community, and defines standard specifications for software applications required to minimize energy costs within the constraints of water quality and operation goals.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Market assessment of fuel cell total energy systems summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An investigation of the potential market penetration of fuel cell total energy systems (FCTES) into the nonindustrial, single building market is summarized. Nine building types, two types of construction, and the ten Department of Energy (DOE) regions were used to model the market for the time period 1985--2000. Input data developed for the penetration model included size distributions of each building type and performance and cost characteristics of FCTES and competing conventional systems. Two fuel cell systems, fuel cell - heat pump and fuel cell - central boiler and chiller, were assumed to compete with two conventional systems, electric heat pump and central chiller-boiler models. Two fuel cell supply situations were considered: (a) one in which only 40 kW(e) modules were available, and (b) one in which a catalog of 25, 40, 100, and 250 kW(e) modules were available. Data characterizing the economic climate, the intended market, and system cost and performance were used to determine the present value of life-cycle costs for each system in each market segment. Two market models were used to estimate FCTES sales. In the first, the perfect market model, FCTES sales were assumed to occur in all segments in which that system had the lowest present-valued costs. In the second, a market diffusion model was used to obtain a more probable (and lower) sales estimate than that of the perfect market model. Results are presented as FCTES sales for each market segment by FCTES module size and the effect on primary energy use by fuel type.

Mixon, W.R.; Christian, J.E.; Jackson, W.L.; Pine, G.D.; Hagler, H.; Shanker, R.; Koppelman, L.; Greenstein, D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Environmental Emissions from Energy Technology Systems: The Total Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report that compares emissions during the entire project life cycle for a number of fossil-fueled and renewable electric power systems, including geothermal steam (probably modeled after The Geysers). The life cycle is broken into Fuel Extraction, Construction, and Operation. The only emission covered is carbon dioxide.

San Martin, Robert L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Environmental Emissions From Energy Technology Systems: The Total Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report that compares emissions during the entire project life cycle for a number of fossil-fueled and renewable electric power systems, including geothermal steam (probably modeled after The Geysers). The life cycle is broken into Fuel Extraction, Construction, and Operation. The only emission covered is carbon dioxide. (DJE 2005)

San Martin, Robert L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

14

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

15

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

16

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

17

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

18

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

19

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

20

Solar total energy systems final technical summary report. Volume I. Solar total energy systems market penetration  

SciTech Connect

The results of the market penetration analysis of Solar Total Energy Systems (STES) for the industrial sector are described. Performance data derived for STES commercial applications are included. The energy use and price forecasts used in the analysis are summarized. The STES Applications Model (SAM), has been used to develop data on STES development potential by state and industry as a function of time from 1985 through 2015. A second computer code, the Market Penetration Model (MPM), has been completed and used to develop forecasts of STES market penetration and national energy displacement by fuel type. This model was also used to generate sensitivity factors for incentives, and variations in assumptions of cost of STES competing fuel. Results for the STES performance analysis for commercial applications are presented. (MHR)

Bush, L.R.; Munjal, P.K.

1978-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total Thermal Management System for Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles  

Total Thermal Management System for Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

22

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

23

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

24

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

25

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

26

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

27

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump... 53.5...

28

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

29

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

30

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

31

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

32

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

33

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

34

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

35

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

36

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

37

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

38

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

39

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

40

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

42

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

43

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

44

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

45

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

46

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

47

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

48

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

49

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

50

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

51

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

52

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

53

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

54

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

55

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

56

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

57

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

58

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

59

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

60

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

62

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

63

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

64

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

65

Institutional applications of solar total-energy systems. Draft final report. Volume 2. Appendixes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The appendices present the analytical basis for the analysis of solar total energy (STE) systems. A regional-climate model and a building-load requirements model are developed, along with fuel-price scenarios. Life-cycle costs are compared for conventional-utility, total energy, and STE systems. Thermal STE system design trade-offs are performed and thermal STE system performance is determined. The sensitivity of STE competitiveness to fuel prices is examined. The selection of the photovoltaic array is briefly discussed. The institutional-sector decision processes are analyzed. Hypothetical regional back-up rates and electrical-energy costs are calculated. The algorithms and equations used in operating the market model are given, and a general methodology is developed for projecting the size of the market for STE systems and applied to each of 8 institutional subsectors. (LEW)

None

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Institutional applications of solar total-energy systems. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conceptual designs are presented for thermal and photovoltaic solar total energy (STE) systems optimized to have the lowest possible life-cycle costs. An analysis is made of the market for STE systems, synthesizing the results of interviews with institutional-sector decision-makers and representatives of utilities, component manufacturers, architect/engineers, contractors, and labor unions. The operation and outputs of the market model developed to estimate potential STE system sales and resultant energy savings are presented. Outlined are the preliminary guidelines for selecting sites and conducting the planned federal demonstration program. (LEW)

None

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Distributed Control System Life Cycle Management: Guidelines for Planning and Managing the Life Cycle of Distributed Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power producers are often not concerned with the life cycle of a control system until they receive a notification from the manufacturer that the system is no longer supported. This situation results in a reactive effort to gain information, develop a plan, obtain funding, and execute an upgrade project. Effectively managing the life cycle of a control system requires a proactive approach, including gaining information about the installed system and its expected life span and the available ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

68

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

69

Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issue (KTI) agreements, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (CNWRA 2002 [158449]), and 10 CFR Part 63. This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are utilized in this document.

J. McNeish

2002-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

70

Waterflood control system for maximizing total oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system and method for determining optimal fluid injection pressure is based upon a model of a growing hydrofracture due to waterflood injection pressure. This model is used to develop a control system optimizing the injection pressure by using a prescribed injection goal coupled with the historical times, pressures, and volume of injected fluid at a single well. In this control method, the historical data is used to derive two major flow components: the transitional component, where cumulative injection volume is scaled as the square root of time, and a steady-state breakthrough component, which scales linearly with respect to time. These components provide diagnostic information and allow for the prevention of rapid fracture growth and associated massive water break through that is an important part of a successful waterflood, thereby extending the life of both injection and associated production wells in waterflood secondary oil recovery operations.

Patzek, Tadeusz Wiktor (Oakland, CA); Silin, Dimitriy Borisovich (Pleasant Hill, CA); De, Asoke Kumar (San Jose, CA)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

71

Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment, Phase 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses recent developments of EPRI's Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model applied to the candidate spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Building on earlier work where a probability-based methodology was developed, the report details the recent modifications to the EPRI TSPA code, IMARC, applied to Yucca Mountain. The report also includes performance analyses using IMARC, identifies key technical components important to Yucca...

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

72

Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. [Geothermally heated]. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An engineering and economic study was made to determine a practical balance of selected agribusiness subsystems resulting in realistic estimated produce yields for a geothermally heated system known as the Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. The subsystem cycles for an average application at an unspecified hydrothermal resources site in the western United States utilize waste and by-products from their companion cycles insofar as practicable. Based on conservative estimates of current controlled environment yields, produce wholesale market prices, production costs, and capital investment required, it appears that the family-operation-sized TERSA module presents the potential for marginal recovery of all capital investment costs. In addition to family- or small-cooperative-farming groups, TERSA has potential users in food-oriented corporations and large-cooperative-agribusiness operations. The following topics are considered in detail: greenhouse tomatoes and cucumbers; fish farming; mushroom culture; biogas generation; integration methodology; hydrothermal fluids and heat exchanger selection; and the system. 133 references. (MHR)

Fogleman, S.F.; Fisher, L.A.; Black, A.R.; Singh, D.P.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Life Extension Guidelines of Existing HVDC Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Like many other parts of the electric utility infrastructure, High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) facilities have reached the end of their service life time. Many of these facilities are over thirty years in age. Owners and operators need help making maintenance and replacement/refurbishment decisions. The guidelines in this report support a structured life extension program that can aid the Owners/Operators decide on replacement versus refurbishment of these facilities.

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

74

Battery Life Estimation of Mobile Embedded Systems Debashis Panigrahi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery Life Estimation of Mobile Embedded Systems Debashis Panigrahi ¡ , Carla Chiasserini Torino, Italy. £ C & C Research Labs, NEC USA, Princeton, NJ. Abstract Since battery life directly embedded system should be to maximize the energy de- livered by the battery, and hence the battery lifetime

75

Risk assessment and life prediction of complex engineering systems  

SciTech Connect

Many complex engineering systems will exceed their design life expectancy within the next 10 to 15 years. It is also expected that these systems must be maintained and operated beyond their design life. This paper presents a integrated approach for managing the risks associated with aging effects and predicting the residually expectancy these systems, The approach unifies risk assessment, enhanced surveillance and testing, and robust computational models to assess the risk, predict age, and develop a life-extension management procedure. It also relies on the state of the art in life-extension and risk assessment methods from the nuclear power industry. Borrowing from the developments in decision analysis, this approach should systematically identify the options available for managing the existing aging systems beyond their intended design life.

Garcia, M.D.; Varma, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heger, A.S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 4. Appendices. Final report. [Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology has been developed by Atomics International under contract to the Department of Energy to define the applicability of solar total energy systems (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., retail stores, shopping centers, offices, etc.) in the United States. Candidate STES concepts were selected to provide on-site power generation capability, as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. Each concept was evaluated on the basis of its cost effectiveness (i.e., as compared to other concepts) and its ability to ultimately penetrate and capture a significant segment of this market, thereby resulting in a saving of fossil fuel resources. This volume contains the appendices. Topics include deterministic insolation model computer code; building energy usage data; computer simulation programs for building energy demand analysis; model buildings for STES evaluation; Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) computer code; transient simulation of STES concept; solar data tape analysis; program listings and sample output for use with TRNSYS; transient simulation, and financial parameters sensitivities. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Solar total energy systems (STES) simulation program user's guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer program which simulates the operations of a STES facility and evaluates its annualized costs and energy displacement is described. The program contains a dynamic model which simulates the interaction of the insolation and electrical and thermal demands on an hourly basis. The program is flexible enough to allow thousands of different configurations to be simulated under a wide variety of conditions. Moreover, with this program, the sizes of the STES components can be adjusted to maximize the return on invested capital or the savings in fossil fuels. The program can also be used to simulate conventional fossil fuel Total Energy (TE) systems and solar thermal energy systems for comparison with STES. The program is written in Fortran for the FTN compiler on The Aerospace Corporation's CDC 7600 computer. It consists of 9 routines and approximately 1300 cards, including comments. A description of the program, its inputs and its outputs are presented. Examples of program input and otput as well as a sample deck structure are provided. A source listing appears in the appendix.

Timmer, B.R.

1979-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

78

The Life Cycle of the South American Monsoon System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The South American monsoon system (SAMS) life cycle plays an important role in the distribution and duration of the rainy season mainly over southwestern Amazonia, and the central west and southeast Brazil regions, affecting the economy through ...

Adma Raia; Iracema Fonsecade Albuquerque Cavalcanti

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Convective System Area Expansion over Amazonia and Its Relationships with Convective System Life Duration and High-Level Wind Divergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between the initial area expansion rate of tropical convective systems and their total life duration are analyzed during the period of the Wet Season Amazon Mesoscale Campaign/Large-Scale BiosphereAtmosphere (WETAMC/LBA) ...

Luiz Augusto T. Machado; Henri Laurent

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

UNCORRECTED 2 Total Life Cycle-Based Materials Selection for Polymer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

component/module. Due to attending 11 synergetic effects, the performance of the PMH component typically specific strength such as high- 37 strength steels, aluminum alloys and polymer-matrix compos- 38 ites-end vehicle modules. 47The main idea behind the PMH technology is to use a system 48level approach to combine

Grujicic, Mica

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Title Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Masanet, Eric R., Yuan Chang, Anand R. Gopal, Peter H. Larsen, William R. Morrow, Roger Sathre, Arman Shehabi, and Pei Zhai Journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources Volume 38 Date Published 2013 Keywords electricity, energy policy, environmental analysis, life-cycle impact, life-cycle inventory Abstract The application of life-cycle assessment (LCA) to electric power (EP) technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts. While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use, LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life-cycle energy, GHG emissions, air pollutant emissions, and water use implications of EP technologies. With continued progress, LCA offers promise for assessing and comparing EP technologies in an analytically-thorough and environmentally-holistic manner for more robust deployment decisions. This article summarizes: (1) major challenges in applying LCA to EP technologies thus far, (2) LCA results to date on the various impacts of EP technologies, and (3) opportunities for improving LCAs as applied to EP technologies moving forward.

82

Light and Life: Exotic Photosynthesis in Binary Star Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential for hosting photosynthetic life on Earth-like planets within binary/multiple stellar systems was evaluated by modelling the levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) such planets receive. Combinations of M and G stars in: (i) close-binary systems; (ii) wide-binary systems and (iii) three-star systems were investigated and a range of stable radiation environments found to be possible. These environmental conditions allow for the possibility of familiar, but also more exotic forms of photosynthetic life, such as infrared photosynthesisers and organisms specialised for specific spectral niches.

O'Malley-James, J T; Cockell, C S; Greaves, J S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Commonality analysis for exploration life support systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commonality, defined practically as the use of similar technologies to deliver similar functions across a range of different complex systems, offers opportunities to improve the lifecycle costs of portfolios of complex ...

Cunio, Phillip M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

title Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources volume year month abstract p The application of life cycle assessment LCA to electric power EP technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life cycle energy GHG emissions air pollutant emissions and water use implications of EP technologies With continued progress LCA offers promise for assessing and comparing EP technologies in an analytically thorough and environmentally holistic manner for more robust deployment

85

System strategies in the management of transit systems towards the end of their life cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores and evaluates essential strategies needed for the transit authority/operator to deal with end of life cycle challenges of Rapid Transit Systems (RTS) systems. RTS systems are elaborate systems consisting ...

Kairon, Ajmer Singh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).  

SciTech Connect

The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).  

SciTech Connect

The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Battery energy storage systems life cycle costs case studies  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a comparison of life cycle costs between battery energy storage systems and alternative mature technologies that could serve the same utility-scale applications. Two of the battery energy storage systems presented in this report are located on the supply side, providing spinning reserve and system stability benefits. These systems are compared with the alternative technologies of oil-fired combustion turbines and diesel generators. The other two battery energy storage systems are located on the demand side for use in power quality applications. These are compared with available uninterruptible power supply technologies.

Swaminathan, S.; Miller, N.F.; Sen, R.K. [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Life Cycle Variations of Mesoscale Convective Systems over the Americas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using GOES-7 ISCCP-B3 satellite data for 198788, the authors studied the evolution of the morphological and radiative properties of clouds over the life cycles of deep convective systems (CS) over the Americas at both tropical and middle ...

L. A. T. Machado; W. B. Rossow; R. L. Guedes; A. W. Walker

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transformational Approach to Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Digg

91

Life Cycle Assessment of Amonix 7700 HCPV Systems  

SciTech Connect

We estimated the energy payback time (EPBT) and greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in the life cycle of the Amonix high-concentration photovoltaic (HCPV) system with III-V solar cells. For a location in the southwest United States, the Amonix 7700 has an EPBT of only 0.86 yrs and GHG emissions of 24g CO{sub 2}-eq./kWh we expect further decreases in both by 2011.

Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H.

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) (a) Total Compensation System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) (a) Total Compensation System The Contractor shall develop, implement and maintain formal policies, practices and procedures to be used in the administration of its compensation system consistent with FAR 31.205-6 and DEAR 970.3102-05-6; "Compensation for Personal Services" ("Total Compensation System"). DOE-approved standards, if any, shall be applied to the Total Compensation System. The Contractor's Total Compensation System shall be fully documented, consistently applied, and acceptable to the Contracting Officer. Periodic appraisals of contractor performance with respect to the Contractors' Total Compensation System will be conducted. (1) The description of the Contractor Employee Compensation Program should

93

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Eric Masanet, 1 Yuan Chang, 1 Anand R. Gopal, 2 Peter Larsen, 2,3 William R. Morrow III, 2 Roger Sathre, 2 Arman Shehabi, 2 and Pei Zhai 2 1 McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208; email: eric.masanet@northwestern.edu, yuan.chang@northwestern.edu 2 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720; email: argopal@lbl.gov, wrmorrow@lbl.gov, rsathre@lbl.gov, ashehabi@lbl.gov, pzhai@lbl.gov 3 Management Science and Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305; email: phlarsen@lbl.gov Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. 2013. 38:107-36 First published online as a Review in Advance on August 7, 2013 The Annual Review of Environment and Resources is online at http://environ.annualreviews.org

94

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 2. System performance and supporting studies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. System performance analysis and evaluation are described. Feedback of completed performance analyses on current system design and operating philosophy is discussed. The basic computer simulation techniques and assumptions are described and the resulting energy displacement analysis is presented. Supporting technical studies are presented. These include health and safety and reliability assessments; solar collector component evaluation; weather analysis; and a review of selected trade studies which address significant design alternatives. Additional supporting studies which are generally specific to the installation site are reported. These include solar availability analysis; energy load measurements; environmental impact assessment; life cycle cost and economic analysis; heat transfer fluid testing; meteorological/solar station planning; and information dissemination. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Conceptual design study on incorporating a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into an operating total energy system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design study on incorporating a pyrolysis unit into an existing total energy plant are presented. The objectives of this study were to examine the institutional, technical and economic factors affecting the incorporation of a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant. The Indian Creek total energy plant is described. Results of the conceptual design are presented. A survey of the availability of waste materials and a review of health and safety ordinances are included. The technical aspects of the pyrolysis system are discussed, including the results of the review of facilities requirements for the pyrolysis unit, the analysis of necessary system modification, and an estimate of the useful energy contribution by the pyrolysis unit. Results of the life-cycle cost analysis of the pyrolysis unit are presented. The major conclusions are that: there appears to be no institutional or technical barriers to constructing a waste pyrolysis unit at the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant; pyrolysis gas can be consumed in the engines and the boilers by utilizing venturi mixing devices; the engines can consume only 5% of the output of the 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit; Therefore, consumption of pyrolysis gas will be controlled by boiler energy demand patterns; a waste pyrolysis unit is not cost effective at the current natural gas price of $0.90/10/sup 6/ Btu; and pyrolysis is economically attractive at natural gas prices above $3.00/10/sup 6/ Btu.

None

1976-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

96

Comparative cost analyses: total flow vs other power conversion systems for the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource  

SciTech Connect

Cost studies were done for Total Flow, double flash, and multistage flash binary systems for electric Energy production from the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource. The purpose was to provide the Department of energy's Division of Geothermal Energy with information by which to judge whether to continue development of the Total Flow system. Results indicate that the Total Flow and double flash systems have capital costs of $1,135 and $1,026 /kW with energy costs of 40.9 and 39.7 mills/kW h respectively. The Total Flow and double flash systems are not distinguishable on a cost basis alone; the multistage flash binary system, with capital cost of $1,343 /kW and energy cost of 46.9 mills/kW h, is significantly more expensive. If oil savings are considered in the total analysis, the Total Flow system could save 30% more oil than the double flash system, $3.5 billion at 1978 oil prices.

Wright, G.W.

1978-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

97

Comparative cost analyses: total flow vs other power conversion systems for the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost studies were done for Total Flow, double flash, and multistage flash binary systems for electric Energy production from the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource. The purpose was to provide the Department of energy's Division of Geothermal Energy with information by which to judge whether to continue development of the Total Flow system. Results indicate that the Total Flow and double flash systems have capital costs of $1,135 and $1,026 /kW with energy costs of 40.9 and 39.7 mills/kW h respectively. The Total Flow and double flash systems are not distinguishable on a cost basis alone; the multistage flash binary system, with capital cost of $1,343 /kW and energy cost of 46.9 mills/kW h, is significantly more expensive. If oil savings are considered in the total analysis, the Total Flow system could save 30% more oil than the double flash system, $3.5 billion at 1978 oil prices.

Wright, G.W.

1978-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

98

Total Lightning Characteristics Relative to Radar and Satellite Observations of Oklahoma Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of regional very high frequency (VHF) Lightning Mapping Arrays (LMAs) makes it possible to begin analyzing trends in total lightning characteristics in ensembles of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Flash initiations observed by the ...

Jeffrey A. Makowski; Donald R. MacGorman; Michael I. Biggerstaff; William H. Beasley

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A Relaxed Eddy Accumulation System for Measuring Surface Fluxes of Total Gaseous Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system was designed to continuously measure total gaseous mercury (TGM) fluxes over a forest canopy. TGM concentration measurements were measured at 5-min intervals with a Tekran model 2537A mercury analyzer ...

Jesse O. Bash; David R. Miller

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

System dynamics based models for selecting HVAC systems for office buildings: a life cycle assessment from carbon emissions perspective.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study aims to explore the life cycle environmental impacts of typical heating ventilation and air condition (HVAC) systems including variable air volume (VAV) system, (more)

Chen, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Systems integration and analysis of advanced life support technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extended missions to space have long been a goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Accomplishment of NASA's goal requires the development of systems and tools for sustaining human life for periods of several months to several years. This is the primary objective of NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) program. This work contributes directly to NASA efforts for ALS, particularly food production. The objective of this work is to develop a systematic methodology for analyzing and improving or modifying ALS technologies to increase their acceptability for implementation in long-duration space missions. By focusing primarily on the food production systems, it is an aim of this work to refine the procedure for developing and analyzing the ALS technologies. As a result of these efforts, researchers will have at their disposal, a powerful tool for establishing protocols for each technology as well as for modifying each technology to meet the standards for practical applications. To automate the developed methodology and associated calculations, a computer-aided tool has been developed. The following systematic procedures are interrelated and automatically integrated into the computer-aided tool: Process configuration, with particular emphasis given to food production (e.g., syrup and flour from sweet potato, starch from sweet potato, breakfast cereal from sweet potato); Modeling and analysis for mass and energy tracking and budgeting; Mass and energy integration Metrics evaluation (e.g., Equivalent System Mass (ESM)). Modeling and analysis is achieved by developing material- and energy-budgeting models. Various forms of mass and energy are tracked through fundamental as well as semiempirical models. Various system alternatives are synthesized and screened using ESM and other metrics. The results of mass, energy and ESM analyses collectively revealed the major consumers of time, equivalent mass, and energy, namely evaporation, condensation, dehydration, drying and extrusion. The targeted processes were subsequently targeted for modifications. In conclusion, this work provides a systematic methodology for transforming non-conventional problems into traditional engineering design problems, a significant contribution to ALS studies.

Nworie, Grace A.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Total least squares in fuzzy system identification: An application to an industrial engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy models have proved to be a powerful tool for the identification of nonlinear dynamic systems. Their generic nonlinear model representation is particularly useful if information about the structure of the nonlinearity is available. ... Keywords: Gas engine, Identification algorithms, Local model networks, Nonlinear system identification, Steady-state constraints, Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy models, Total least squares

Stefan Jakubek; Christoph Hametner; Nikolaus Keuth

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect

Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. The new information incorporated in TSPA 1993 includes (1) revised estimates of radionuclide solubilities (and their thermal and geochemical dependency), (2) thermal and geochemical dependency of spent fuel waste alteration and glass dissolution rates, (3) new distribution coefficient (k{sub d}) estimates, (4) revised estimates of gas-phase velocities and travel times, and (5) revised hydrologic modeling of the saturated zone which provides updated estimates of the advective flux through the saturated zone.

Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

EPRI Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment Code (IMARC) Version 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1989, EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level radioactive waste (HLW) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. EPRI pioneered application of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) approach for evaluating performance of geologic repository systems on a probabilistic basis. Along the way, EPRI developed the Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code (IMARC) as its primary analytical tool for ...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Integration of project management and systems engineering: Tools for a total-cycle environmental management system  

SciTech Connect

An expedited environmental management process has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This process is one result of the Lockheed Martin commitment to the US Department of Energy to incorporate proven systems engineering practices with project management and program controls practices at the INEEL. Lockheed Martin uses a graded approach of its management, operations, and systems activities to tailor the level of control to the needs of the individual projects. The Lockheed Martin definition of systems engineering is: ``Systems Engineering is a proven discipline that defines and manages program requirements, controls risk, ensures program efficiency, supports informed decision making, and verifies that products and services meet customer needs.`` This paper discusses: the need for an expedited environmental management process; how the system was developed; what the system is; what the system does; and an overview of key components of the process.

Blacker, P.B.; Winston, R.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Stirling total energy systems study. Final report, May 15, 1976--June 13, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The application of Stirling cycle prime movers to total energy power generation systems was investigated. Electrical, heating, and cooling demand profiles for a typical residential complex, hospital, and office building were studied, and alternative Stirling total energy systems were conceptualized for each site. These were analyzed in detail and contrasted with purchased-power systems for these sites to determine fuel-energy savings and investment attractiveness. The residential complex and hospital would be excellent candidates for total energy systems, and prime movers in the 1000 kW output range would be required. Stirling engines with so large an output have not been built to date, although there would be no fundamental technical barrier to prevent this. However, careful consideration must be given to the following technological decision areas before arriving at a final design, if its potential is to be realized: engine configuration, hotside heat exchange interface, engine control system, internal gas seals, and advanced coal combustion technology. The principal advantage of a Stirling prime mover in this application, in view of national concern over present and future dependence on oil, is that it could utilize low-grade liquid fuels and coal.

Lehrfeld, D.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Damage Modeling and Life Extending Control of a Boiler-Turbine System1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damage Modeling and Life Extending Control of a Boiler-Turbine System1 Donglin Li Tongwen Chen2 hierarchical LEC structure and apply it to a typ- ical boiler system. There are two damage models

Marquez, Horacio J.

111

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life cycle analysis study of solar pv systems: an example ofa 2.7 kwp distributed solar pv system in singapore. Solarcycle analysis of solar pv based electricity generation: a

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

Harto, Andang Widi [Engineering Physics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

A probabilistic total system approach to the simulation of complex environmental systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GoldSim is a powerful and flexible Windows-based computer program for carrying out probabilistic simulations of complex systems to support management and decision-making in engineering, science and business. The program is highly graphical, highly extensible, ...

Rick Kossik; Ian Miller

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Logistics 1: closed-loop, simulation-based, systems engineering approach to life cycle management of defense systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the life-cycle impacts of operations and maintenance decisions made for new or aging systems requires an accurate ability to measure and respond to uncertainty. Maintenance and parts requirements forecasts for fielded military systems are traditionally ...

Sean Connors; Julie Gauldin; Marshall Smith

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Conceptual design of a 5x CPC for solar total energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design of a nontracking collector for a solar total energy system are described. Sandia Laboratories has responsibility for the evaluation of concentrating collectors in a total energy test bed. A Rankine cycle turbine, generator, controls, thermal storage, and air conditioning equipment have been installed and checked out. The thermal energy for the facility is to be provided by a large (approximately 800 m/sup 2/) concentrating collector field. At present a portion of the area is installed as E-W oriented linear parabolic troughs. Three additional concepts for the remaining area have been selected--a fixed mirror-moving receiver system, fixed receiver-moving reflector slats, and a two-axis tracking parabolic dish. All four systems use diurnal tracking and have the reflecting surfaces exposed to the elements. Argonne National Laboratory has been working on the development of non-tracking concentrators for high temperature operation. The recent experimental results indicate that a 5x CPC collector with only 12 adjustments per year could effectively compete with the systems presently being considered. These collectors would be enclosed under a protective cover glass, eliminating many of the problems with dirt, etc. A conceptual design of a CPC collector system is presented.

Cole, R; Schertz, W W; Teagan, W P

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Analysis of photovoltaic total energy systems for single family residential applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance and cost-effectiveness of three photovoltaic total energy system concepts designed to meet the thermal and electrical demands of a typical single family house are compared. The three photovoltaic total energy system concepts considered are: (1) All-photovoltaic systems. Passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels provide electricity to meet both electrical and thermal demands. (2) Separate-panel systems. Solar thermal panels provide thermal energy, while passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels serve the purely electric demand. (3) Combined thermal/electric panel systems. Water-cooled photovoltaic panels provide both thermal energy (transported by cooling water) and electrical energy to meet the separate thermal and electrical demands. Additional passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels are added, as required, to meet the electrical demand. The thermal demand is assumed to consist of the energy required for domestic hot water and space heating, while the electrical demand includes the energy required for baseload power (lights, appliances, etc.) plus air conditioning. An analysis procedure has been developed that permits definition of the panel area, electrical and/or thermal storage capacity, and utility backup energy level that, in combination, provide the lowest annual energy cost to the homeowner for each system concept for specified assumptions about costs and system operations. The procedure appears capable of being used to approximately any size system using solar collectors, as well as in any application where the thermal and/or electrical demand is being provided by solar energy, with utility or other conventional backup. This procedure has been used to provide results for homes located in Phoenix, Arizona, and Madison, Wisconsin, and to evaluate the effects of array and backup power costs and the desirability of selling excess electrical energy back to the utility. (WHK)

Chobotov, V.; Siegel, B.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a t echnoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Total environmental warming impact (TEWI) calculations for alternative automative air-conditioning systems  

SciTech Connect

The Montreal Protocol phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has required manufacturers to develop refrigeration and air-conditioning systems that use refrigerants that can not damage stratospheric ozone. Most refrigeration industries have adapted their designs to use hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) or hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants; new automobile air- conditioning systems use HFC-134a. These industries are now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants on global warming. Automobile air-conditioning has three separate impacts on global warming; (1) the effects of refrigerant inadvertently released to the atmosphere from accidents, servicing, and leakage; (2) the efficiency of the cooling equipment (due to the emission of C0{sub 2} from burning fuel to power the system); and (3) the emission of C0{sub 2} from burning fuel to transport the system. The Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) is an index that should be used to compare the global warming effects of alternative air-conditioning systems because it includes these contributions from the refrigerant, cooling efficiency, and weight. This paper compares the TEWI of current air-conditioning systems using HFC-134a with that of transcritical vapor compression system using carbon dioxide and systems using flammable refrigerants with secondary heat transfer loops. Results are found to depend on both climate and projected efficiency of C0{sub 2}systems. Performance data on manufacturing prototype systems are needed to verify the potential reductions in TEWI. Extensive field testing is also required to determine the performance, reliability, and ``serviceability`` of each alternative to HFC-134a to establish whether the potential reduction of TEWI can be achieved in a viable consumer product.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness: Lake County study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief summary is given of the results of a previously reported study designed to evaluate the costs and viability of combined thermodynamic and biologic cycles in a system known as the Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness (TERSA). This conceptual system involved the combined geothermally assisted activities of greenhouse crop and mushroom growing, fish farming, and biogas generation in an integrated biologic system such that the waste or by-products of each subsystem cycle were recovered to service input needs of companion cycles. An updated direct use geothermal system based on TERSA that is viable for implementation in Lake County is presented. Particular consideration is given to: location of geothermal resources, availability of land and irrigation quality water, compatibility of the specific direct use geothermal activities with adjacent and local uses. Private interest and opposition, and institutional factors as identified. Factors relevant to local TERSA implementation are discussed, followed by sites considered, selection criteria, site slection, and the modified system resulting. Particular attention is paid to attempt to make clear the process followed in applying this conceptual design to the specific task of realistic local implementation. Previous publications on geothermal energy and Lake County are referenced where specific details outside the scope of this study may be found. (JGB)

Fogleman, S.F.; Fisher, L.A.; Black, A.R.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Composite Life Cycle of Maritime Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems in Scatterometer and Microwave Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines scatterometer-observed surface wind divergence and vorticity, along with precipitable water (PW), across the life cycle of tropical maritime mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) as resolved in 0.5 data. Simple composites were ...

Brian Mapes; Ralph Milliff; Jan Morzel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Final report. Volume 2. Technical  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program was to assess the feasibility of using solar energy to provide a significant fraction of the energy needs of commercial buildings that have energy demands greater than 200 kWe. This volume of the final report discusses the approach employed to develop: (1) STES concept configurations and component data, (2) commercial buildings application data, and (3) computer simulation programs for evaluating various STES concept-commercial buildings applications. Various solar thermal and photovoltaic solar total energy systems (STES) configurations were considered. Concurrently, data on commercial buildings (e.g., categories, energy demand, demographic population, etc.) were developed and used to define six model building configurations which could be used as representative commercial buildings within six various regions (12 specific sites) of the United States. The six configurations included four building types (a low rise office building, a large retail store, a medium-size shopping center and a large shopping center) typifying current building designs. The remaining two configurations used the large shopping center model except that the energy demand was changed to reflect future building designs. The STESEP Computer Code was developed for a quick evaluation method for tradeoffs related to (1) cascading of thermal power conversion systems, (2) determination of optimum collector sizes and operating conditions (make or buy decisions for auxiliary energy), and (3) comparison of solar total energy concepts in various parts of the country and in various types of commercial buildings to assess their future economic potential for various economic scenarios. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Probabilistic Models for Life Cycle Management of Energy Infrastructure Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The degradation of aging energy infrastructure systems has the potential to increase the risk of failure, resulting in power outage and costly unplanned maintenance work. (more)

Datla, Suresh Varma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 1. Summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology has been developed by Atomics International under contract to the Department of Energy to define the applicability of solar total energy systems (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., retail stores, shopping centers, offices, etc.) in the United States. Candidate STES concepts were selected to provide on-site power generation capability, as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. Each concept was evaluated on the basis of its cost effectiveness (i.e., as compared to other concepts) and its ability to ultimately penetrate and capture a significant segment of this market, thereby resulting in a saving of fossil fuel resources. The photovoltaic STES appears favorable for applications under 800 kWe; whereas the organic Rankine STES would be more cost effective for larger energy demand applications. Initial penetration of these systems are expected to occur in the northeast for large shopping centers in the 1990 to 2000 time period. Such systems could provide about 0.8 to 1.8 quads (8 x 10/sup 14/ to 1.8 x 10/sup 15/ Btu) of energy per year for commercial applictions by the year 2010.

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Comparing maintenance costs of geothermal heat pump systems with other HVAC systems: Preventive maintenance actions and total maintenance costs  

SciTech Connect

Total annual heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) maintenance costs were determined for 20 schools in the Lincoln, Nebraska, Public School District. Each school examined provides cooling to over 70% of its total floor area and relies on one of the following heating and cooling systems to provide the majority of space conditioning: vertical-bore, geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), air-cooled chiller with gas-fired hot water boiler (ACC/GHWB), or water-cooled chiller with gas-fired steam boiler (WCC/GSB). A precursor to this study examined annual costs associated with repair, service, and corrective maintenance activities tracked in a work order database. This follow-up study examines costs associated with preventive maintenance (PM) activities conducted by the district. Annual PM costs were 5.87 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (63.14 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 7.14 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (76.86 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 9.82 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (105.39 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/ GSB, and 12.65 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (136.30 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. The results of the two analyses are combined to produce an estimate of total annual maintenance costs, by system type, for the 20 schools. Total annual maintenance costs were 8.75 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (94.20 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 9.27 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (99.76 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 13.54 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (145.49 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GSB, and 18.71 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (201.61 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. It should be noted that these costs represent only the trends seen in the maintenance database of the Lincoln School District. Because of differences in the number of schools using each system type, varying equipment age, and the small total number of schools included in the study, the maintenance costs presented here may not be representative of the maintenance costs seen for similar equipment in other locations.

Martin, M.A.; Madgett, M.G.; Hughes, P.J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Proceedings: 2003 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings of the 2003 EPRI Life Cycle Management Workshop provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and value in a market-driven industry. The proceedings summarize the results of applying life cycle management at several plants.

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

128

Proceedings: 2003 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings of the 2003 EPRI Life Cycle Management Workshop provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and value in a market-driven industry. The proceedings summarize the results of applying life cycle management at several plants.

None

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Stochastic Life-cycle Analysis of Deteriorating Infrastructure Systems and an Application to Reinforced Concrete Bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrastructure systems are critical to a countrys prosperity. It is extremely important to manage the infrastructure systems efficiently in order to avoid wastage and to maximize benefits. Deterioration of infrastructure systems is one of the primary issues in civil engineering today. This problem has been widely acknowledged by engineering community in numerous studies. We need to evolve efficient strategies to tackle the problem of infrastructure deterioration and to efficiently operate infrastructure. In this research, we propose stochastic models to predict the process of deterioration in engineering systems and to perform life-cycle analysis (LCA) of deteriorating engineering systems. LCA has been recognized, over the years, as a highly informative tool for helping the decision making process in infrastructure management. In this research, we propose a stochastic model, SSA, to accurately predict the effect of deterioration processes in engineering systems. The SSA model addresses some of the important and ignored areas in the existing models such as the effect of deterioration on both capacity and demands of systems and accounting for different types of failures in assessing the life-span of a deteriorating system. Furthermore, this research proposes RTLCA, a renewal theory based LCA model, to predict the life-cycle performance of deteriorating systems taking into account not only the life-time reliability but also the costs associated with operating a system. In addition, this research investigates the effect of seismic degradation on the reliability of reinforced concrete (RC) bridges. For this purpose, we model the seismic degradation process in the RC bridge columns which are the primary lateral load resisting system in a bridge. Thereafter, the RTLCA model along with SSA model is used to study the life-cycle of an example RC bridge located in seismic regions accounting for seismic degradation. It is expected that the models proposed in this research will be helpful in better managing our infrastructure systems.

Ramesh Kumar, - 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Designing eco-feedback systems for everyday life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eco-feedback systems currently frame householders as micro-resource managers, who weigh up the costs and benefits of their consumption, and make autonomous, rational and efficient decisions. Reporting on findings from a qualitative study of three Australian ... Keywords: consumption, demand management, eco-feedback, energy, smart meters, sustainable hci, water

Yolande A.A. Strengers

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Texas A&M University System Chancellor's Diversity Council Representatives from Texas AgriLife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M University System Chancellor's Diversity Council Representatives from Texas AgriLife Facilitator Joni E. Baker, Ph.D. Director of Equal Opportunity and Diversity The Texas A&M University System 200 Technology Way, Suite 1281 College Station, Texas 77845-3424 979-458-6203 979-458-6206 (fax

132

Service life of the reinforced concrete bridge deck in corrosive environments: A soft computing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the recent years, the soft computing techniques are increasingly applied in many fields of civil engineering due to their capabilities in computation and knowledge processing. In this paper, a soft computing system is developed to estimate the service ... Keywords: ?-Level optimization, Concrete bridge, Corrosion, Fuzzy random, Fuzzy system, Service life

Jafar Sobhani; Ali Akbar Ramezanianpour

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Sustainability and socio-enviro-technical systems: modeling total cost of ownership in capital facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investment in sustainability strategies and technologies holds promise for significant cost savings over the operational phase of a facility's life cycle, while more effectively meeting stakeholder needs. However, accurately estimating the first costs ...

Annie R. Pearce; Kristen L. Sanford Bernhardt; Michael J. Garvin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Program on Technology Innovation: EPRI Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment Code (IMARC) Version 8: Model Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the total system performance of the candidate spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, since 1989. EPRI's total system performance assessment (TSPA) code is formally known as IMARC, or Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code. Descriptions of the current version of IMARC are found in numerous EPRI reports. The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct summary of all components of IMARC...

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

The effect of lighting system components on lighting quality, energy use, and life-cycle cost  

SciTech Connect

A computational method was developed to examine the effect of lamp, ballast, and fixture selection on the quality and quantity of illumination, energy consumption, and life-cycle cost of lighting systems. Applying this analysis to lighting layouts using different lamp/ballast/fixture combinations suggested that combinations with higher lumen outputs reduced the uniformity of the illuminance distribution at the workplace but did not reduce visibility levels. The use of higher lumen output lamp/ballast/fixture systems and higher efficiency components tended to reduce life-cycle costs as long as the premium cost of the components was not too high.

Rubinstein, F.; Clark, T.; Siminovitch, M.; Verderber, R.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Method and apparatus to predict the remaining service life of an operating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and computer-based apparatus for monitoring the degradation of, predicting the remaining service life of, and/or planning maintenance for, an operating system are disclosed. Diagnostic information on degradation of the operating system is obtained through measurement of one or more performance characteristics by one or more sensors onboard and/or proximate the operating system. Though not required, it is preferred that the sensor data are validated to improve the accuracy and reliability of the service life predictions. The condition or degree of degradation of the operating system is presented to a user by way of one or more calculated, numeric degradation figures of merit that are trended against one or more independent variables using one or more mathematical techniques. Furthermore, more than one trendline and uncertainty interval may be generated for a given degradation figure of merit/independent variable data set. The trendline(s) and uncertainty interval(s) are subsequently compared to one or more degradation figure of merit thresholds to predict the remaining service life of the operating system. The present invention enables multiple mathematical approaches in determining which trendline(s) to use to provide the best estimate of the remaining service life.

Greitzer, Frank L. (Richland, WA); Kangas, Lars J. (West Richland, WA); Terrones, Kristine M. (Los Alamos, NM); Maynard, Melody A. (Richland, WA); Pawlowski, Ronald A. (West Richland, WA), Ferryman; Thomas A. (Richland, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA); Wilson, Bary W. (Coconut Creek, FL)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

138

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

139

Total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain - SNL second iteration (TSPA-1993); Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has completed the second iteration of the periodic total-system performance assessments (TSPA-93) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). These analyses estimate the future behavior of a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site under consideration by the Department of Energy. TSPA-93 builds upon previous efforts by emphasizing YMP concerns relating to site characterization, design, and regulatory compliance. Scenarios describing expected conditions (aqueous and gaseous transport of contaminants) and low-probability events (human-intrusion drilling and volcanic intrusion) are modeled. The hydrologic processes modeled include estimates of the perturbations to ambient conditions caused by heating of the repository resulting from radioactive decay of the waste. Hydrologic parameters and parameter probability distributions have been derived from available site data. Possible future climate changes are modeled by considering two separate groundwater infiltration conditions: {open_quotes}wet{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 10 mm/yr, and {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 0.5 mm/yr. Two alternative waste-package designs and two alternative repository areal thermal power densities are investigated. One waste package is a thin-wall container emplaced in a vertical borehole, and the second is a container designed with corrosion-resistant and corrosion-allowance walls emplaced horizontally in the drift. Thermal power loadings of 57 kW/acre (the loading specified in the original repository conceptual design) and 114 kW/acre (a loading chosen to investigate effects of a {open_quotes}hot repository{close_quotes}) are considered. TSPA-93 incorporates significant new detailed process modeling, including two- and three-dimensional modeling of thermal effects, groundwater flow in the saturated-zone aquifers, and gas flow in the unsaturated zone.

Wilson, M.L.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Dockery, H.A.; Dunn, E.; Eaton, R.R.; Martinez, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauthier, J.H.; Guerin, D.C.; Lu, N. [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain - SNL second iteration (TSPA-1993); Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has completed the second iteration of the periodic total-system performance assessments (TSPA-93) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). These analyses estimate the future behavior of a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site under consideration by the Department of Energy. TSPA-93 builds upon previous efforts by emphasizing YMP concerns relating to site characterization, design, and regulatory compliance. Scenarios describing expected conditions (aqueous and gaseous transport of contaminants) and low-probability events (human-intrusion drilling and volcanic intrusion) are modeled. The hydrologic processes modeled include estimates of the perturbations to ambient conditions caused by heating of the repository resulting from radioactive decay of the waste. Hydrologic parameters and parameter probability distributions have been derived from available site data. Possible future climate changes are modeled by considering two separate groundwater infiltration conditions: {open_quotes}wet{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 10 mm/yr, and {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 0.5 mm/yr. Two alternative waste-package designs and two alternative repository areal thermal power densities are investigated. One waste package is a thin-wall container emplaced in a vertical borehole, and the second is a container designed with corrosion-resistant and corrosion-allowance walls emplaced horizontally in the drift. Thermal power loadings of 57 kW/acre (the loading specified in the original repository conceptual design) and 114 kW/acre (a loading chosen to investigate effects of a {open_quotes}hot repository{close_quotes}) are considered. TSPA-93 incorporates significant new detailed process modeling, including two- and three-dimensional modeling of thermal effects, groundwater flow in the saturated-zone aquifers, and gas flow in the unsaturated zone.

Wilson, M.L.; Gauthier, J.H.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Dockery, H.A.; Dunn, E.; Eaton, R.R.; Guerin, D.C.; Lu, N.; Martinez, M.J. [and others] [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Case history study of total energy system at Western Mall Shopping Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Western Mall Total Energy Plant in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, serves an enclosed mall shopping center of 462,000 ft/sup 2/. The plant provides most of the mall and tenants with electricity, space-heating, and air-conditioning services from a natural gas-fueled engine-generator plant with hot water heat recovery, supplementary gas-fueled boiler, and absorption water chiller. Heating load served by the plant is calculated to be 15,000,000 Btu at -30/sup 0/F winter design condition with 70/sup 0/F space temperature. Maximum observed cooling load at 100/sup 0/F, 75/sup 0/ W.B. outdoor conditions is about 750 tons of refrigeration. Engine heat is recovered in a water system operated at 210 to 240/sup 0/F; an auxiliary scotch marine type, firetype gas-fueled boiler provides up to 14,000,000 Btu/h or supplementary heat. Energy customers have recently begun to exercise considerable control over their uses of electricity with more careful operation of lighting and appliances and with some replacement of illumination devices with more-efficient equipment. It is concluded that central heating and air-conditioning facilities provide the owner with an assured means for serving the shopping center, regardless of which energy source is most economical or least available. The hot and chilled water can be obtained from gas fuel as at present, from fuel oil, propane, all electric, or coal firing. Adapting the conversion equipment is difficult only for coal because of the space requirement for storage and handling that fuel. The power-generating capacity in place is an asset that should be used to serve the tenants because it reduces the public utility company need for expanded capacity. (MCW)

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Texas A&M AgriLife The Texas A&M University System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M AgriLife The Texas A&M University System Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Award. , Former Texas Governor 1995 Mr. L. Don Anderson, Distinguished Cotton Leader 1996 Senator William "Bill" Sims, Former Executive Director, Texas Sheep and Goat Raisers Association 1997 Mrs. Mary Nan West

143

System dynamics modelling of product carbon footprint life cycles for collaborative green supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Governments, environmental groups and industry associations are reducing greenhouse gas emissions to insure environmental sustainability. Manufacturing plays an important role in economic development but is a main cause of global warming since production ... Keywords: economic inputoutput life cycle assessment, mass customisation, product carbon footprint, system dynamics

AmyJ. C. Trappey; CharlesV. Trappey; Chih-Tung Hsiao; JerryJ. R. Ou; Chin-Tsung Chang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Homeless young people's experiences with information systems: life and work in a community technology center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores how homeless young people, aged 13-25, make use of information systems in daily life. Observed in a community technology center, four different examples of uses are described: i) Using digital tools to find employment, ii) Telling ... Keywords: digital media, homelessness, identity, youth

Jill Palzkill Woelfer; David G. Hendry

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Proceedings of 2001 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and plant value. Results of applying life-cycle management (LCM) at four plants are summarized.

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Surface Pressure and Precipitation Life Cycle Characteristics of PRE-STORM Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive observations of the MayJune 1985 OklahomaKansas Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central (OK PRE-STORM) are used to examine the life cycle characteristics of 16 mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). The primary focus is on the ...

Scot M. Loehrer; Richard H. Johnson

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hydro Life Extension Modernization Guides: Volumes 4 and 5: Auxiliary Mechanical and Electrical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These guidelines are the fourth and fifth volumes in a series for assessing the needs and benefits and evaluating the cost and economic justification of life extension and modernization alternatives at hydroelectric plants and for implementing the selected plan. They specifically address the plant auxiliary mechanical systems (Volume 4) and auxiliary electrical systems (Volume 5). They also provide a screening procedure and criteria to enable utility personnel to identify where there are opportunities fo...

2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

148

Total Lightning Signatures of Thunderstorm Intensity over North Texas. Part II: Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total lightning data from the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR II) research network in addition to cloud-to-ground flash data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and data from the DallasFort Worth, Texas, Weather ...

Scott M. Steiger; Richard E. Orville; Lawrence D. Carey

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume III, conceptual design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the work described in this volume was to conceptualize suitable designs for solar total energy systems for the following residential market segments: single-family detached homes, single-family attached units (townhouses), low-rise apartments, and high-rise apartments. Conceptual designs for the total energy systems are based on parabolic trough collectors in conjunction with a 100 kWe organic Rankine cycle heat engine or a flat-plate, water-cooled photovoltaic array. The ORC-based systems are designed to operate as either independent (stand alone) systems that burn fossil fuel for backup electricity or as systems that purchase electricity from a utility grid for electrical backup. The ORC designs are classified as (1) a high temperature system designed to operate at 600/sup 0/F and (2) a low temperature system designed to operate at 300/sup 0/F. The 600/sup 0/F ORC system that purchases grid electricity as backup utilizes the thermal tracking principle and the 300/sup 0/F ORC system tracks the combined thermal and electrical loads. Reject heat from the condenser supplies thermal energy for heating and cooling. All of the ORC systems utilize fossil fuel boilers to supply backup thermal energy to both the primary (electrical generating) cycle and the secondary (thermal) cycle. Space heating is supplied by a central hot water (hydronic) system and a central absorption chiller supplies the space cooling loads. A central hot water system supplies domestic hot water. The photovoltaic system uses a central electrical vapor compression air conditioning system for space cooling, with space heating and domestic hot water provided by reject heat from the water-cooled array. All of the systems incorporate low temperature thermal storage (based on water as the storage medium) and lead--acid battery storage for electricity; in addition, the 600/sup 0/F ORC system uses a therminol-rock high temperature storage for the primary cycle. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Highlights of the solar total energy systems, distributed collector systems, and research and development projects. Semiannual review, 26-27 January 1976, Atlanta, Georgia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The highlights of the ERDA Solar Thermal Branch Semiannual Review held in Atlanta, Georgia, on January 26-27, 1976, are presented. Status and plans for Total Energy Systems, Distributed Collectors, and Research and Development Projects are reviewed. (WHK)

Latta, A.F.

1976-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

152

Reducing the Carbon Footprint of Commercial Refrigeration Systems Using Life Cycle Climate Performance Analysis: From System Design to Refrigerant Options  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) analysis is used to estimate lifetime direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent gas emissions of various refrigerant options and commercial refrigeration system designs, including the multiplex DX system with various hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, the HFC/R744 cascade system incorporating a medium-temperature R744 secondary loop, and the transcritical R744 booster system. The results of the LCCP analysis are presented, including the direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent emissions for each refrigeration system and refrigerant option. Based on the results of the LCCP analysis, recommendations are given for the selection of low GWP replacement refrigerants for use in existing commercial refrigeration systems, as well as for the selection of commercial refrigeration system designs with low carbon dioxide equivalent emissions, suitable for new installations.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Systems Modeling For The Laser Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systems model has been developed for the Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) power plant. It combines cost-performance scaling models for the major subsystems of the plant including the laser, inertial fusion target factory, engine (i.e., the chamber including the fission and tritium breeding blankets), energy conversion systems and balance of plant. The LIFE plant model is being used to evaluate design trade-offs and to identify high-leverage R&D. At this point, we are focused more on doing self consistent design trades and optimization as opposed to trying to predict a cost of electricity with a high degree of certainty. Key results show the advantage of large scale (>1000 MWe) plants and the importance of minimizing the cost of diodes and balance of plant cost.

Meier, W R; Abbott, R; Beach, R; Blink, J; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Farmer, J; Halsey, W; Ladran, T; Latkowski, J; MacIntyre, A; Miles, R; Storm, E

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

154

OPTIMIZATION FOR COGENERATION SYSTEMS IN BUILDINGS BASED ON LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY: This paper presents a model that is developed to optimize the selection and operation of energy systems in commercial buildings based on their environmental performance. The model can be used for decision support regarding infrastructure in both design and operation of building energy systems. The approach is composed of energy simulation to generate buildings energy demand, life cycle assessment (LCA) to model different energy systems, and optimization model to optimize the selection and operation of these energy systems. The energy systems that are discussed in this paper are cogeneration systems, average electric grid, gas boilers, and absorption and electric chillers. The performance criteria presented in this paper are primary energy consumption (PEC) and tropospheric ozone precursor potential (TOPP).

J. Vanier; Ayat E. Osman; Phd C; Robert Ries; Assistant Professor

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

International Review Team Report: A Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain IMARC Total System Performance Assessment EPRI Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1989, EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. EPRI pioneered application of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) approach for evaluating performance of geologic repository systems on a probabilistic basis. Along the way, EPRI developed the Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code (IMARC) as its primary analytical tool for TSPA-based e...

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

Evaluation of the Proposed High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain Using Total System Performance Assessment: Phase 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful license application for the candidate spent-fuel and high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain depends on a robust demonstration of long-term safety. This report presents EPRI's evaluation of, and makes a case for, the suitability of the Yucca Mountain repository using a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The report discusses factors that make the Yucca Mountain repository system suitable for continued development and initiation of the licensing process. Information in this Phas...

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Westinghouse Full-Length Rod Control System - Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sourcebook provides the technical information necessary to develop a comprehensive plant-specific life cycle management plan for the Westinghouse solid-state full-length rod control system. The technical information includes operating experience, industry bench-marking performance survey results, recommended preventive and predictive maintenance, industry "good practices," obsolescence issues, and OEM component upgrades and design enhancements. The component upgrades/enhancements will improve the sy...

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

A network hierarchical feedback system for Taiwanese universities based on the integration of total quality management and innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing number of Taiwanese universities are improving operational performance through innovation and total quality management (TQM). In addition, the National Quality Award (NQA), which is based on TQM, is now used to evaluate quality performance ... Keywords: Decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL), Fuzzy analytical hierarchical process (FAHP), Fuzzy analytical network process (FANP), Gray relational analysis (GRA), Network hierarchical feedback system (NHFS)

Jui-Kuei Chen; I-Shuo Chen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

TY JOUR T1 Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems JF Annual Review of Environment and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems JF Annual Review of Environment and Resources A1 Eric R Masanet A1 Yuan Chang A1 Anand R Gopal A1 Peter H Larsen A1 William R Morrow A1 Roger Sathre A1 Arman Shehabi A1 Pei Zhai KW electricity KW energy policy KW environmental analysis KW life cycle impact KW life cycle inventory AB p The application of life cycle assessment LCA to electric power EP technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life cycle energy

160

Parametric study of the total system life cycle cost of an alternate nuclear waste management strategy using deep boreholes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Energy recently submitted a license application for the Yucca Mountain repository to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, yet even the most optimistic timetable projects that the repository will not now ...

Moulton, Taylor Allen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Develop and test fuel cell powered on-site integrated total energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design, fabrication and testing of a 25kW phosphoric acid fuel cell system aimed at stationary applications, and the technology development underlying that system. The 25kW fuel cell ran at rated power in both the open and closed loop mode in the summer of 1988. Problems encountered and solved include acid replenishment leakage, gas cross-leakage and edge-leakage in bipolar plates, corrosion of metallic cooling plates and current collectors, cooling groove depth variations, coolant connection leaks, etc. 84 figs., 7 tabs.

Kaufman, A.; Werth, J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Total System Cost Analysis of Master-Slave Multi-super-Hypercube DX-tree Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years the area of High Performance Computing (HPC) has received an outstanding support both from the users as well as the computer system designers. This support is mainly due to the increase of the complexity and density of the data processing ... Keywords: DX-Tree architecture, XTree architecture, cost analysis, high performance computing, super-hypercube architecture

Hamid Abachi

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Total cost of 46-Mw Borax cogen system put at $30M  

SciTech Connect

The cogeneration system, designed around a W-251B gas turbine power plant exhausting into a Deltak waste heat boiler to produce ''free'' process steam from the gas turbine exhaust, is discussed. The design includes water injection for NO/sub x/ control, self-cleaning inlet air filters, evaporative coolers, supercharger, and supplementary firing of the waste heat boiler. Once the system is operational Borax will be able to generate all of the electricity needed for on-site operations and a large share of process steam needs--plus still have 22-23 Mw surplus electric power to sell, so that the installation should pay for itself in less than 5 years of service.

de Biasi, V.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 3. Conceptual designs and market analyses. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to assess the feasibility of using solar energy to provide a significant fraction of the energy needs of commercial buildings that have energy demands greater than 200 kWe. The STES concept trade studies, sensitivity parameters, performance characteristics, and selected concepts are discussed. Market penetration rate estimates are provided, and technology advancements and utilization plans are discussed. Photovoltaic STES configurations and Rankine cycle thermal STES systems are considered. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Program on Technology Innovation: Treatment of Colloid-Facilitated Transport for Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has evaluated the potential importance of colloid-aided radionuclide transport from the candidate high level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the total system performance of Yucca Mountain since 1989. The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct summary of EPRI's independent evaluation of the importance of radionuclide transport via colloids. EPRI concludes th...

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

166

Evaluation of the Candidate High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain Using Total System Performance Assessment: Phase 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful license application for the candidate spent-fuel and high level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain depends on a robust demonstration of long-term safety. This report presents EPRI's independent review to identify any conservatisms in the U.S. Depawrtment of Energy's (DOE's) Phase 5 Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The review specifically identifies key facility components, makes recommendations regarding technical development work priorities, and evaluates ove...

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

167

Fort Hood solar total energy project: technical support and systems integration. Third semiannual report, May 1, 1979-October 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work on the Fort Hood STES which was planned by DOE as a Large Scale Experiment for the Solar Total Energy Program is described. The history of the design evolution and management of the project which began in 1973 is summarized. The project was discontinued by DOE in December 1979. Supporting studies underway at the time are reported including: (1) reassessment of energy loads, (2) revised system concept, (3) plant sizing calculations, and (4) insolation variation measurement planning. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Fort Hood solar total energy project. Technical support and systems integration. First semiannual report, May 1-October 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress on the design of a Solar Total Energy System which will supply a significant portion of the energy requirements of a troop housing complex at Fort Hood, Texas, is described. Selection and sizing of the distributed collector field are discussed, and parabolic trough collector technology is reviewed. Energy load measurements and insolation models for the Fort Hood site are described. Technical project support efforts are reviewed. (WHK)

None,

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Sustainable Transportation Decision-Making: Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) and Total Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a new infrastructure facility requires a significant amount of time and expense. This is particularly true for investments in transportation for their longstanding and great degree of impact on society. The scope of time and money involved does not mean, however, we only focus on the economies of scale and may ignore other aspects of the built environment. To this extent, how can we achieve a more balanced perspective in infrastructure decision-making? In addition, what aspects should be considered when making more sustainable decisions about transportation investments? These two questions are the foundations of this study. This dissertation shares its process in part with a previous research project Texas Urban Triangle (TUT). Although the TUT research generated diverse variables and created possible implementations of spatial decision support system (SDSS), the methodology still demands improvement. The current method has been developed to create suitable routes but is not designed to rank or make comparisons. This is admittedly one of the biggest shortfalls in the general SDSS approach, but is also where I see as an opportunity to make alternative interpretation more comprehensive and effective. The main purpose of this dissertation is to develop a Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) that will lead to more balanced decision-making in transportation investment and optimize the most sustainable high-speed rail (HSR) route. The decision support system developed here explicitly elaborates the advantages and disadvantages of a transportation corridor in three particular perspectives: construction (fixed costs); operation (maintenance costs); and externalities (social and environmental costs), with a specific focus on environmental externalities. Considering more environmental features in rail routing will offset short-term economic losses and creates more sustainable environments in long-term infrastructure planning.

Kim, Hwan Yong

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

USE OF ONE-ON ANALYSIS TO EVALUATE TOTAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of analyses of the hypothetical performance of the various configurations of selected natural and engineered elements of the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear-waste repository. These analyses were conducted upon the recommendation of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (NWTRB) regarding an alternative approach to investigate the identified natural and engineered barriers and associated processes with respect to the postclosure performance of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The analyses were conducted per Technical Work Plan (TWP) TWP-MGR-PA-000011 REV 00, Section 3.2.4, Task 2, which states that the task involves ''Identification of barriers that are important to repository performance:'' by means of ''one-on'' analyses to gain a better understanding of repository performance relative to previously identified barriers.'' The ''One-on Analysis'' was performed per Administrative Procedure AP-SIII.9Q. The NWTRB previously reviewed similar analyses conducted by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) (EPRI 2002 [158069]). The approach of the investigation was to simulate the hypothetical performance of the repository after an arbitrarily chosen successive addition of each of the selected natural and engineered barrier components and associated processes that provide for the overall safety of the repository. Because the repository system will behave as an integrated system, the combined interaction of all the processes and barriers identified in this report will provide the ultimate repository performance as indicated in various performance-assessment analyses for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) M&O 2000 [153246]; Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2001 [155950]; and Williams 2001 [157307]. The analyses presented in this report should not be construed as an indication, for the chosen additive sequence, of the relative importance on any one barrier or process. Rather, the results of these analyses provide an indication of the relative performance of those barriers and processes and an understanding of their contribution to the overall performance of the proposed repository system. The analyses in this report considered the nominal-performance scenario only, and did not address performance following unlikely disruptive events (e.g., volcanic activity) (10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 63.342).

G.J. Saulnier Jr.

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

171

A building life-cycle information system for tracking building performance metrics  

SciTech Connect

Buildings often do not perform as well in practice as expected during pre-design planning, nor as intended at the design stage. While this statement is generally considered to be true, it is difficult to quantify the impacts and long-term economic implications of a building in which performance does not meet expectations. This leads to a building process that is devoid of quantitative feedback that could be used to detect and correct problems both in an individual building and in the building process itself. One key element in this situation is the lack of a standardized method for documenting and communicating information about the intended performance of a building. This paper describes the Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS); designed to manage a wide range of building related information across the life cycle of a building project. BLISS is based on the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) developed by the International Alliance for Interoperability. A BLISS extension to th e IFC that adds classes for building performance metrics is described. Metracker, a prototype tool for tracking performance metrics across the building life cycle, is presented.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Life Cycle Characteristics of Deep Cloud Systems over the Indian Region Using INSAT-1B Pixel Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed study of deep cloud systems (denoted by CSs) over the Indian region using INSAT-1B pixel data is presented. The life cycle characteristics of CSs are examined, including their preferred regions of formation and dissipation, frequency ...

Arvind V. Gambheer; G. S. Bhat

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these options. Conclusions Natural gas utilization as the primary heat source for district heat production implies environmental complications beyond just the global warming impacts. Diffusing renewable energy sources for generating the base load district heat would reduce human toxicity, ecosystem quality degradation, global warming, and resource depletion compared to the case of natural gas. Reducing fossil fuel dependency in various stages of wood pellet production can remarkably reduce the upstream global warming impact of using wood pellets for district heat generation.

Ghafghazi, Saeed [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 1. System criteria and design description. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume documents the preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas. Current system, subsystem, and component designs are described and additional studies which support selection among significant design alternatives are presented. Overall system requirements which form the system design basis are presented. These include program objectives; performance and output load requirements; industrial, statutory, and regulatory standards; and site interface requirements. Material in this section will continue to be issued separately in the Systems Requirements Document and maintained current through revision throughout future phases of the project. Overall system design and detailed subsystem design descriptions are provided. Consideration of operation and maintenance is reflected in discussion of each subsystem design as well as in an integrated overall discussion. Included are the solar collector subsystem; the thermal storage subsystem, the power conversion sybsystem (including electrical generation and distribution); the heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystems; overall instrumentation and control; and the STES building and physical plant. The design of several subsystems has progressed beyond the preliminary stage; descriptions for such subsystems are therefore provided in more detail than others to provide complete documentation of the work performed. In some cases, preliminary design parameters require specific verificaton in the definitive design phase and are identified in the text. Subsystem descriptions will continue to be issued and revised separately to maintain accuracy during future phases of the project. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume II, energy requirements. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project analyzed the application of solar total energy systems to appropriate segments of the residential sector and determined their market penetration potential. This volume covers the work done on energy requirements definition and includes the following: (1) identification of the single-family and multi-family market segments; (2) regionalization of the United States; (3) electrical and thermal load requirements, including time-dependent profiles; (4) effect of conservation measures on energy requirements; and (5) verification of simulated load data with real data.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Documenting performance metrics in a building life-cycle information system  

SciTech Connect

In order to produce a new generation of green buildings, it will be necessary to clearly identify their performance requirements, and to assure that these requirements are met. A long-term goal is to provide building decision-makers with the information and tools needed to cost-effectively assure the desired performance of buildings, as specified by stakeholders, across the complete life cycle of a building project. A key element required in achieving this goal is a method for explicitly documenting the building performance objectives that are of importance to stakeholders. Such a method should clearly define each objective (e.g., cost, energy use, and comfort) and its desired level of performance. This information is intended to provide quantitative benchmarks useful in evaluating alternative design solutions, commissioning the newly constructed building, and tracking and maintaining the actual performance of the occupied building over time. These quantitative benchmarks are referred to as performance metrics, and they are a principal element of information captured in the Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS). An initial implementation of BLISS is based on the International Alliance for Interoperability`s (IAI) Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), an evolving data model under development by a variety of architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry firms and organizations. Within BLISS, the IFC data model has been extended to include performance metrics and a structure for archiving changing versions of the building information over time. This paper defines performance metrics, discusses the manner in which BLISS is envisioned to support a variety of activities related to assuring the desired performance of a building across its life cycle, and describes a performance metric tracking tool, called Metracker, that is based on BLISS.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Multiscale Interactions in the Life Cycle of a Tropical Cyclone Simulated in a Global Cloud-System-Resolving Model. Part II: System-Scale and Mesoscale Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of Tropical Storm Isobel was simulated reasonably well in the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM), a global cloud-system-resolving model. The evolution of the large-scale circulation and the storm-scale structure ...

Hironori Fudeyasu; Yuqing Wang; Masaki Satoh; Tomoe Nasuno; Hiroaki Miura; Wataru Yanase

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Simulation System on the Thermal Stress and Fatigue Life Loss of Startup and Shutdown for a Domestic 600MW Steam Turbo Generator Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Simulation System on the thermal stresses and fatigue life loss of the rotator during startup and shutdown for a domestic 600MW steam turbo generator unit, By means of the analysis of Simulation System on the thermal stress and life loss of the rotor, ... Keywords: steam turbine unit, thermal stress, Fatigue Life Loss, rotator, startup, shutdown

Yunchun Xia

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Third quarterly progress report, November 1, 1976--January 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of Solar Total Energy System (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., office buildings, shopping centers, retail stores, etc.) in the United States is investigated. Candidate solar-thermal and solar-photovoltaic concepts are considered for providing on-site electrical power generation as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. The solar-thermal concepts include the use of solar concentrators (distributed or central-receiver) for collection of the thermal energy for conversion to electricity by means of a Rankine-cycle or Brayton-cycle power-conversion system. Recoverable waste heat from the power-generation process is utilized to help meet the building thermal-energy demand. Evaluation methodology is identified to allow ranking and/or selection of the most cost-effective concept for commercial-building applications.

Not Available

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Second quarterly progress report, August 1, 1976--October 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report investigates the application of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., office buildings, shopping centers, retail stores, etc.) in the United States. Candidate solar thermal and solar photovoltaic concepts are considered for providing on-site electrical power generation as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. The solar thermal concepts include the use of solar concentrators (distributed or central receiver) for collection of the thermal energy for conversion to electricity by means of a Rankine cycle or Brayton cycle power conversion system. Recoverable waste heat from the power generation process is utilized to help meet the building thermal energy demand. Evaluation methodology is identified to allow ranking and/or selection of the most cost-effective concept for commercial building applications.

Not Available

1977-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mo-6%Nb single crystal alloy creep strength demonstration for long life thermionic power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results of one- and two-dimensional creep testing for single crystal Mo-6%Nb alloy are presented. Three 1-D specimens were creep-tested for up to 3000 hours at 1873 to 1973 K and 5 to 15 MPa. One 2-D specimen tube was creep-tested for 2000 hours at 1873 K/15MPa. Results confirm the high creep strength of Mo-6%Nb for long life (10 to 15 year) TFE emitter application in thermionic space nuclear power systems. After the initial transition stage (about 1000 hours), quasi-steady state 1-D and 2-D creep rates were within 20% of each other suggesting little significant effect of anisotropy. More data points will be needed to define the Sherby-Dom parameters with statistical accuracy. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

Rhee, H.S.; Zheng, C.; Kent Koester, J. [Space Power, Inc., 621 River Oaks Parkway, San Jose, California 95134 (United States); Yastrebkov, A.; Nikolaev, Y.; Gontar, A. [Scientific Industrial Association Lutch, Podolsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

182

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

183

An Investigation of Window and Lighting Systems using Life Cycle Cost Analysis for the Purpose of Energy Conservation in Langford Building A at Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Langford Building A forms part of the Langford Architectural Complex at Texas A & M University. Inefficient lighting fixtures and single pane windows in Langford Building A contribute to a considerable portion of the total cost of energy for this building. In the Southwestern United States, a building's windows can be responsible for a significant loss of energy. The windows and inefficient light bulbs can result in high utility costs and high labor charges from more frequent lighting maintenance than that required for efficient lighting. In Langford Building A, window system energy efficiency has not been improved since the building was constructed in 1977. This paper investigates the economic feasibility of using efficient lighting and window systems in Langford Building A. The cost for windows and new lighting tubes was analyzed and compared by using Life Cycle Cost Analysis. The payback periods, determined in this analysis, showed that more efficient lighting and window systems would reduce costs. As results of this analysis, the window film and LED lighting tube reduce building life cycle cost and short payback periods than other alternatives.

Hwang, Hea Yeon

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY and other countries. Higher efficiencies are produced by innovative cell designs and material and energy% more electricity than average efficiency (i.e., 14%) c-Si PV modules. Keywords: Photovoltaic, energy

185

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

186

Central receiver solar thermal power system: collector subsystem extended life test. Final report  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate long term durability and stability of heliostat reflector and enclosure materials an extended life test program was performed on Research Experiment Heliostats by Boeing Engineering and Construction. The reflectors and enclosures were periodically evaluated and analyzed for the effects of dirt, sunlight, wind and thermal cycling on the mechanical and optical properties of Tedlar and changes in the Mylar reflector tension and reflectivity. During testing the heliostats were maintained and semi-annualy evaluated for optical and mechanical stability. The heliostats tested were located at the Boeing Boardman, Oregon test facility. The purpose of the program was to obtain data through measurements and observation to aid in heliostat design improvement. Certain weather and time related information, most reliably acquired by real time exposure testing, was sought through performance of mechanical and optical testing of the Boardman heliostats. The key areas of technical concern were: (1) enclosure and reflector optical property retention; (2) enclosure and reflector mechanical property retention; and (3) reflector creep (or loss in membrane tension) using bonded joints. In-place optical measurements as well as laboratory optical measurements on coupons cut from a heliostat, mechanical measurements from heliostat coupons, reflector sag measurements, and observations of the air supply system pressure stability and filter condition were made during the initial and two semi-annual test samplings. Results are summarized and discussed. (WHK)

1979-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

187

Mathematical Analysis of a Novel Approach to Maximize Waste Recovery in a Life Support System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NASA has been evaluating closed-loop atmosphere revitalization architectures carbon dioxide, CO2, reduction technologies. The CO2 and steam, H2O, co-electrolysis process is another option that NASA has investigated. Utilizing recent advances in the fuel cell technology sector, the Idaho National Laboratory, INL, has developed a CO2 and H2O co-electrolysis process to produce oxygen and syngas (carbon monoxide, CO and hydrogen, H2 mixture) for terrestrial (energy production) application. The technology is a combined process that involves steam electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis, and the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Two process models were developed to evaluate novel approaches for waster recovery in a life support system. The first is a model INL co-electrolysis process combined with a methanol production process. The second is the INL co-electrolysis process combined with a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process. For both processes, the overall power increases as the syngas ratio, H2/CO, increases because more water is needed to produce more hydrogen at a set CO2 incoming flow rate. The power for the methanol cases is less than the PSA because heat is available from the methanol reactor to preheat the water and carbon dioxide entering the co-electrolysis process.

Michael G. McKellar; Rick A. Wood; Carl M. Stoots; Lila Mulloth; Bernadette Luna

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

THE MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF A NOVEL APPROACH TO MAXIMIZE WASTE RECOVERY IN A LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NASA has been evaluating closed-loop atmosphere revitalization architectures that include carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technologies. The CO2 and steam (H2O) co-electrolysis process is one of the reduction options that NASA has investigated. Utilizing recent advances in the fuel cell technology sector, the Idaho National Laboratory, INL, has developed a CO2 and H2O co-electrolysis process to produce oxygen and syngas (carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2) mixture) for terrestrial (energy production) application. The technology is a combined process that involves steam electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis, and the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Two process models were developed to evaluate novel approaches for energy storage and resource recovery in a life support system. In the first model, products from the INL co-electrolysis process are combined to produce methanol fuel. In the second co-electrolysis, products are separated with a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process. In both models the fuels are burned with added oxygen to produce H2O and CO2, the original reactants. For both processes, the overall power increases as the syngas ratio, H2/CO, increases because more water is needed to produce more hydrogen at a set CO2 incoming flow rate. The power for the methanol cases is less than pressure swing adsorption, PSA, because heat is available from the methanol reactor to preheat the water and carbon dioxide entering the co-electrolysis process.

Michael G. McKellar; Rick A. Wood; Carl M. Stoots; Lila Mulloth; Bernadette Luna

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems. An evaluation based on life cycle assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the environmental results, integrated with those arising from mass and energy balances, of a research project on the comparative analysis of strategies for material and energy recovery from waste, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. The project, involving the cooperation of five University research groups, was devoted to the optimisation of material and energy recovery activities within integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems. Four scenarios of separate collection (overall value of 35%, 50% without the collection of food waste, 50% including the collection of food waste, 65%) were defined for the implementation of energetic, environmental and economic balances. Two sizes of integrated MSW management system (IWMS) were considered: a metropolitan area, with a gross MSW production of 750,000 t/year and an average province, with a gross MSW production of 150,000 t/year. The environmental analysis was conducted using Life Cycle Assessment methodology (LCA), for both material and energy recovery activities. In order to avoid allocation we have used the technique of the expansion of the system boundaries. This means taking into consideration the impact on the environment related to the waste management activities in comparison with the avoided impacts related to the saving of raw materials and primary energy. Under the hypotheses of the study, both for the large and for the small IWMS, the energetic and environmental benefits are higher than the energetic and environmental impacts for all the scenarios analysed in terms of all the indicators considered: the scenario with 50% separate collection in a drop-off scheme excluding food waste shows the most promising perspectives, mainly arising from the highest collection (and recycling) of all the packaging materials, which is the activity giving the biggest energetic and environmental benefits. Main conclusions of the study in the general field of the assessment of the environmental performance of any integrated waste management scheme address the importance of properly defining, beyond the design value assumed for the separate collection as a whole, also the yields of each material recovered; particular significance is finally related to the amount of residues deriving from material recovery activities, resulting on average in the order of 20% of the collected materials.

Giugliano, Michele; Cernuschi, Stefano [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Grosso, Mario, E-mail: mario.grosso@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Vehicle Systems Approach to Evaluate Plug-in Hybrid Battery Cold Start, Life and Cost Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The batteries used in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) need to overcome significant technical challenges in order for PHEVs to become economically viable and have a large market penetration. The internship at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) involved two experiments which looked at a vehicle systems approach to analyze two such technical challenges: Battery life and low battery power at cold (-7 ?C) temperature. The first experiment, concerning battery life and its impact on gasoline savings due to a PHEV, evaluates different vehicle control strategies over a pre-defined vehicle drive cycle, in order to identify the control strategy which yields the maximum dollar savings (operating cost) over the life of the vehicle, when compared to a charge sustaining hybrid. Battery life degradation over the life of the vehicle, and fuel economy savings on every trip (daily) are taken into account when calculating the net present value of the gasoline dollars saved. The second experiment evaluates the impact of different vehicle control strategies in heating up the PHEV battery (due to internal ohmic losses) for cold ambient conditions. The impact of low battery power (available to the vehicle powertrain) due to low battery and ambient temperatures has been well documented in literature. The trade-off between the benefits of heating up the battery versus heating up the internal combustion engine are evaluated, using different control strategies, and the control strategy, which provided optimum temperature rise of each component, is identified.

Shidore, Neeraj Shripad

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Improved Life and Life Prediction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life and Life and Life Prediction University of North Dakota Forrest Ames #086 *Low NOx combustor turbulence characteristics were documented and should aid designers in the prediction of surface heat load. *Data was assessed by Rolls Royce and P&W and is now being used. *Future catalytic combustor designs should benefit from the enhanced ability to predict heat load. * New catalytic combustor technology has the potential to reduce NOx emissions and heat load, and potentially increase the life of nozzle guide vanes. * Simulated combustor geometries for Rolls-Royce, GE, and Catalytica Energy Systems were tested. 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 0.5 1 1.5 2 Relative Engine Size (Re C x 10 6 ) Relative Vane Heat Load (St AVE /St AVE ,Low Turbulence) CC, Conventional Vane DLN, Conventional Vane AC, Conventional Vane

192

ACCOUNTING FOR A VITRIFIED PLUTONIUM WASTE FORM IN THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY TOTAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (TSPA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vitrification technology utilizing a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass appears to be a viable option for dispositioning excess weapons-useable plutonium that is not suitable for processing into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. A significant effort to develop a glass formulation and vitrification process to immobilize plutonium was completed in the mid-1990s to support the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP). Further refinement of the vitrification process was accomplished as part of the Am/Cm solution vitrification project. The LaBS glass formulation was found to be capable of immobilizing in excess of 10 wt% Pu and to be very tolerant of the impurities accompanying the plutonium material streams. Thus, this waste form would be suitable for dispositioning plutonium owned by the Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) that may not be well characterized and may contain high levels of impurities. The can-in-canister technology demonstrated in the PIP could be utilized to dispose of the vitrified plutonium in the federal radioactive waste repository. The can-in-canister technology involves placing small cans of the immobilized Pu form into a high level waste (HLW) glass canister fitted with a rack to hold the cans and then filling the canister with HLW glass. Testing was completed to demonstrate that this technology could be successfully employed with little or no impact to current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operation and that the resulting canisters were essentially equivalent to the present HLW glass canisters to be dispositioned in the federal repository. The performance of wastes in the repository and, moreover, the performance of the entire repository system is being evaluated by the Department of Energy-Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE-RW) using a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) methodology. Technical bases documents (e.g., Analysis/Modeling Reports (AMR)) that address specific issues regarding waste form performance are being used to develop process models as input to the TSPA analyses. In this report, models developed in five AMRs for waste forms currently slated for disposition in the repository are evaluated for their applicability to waste forms with plutonium immobilized in LaBS glass using the can-in-canister technology. Those AMRs address: high-level waste glass degradation; radionuclide inventory; in-package chemistry; dissolved concentration limits of radioactive elements; and colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. Based on evaluation of how the models treated HLW glass and similarities in the corrosion behaviors of borosilicate HLW glasses and LaBS glass, the models in the AMRs were deemed to be directly applicable to the disposition of excess weapons-useable plutonium. The evaluations are summarized.

Marra, J

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

The life cycle CO2 emission performance of the DOE/NASA solar power satellite system: a comparison of alternative power generation systems in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar power generation and, in particular, space solar power generation seem to be one of the most promising electric power generation technologies for reducing emissions of global warming gases (denoted collectively as CO2 emissions below). ... Keywords: Alternative technology, CO, Department of Energy (DOE)/NASA reference system, life cycle assessment (LCA), power generation, solar power satellite (SPS)

H. Hayami; M. Nakamura; K. Yoshioka

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The CI-FLOW Project: A System for Total Water Level Prediction from the Summit to the Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Coastal and Inland Flooding Observation and Warning (CI-FLOW) project is to prototype new hydrometeorologic techniques to address a critical NOAA service gap: routine total water level predictions for tidally influenced watersheds. ...

Suzanne Van Cooten; Kevin E. Kelleher; Kenneth Howard; Jian Zhang; Jonathan J. Gourley; John S. Kain; Kodi Nemunaitis-Monroe; Zac Flamig; Heather Moser; Ami Arthur; Carrie Langston; Randall Kolar; Yang Hong; Kendra Dresback; Evan Tromble; Humberto Vergara; Richard A Luettich Jr.; Brian Blanton; Howard Lander; Ken Galluppi; Jessica Proud Losego; Cheryl Ann Blain; Jack Thigpen; Katie Mosher; Darin Figurskey; Michael Moneypenny; Jonathan Blaes; Jeff Orrock; Rich Bandy; Carin Goodall; John G. W. Kelley; Jason Greenlaw; Micah Wengren; Dave Eslinger; Jeff Payne; Geno Olmi; John Feldt; John Schmidt; Todd Hamill; Robert Bacon; Robert Stickney; Lundie Spence

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Development of Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerant Solutions for Commercial Refrigeration Systems using a Life Cycle Climate Performance Design Tool  

SciTech Connect

Commercial refrigeration systems are known to be prone to high leak rates and to consume large amounts of electricity. As such, direct emissions related to refrigerant leakage and indirect emissions resulting from primary energy consumption contribute greatly to their Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP). In this paper, an LCCP design tool is used to evaluate the performance of a typical commercial refrigeration system with alternative refrigerants and minor system modifications to provide lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerant solutions with improved LCCP compared to baseline systems. The LCCP design tool accounts for system performance, ambient temperature, and system load; system performance is evaluated using a validated vapor compression system simulation tool while ambient temperature and system load are devised from a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). The LCCP design tool also accounts for the change in hourly electricity emission rate to yield an accurate prediction of indirect emissions. The analysis shows that conventional commercial refrigeration system life cycle emissions are largely due to direct emissions associated with refrigerant leaks and that system efficiency plays a smaller role in the LCCP. However, as a transition occurs to low GWP refrigerants, the indirect emissions become more relevant. Low GWP refrigerants may not be suitable for drop-in replacements in conventional commercial refrigeration systems; however some mixtures may be introduced as transitional drop-in replacements. These transitional refrigerants have a significantly lower GWP than baseline refrigerants and as such, improved LCCP. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the tradeoffs between refrigerant GWP, efficiency and capacity.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Security Evaluation for Software System with Vulnerability Life Cycle and User Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes the definition of a security criterion and security assessment based on the criterion. More precisely, we present a stochastic model with a vulnerability life-cycle model and a user profile using continuous-time Markov chains. The ... Keywords: vulnerability, security evaluation, user profile

Hiroyuki Okamura; Masataka Tokuzane; Tadashi Dohi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system are energy conversion efficiency, system performanceenergy conversion efficiency to the environmental performance of the PV system.energy conversion efficiency is only one factor in the environmental perfor- mance of a PV system.

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the spreadsheets when better information is available or to allow the performance of sensitivity studies. The selected reference plant design for this study was a 1500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant operating in the thermal-neutral mode. The plant utilized industrial natural gas-fired heaters to provide process heat, and grid electricity to supply power to the electrolyzer modules and system components. Modifications to the reference design included replacing the gas-fired heaters with electric resistance heaters, changing the operating mode of the electrolyzer (to operate below the thermal-neutral voltage), and considering a larger 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant design. Total H2A-calculated hydrogen production costs for the reference 1,500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant were $3.42/kg. The all-electric plant design using electric resistance heaters for process heat, and the reference design operating below the thermal-neutral voltage had calculated lifecycle hydrogen productions costs of $3.55/kg and $5.29/kg, respectively. Because of its larger size and associated economies of scale, the 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant was able to produce hydrogen at a cost of only $2.89/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Going with the flow: Life cycle costing for industrial pumping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stavale et al. 2001) for a cooling tower application at thisparameters. The cooling tower pumping system serves asecond system for another cooling tower. To date, the actual

Tutterow, Vestal; Hovstadius, Gunnar; McKane, Aimee

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The benefits of wind energy had previously been captured in the literature at an overview level with relatively low transparency or ability to understand the basis for that information. This has limited improvement and decision-making to larger questions such as wind versus other electrical sources (such as coal-fired plants). This research project has established a substantially different approach which is to add modular, high granularity life cycle inventory (lci) information that can be used by a wide range of decision-makers, seeking environmental improvement. Results from this project have expanded the understanding and evaluation of the underlying factors that can improve both manufacturing processes and specifically wind generators. The use of life cycle inventory techniques has provided a uniform framework to understand and compare the full range of environmental improvement in manufacturing, hence the concept of green manufacturing. In this project, the focus is on 1. the manufacturing steps that transform materials and chemicals into functioning products 2. the supply chain and end-of-life influences of materials and chemicals used in industry Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The effect of expansion-ratio limitations on positive-displacement, total-flow geothermal power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined steam-turbine/positive-displacement engine (PDE) geothermal power systems are analyzed thermodynamically and compared with optimized reference flash-steam plants. Three different configurations of combined systems are considered. Treated separately are the cases of self-flowing and pumped wells. Two strategies are investigated that help overcome the inherent expansion-ratio limitation of PDE's: pre-flashing and pre-mixing. Parametrically-obtained results show the required minimum PDE efficiency for the combined system to match the reference plant for various sets of design conditions.

DiPippo, R.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Reactive carbon from life support wastes for incinerator flue gas cleanup-System Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results from a joint research initiative between NASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Berkeley National lab. The objective of the research is to produce activated carbon from life support wastes and to use the activated carbon to adsorb and chemically reduce the NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} contained in incinerator flue gas. Inedible biomass waste from food production is the primary waste considered for conversion to activated carbon. Results to date show adsorption of both NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} in activated carbon made from biomass. Conversion of adsorbed NO{sub x} to nitrogen has also been observed.

Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Moran, Mark J.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Xu, X.H.; Shi, Yao; Chang, Shih-Ger

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

203

Solar Total Energy System: Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume I. Section 1. Conclusions and recommendations. Section 2. Systems requirements. [1. 72-MW thermal and 383. 6-kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is described. The various LSE's are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power (both space heating and process heat) and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The section on conclusions and recommendations described the baseline design recommendation, facility requirements, the solar system, power conversion system, schedules and cost, and additional candidate systems. The systems requirements analysis includes detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: load analysis, energy displacement, local laws and ordinances, life cycle cost, health and safety, environmental assessment, reliability assessment, and utility interface. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

204

A month in the life of a production news recommender system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last decade, recommender systems have become a ubiquitous feature in the online world. Research on systems and algorithms in this area has flourished, leading to novel techniques for personalization and recommendation. The evaluation of recommender ... Keywords: benchmarking, evaluation, live evaluation, recommender systems

Alan Said, Jimmy Lin, Alejandro Bellogn, Arjen de Vries

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Fatigue Life Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...It has long been recognized that fatigue data, when resolved into elastic and plastic terms, can be represented as linear functions of life on a logarithmic scale. Figure 41 schematically shows this representation of elastic and plastic components, which together define the total fatigue life...

206

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume IV, market penetration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume first describes the residential consumption of energy in each of the 11 STES regions by fuel type and end-use category. The current and projected costs and availability of fossil fuels and electricity for the STES regions are reported. Projections are made concerning residential building construction and the potential market for residential STES. The effects of STES ownership options, institutional constraints, and possible government actions on market penetration potential were considered. Capital costs for two types of STES were determined, those based on organic Rankine cycle (ORC) heat engines and those based on flat plate, water-cooled photovoltaic arrays. Both types of systems utilized parabolic trough collectors. The capital cost differential between conventional and STE systems was calculated on an incremental cost per dwelling unit for comparison with projected fuel savings in the market penetration analysis. The market penetration analysis was planned in two phases, a preliminary analysis of each of the geographical regions for each of the STE systems considered; and a final, more precise analysis of those regions and systems showing promise of significant market penetration. However, the preliminary analysis revealed no geographical regions in which any of the STES considered promised to be competitive with conventional energy systems using utility services at the prices projected for future energy supplies in the residential market. Because no promising situations were found, the analysis was directed toward an examination of the parameters involved in an effort to identify those factors which make a residential STES less attractive than similar systems in the commercial and industrial areas. Results are reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Technical Guideline for Cyber Security Requirements and Life Cycle Implementation Guidelines for Nuclear Plant Digital Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants face increasing regulatory requirements from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for cyber security of digital devices, components, and systems. The focus of these cyber security requirements is to protect plant digital computer systems, communications systems, and networks from cyber attacks that would affect reactor safety or generation reliability. This EPRI guideline document provides technical guidance for addressing c...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21st European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Dresden,21st European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Dresden,International Energy Agency Photovoltaic Power System

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Sourcebook on the production of electricity from geothermal energy. Draft: Chapter 4, Section 4. 4. Status of the development of the total flow system for electric power production from geothermal energy. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion is presented under the following section headings: introduction; characteristics of wellhead fluid; energy conversion concepts (including subsections, the flashed steam system, the total flow concept, and comparison of total flow expanders); brine chemistry effects; a possible total flow system design; and references, bibliography, glossary, and figures. (JGB)

Austin, A.L.; Ryley, D.J.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Colloids in Saturated and Partially-Saturated Porous Media: Approaches to the Treatment of Colloids in Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the Yucca Mountain Project, most contaminant transport modeling has considered the mobility of dissolved aqueous species but has neglected colloid transport. This report provides a survey of what is known about colloid-aided contaminant transport and the incorporation of this mechanism in Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) for deep geologic disposal of radioactive wastes. The report concludes with several recommendations for appropriate approaches to assessing the importance of colloid-a...

1999-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

212

TSPA 1991: An initial total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an assessment of the long-term performance of a repository system that contains deeply buried highly radioactive waste; the system is assumed to be located at the potential site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The study includes an identification of features, events, and processes that might affect the potential repository, a construction of scenarios based on this identification, a selection of models describing these scenarios (including abstraction of appropriate models from detailed models), a selection of probability distributions for the parameters in the models, a stochastic calculation of radionuclide releases for the scenarios, and a derivation of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) for the releases. Releases and CCDFs are calculated for four categories of scenarios: aqueous flow (modeling primarily the existing conditions at the site, with allowances for climate change), gaseous flow, basaltic igneous activity, and human intrusion. The study shows that models of complex processes can be abstracted into more simplified representations that preserve the understanding of the processes and produce results consistent with those of more complex models.

Barnard, R.W.; Wilson, M.L.; Dockery, H.A.; Kaplan, P.G.; Eaton, R.R.; Bingham, F.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauthier, J.H.; Robey, T.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

214

Integrated process modeling for the laser inertial fusion Energy (LIFE) generation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concept for a new fusion-fission hybrid technology is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The primary application of this technology is base-load electrical power generation. However, variants of the baseline technology can be used to 'burn' spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors or to perform selective transmutation of problematic fission products. The use of a fusion driver allows very high burn-up of the fission fuel, limited only by the radiation resistance of the fuel form and system structures. As a part of this process, integrated process models have been developed to aid in concept definition. Several models have been developed. A cost scaling model allows quick assessment of design changes or technology improvements on cost of electricity. System design models are being used to better understand system interactions and to do design trade-off and optimization studies. Here we describe the different systems models and present systems analysis results. Different market entry strategies are discussed along with potential benefits to US energy security and nuclear waste disposal. Advanced technology options are evaluated and potential benefits from additional R&D targeted at the different options is quantified.

Meier, W R; Anklam, T M; Erlandson, A C; Miles, R R; Simon, A J; Sawicki, R; Storm, E

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

215

Web-based feedback system: the life cycle management as continuous maintenance of apartment facility information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigates the feasibility of web technology as a means of delivering facility information for better support of facility operations and maintenance. This study proposes a web-based feedback system as a pragmatic solution to the limitations of current facility management (FM) processes, increasing the efficiency of these processes via web technology. In practice, work orders and records are often misplaced, resulting in reduced efficiencies, redundancies, and time-consuming, costly tasks. This problem may be overcome by use of a system that stores information digitally and provides a web-based interface. The interface could allow operations personnel to create documentation, share and monitor work orders, provide feedback for service online, and facilitate communication between facility teams. The benefit for a FM department is that it can receive feedback on performance, which would improve the quality of service and build a record of practical experiences. In this research, the software was tested using two types of prototype testing: first, system testing to evaluate functionality, usability and capability; and second, a post-task questionnaire survey was conducted to test and review the concept, interface, and usability of the system. Facility Management Industry Advisor Council (FMIAC) members answered the questionnaires after using the system posted on the web. By using web-based feedback system, a facility web site can be created and maintained easily through a standard web browser. The questionnaires from the FMIAC members were analyzed to test research questions. The tests show that the software aids facilities managers in maintaining living documents of their facilities.

Jeong, Jin Su

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Demonstration of Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components: With Pilot Applications at Oconee and Prairie Island Nuclear Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, interest is growing in life cycle management (LCM) of nuclear plants over their remaining operating life. This report describes a process and software tools for identifying the most effective and economical way to manage the aging and obsolescence of important systems, structures, and components -- thereby enhancing their long-term reliability, availability, and value. Also described are pilot LCM planning studies at Oconee and Prairie Island nucle...

2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

217

Power systems for production, construction, life support, and operations in space  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As one looks forward to mankind`s future in space, it becomes obvious that unprecedented amounts of power will be required for the exploration, colonization, and exploitation of space. Activities envisioned include interplanetary travel, LEO to GEO transport using electric propulsion, lunar and Mars bases, advanced communications, planetary surface rovers, mining, construction, and manufacturing in space or at planetary surfaces. Power levels required for these applications vary from a few kilowatts (kWe) to 4 or 5 megawatts (MW{sub e}) electric. Significant advancements must be made over the present state of space power technology in order to enable or significantly enhance these missions. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the advanced power system technologies being pursued by NASA to fulfill these future needs. Technologies discussed will include photovoltaic, solar dynamic, and nuclear power systems.

Sovie, R.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A discussion on life-cycle costs of residential photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the characteristics and needed improvements/enhancements required for the expansion of the grid-tied residential power systems market. The purpose of the paper is to help establish a common understanding, between the technical community and the customers of the technology, of value and costs and what is required in the longer term for reaching the full potential of this application.

THOMAS,MICHAEL G.; CAMERON,CHRISTOPHER P.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

219

Impacts of Texas Lignite on Selective Catalytic Reduction System Life and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NOx control are being broadly applied to U.S. power generating units fired with western subbituminous and eastern bituminous coals and natural gas. Prior to 2010, no power generating units firing Texas lignite were equipped with SCR. To develop an understanding of the potential deactivation and erosion of SCR catalyst by Texas lignite, a pilot-scale SCR reactor was used in a two-phase program at the Sandow Station, located near Rockdale, Texas. The test pro...

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

Impacts of Texas Lignite on Selective Catalytic Reduction System Life and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NOx control are being broadly applied to U.S. power generating units fired with western subbituminous and eastern bituminous coals and natural gas. To date, no power generating units firing Texas lignite are equipped with SCR. To develop an understanding of the potential deactivation and erosion of SCR catalyst by Texas lignite, a pilot-scale SCR reactor was used in a one-year program to test a plate-type catalyst at the Sandow Station, located near Rockdal...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Effect of Coal Contaminants on Solid Oxide Fuel System Performance and Service Life  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's SECA program envisions the development of high-efficiency, low-emission, CO{sub 2} sequestration-ready, and fuel-flexible technology to produce electricity from fossil fuels. One such technology is the integrated gasification-solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) that produces electricity from the gas stream of a coal gasifier. SOFCs have high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency, environmental compatibility (low NO{sub x} production), and modularity. Naturally occurring coal has many impurities and some of these impurities end in the fuel gas stream either as a vapor or in the form of fine particulate matter. Establishing the tolerance limits of SOFCs for contaminants in the coal-derived gas will allow proper design of the fuel feed system that will not catastrophically damage the SOFC or allow long-term cumulative degradation. The anodes of Ni-cermet-based SOFCs are vulnerable to degradation in the presence of contaminants that are expected to be present in a coal-derived fuel gas stream. Whereas the effects of some contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3} and HCl have been studied, the effects of other contaminants such as As, P, and Hg have not been ascertained. The primary objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the performance of solid oxide fuel cells to trace level contaminants present in a coal-derived gas stream in the temperature range 700 to 900 C. The results were used to assess catastrophic damage risk and long-term cumulative effects of the trace contaminants on the lifetime expectancy of SOFC systems fed with coal-derived gas streams.

Gopala Krishnan; P. Jayaweera; J. Bao; J. Perez; K. H. Lau; M. Hornbostel; A. Sanjurjo; J. R. Albritton; R. P. Gupta

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

Development of a structural health monitoring system for the life assessment of critical transportation infrastructure.  

SciTech Connect

Recent structural failures such as the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge in Minnesota have underscored the urgent need for improved methods and procedures for evaluating our aging transportation infrastructure. This research seeks to develop a basis for a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system to provide quantitative information related to the structural integrity of metallic structures to make appropriate management decisions and ensuring public safety. This research employs advanced structural analysis and nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for an accurate fatigue analysis. Metal railroad bridges in New Mexico will be the focus since many of these structures are over 100 years old and classified as fracture-critical. The term fracture-critical indicates that failure of a single component may result in complete collapse of the structure such as the one experienced by the I-35W Bridge. Failure may originate from sources such as loss of section due to corrosion or cracking caused by fatigue loading. Because standard inspection practice is primarily visual, these types of defects can go undetected due to oversight, lack of access to critical areas, or, in riveted members, hidden defects that are beneath fasteners or connection angles. Another issue is that it is difficult to determine the fatigue damage that a structure has experienced and the rate at which damage is accumulating due to uncertain history and load distribution in supporting members. A SHM system has several advantages that can overcome these limitations. SHM allows critical areas of the structure to be monitored more quantitatively under actual loading. The research needed to apply SHM to metallic structures was performed and a case study was carried out to show the potential of SHM-driven fatigue evaluation to assess the condition of critical transportation infrastructure and to guide inspectors to potential problem areas. This project combines the expertise in transportation infrastructure at New Mexico State University with the expertise at Sandia National Laboratories in the emerging field of SHM.

Roach, Dennis Patrick; Jauregui, David Villegas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Daumueller, Andrew Nicholas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process Final Report December 2001 This document is not an official copy and is for informational purposes only. CONTENTS Summary Objectives International perspective Recommendations for future assessments 1 Introduction 1.1 Background to the Yucca Mountain Project 1.2 Terms of reference, objectives and scope of the review 1.3 Conduct of the review 1.4 Organisation of this report 2 General Considerations 2.1 Regulatory perspective 2.2 Performance assessment rationale 2.3 General approach to performance assessment 2.4 Documentation 3 Sub-system methodology 3.1 Repository design

224

Grain - A Java Analysis Framework for Total Data Readout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grain is a data analysis framework developed to be used with the novel Total Data Readout data acquisition system. In Total Data Readout all the electronics channels are read out asynchronously in singles mode and each data item is timestamped. Event building and analysis has to be done entirely in the software post-processing the data stream. A flexible and efficient event parser and the accompanying software framework have been written entirely in Java. The design and implementation of the software are discussed along with experiences gained in running real-life experiments.

P. Rahkila

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

225

Life Management System for Advanced E Class Gas Turbines: General Electric 7EA 1st Stage Bucket Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a continuation in an ongoing series of life management studies for turbine hot section components. It represents the efforts associated with benchmarking the 1st row bucket of the General Electric 7EA class of machines. It describes the application of the Hot Section Life Management Platform (HSLMP) and the temperatures, stress and life consumption that occur in the bucket during cyclic and base load operation.

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

226

ATU/Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Military Large-Scale Experiment (LSE-1): system design and support activities. Final report, November 23, 1976-November 30, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The ATU/Fort Hood Solar Total Energy System will include a concentrating solar collector field of several acres. During periods of direct insolation, a heat-transfer fluid will be circulated through the collector field and thus heated to 500 to 600/sup 0/F. Some of the fluid will be circulated through a steam generator to drive a turbine-generator set; additional fluid will be stored in insulated tanks for use when solar energy is not available. The electrical output will satisfy a portion of the electrical load at Fort Hood's 87,000 Troop Housing Complex. Heat extracted from the turbine exhaust in the form of hot water will be used for space heating, absorption air conditioning, and domestic water heating at the 87,000 Complex. Storage tanks for the hot water are also included. The systems analysis and program support activities include studies of solar availability and energy requirements at Fort Hood, investigation of interfacing LSE-1 with existing energy systems at the 87,000 Complex, and preliminary studies of environmental, health, and safety considerations. An extensive survey of available concentrating solar collectors and modifications to a computerized system simulation model for LSE-1 use are also reported. Important program support activities are military liaison and information dissemination. The engineering test program reported involved completion of the Solar Engineering Test Module (SETM) and extensive performance testing of a single module of the linear-focusing collector.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Life Cycle Management Planning at Wolf Creek Generating Station: EDG, Main Steam, and Feedwater Isolation Valves, and Reactor Protec tion System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes very important to keep plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms (either 40-year or 60-year terms). This report provides the industry with lessons learned from applying EPRI's LCM planning process to three SSCs at Wolf Creek Generating Station.

2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

228

The worldwide demand for green energy systems is evident. In this context, wind energy converters will play a paramount role. Extending the service life of a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The worldwide demand for green energy systems is evident. In this context, wind energy converters will play a paramount role. Extending the service life of a wind energy converter translates and operation of the wind energy converters make it beneficial to know the structural condition

Stanford University

229

Statistical Analysis of the Life Cycle of Isolated Tropical Cold Cloud Systems Using MTSAT-1R and TRMM Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from the Multifunctional Transport Satellite-1R (MTSAT-1R) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellites are analyzed to show the universal view of the cloud life cycle, including the changes of vertical structure of ...

Keiji Imaoka; Kenji Nakamura

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Accelerated life test of the USDOE OC-OTEC experimental system refurbished with magnetic bearings for the 3rd stage vacuum compressor. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the accelerated life test (time-to-failure) performed, at the request of DOE, to evaluate the viability of the magnetic bearing system installed in the stage 3 vacuum pump. To this effect the plant was successfully operated for over 500 hours during the period September-November 1996. The first part of this report discusses system performance by deriving subsystem and system performance parameters from a typical record. This is followed by the discussion of the life tests. The instrumentation used to estimate the performance parameters given here is depicted. The third stage pump was operated for 535 hours without incident. It is concluded that magnetic bearings are the preferable choice for the OC-OTEC centrifugal vacuum pumps.

Vega, L.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Life sciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

Day, L. (ed.)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Life Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Photosynthetic Bacteria Enhanced Renewable Methane Production System Licensable Life Science Technologies Magneto-Optic Biosensor Using Bio-Functionalized Magnetic...

233

Life Cycle Management Plans for Hope Creek and Salem: Feedwater Heater and Moisture Separator Controls, Circuit Breakers, and Station Air System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides utilities with optimized LCM plans for three SSC types at PSEG's Salem and Hope Creek generating stations for use as a resource for LCM planning for these SSC types at other plants.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Life Cycle Management Planning at V.C. Summer Nuclear Plant: Main Condenser, Radiation Monitoring System, and Nuclear Safety-Related HVAC Chilled Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes very important to keep the plant economically viable throughout its remaining licensed operating term (either a 40-year or 60-year term). This report provides the industry with lessons learned from applying the EPRI LCM planning process to three SSCs at V.C. Summer Generating Station.

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

235

A Radar Study of Convective Cells in Mesoscale Systems in GATE. Part II: Life Cycles of Convective Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Part II of a two-part paper describing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity in GATE convective cells. Time-height radar life histories for 42 cells over three GATE days are examined, using data from the Quadra radar with 5-minute ...

Edward J. Szoke; Edward J. Zipser

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT:1 A LIFE-CYCLE ENERGY CASE STUDY AND ANALYSIS2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models for petroleum use (from driving) and26 residential and commercial power and natural gas use infrastructure) made up 44 to 47% of the life-cycle energy demands34 tallied. Energy elasticity calculations across the neighborhoods suggest that increased population35 density and reduced residential unit size

Kockelman, Kara M.

237

A New Ventilation System Integrates Total Energy Recovery, Conventional Cooling and a Novel 'Passive' Dehumidification Wheel to Mitigate the Energy, Humidity Control and First Cost Concerns Often Raised when Designing for ASHRAE Standard 62-1999 Compliance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces a novel, ''passive" desiccant based outdoor air preconditioning system (PDH) that is shown to be significantly more energy-efficient than all known alternatives, and has the unique ability to dehumidify outdoor air streams to very low dewpoints unattainable with conventional cooling approaches. The system allows for precise control of the indoor space humidity while delivering high quantities of outdoor air, at both peak and part load conditions, and during both occupied and unoccupied modes. Low operating cost, reasonable first cost and a significant reduction in cooling plant capacity requirements provide a life cycle cost that is substantially less than that of more conventional system approaches.

Fischer, J. C.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

239

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Constructed Costs of a Net-Zero Office Building Facility: Research Support Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado Operational: August 2010 Constructed cost: $259/ft2 to achieve 50% less energy use than code Constructed cost of similar office buildings in area: $225 to $300/ft2 Reaching Net-Zero: A 1.27 MW photovoltaic system was added to the project in two phases to bring the system to net-zero. This system was financed through a power purchase agreement and did not add to the constructed cost of the building. If those costs were included in the capital costs, the total constructed cost would have been 291/ft2 to reach net-zero energy use. Learn more about the Research Support

240

Life Sciences Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Life Sciences Portal. Life Sciences Portal. Programs ... more. >> see all Life Sciences programs and projects ... ...

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Specification and implementation of IFC based performance metrics to support building life cycle assessment of hybrid energy systems  

SciTech Connect

Minimizing building life cycle energy consumption is becoming of paramount importance. Performance metrics tracking offers a clear and concise manner of relating design intent in a quantitative form. A methodology is discussed for storage and utilization of these performance metrics through an Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) instantiated Building Information Model (BIM). The paper focuses on storage of three sets of performance data from three distinct sources. An example of a performance metrics programming hierarchy is displayed for a heat pump and a solar array. Utilizing the sets of performance data, two discrete performance effectiveness ratios may be computed, thus offering an accurate method of quantitatively assessing building performance.

Morrissey, Elmer; O' Donnell, James; Keane, Marcus; Bazjanac, Vladimir

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

242

Multiscale Interactions in the Life Cycle of a Tropical Cyclone Simulated in a Global Cloud-System-Resolving Model. Part I: Large-Scale and Storm-Scale Evolutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM), a global cloud-system-resolving model, successfully simulated the life cycle of Tropical Storm Isobel that formed over the Timor Sea in the austral summer of 2006. The multiscale ...

Hironori Fudeyasu; Yuqing Wang; Masaki Satoh; Tomoe Nasuno; Hiroaki Miura; Wataru Yanase

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

244

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

245

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

246

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

247

Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Water Heating Systems: Life-Cycle Analyses and Opportunities for Cost Reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conference paper regarding research in potential cost-savings measures for cold-climate solar domestic water hearing systems.

Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.; Hillman, T.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Life spans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life spans Life spans Name: kelly trina Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Why do all living things have to die? Replies: A very good question, and one that has many answers! I know that younger people especially are concerned about death. If living things did not die, there would not be evolution, there would not be procreation (what!? a world without sex!), there would not be people, cats, cows, dogs or frogs, trees, grass, or dandelions: the only life would be very simple one-cell plants and animals. It may be possible in the near future to greatly extend the human life span. Maybe. Hope this helps on a very difficult subject. Jade A fundamental reason why living things eventually die is that they are unable to make enough properly functioning enzymes. This means that reactions required to sustain life - convert ingested food into energy, make new structural protein and lipids to replace worn out membranes, synthesize the mRNA needed to make these proteins and enzymes, etc., these reactions andmany more cannot take place at all or are so inefficient that they are not useful. The reason cells begin to lose their ability to make these essential enzymes is that DNA, which "codes" for all enzymes in the cell, is always accumulating errors. The cell is able to repair these errors, but not at 100% accuracy. So eventually misrepaired errors in DNA are so great in number that the cell's function is affected. This results in cell death (from any number of reasons, depending on what enzymes are affected by the DNA errors).

249

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

250

A professor's life, simplified Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A professor's life, simplified Windows® 7 makes a professor's "technology life" easier. Now, using programs quickly. Windows Search finds virtually anything on your PC instantly­ files, photos, documents, even a buried e-mail. 2. Helps you get started faster Windows7 operating system is not tardy. It starts

Bernstein, Phil

251

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

252

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

253

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Life cycle assessment of an energy-system with a superheated steam dryer integrated in a local district heat and power plant  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a method for analyzing and assessing the environmental impact of a material, product or service throughout the entire life cycle. In this study 100 GWh heat is to be demanded by a local heat district. A mixture of coal and wet biofuel is frequently used as fuel for steam generation (Case 1). A conversion of the mixed fuel to dried biofuel is proposed. In the district it is also estimated that it is possible for 4000 private houses to convert from oil to wood pellets. It is proposed that sustainable solution to the actual problem is to combine heat and power production together with an improvement in the quality of wood residues and manufacture of pellets. It is also proposed that a steam dryer is integrated to the system (Case 2). Most of the heat from the drying process is used by the municipal heating networks. In this study the environmental impact of the two cases is examined with LCA. Different valuation methods shows the Case 2 is an improvement over Case 1, but there is diversity in the magnitudes of environmental impact in the comparison of the cases. The differences depend particularly on how the emissions of CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and hydrocarbons are estimated. The impact of the organic compounds from the exhaust gas during the drying is estimated as low in all of the three used methods.

Bjoerk, H.; Rasmuson, A. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering Design

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

256

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

257

Life cycle evolution and systematics of Campanulariid hydrozoans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to study campanulariid life cycle evolution and systematics. The Campanulariidae is a hydrozoan family with many life cycle variations, and provide an excellent model system to study life cycle ...

Govindarajan, Annette Frese, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Commissioning : The Total Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, most new buildings have been equipped with increasingly sophisticated heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, energy conservation equipment, lighting systems, security systems, and environmental control devices that rely on electronic control. Very frequently these systems and design features have not performed as expected. This can result in energy-efficiency losses. occupant complaints about comfort, indoor air quality problems. high operating costs, and increased liability for building owners, operators, employers, and design professionals. Building commissioning was developed in response to these concerns. Commissioning involves the examining and testing of building systems to verify aspects of the building design, ensure that the building is constructed in accordance with the contract documents, and verify that the building and its systems function according to the design intent documents. The process helps to integrate and organize the design, construction, operations, and maintenance of a building's systems to produce a healthy, comfortable, and efficient facility.

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Life and Mind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It's sometimes said, and even more often assumed, that life is necessary for mind. If so, and if A-Life promises to throw light on the nature of life as such, then A-Life is in principle highly relevant to the philosophy of mind and cognitive science. ... Keywords: A-Life, Evolution, Intentionality, Life, Self-organization

Margaret A. Boden

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan...

262

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

263

Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume III. Appendix. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the appendix to the Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design report on ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2). The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. Under this contract Stearns-Roger developed a conceptual design, which was site specific, containing the following major elements: System Requirements Analysis, Site Description, System Conceptual Design, Conceptual Test and Operating Plans, Development Plans, Procurement and Management Plans for Subsequent Phases, and Cost Estimates. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. Drawings, tables, and data sheets are included on hourly temperatures, displacement, utility rates, power conversion system, seasonal design load summary, average collector temperature optimization study, system operating temperature optimization study, power conversion system seasonal performance, thermal storage/fluid loop, system integration, and cost estimates. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

PVT -- A photovoltaic/thermal concentrator total energy system: Final phase 1 project report. Building opportunities in the U.S. for photovoltaics (PV:BONUS) Two  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

United Solar completed its Phase 1 report and its proposal for Phase 2 of the PVBONUS Two program at the end of March 1998. At the same time, it also completed and submitted a proposal to the California Energy Commission PIER program for additional funding to cost-share development and testing of a pre-production model of the PVT-14. It was unsuccessful in both of these proposed efforts. While waiting for the proposal decisions, work continued in April and May to analyze the system design and component decisions described below. This document is a final summation report on the Phase 1 effort of the PVBONUS Two program that describes the key technical issues that United Solar and its subcontractor, Industrial Solar Technology Corporation, worked on in preparation of a Phase 2 award. The decisions described were ones that will guide the design and fabrication of a pre-production prototype of a 1500:1 mirrored concentrator with gallium arsenide cells when United solar resumes its development work. The material below is organized by citing the key components that underwent a design review, what the company considered, what was decided, the name of the expected supplier, if not to be produced in-house, and some information about expected costs. The cost figures given are usually budgetary estimates, not the result of firm quotations or extensive analysis.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

266

Business reasons for utilizing renewable energy applications in facilities to assist in extending the life of the heating ventilation and air conditioning systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research is intended to discover business reasons for utilizing renewable energy applications in buildings to help extend the life of the heating, ventilation and (more)

Thompson, Glendon Raymond

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

268

Life Sciences Division Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The vision of the Life Sciences Division is to advance basic knowledge, and The vision of the Life Sciences Division is to advance basic knowledge, and the health of humans and the biosphere, by elucidating the 4-Dimensional dynamics of complex biological systems -- ranging from molecules to microbes to humans. Research Highlights New Imaging Technique Identified to Monitor Progression of Heart Failure In a recent publication of Journal of Nuclear Medicine, a team of scientists from Berkeley Lab, the University of Utah, and UC San Francisco describe a new imaging technique used to monitor the progression of heart failure. More » Unlocking the Secrets of Proteins Cryoelectron microscopy is helping to unlock the secrets of proteins as never before, thanks to technology developed for one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes, TEAM, at Berkeley Lab's National Center for

269

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions. ...

270

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Photovoltaics: Life-cycle Analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Life-cycle analysis is an invaluable tool for investigating the environmental profile of a product or technology from cradle to grave. Such life-cycle analyses of energy technologies are essential, especially as material and energy flows are often interwoven, and divergent emissions into the environment may occur at different life-cycle-stages. This approach is well exemplified by our description of material and energy flows in four commercial PV technologies, i.e., mono-crystalline silicon, multi-crystalline silicon, ribbon-silicon, and cadmium telluride. The same life-cycle approach is applied to the balance of system that supports flat, fixed PV modules during operation. We also discuss the life-cycle environmental metrics for a concentration PV system with a tracker and lenses to capture more sunlight per cell area than the flat, fixed system but requires large auxiliary components. Select life-cycle risk indicators for PV, i.e., fatalities, injures, and maximum consequences are evaluated in a comparative context with other electricity-generation pathways.

Fthenakis V. M.; Kim, H.C.

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

272

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen CROSS EFFECTS, TOTAL SYSTEM LAY-OUT 13.6.2001 10-1 Figure 10.1 Typical pulverised coal combustion and gas clean-up system: dry scrubber +  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REGULATIONS Although incinerator flue gas emission limits for acid gases have been imposed by the federal, such as sodium chlorite (NaCI02), is added to oxidize flue gas NO to N02, which can be removed by a sodium of saturated flue gas to approximately 60°C ( 140°F), the total (par ticulate and gaseous) mercury emissions

Laughlin, Robert B.

273

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

274

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

275

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

276

/select/modify/life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF: Finite Element Analysis of Microstructures. Table of Contents, /select/modify/life, OOF home. Prev, ... select/modify/life. /select ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Topic: Service Life Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic: Service Life Prediction. Event. 24th NIST Computer Modeling Workshop. ... Service Life Prediction of Polymeric Materials: Vision for the Future. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

280

Life Cycle Engineering Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for green manufacturing and construction applications; conduct life cycle engineering assessments for energy efficiency and environmental ...

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Service Life Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction of Service Life of Reinforced Concrete Structure Exposed to Chlorides. Please supply the following parameters ...

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

Combinatorial aspects of total positivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I study combinatorial aspects of an emerging field known as total positivity. The classical theory of total positivity concerns matrices in which all minors are nonnegative. While this theory was pioneered ...

Williams, Lauren Kiyomi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Total correlations and mutual information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In quantum information theory it is generally accepted that quantum mutual information is an information-theoretic measure of total correlations of a bipartite quantum state. We argue that there exist quantum states for which quantum mutual information cannot be considered as a measure of total correlations. Moreover, for these states we propose a different way of quantifying total correlations.

Zbigniew Walczak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

285

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

286

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

287

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

288

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

289

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

290

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

291

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

292

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

293

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

294

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

295

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

296

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

297

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

298

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

299

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

300

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

302

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

303

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

304

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

305

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

306

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

307

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,000 to 79,999 80,000 or More Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

308

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators U.S. Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Energy Information...

309

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.7...

310

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC4.7...

311

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC8.7...

312

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East North Central West North Central Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

313

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

314

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

315

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

m... 3.2 0.2 Q 0.1 Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 14.9 11.1 3.9 Cordless...

316

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

m... 3.2 0.9 0.7 Q Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 19.3 13.2 6.1 Cordless...

317

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q 0.5 Q Q Monitor is Turned Off... 0.5 N Q Q Q Q N Q Use of Internet Have Access to Internet Yes... 66.9...

318

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Four Most Populated States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four...

319

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

320

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer......

322

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 25.8 2.8 5.8 5.5 3.8 7.9 1.4 5.1 Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan Used All Summer... 18.7 4.2 4.9 4.1 2.1 3.4 2.4 6.3...

323

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Characteristics Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC5.4 Space Heating...

324

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.1 0.5 Q 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

325

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.3 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.7 0.5 Q Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

326

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.8 0.3 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

327

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.1 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.4 Q 0.2 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

328

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.4 0.4 0.4 0.7 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

329

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

330

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 34.3 1.2 0.9 2.2 2.9 5.4 7.0 8.2 6.6 Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated... 29.5 1.5 0.9 2.3 2.7 4.1...

331

An experiment of the life support network for elderly people living in a rural area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to provide comfortable and safety life for every people in the world, information technologies will be useful in a rural area as well as in a metropolitan area. This paper proposes a new concept of Life Support Network (LSN) for elderly people ... Keywords: healthcare system, information network, information system, life support system, quality of life, safety network, telemedicine, welfare system

Jun Sasaki; Bayme Abaydulla; Keizo Yamada; Michiru Tanaka; Yutaka Funyu

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Total Building Air Management: When Dehumidification Counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry trends toward stringent indoor air quality codes, spearheaded by ASHRAE 62-89: Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, present four challenges to the building industry in hot and humid climates: 1. Infusion of large quantities of make-up air to code based on zone requirements 2. Maintenance of tight wet bulb and dry bulb temperature tolerances within zones based on use 3. Energy management and cost containment 4. Control of mold and mildew and the damage they cause Historically, total air management of sensible and latent heat, filtration and zone pressure was brought about through the implementation of non-integrated, composite systems. Composite systems typically are built up of multi-vendor equipment each of which perform specific, independent functions in the total control of the indoor air environment. Composite systems have a high up-front cost, are difficult to maintain and are costly to operate. Today, emerging technologies allow the implementation of fully integrated system for total building air management. These systems provide a single-vendor solution that is cost effective to purchase, maintain and operate. Operating saving of 23% and ROIs of 2.3 years have been shown. Equipment specification is no longer based primarily on total building load. Maximum benefits of these dynamic systems are realized when systems are designed with a total operating strategy in mind. This strategy takes into consideration every factor of building air management including: 1. Control of sensible heat 2. Balance management of heat rejection 3. Latent heat management 4. Control of process hot water 5. Indoor air quality management 6. Containment of energy consumption 7. Load shedding

Chilton, R. L.; White, C. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Creating digital life stories through activity recognition with image filtering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents two algorithms that enables the MemoryLane system to support persons with mild dementia through creation of digital life stories. The MemoryLane system consists of a Logging Kit that captures context and image data, and a Review Client ... Keywords: activity recognition, image filtering, life logging, life story, memory assistance

Basel Kikhia; Johan E. Bengtsson; Kre Synnes; Zaheer ul Hussain Sani; Josef Hallberg

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

335

China Total Cloud Amount Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Total Cloud Amount Over China DOI: 10.3334CDIACcli.008 data Data image Graphics Investigator Dale P. Kaiser Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental...

336

Texas AgriLife Extension Service and Texas AgriLife Research, and Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vendor Guide Texas AgriLife Extension Service and Texas AgriLife Research, and Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory are members of The Texas A&M University System. All purchases made by Texas A&M AgriLife follow State Law, the Texas A&M University System Procurement Code, and the Texas A

337

A Comprehensive Overview of the Applications of Artificial Life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the applications of artificial life (ALife), the creation of synthetic life on computers to study, simulate, and understand living systems. The definition and features of ALife are shown by application studies. ALife application fields treated ...

Kyung-Joong Kim; Sung-Bae Cho

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

339

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

340

Attainable Burnup in a LIFE Engine Loaded with Depleted Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE) system uses a laser-based fusion source for electricity production. The (D,T) reaction, beside a pure fusion system, allows the option to drive a sub-critical fission blanket in order to increase the total energy gain. In a typical fusion-fission LIFE engine the fission blanket is a spherical shell around the fusion source, preceded by a beryllium shell for neutron multiplications by means of (n,2n) reactions. The fuel is in the form of TRISO particles dispersed in carbon pebbles, cooled by flibe. The optimal design features 80 cm thick blanket, 16 cm multiplier, and 20% TRISO packing factor. A blanket loaded with depleted uranium and depleted in a single batch with continuous mixing can achieve burnup as high as {approx}85% FIMA while generating 2,000 MW of total thermal power and producing enough tritium to be used for fusion. A multi-segment blanket with a central promotion shuffling scheme enhances burnup to {approx}90% FIMA, whereas a blanket that is operated with continuous refueling achieves only 82% FIMA under the same constraints of thermal power and tritium self-sufficiency. Both, multi-segment and continuous refueling eliminate the need for a fissile breeding phase.

Fratoni, M; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life or life-cycle cost of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select an ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

342

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life-Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life, or life-cycle cost, of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability-associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select a...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Transmission Cable Life Evaluation and Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-pressure fluid-filled (HPFF) transmission cable systems constitute nearly 80 percent of the transmission cables in the United States, and represent an estimated $18 billion investment, in present-day dollars. Many of these systems are reaching or have exceeded their design life of 40 years, and evaluating their condition and remaining life is of utmost importance to utilities seeking to make full use of their underground transmission assets. This report describes procedures and diagnostic tools for ...

1998-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

344

A committee machine with intelligent systems for estimation of total organic carbon content from petrophysical data: An example from Kangan and Dalan reservoirs in South Pars Gas Field, Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total organic carbon (TOC) content present in reservoir rocks is one of the important parameters, which could be used for evaluation of residual production potential and geochemical characterization of hydrocarbon-bearing units. In general, organic-rich ... Keywords: Committee machine, Fuzzy logic, Genetic algorithm, Neural network, Neuro-fuzzy, Petrophysical data, South Pars Gas Field, Total organic carbon

Ali Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi; Hossain Rahimpour-Bonab; Mohammadreza Rezaee

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports...

347

ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Net broadband total irradiance The difference between upwelling and downwelling, covering longwave and shortwave radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

348

Systems Integration Division Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... systems integration and engineering, life cycle assessment, cyber-physical systems, productivity measurement, sustainability and energy efficiency. ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

349

Life Cycle Inventory Database | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Database Life Cycle Inventory Database The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database serves as a central repository for information about the total energy and resource impacts of developing and using various commercial building materials, components, and assemblies. The database helps manufacturers, building designers, and developers select energy-efficient and environmentally friendly materials, products, and processes for their projects based on the environmental impact of an item over its entire lifespan. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the database in 2003 with input from a variety of partners. NREL maintains and updates the database with support from the

350

A preliminary categorization of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment as secondary metal resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) as secondary metal resources. > The content and the total amount of metals in specific equipment are both important. > We categorized 21 EEE types from contents and total amounts of various metals. > Important equipment types as secondary resources were listed for each metal kind. > Collectability and possible collection systems of various EEE types were discussed. - Abstract: End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) has recently received attention as a secondary source of metals. This study examined characteristics of end-of-life EEE as secondary metal resources to consider efficient collection and metal recovery systems according to the specific metals and types of EEE. We constructed an analogy between natural resource development and metal recovery from end-of-life EEE and found that metal content and total annual amount of metal contained in each type of end-of-life EEE should be considered in secondary resource development, as well as the collectability of the end-of-life products. We then categorized 21 EEE types into five groups and discussed their potential as secondary metal resources. Refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners, and CRT TVs were evaluated as the most important sources of common metals, and personal computers, mobile phones, and video games were evaluated as the most important sources of precious metals. Several types of small digital equipment were also identified as important sources of precious metals; however, mid-size information and communication technology (ICT) equipment (e.g., printers and fax machines) and audio/video equipment were shown to be more important as a source of a variety of less common metals. The physical collectability of each type of EEE was roughly characterized by unit size and number of end-of-life products generated annually. Current collection systems in Japan were examined and potentially appropriate collection methods were suggested for equipment types that currently have no specific collection systems in Japan, particularly for video games, notebook computers, and mid-size ICT and audio/video equipment.

Oguchi, Masahiro, E-mail: oguchi.masahiro@nies.go.jp [Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2, Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Murakami, Shinsuke [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Kida, Akiko [Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2, Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Kameya, Takashi [Graduate School of Environment and Information Science, Yokohama National University, 79-7 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Life Sciences News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Life Sciences News. ... may be within reach of every doctor's office if recent ... NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology researchers Gregg ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Condition and Life Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Regulations and standards on life assessment...to TRD 508 Italy ISPESL (1992). Components of steam generators and

354

NREL: Energy Analysis - Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power (Factsheet) Cover of the Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power Download the Factsheet Flowchart that shows the life cycle stages for concentrating solar power systems. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Figure 1. Process flow diagram illustrating the life cycle stages for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. The yellow box defined by the grey line shows the systems boundaries assumed in harmonization. Enlarge image NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review literature on life cycle assessments of concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, identify

355

The national livestock identification system: the importance of traceability in E-business  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to explore how Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) can be utilized on dairy farms to enhance total farm management. There is a growing worldwide trend for countries to implement whole-of-life traceability systems for livestock, and ... Keywords: livestock, radio frequency identification, total farm management, traceability

Adam Trevarthen

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Incorporating uncertainty in the Life Cycle Cost Analysis of pavements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) is an important tool to evaluate the economic performance of alternative investments for a given project. It considers the total cost to construct, maintain, and operate a pavement over its ...

Swei, Omar Abdullah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Review: a comprehensive overview of the applications of artificial life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the applications of artificial life ALife, the creation of synthetic life on computers to study, simulate, and understand living systems. The definition and features of ALife are shown by application studies. ALife application fields treated ... Keywords: Artificial life, evolution, hardware, perspective, simulation, software

Kyung-Joong Kim; Sung-Bae Cho

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Torsional Torques and Fatigue Life Expenditure for Large-Scale Steam Turbine-Generator Shafts and Blades Due to Power System Harmonics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the three decades, the torsional impact on turbine-generator sets due to power system disturbances has been extensively discussed in many research works. However, most (more)

Tsai, Jong-ian

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The role of life cycle analysis in considering product change  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle analysis is an important tool for determining the environmental impacts of products and packaging. A complete life cycle analysis consists of three phases: life cycle inventory, impact analysis, and improvement analysis. Life cycle inventory examines the energy and resource usage and environmental releases associated with a product system from cradle to grave, that is, from the extraction of raw materials through raw material processing; manufacture, transportation, and use of the product; and, finally, disposal, reuse, or recycling of the product. Life cycle inventory results can be used to identify areas for improving product and packaging systems in terms of reducing energy usage, resource usage, and environmental releases.

Rethmeyer, D.A. (Franklin Associates, Ltd., Prairie Village, KS (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Compact Totally Disconnected Moufang Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\Delta$ be a spherical building each of whose irreducible components is infinite, has rank at least 2 and satisfies the Moufang condition. We show that $\\Delta$ can be given the structure of a topological building that is compact and totally disconnected precisely when $\\Delta$ is the building at infinity of a locally finite affine building.

Grundhofer, T; Van Maldeghem, H; Weiss, R M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. Total 135,676 127,682 120,936 133,646 119,888 93,672 1936-2012 PAD District 1 78,197 73,348 69,886 88,999 79,188 59,594 1981-2012...

363

Enabling Sustainability through Life Cycle Management, LCA and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... While installed PV systems are generating emission free electricity, it is also important that the production and end-of-life recycling of solar cells...

364

Detecting alien life forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting alien life forms Detecting alien life forms Name: Brian S Foster Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What would you do to find out if there is any life form on other planets? Replies: If you mean intelligent life, probably the best way would be to listen for radio messages, since you could do this from very far away. Earth emits as much radio energy as a small star --- very noticeable. If you mean just any kind of life it gets harder and you would have to send a robot or human in a spacecraft to visit. You could then look for the absorption of reflected light by oxygen molecules in the atmosphere. Oxygen is such a reactive molecule that it can only stay in the atmosphere if it is continually replenished by something, such as plants photosynthesizing. We cannot of course know that other life will build itself as does life on Earth, out of carbon-containing molecules which are formed by cracking apart carbon dioxide molecules with light energy (releasing oxygen). So the only sure way would probably be to land on the planet and look around. And even then you might well miss something

365

When does life begin?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When does life begin? When does life begin? Name: Amit Srivastava Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Hi, I was wondering about a bioethical issue that's really important today- abortion. Most of the debate about abortion revolves around when life begins, so I was wondering when most scientist's believe that life begins, since you obviously would know more about this subject. You don't have to give your moral beliefs or anything, but I would just like to know when you think that life begins... Thanks! =) Replies: This is an important topic, but even (or especially) for a scientist you and I must realize that my "moral beliefs" will affect the kind of answer I give. Even the unfertilized egg and sperm are "alive" so in some sense life begins before fertilization! The fertilized egg is certainly alive, in that it can copy its genetic information (DNA) and it can divide into more and more cells. The more critical question, I think, is when that life becomes "human", and that is not a question that science will be able to answer. Human-ness is a religious, or moral, or philosophical question that is not likely to have a single agreed-upon answer.

366

NREL: Energy Analysis: Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life cycle assessment (LCA) harmonization helps lenders, utility executives, and lawmakers get the best, most precise information on greenhouse gas emissions from various sources of energy. LCA has been used to estimate and compare GHG emissions from utility-scale power systems for three decades, often with considerable variability in results. Harmonization provides more exact estimates of greenhouse-gas emissions for renewable and conventional electricity generation technologies, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature and reducing uncertainty. Highlights of Recent Studies Chart that compares published and harmonized lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster.

367

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

368

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

369

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

370

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

371

Penetration of hydrogen-based energy system and its potential for causing global environmental change: Scoping risk analysis based on life cycle thinking  

SciTech Connect

A hydrogen-based economy seems superficially to be environmentally friendly, and many people have worked toward its realization. Today hydrogen is mainly produced by decarbonizing fossil fuels (e.g. natural gas), and in the future decarbonization of both fossil fuels and biomass will play a leading role in the production of hydrogen. The main purpose of this paper is to suggest the identification of potential environmental risks in terms of 'life cycle thinking' (which considers all aspects from production to utilization) with regard to the hydrogen-based economy to come. Hydrogen production by decarbonization results in CO{sub 2} emissions. The final destination of the recovered CO{sub 2} is uncertain. Furthermore, there is a possibility that hydrogen molecules will escape to the atmosphere, posing risks that could occasion global environmental changes such as depletion of stratospheric ozone, temperature change in the stratosphere and change of the hydrides cycle through global vaporization. Based on the results of simulation, requirements regarding the following items are proposed to minimize potential risks: hydrogen source, production and storage loss.

Kikuchi, Ryunosuke [Department of Basic Science and Environment (CERNAS), ESAC, Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Bencanta, 3040-316 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: kikuchi@mail.esac.pt

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

A life-cycle flexibility framework for designing, evaluating and managing "complex" real options : case studies in urban transportation and aircraft systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing a flexible system with real options is a method for managing uncertainty. This research introduces the concept of "complex" real options, which are composed of interconnected echnological, organizational and ...

McConnell, Joshua B. (Joshua Bryan), 1974-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Systems approach to rechargeable batteries  

SciTech Connect

When selecting a rechargeable battery for an application, consideration must be given to the total system. Electrical load requirements, mechanical restrictions, environmental conditions, battery life, and charging must be considered to assure satisfactory battery performance. Meeting the electrical requirements involves selecting a battery that will deliver adequate voltage, run time and power. The mechanical aspects are largely a matter of resolving volume and weight. The charger must be capable of returning the battery to full charge in an allotted time. But of greater importance, the charge control method should be chosen carefully to maximize the operational life of the battery. 4 refs.

Mullersman, F.H.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Texas AgriLife Extension Service Rule 34.05.99.X1 Smoking in Texas AgriLife Extension Service Facilities and Vehicles Page 1 of 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas AgriLife Extension Service Rule 34.05.99.X1 Smoking in Texas AgriLife Extension Service Facilities and Vehicles Page 1 of 2 Texas AgriLife Extension Service Rules 34.05.99.X1 SMOKING IN TEXAS Supplements System Policy 34.05 PURPOSE To provide guidelines concerning smoking in Texas AgriLife Extension

375

Mosquito Life Histories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Histories Life Histories Nature Bulletin No. 682 June 2, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist MOSQUITO LIFE HISTORIES Everybody knows that a mosquito is a small, long-legged insect that bites. However, there are many kinds of them each with its own peculiarities of life history and habits. Some are produced in marshes or in flood plains of streams, some in puddles, some in woodlands, and others in cities and towns. Here in the Chicago region, although mosquito-borne diseases are no longer a danger, they become nuisances in many places at certain times in almost every year. In times past and in many countries the mosquitoes which carried malaria, yellow fever and other infections shaped the course of history. Hundreds of scientists have studied them for years but much remains to be learned.

376

PRESENTATIONS: Life Beyond 60  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2008 ... The U.S. NRC and DOE co-sponsored a three-day workshop on U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Life Extension Research and Development in order...

377

Every sign of life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every Sign of Life introduces an approach to and motivational schema for personal health monitoring. It is an exploration of how to make information collected by personal health-monitoring devices fun and engaging, and ...

Gerasimov, Vadim, 1969-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Other life forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

there any evidence of life existing anywhere except on the earth? I have heard plenty of UFO stories, but it would be nice to know what one of you guys thinks. Replies: I do not...

379

Life Events | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life Events Life Events Life Events is a listing of common events that may occur during or after your Federal career. It's divided into three sections: memy family, job, and...

380

Glossary Item - Half-life  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Half-life Thallium-208 decays into lead-208 with a half-life of 3.05 minutes. The half-life describes the amount of time needed for half of a sample of unstable atoms or particles...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies Learn about how NREL research analysts are evaluating various LCA studies in the Life Cycle Analysis Harmonization Project. NREL is a leader in the field of life cycle assessment (LCA) of energy technologies, both renewable and conventional. Life cycle assessment is a standardized technique that tracks all material, energy, and pollutant flows of a system-from raw material extraction, manufacturing, transport, and construction to operation and end-of-life disposal. Life cycle assessment can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate comparisons of energy technologies. Life cycle assessments provide a well-established and comprehensive framework to compare renewable energy technologies with fossil-based and

382

Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fissions are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for .sup.239 Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

Caldwell, John T. (Los Alamos, NM); Kunz, Walter E. (Santa Fe, NM); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Life Cycle of Lightning and Severe Weather in a 34 June 1985 PRE-STORM Mesoscale Convective System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-to-ground lightning flash characteristics of a series of four mesoscale convective systems (MCS) that occurred in Oklahoma and Kansas on 34 June 1985 during the Oklahoma-Kansas Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central project are ...

Ronald L. Holle; Andrew I. Watson; Ral E. Lpez; Donald R. Macgorman; Robert Ortiz; William D. Otto

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

AN ENGINE OIL LIFE ALGORITHM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An oil-life algorithm to calculate the remaining percentage of oil life is presented as a means to determine the right time to change the oil (more)

Bommareddi, Anveshan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

386

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

387

Life and hydrothermal vents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life and hydrothermal vents Life and hydrothermal vents Name: williamh Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Are there biological communities near hydrothermal vents in the ocean? Is there any life inside the hydrothermal vent? Replies: If the presence of microorganisms in hot springs and geysers are any indication, I am certain there is life inside hydrothermal vents. These heat loving organisms are termed "thermophiles" and thrive where other life dies. They are able to survive in extreme heat due to the unique way their proteins are synthesized. The May 1993 Discover has a special article on thermophiles. wizkid Life at high temperature became very interesting to molecular biologists recently. The enormously useful technique known as PCR, (polymerase chain reaction), by which very small amounts of rare DNA can be amplified to large concentrations (Jurassic Park!), depends on having a DNA polymerase (the enzyme that synthesizes complementary DNA strands during replication of chromosomes), that can work at high temperatures, or at least can survive repeated high temperature cycles. PCR depends on synthesis of DNA followed by forced separation of the daughter strands at high temperature, followed by new synthesis, to amplify DNA exponentially. At any rate, normal bacterial polymerase will not work because the high temperature cycles kill it. Enter the now infamous, patented Taq polymerase, isolated from Thermus aquaticus, a hot spring bacterium, which works after heating to up to 94 C! So knowledge of life at high temperature allowed molecular biologists to get PCR to work, with all its benefits in cloning very rare genes and amplifying small amounts of DNA for forensic work etc.

388

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and module manufacturing. · System/Plant Decommissioning · Disposal · PowerPlant Decommissioning · Waste life cycle GHG emissions from solar PV systems are similar to other renewables and nuclear energy.nrel.gov/harmonization. · Life cycle GHG emissions from c-Si and TF PV technologies appear broadly similar; the small number

389

LIFE Target Fabrication Research Plan Sept 2008  

SciTech Connect

The target-system for the baseline LIFE fast-ignition target was analyzed to establish a preliminary estimate for the costs and complexities involved in demonstrating the technologies needed to build a prototype LIFE plant. The baseline fast-ignition target upon which this analysis was developed is shown in Figure 1.0-1 below. The LIFE target-system incorporates requirements for low-cost, high throughput manufacture, high-speed, high accuracy injection of the target into the chamber, production of sufficient energy from implosion and recovery and recycle of the imploded target material residue. None of these functions has been demonstrated to date. Existing target fabrication techniques which lead to current 'hot spot' target costs of {approx}$100,000 per target and at a production rate of 2/day are unacceptable for the LIFE program. Fabrication techniques normally used for low-cost, low accuracy consumer products such as toys must be adapted to the high-accuracy LIFE target. This will be challenge. A research program resulting is the demonstration of the target-cycle technologies needed for a prototype LIFE reactor is expected to cost {approx}$51M over the course of 5 years. The effort will result in targets which will cost an estimated $0.23/target at a rep-rate of 20 Hz or about 1.73M targets/day.

Miles, R; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S; Montesanti, R; Satcher, J; Spadaccini, C; Rose, K; Wang, M; Hamza, A; Alexander, N; Brown, L; Hund, J; Petzoldt, R; Sweet, W; Goodin, D

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

391

life cycle inventory | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

life cycle inventory life cycle inventory Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system for eGrid regions (AKGD, AKMS, AZNM, CAMX, ERCT, FRCC, HIMS, HIOA, MROE, MROW, NEWE, NWPP, NYCW, NYLI, NYUP, RFCE, RFCM, RFCW, RMPA, SPNO, SPSO, SRMV, SRMW, SRSO, SRTV, SRVC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory forms (xls and xml) . A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included.Datasets include generation and transmission of electricity for each of the eGrid regions. It is representative of the year 2008 mix of fuels used for utility generations for each of the eGrid regions Source USLCI Database Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords eGrid Electricity grid LCI life cycle inventory US Data application/zip icon egrid_electricity_lci_datasets_2008.zip (zip, 7 MiB)

392

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 07.03.01.A1.01 Political Campaign Events on AgriLife Research Property Page 1 of 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 07.03.01.A1.01 Political Campaign Events on AgriLife Research Property Page 1 of 1 Texas AgriLife Research Procedures 07.03.01.A1.01 POLITICAL CAMPAIGN EVENTS ON TEXAS STATEMENT In accordance with System Policies 07.03.01, Texas AgriLife Research (AgriLife Research

394

Work/Life Balance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Work/Life Balance Work/Life Balance /careers/_assets/images/careers-icon.jpg Work/Life Balance Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. What our employees say: Health & Wellness "The Lab pays 80 percent of my family's medical premiums with Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico." Retirement & Savings "With the Lab matching my 401K contributions of six percent, I'm making good progress in saving for my retirement." Time Off "Like many of my colleagues here, I work nine hours on most work days so that I can take every other Friday off." Tax Savings "My flexible spending accounts allow me to set aside pre-tax dollars for

395

Solar Total Energy Project final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP), a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Georgia Power Company (GPC) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, has undergone several design modifications based on experience from previous operations and test programs. The experiences encountered were discussed in detail in the Solar Total Energy Project Summary Report'' completed in 1987 for DOE. Most of the proposed changes discussed in this report were installed and tested in 1987 as part of two 15-day test programs (SNL Contract No. 06-3049). However, several of the suggested changes were not completed before 1988. These plant modifications include a new distributed control system for the balance of plant (BOP), a fiber a optical communications ring for the field control system, and new control configuration reflecting the new operational procedures caused by the plant modifications. These modifications were tested during a non-consecutive day test, and a 60-day field test conducted during the autumn of 1989. These test were partially funded by SNL under Contract No. 42-4859, dated June 22, 1989. Results of these tests and preliminary analysis are presented in this test summary report. 9 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

Nelson, R.F.; Abney, L.O.; Towner, M.L. (Georgia Power Co., Shenandoah, GA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume II, Section 3. Facility concept design. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is presented. The various LSEs are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The details of studies conducted for Phase II of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) for the conceptual design requirements of the facility are presented. Included in this section are the detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: facility concept design, system concept design, performance analysis, operation plan, component and subsystem development, procurement plan, cost estimating and scheduling, and technical and management plans. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nuclear steam-generator transplant total rises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several utilities with pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are replacing leaking and corroded steam generators. Over half the PWRs face corrosion problems that will cost $50 million to $100 million per unit to correct. An alternative approach of installing new tube sleeves has only had one application. Corrosion prevention still eludes utilities, whose problems differ. Westinghouse units were the first to experience corrosion problems because they have almost all operated for a decade or more. Some advances in condenser and steam-generator technology should extend the component life of younger units, and some leaking PWR tubes can be plugged. Operating differences may explain why PWRs have operated for over 20 years on submarines using phosphate water chemistry, while the use of de-aerators in the secondary-systems of foreign PWRs may explain their better performance. Among the corrective steps recommended by Stone and Webster are tighter chemistry control, better plant layup practices, revamping secondary-system hardware, condensate polishing, and de-aerators. Research continues to find the long-term preventative. 2 tables. (DCK)

Smock, R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Battery life extender  

SciTech Connect

A battery life extender is described which comprises: (a) a housing disposed around the battery with terminals of the battery extending through top of the housing so that battery clamps can be attached thereto, the housing having an access opening in the top thereof; (b) means for stabilizing temperature of the battery within the housing during hot and cold weather conditions so as to extend operating life of the battery; and (c) a removable cover sized to fit over the access opening in the top of the housing so that the battery can be serviced without having to remove the housing or any part thereof.

Foti, M.; Embry, J.

1989-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

399

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

400

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

402

Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalProjectCost TotalProjectCost Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/TotalProjectCost Property Type Number Description Total Project Cost Pages using the property "Geothermal/TotalProjectCost" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 6,135,381 + A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project + 1,629,670 +

403

Map Data: Total Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total Production Map Data: Total Production totalprod2009final.csv More Documents & Publications Map Data: Renewable Production Map Data: State Consumption...

404

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

405

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

406

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

407

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

408

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

409

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

410

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

411

Thermodynamic Origin of Life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the thermodynamic function of life may shed light on its origin. Life, as are all irreversible processes, is contingent on entropy production. Entropy production is a measure of the rate of the tendency of Nature to explore available microstates. The most important irreversible process generating entropy in the biosphere, and thus facilitating this exploration, is the absorption and transformation of sunlight into heat. Here we hypothesize that life began, and persists today, as a catalyst for the absorption and dissipation of sunlight at the surface of shallow seas. The resulting heat is then efficiently harvested by other irreversible processes such as the water cycle, hurricanes, and ocean and wind currents. RNA and DNA are the most efficient of all known molecules for absorbing the intense ultraviolet light that could have penetrated the dense early atmosphere, and are remarkably rapid in transforming this light into heat in the presence of liquid water. From this perspective, the origin and evolution of life, inseparable from water and the water cycle, can be understood as resulting from the natural thermodynamic imperative of increasing the entropy production of the Earth in its interaction with its solar environment. A mechanism is proposed for the reproduction of RNA and DNA without the need for enzymes, promoted instead through UV light dissipation and the ambient conditions of prebiotic Earth.

K. Michaelian

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Elastomer shelf life  

SciTech Connect

The shelf life of elastomeric products used in the Nuclear Industry is typically based on military standards (MIL-HDBK-695C (1) or MIL- STD-1523A (2)). Recently, data became available on naturally aged O-rings that were over 30 years old. An evaluation of this data is presented to demonstrate the conservatism of current guidelines.

Boyum, B.M.; Rhoads, J.E.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL Campaign Links Images Wiki 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Sedlacek 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Springston 2010 ASR Fall Meeting: Sedlacek News, June 14, 2011: Next-generation Aerosol-sampling Stations to Head for India Related Campaigns Aerosol Life Cycle: Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer - CIMS 2011.07.10, Lee, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: HR-ToF-AMS 2011.06.15, Zhang, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: ARM Mobile Facility 2 Aerosol Observing System 2011.06.15, Sedlacek, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: UV-APS and Nano-SMPS 2011.06.10, Hallar, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL 2011.06.01 - 2011.08.31 Lead Scientist : Arthur Sedlacek For data sets, see below.

414

NREL: Energy Analysis - Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Over the last 30 years, analysts have conducted life cycle assessments on the environmental impacts associated with a variety of nuclear power technologies and systems. These life cycle assessments have had wide-ranging results. To better understand greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from nuclear power systems, NREL completed a comprehensive review and analysis of life cycle assessments focused on light water reactors (LWRs)-including both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs)-published between 1980 and 2010. NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review life cycle assessment literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions

415

Work-Life Programs and Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST? Work Life Programs; Work Schedules. *. Bookmark and Share. Work-Life Programs and Services. Alternative ...

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

416

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

417

16.423J Space Biomedical Engineering & Life Support, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamentals of human performance, physiology, and life support impacting engineering design and aerospace systems. Topics include: effects of gravity on the muscle, skeletal, cardiovascular, and neurovestibular systems; ...

Newman, Dava J.

418

Life cycle support for sensor network applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing applications for sensor networks is a challenging task. Most programming systems narrowly focus on programming issues while ignoring that programming represents only a tiny fraction of the typical life cycle of an application. Furthermore, ... Keywords: assessment, middleware, sensor networks, separation of concerns, software engineering

Urs Bischoff; Gerd Kortuem

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Life Extension Guidelines for Substation Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update is part of an ongoing effort of the Electric Research Power Institute (EPRI) to improve high-voltage circuit breaker life management and provides maintenance and asset managers with a resource for the decisions faced when dealing with aging breaker systems, subsystems, assemblies, and components. It also is a source of information on circuit breaker inspection, assessment, maintenance, and ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

420

Total energy cycle emissions and energy use of electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to provide estimates of changes in life cycle energy use and emissions that would occur with the introduction of EVs. The topics covered include a synopsis of the methodology used in the project, stages in the EV and conventional vehicle energy cycles, characterization of EVs by type and driving cycle, load analysis and capacity of the electric utility, analysis of the materials used for vehicle and battery, description of the total energy cycle analysis model, energy cycle primary energy resource consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, energy cycle emissions, and conclusions.

Singh, M.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Reclamation and reuse of Freon in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), we have successfully demonstrated the use of a solvent recycling system to reclaim spent Freon solvent in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) analyses of radioactive samples. A wide variety of sample types including ground water, organics, laboratory waste, process control, sludge, soils, and others are received by our lab for total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. This paper demonstrates the successful use of a commercially available carbon bed recycle system which we modified to enable the recovery of 95-98 percent of the radioactive contaminated Freon. This system has been used successfully in our lab for the past three years.

Ekechukwu, A.A.; Young, J.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Technology development life cycle processes.  

SciTech Connect

This report and set of appendices are a collection of memoranda originally drafted in 2009 for the purpose of providing motivation and the necessary background material to support the definition and integration of engineering and management processes related to technology development. At the time there was interest and support to move from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Level One (ad hoc processes) to Level Three. As presented herein, the material begins with a survey of open literature perspectives on technology development life cycles, including published data on %E2%80%9Cwhat went wrong.%E2%80%9D The main thrust of the material presents a rational expose%CC%81 of a structured technology development life cycle that uses the scientific method as a framework, with further rigor added from adapting relevant portions of the systems engineering process. The material concludes with a discussion on the use of multiple measures to assess technology maturity, including consideration of the viewpoint of potential users.

Beck, David Franklin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Definition of life  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Definition of life Definition of life Name: Chris E Lee Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Does anyone know what is currently the most accepted idea on the characteristics needed for any kind of life? Replies: I assume since no one has answered your question in nearly a month that no one has a sufficient answer for you, so I'll take a crack at it. As far as I know, most of the accepted criteria for determining whether something is "alive" can also, at least individually, be applied to non-living things -- it's kind of difficult to say. The main points I can think of at the moment are: MOTION -- does it seem to move under its own power? Does it move with some discernible purpose? (Toward food, away from heat, etc) REPRODUCTION -- does it have some way of making more of itself, either through sexual reproduction or by budding or fissioning in some way?

424

Educational programs of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Educational programs of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating. What is Walk Across

Wilkins, Neal

425

Genetic algorithms and artificial life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genetic algorithms are computational models of evolution that play a central role in many artificial-life models. We review the history and current scope of research on genetic algorithms in artificial life, giving illustrative examples in which the ...

Melanie Mitchell; Stephanie Forrest

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Life Cycle Management of Chemicals: Conceptual Design for Information Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracking the acquisition, use, and disposition of chemicals allows companies to reduce costs; manage risks to health, safety, and the environment; and improve compliance and reporting efficiency. This report provides a means of identifying and evaluating chemical life cycle information management needs. The conceptual design presented here will guide utilities through development of a custom system for managing chemical life cycle data.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

427

Semantic modelling of dependency relations between life cycle analysis processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment provides a well-accepted methodology for modelling environmental impacts of human activities. This methodology relies on the decomposition of a studied system into interdependent processes. Several organisations provide processes ... Keywords: environmental information management, life cycle assessment, ontology

Benjamin Bertin; Marian Scuturici; Jean-Marie Pinon; Emmanuel Risler

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Life Cycle Management Sourcebooks Volume 10: Feedwater Heaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is producing a series of Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, each containing a compilation of industry experience and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). This sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost-effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for feedwater heaters.

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

429

Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, Volume 5: Main Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is producing a series of "Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks," each containing a compilation of industry experience and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). This sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost-effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for main generators.

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

430

Plant Support Engineering: Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks - Chillers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is producing a series of Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, each containing a compilation of industry experience information and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). In addition, this sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost8212effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for chillers.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

431

Life Sciences Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Life Sciences Programs & Projects. ... to PMT sensitivity and long-term stability ... Micronutrients Measurement Quality Assurance Program Last Updated ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

432

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project ID: 143 Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Brief Description: Examines the social, environmental and economic impacts of hydrogen fuel cell and gasoline vehicles. Purpose This project aims to investigate fuel cell vehicles through environmental impact, life cycle assessment, sustainability, and thermodynamic analyses. The project will assist in the development of highly qualified personnel in such areas as system analysis, modeling, methodology development, and applications. Performer Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Organization: University of Ontario Institute of Technology

433

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand total social cost of highway transportation Subtotal:of alternative transportation investments. A social-costtransportation option that has These costs will be inefficiently incurred if people do not fully lower total social costs.

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 2,550,203 FY2009 39,646,446 FY2010 64,874,187 FY2011 66,253,207 FY2012...

436

Fractionally total colouring Gn,p  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the fractional total chromatic number of G"n","p as p varies from 0 to 1. We also present an algorithm that computes the fractional total chromatic number of a random graph in polynomial expected time. Keywords: Fractional total colouring, Graph colouring, Random graphs

Conor Meagher; Bruce Reed

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Building Technologies Office: Life Cycle Inventory Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Inventory Database to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Life Cycle Inventory Database on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Life...

438

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

439

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

440

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

442

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

443

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

444

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

445

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

446

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

447

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

448

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

449

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

450

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

451

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

452

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

453

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

454

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

455

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

456

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

457

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

458

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

459

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

460

Experience with life extension for power plant piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major part of thermal power plant piping has a limited design life due to loading conditions and stresses such as: - erosion/corrosion - vibrations - thermal shock - mechanical failures - high-temperature creep stress. Methods for preventing premature exhaustion of the service life are required now in causes of extended plant operation beyond the design life in the course of retrofitting pollution control systems. Since partly the piping systems design life has been reached or exceeded and sometimes the initial operating mode has been changed, andy inspection/overhaul program or upgrading work must consider this very carefully. Design modifications, inspection measures, and change of the operating mode are ways of extending the service life of components.

Arnswald, W. (Vereinigte Kraftwerke Ruhr, Gelsenkirchen (DE)); Kautz, H.R. (Grosskraftwerk Mannheim AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Speaker(s): Roger Sathre Date: December 5, 2011 - 3:30pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner Barbara Adams In this presentation we describe the prospective life-cycle modeling of metal-organic frameworks (MOF), a novel type of material with the potential for efficiently capturing CO2. Life-cycle modeling of emerging technologies, conducted early in the innovation process, can generate knowledge that can feed back to inform scientific discovery and development. We discuss the challenges of credibly modeling a system that does not yet exist, and describe methodological approaches including parametric system modeling (quantifying relations between system elements), scenario projections (defining plausible pathways for system scale-up),

462

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

463

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

464

The Relationship between Total Cloud Lightning Behavior and Radar-Derived Thunderstorm Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total lightning detection systems have been in development since the mid-1980s and deployed in several areas around the world. Previous studies on total lightning found intra- and intercloud lightning (IC) activity tends to fluctuate significantly ...

Eric Metzger; Wendell A. Nuss

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - XLS Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top...

466

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - ODS format Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...

467

Green Building- Efficient Life Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy saving does not just apply to traffic, production or agriculture. Buildings are also contributing to the climate change. The focus here is on the energy they use and on their CO2 emissions. Each year, Siemens invests more than two billion euros in the appropriate research and development. For customers, this means that Siemens is already providing them with energy efficient solutions that save resources and reduce emissions. Siemens Real Estate (SRE) has taken on the task of ensuring that Siemens AG will become 20 percent more energy efficient by 2011, and it has turned an efficiency program for existing real estate, which has been in existence since 2005, into an integrated green building initiative. This initiative comprises the components Sustainable Building Design, Life Cycle Cost Analysis, Green Building Certification and Natural Resources Management. These components are deliberately arranged around the life cycle of the real estate concerned. This allows a different emphasis to be placed on the different questions in each project phase and each phase of a buildings life and for them to be answered in a targeted manner. Sustainable Building Design comes into effect during the tasking and preliminary planning phase of a building project; and, by providing a specially developed sustainability manual, it helps with the definition of target values and the drawing up of efficiency strategies for the planning of the building. The manual epitomizes, and sets out clearly, the attitude of SRE to all building-specific sustainability matters. In addition, it is used in the offering of rewards for project competitions. As a result, through a selection of different energy-efficiency measures that have been roughly conceived beforehand, the primary energy consumption can already be restricted in the project definition phase. Life Cycle Cost Analysis comes into effect when the blueprint for buildings is being drawn up. Up to now, when components and systems were being chosen, the main focus was usually on the investment costs involved. By using a cost tool developed specifically to meet the needs of the company, SRE will in future be able to estimate the component-specific utilization costs such as cleaning, maintenance, and the use of energy at an early planning stage. Green Building Certification is used in building projects during the planning and implementation phase, and it thus ensures the quality of the new real estate over the long term. Siemens is implementing the Green Building Program of the European Commission in new building projects and renovation work in EU countries. In all other countries that are not taking part in the EU Green Building Program, SRE uses certification in accordance with LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design). In the LEED certification, a transparent and easy-to-use catalog of criteria is employed to make an assessment of the use of energy and other aspects of sustainability, such as the selection of the plot of land, the efficient use of water, the quality of air within buildings, and the selection of materials. This ensures that a neutral and independent assessment is made of all new building and large-scale renovation projects. The action program Natural Resources Management rounds off the range of measures in the area of existing real estate. The aim of the program is to identify and highlight all latent efficiency potential in existing buildings. This includes, for instance, modernizing the control equipment used for the heating and ventilation systems. This entails replacing electrical power units with more efficient models, and retrofitting fans and pumps with frequency converters. Sixty buildings have now been inspected, and savings of almost eight million Euros have been achieved. The average payback period is less than two years. One example of this is an old Siemens building from the 1970s at the Munich-Perlach site. Through energy optimization, it has been possible to cu

Kohns, R.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Life Cycle Analysis: Power Studies Compilation Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour LC Life Cycle LCA Life Cycle Analysis LCC Life Cycle Costing LCI Life Cycle Inventory LCOE Levelized Cost of Delivered Electricity LNB Low NO x Burner LNG Liquefied...

469

Pump Systems Matter Mission and Vision:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pump Systems Matter Mission and Vision: Pump Systems Matter Mission and Vision: Pump Systems Matter(tm) (PSM) places a primary focus on pump systems education and outreach and addresses energy savings and total cost of pump ownership. Vision: Pump Systems Matter initiative assists North American pump users gain a more competitive business advantage through strategic, broad-based energy management and pump system performance optimization. Mission: To provide the marketplace with tools and collaborative opportunities to integrate pump system performance optimization and efficient energy management practices into normal business operations. Essential Elements: * Build awareness of the benefits of systems optimization and pump system life cycle cost at the management, production and technical levels of companies throughout the supply chain.

470

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail sales, and electrical system energy losses.

471

Dynamic data sharing and security in a collaborative product definition management system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Product definition management (PDM) is a system that supports management of both engineering data and the product development process during the total product life cycle. The formation of a virtual enterprise is becoming a growing trend, and vendors ... Keywords: CPDM, Common workspace, Concurrent engineering, PDM, Parameter-based collaboration, Virtual engineering community, Web-based application

Kamel Rouibah; Samia Ould-Ali

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Total Dissolved Gas Effects on Fishes of the Lower Columbia River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas supersaturation problems generated by spill from dams on the Columbia River were first identified in the 1960s. Since that time, considerable research has been conducted on effects of gas supersaturation on aquatic life, primarily juvenile salmonids. Also since that time, modifications to dam structures and operations have reduced supersaturated gas levels produced by the dams. The limit for total dissolved gas saturation (TDGS) as mandated by current Environmental Protection Agency water quality standards is 110%. State management agencies issue limited waivers to water quality, allowing production of levels of up to 120% TDGS to facilitate the downstream migration of juvenile salmonids. Recently, gas supersaturation as a water quality issue has resurfaced as concerns have grown regarding chronic effects of spill-related total dissolved gas on salmonids, including incubating embryos and larvae, resident fish species, and other aquatic organisms. Because of current concerns, and because the last comprehensive review of research on supersaturation effects on fishes was conducted in 1997, we reviewed recent supersaturation literature to identify new or ongoing issues that may not be adequately addressed by the current 110% TDGS limit and the 120% TDGS water quality waiver. We found that recent work supports older research indicating that short-term exposure to levels up to 120% TDGS does not produce acute effects on migratory juvenile or adult salmonids when compensating depths are available. Monitoring programs at Snake and Columbia river dams from 1995 to the early 2000s documented a low incidence of significant gas bubble disease or mortality in Columbia River salmonids, resident fishes, or other taxa. We did, however, identify five areas of concern in which total dissolved gas levels lower than water quality limits may produce sublethal effects on fishes of the Columbia River. These areas of concern are 1) sensitive and vulnerable species or life stages, 2) long-term chronic or multiple exposure, 3) vulnerable habitats and reaches, 4) effects on incubating fish in hyporheic habitats, and 5) community and ecosystem effects. Although some of these areas