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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive...

2

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

3

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 2007 total system life cycle cost estimate includes the cost to research, construct and operate Yucca Mountain during a period of 150 years, from the beginning of the program in 1983 through closure and decommissioning in 2133. The new cost estimate of $79.3 billion, when updated to 2007 dollars comes to $96.2 billion, a 38 percent

4

Total Pollution Effect and Total Energy Cost per Output of Different Products for Polish Industrial System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years a broad use has been made of the indices of total energy requirements in the whole large production system corresponding to unit output of particular goods (Boustead I., Hancock G.F., 1979). The...

Henryk W. Balandynowicz

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Sustainable Transportation Decision-Making: Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) and Total Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to develop a Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) that will lead to more balanced decision-making in transportation investment and optimize the most sustainable high-speed rail (HSR) route. The decision support system developed here explicitly elaborates...

Kim, Hwan Yong

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

7

Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalProjectCost TotalProjectCost Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/TotalProjectCost Property Type Number Description Total Project Cost Pages using the property "Geothermal/TotalProjectCost" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 6,135,381 + A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project + 1,629,670 +

8

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analytical Services & Testing Contract June 2014 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Advanced Technologies & Labs International Inc. DE-AC27-10RV15051 Cost Plus Award Fee...

9

Project Functions and Activities Definitions for Total Project Cost  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter provides guidelines developed to define the obvious disparity of opinions and practices with regard to what exactly is included in total estimated cost (TEC) and total project cost (TPC).

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

10

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wastren-EnergX Mission Support LLC Contract Number: DE-CI0000004 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 128,879,762 Contract Period: December 2009 - July 2015 Fee Information...

11

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Period: Fee Information Maximum Fee Contract Type: Minimum Fee 91,085,394 74,386,573 Target Fee September 2002 - March 2017 Cost Plus Fixed FeeIncentive Fee 1,192,114,896...

12

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- Oak Ridge, TN Contract Name: Transuranic Waste Processing Contract June, 2014 2,433,940 Cost Plus Award Fee 150,664,017 Fee Information Minimum Fee 2,039,246 Maximum Fee...

13

Total Estimated Contract Cost:) Performance Period Total Fee...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Washington Closure LLC DE-AC06-05RL14655 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Cost Plus Incentive Fee 2,251,328,348 Fee Information 0 Maximum Fee 337,699,252...

14

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Cumulative Fee Paid 22,200,285 Wackenhut Services, Inc. DE-AC30-10CC60025 Contractor: Cost Plus Award Fee 989,000,000 Contract Period: Contract Type: January 2010 - December...

15

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy Savers [EERE]

& Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number: DE-AC30-11CC40015 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee EM Contractor Fee June, 2014 Site: Portsmouth Paducah Project Office...

16

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Number: Contract Type: Contract Period: 0 Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Washington River Protection Solutions LLC DE-AC27-08RV14800 Cost Plus Award Fee 5,553,789,617 Fee Information...

17

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2011 - September 2015 June 2014 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Idaho Treatment Group LLC DE-EM0001467 Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Information 419,202,975 Contract Period:...

18

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 Fee Information Minimum Fee Maximum Fee June 2014 Contract Number: Cost Plus Incentive Fee Contractor: 3,245,814,927 Contract Period: EM Contractor Fee Site:...

19

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

0 Contractor: Bechtel National Inc. Contract Number: DE-AC27-01RV14136 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Maximum Fee* 595,123,540 Fee Available 102,622,325 10,714,819,974...

20

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

LLC (UCOR) DE-SC-0004645 April 29, 2011 - July 13, 2016 Contract Number: Maximum Fee Cost Plus Award Fee 16,098,142 EM Contractor Fee Site: Oak Ridge Office - Oak Ridge, TN...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 4,104,318,749 28,500,000 31,597,837 0 39,171,018 32,871,600 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Contract Name:...

22

Total Cost of Ownership Considerations in Global Sourcing Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Cost of Ownership Considerations in Global Sourcing Processes Robert Alard, Philipp Bremen and microeconomic aspects which can also be largely used independently. Keywords: Global Supply Networks, Total Cost of Ownership, Global Total Cost of Ownership, Global Procurement, Outsourcing, Supplier Evaluation, Country

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fee Paid 127,390,991 Contract Number: Fee Available Contract Period: Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 4,104,318,749 28,500,000 31,597,837 0 39,171,018 32,871,600 EM...

24

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DE-AM09-05SR22405DE-AT30-07CC60011SL14 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 357,223 597,797 894,699 EM Contractor Fee Site: Stanford Linear...

25

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

$ 3,422,994.00 $ 3,422,994.00 FY2011 4,445,142.00 $ FY2012 $ 5,021,951.68 FY2013 $ 3,501,670.00 FY2014 $0 FY2015 $0 FY2016 $0 FY2017 $0 FY2018 $0 FY2019 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $16,391,758 Wackenhut Services, Inc. DE-AC30-10CC60025 Contractor: Cost Plus Award Fee $989,000,000 Contract Period: Contract Type: January 2010 - December 2019 Contract Number: EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Contract Name: Comprehensive Security Services September 2013 Fee Information Maximum Fee $55,541,496 $5,204,095 $3,667,493 $5,041,415 Minimum Fee 0 Fee Available $5,428,947 $6,326,114

26

Developing a total replacement cost index for suburban office projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the components of replacement costs for office developments, and how these components combine to create total development costs is essential for success in office real estate development. Surprisingly, the ...

Hansen, David John, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

COST SHARING Cost sharing is the portion of total project costs of a sponsored agreement that is not bourn by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COST SHARING Cost sharing is the portion of total project costs of a sponsored agreement. There are primarily three types of cost sharing that may occur on sponsored projects: Mandatory cost sharing. For example, the National Science Foundation requires mandatory cost sharing for some of its projects. COST

Cui, Yan

28

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

CIGNA Study Uncovers Relationship of Disabilities to Total Benefits Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The findings of a new study reveal an interesting trend. Integrating disability programs with health care programs can potentially lower employers' total benefits costs and help disabled employees get back to work sooner and stay at work.

30

Residential photovoltaic systems costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of costs associated with the installation and operation of a residential photovoltaic system has been conducted to determine present and projected (1986) status. As a basis for the study, a residential photovoltaic system design projected for 1986 was assumed, consisting of two principal components: a roof-mounted array and a utility-interactive inverter. The scope of the study encompassed both silicon and cadmium sulfide photovoltaic modules. Cost estimates were obtained by a survey and study of reports generated by companies and agencies presently active in each of the subsystem area. Where necessary, supplemental estimates were established as part of this study. The range of estimates for silicon-based systems strongly suggest that such systems will be competitive for new installations and reasonably competitive for retrofit applications. The cadmium-sulfide-based system cost estimates, which are less certain than those for silicon, indicate that these systems will be marginally competitive with silicon-based systems for new construction, but not competitive for retrofit applications. Significant variations from the DOE system price sub-goals were found, however, particularly in the areas of array mounting, wiring and cleaning. Additional development work appears needed in these areas.

Cox, C.H. III

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Filter system cost comparison for IGCC and PFBC power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cost comparison was conducted between the filter systems for two advanced coal-based power plants. The results from this study are presented. The filter system is based on a Westinghouse advanced particulate filter concept, which is designed to operate with ceramic candle filters. The Foster Wheeler second-generation 453 MWe (net) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) and the KRW 458 MWe (net) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are used for the comparison. The comparison presents the general differences of the two power plants and the process-related filtration conditions for PFBC and IGCC systems. The results present the conceptual designs for the PFBC and IGCC filter systems as well as a cost summary comparison. The cost summary comparison includes the total plant cost, the fixed operating and maintenance cost, the variable operating and maintenance cost, and the effect on the cost of electricity (COE) for the two filter systems.

Dennis, R.A.; McDaniel, H.M.; Buchanan, T. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Minimizing the total cost of hen allocation to poultry farms using hybrid Growing Neural Gas approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper a decision support system to solve the problem of hen allocation to hen houses with the aim of minimizing the total cost is described. The total cost consists of farm utilization cost, hen transportation cost, and loss from mixing hens at different ages in the same hen houses. Clustering of hen houses using the traditional Growing Neural Gas (GNG) was first determined to allocate hens to the hen houses effectively. However, the traditional GNG often solves the clustering problem by considering distance only. Therefore the hybrid Growing Neural Gas (hGNG) considering both the distance from the centroids of the clusters to the hen houses and the weights of hen house sizes was proposed to solve the problem. In the second phase, allocating and determining routes to allocate hens to the hen houses using the nearest neighbor approach were carried out in order to minimize the total distance. The performance of the algorithm was measured using the relative improvement (RI), which compares the total costs of the hGNG and GNG algorithms and the current practice. The results obtained from this study show that the hGNG algorithm provides better total cost values than the firm’s current practice from 7.92% to 20.83%, and from 5.90% to 17.91% better than the traditional GNG algorithm. The results also demonstrate that the proposed method is useful not only for reducing the total cost, but also for efficient management of a poultry production system. Furthermore, the method used in this research should prove beneficial to other similar agro-food sectors in Thailand and around the world.

Atiwat Boonmee; Kanchana Sethanan; Banchar Arnonkijpanich; Somnuk Theerakulpisut

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling...

34

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

35

NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an island’s cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cost Savings of Nuclear Power with Total Fuel Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of fast reactor (FR) generated electricity with pyro-processing is estimated in this article. It compares favorably with other forms of energy and is shown to be less than that produced by light water reactors (LWR's). FR's use all the energy in natural uranium whereas LWR's utilize only 0.7% of it. Because of high radioactivity, pyro-processing is not open to weapon material diversion. This technology is ready now. Nuclear power has the same advantage as coal power in that it is not dependent upon a scarce foreign fuel and has the significant additional advantage of not contributing to global warming or air pollution. A jump start on new nuclear plants could rapidly allow electric furnaces to replace home heating oil furnaces and utilize high capacity batteries for hybrid automobiles: both would reduce US reliance on oil. If these were fast reactors fueled by reprocessed fuel, the spent fuel storage problem could also be solved. Costs are derived from assumptions on the LWR's and FR's five cost components: 1) Capital costs: LWR plants cost $106/MWe. FR's cost 25% more. Forty year amortization is used. 2) The annual O and M costs for both plants are 9% of the Capital Costs. 3) LWR fuel costs about 0.0035 $/kWh. Producing FR fuel from spent fuel by pyro-processing must be done in highly shielded hot cells which is costly. However, the five foot thick concrete walls have the advantage of prohibiting diversion. LWR spent fuel must be used as feedstock for the FR initial core load and first two reloads so this FR fuel costs more than LWR fuel. FR fuel costs much less for subsequent core reloads (< LWR fuel) if all spent fuel feedstock is from the fast reactor (i.e., Breeding Ratio =1). 4) Yucca Mountain storage of unprocessed LWR spent fuel is estimated as $360,000/MTHM. But this fuel can be processed to remove TRU for use as fast reactor fuel. The remaining fission products repository costs are only one fifth that of the original fuel. Storage of short half life fission products alone requires less storage time and long term integrity than LWR spent fuel (300 years storage versus 100,000 years.) 5) LWR decommissioning costs are estimated to be $0.3 x 10{sup 6}/MWe. The annual cost for a 40 year licensed plant would be 2.5 % of this or less if interest is taken into account. All plants will eventually have to replace those components which become radiation damaged. FR's should be designed to replace parts rather than decommission. The LWR costs are estimated to be 2.65 cents/kWh. FR costs are 2.99 cents/kWh for the first 7.5 years and 2.39 cents/kWh for the next 32.5 years. The average cost over forty years is 2.50 cents/kWh which is less than the LWR costs. These power costs are similar to coal power, are lower than gas, oil, and much lower than renewable power.(authors)

Solbrig, Charles W.; Benedict, Robert W. [Fuel Cycle Programs Division, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

,"U.S. Total Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil" "Sourcekey","R00003","R12003","R13003" "Date","U.S. Crude Oil Composite Acquisition Cost by Refiners (Dollars per Barrel)","U.S. Crude Oil Domestic...

38

Cost Modeling and Design Techniques for Integrated Package Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Modeling and Design Techniques for Integrated Package Distribution Systems Karen R. Smilowitz idealizations of network geometries, operating costs, demand and customer distributions, and routing patterns that approximate the total cost of operation. The design problem is then reduced to a series of optimization

Daganzo, Carlos F.

39

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP-5600-56408...

40

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report by NREL discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

42

A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report prepared by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory describes a total cost of ownership model for emerging applications in stationary fuel cell systems.

43

SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transformational Approach to Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Digg

44

Cost Accounting System for fusion studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Cost Accounting System that is applicable to all magnetic fusion reactor design studies has been developed. This system provides: (1) definitions of the elements of cost and methods for the combination of these elements to form a cost estimate; (2) a Code of Accounts that uses a functional arrangement for identification of the plant components; and (3) definitions and methods to analyze actual cost data so that the data can be directly reported into this Cost Accounting System. The purpose of the Cost Accounting System is to provide the structure for the development of a fusion cost data base and for the development of validated cost estimating procedures. This system has been developed through use at the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) and has been applied to different confinement concepts (tokamaks and tandem mirrors) and to different types of projects (experimental devices and commercial power plants). The use of this Cost Accounting System by all magnetic fusion projects will promote the development of a common cost data base, allow the direct comparison of cost estimates, and ultimately establish the cost credibility of the program.

Hamilton, W.R.; Keeton, D.C.; Thomson, S.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Presentation by Stephen Lasher on cost analysis of hydrogen storage systems....

46

Fuel Cell System Cost for Transporationa--2008 Cost Estimate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Cost for Fuel Cell System Cost for Transportation-2008 Cost Estimate National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program NREL/BK-6A1-45457 May 2009 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

47

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Total Cost Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408 April 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. HT12.8610 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408

48

Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. • When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. • When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. • For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

Tonjes, David J., E-mail: david.tonjes@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States); Waste Reduction and Management Institute, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Center for Bioenergy Research and Development, Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center, Stony Brook University, 1000 Innovation Rd., Stony Brook, NY 11794-6044 (United States); Mallikarjun, Sreekanth, E-mail: sreekanth.mallikarjun@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Harmonizing Systems and Software Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this paper is to examine the gaps and overlaps between software and systems engineering cost models with intent to harmonize the estimates in engineering engineering estimation. In particular, we evaluate ...

Wang, Gan

2009-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

Low-Cost Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for use in fuel cell systems need development in order to achieve cost targets. Low-cost, highLow-Cost Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management IIPS Number 16910 LowLow--CostCost;2 Project objective: Create a low cost and passive PEM water management system Project objective

51

Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by Cummins Power Generation, June 2011 Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by...

52

A low cost adaptive optics system using a membrane mirror  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A low cost adaptive optics system constructed almost entirely of commercially available components is presented.

Paterson, Carl; Munro, I; Dainty, J

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

54

A Low-Cost Continuous Emissions Monitoring System for Mobile...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Low-Cost Continuous Emissions Monitoring System for Mobile and Stationary Engine SCRDPF ApplicationsData-Logger for Vehicle Data Acquisition A Low-Cost Continuous Emissions...

55

Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University - Case Study, 2013 Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University - Case Study, 2013...

56

Parametric analysis of total costs and energy efficiency of 2G enzymatic ethanol production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an analysis of total costs (TPC) and energy efficiency of enzymatic ethanol production. The analysis is parametrized with respect to plant capacity and polysaccharides content (pc) of lignocellulosic feedstock. The feedstock is based on wheat straw whose price is proportional to its pc ranging from new straw with high pc and high cost to agro-wastes with limited pc but lower cost. The plant flowsheet was built using a conventional biochemical platform with co-saccharification and fermentation (SHF) technologies. A parametric analysis of TPC as a function of plant capacity (100–2100 ton DB/day) and pc (i.e. feedstock price) (80% (75 USD/ton DB)–35% (6 USD/ton DB)) was performed with Net Present Value (NPV) techniques. Current data from Mexican economics and the agro-industrial sector were used as an illustrative case. A quasi-linear section of the TCP surface was identified delimited by (300–1100 ton DB/day) and (80–55% pc) with increments no larger than 21% of the minimum TPC obtained (0.99 USD/l etOH for 2100 ton DB/day and 80% pc). Major cost contributions are detailed and quantified for boundary cases of this surface. Energy consumption and production were also calculated for all the plant capacity and feedstock pc cases, taking into consideration the Maximum Energy Recovery (MER) obtained from a Pinch analysis. The end-use energy index eer was less than 0.82 for all cases, thus stressing the need to use process equipment with lower energy requirements. TPC are compared against previously published results for SHF technology between 500 and 2100 ton DB/day plant capacities. These values were updated and normalized with respect to feedstock and enzyme costs employed in this work. Differences among TPC and recently published normalized results are within a ±5% range, thus confirming the dependence of TPC from feedstock and enzyme prices, regardless of flowsheet technology and economic conditions.

A. Sanchez; V. Sevilla-Güitrón; G. Magańa; L. Gutierrez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs...

58

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

59

Low-Cost Packaged Combined Heat and Power System | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Cost Packaged Combined Heat and Power System Low-Cost Packaged Combined Heat and Power System Introduction Many combined heat and power (CHP) systems less than 1 megawatt (MW)...

60

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement Improved System Performance and...

62

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled...

63

Steam Basics: Use Available Data to Lower Steam System Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial steam users recognize the need to reduce system cost in order to remain internationally competitive. Steam systems are a key utility that influence cost significantly, and represent a high value opportunity target. However, the quality...

Risko, J. R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

Lacey, Ph.D, P.E., Ronald E. [Texas A& M University

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

65

A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for measuring quality improvement is the cost of quality. Traditionally, comprehensive quality cost reports have regularly been issued in a fixed format to identify opportunities for improvement and provide guidelines for improvement over time. However, current...

Ratliff, William L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant Total Capital Cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cost analysis of the 10MWe Solar One Thermal Central Receiver Plant near Barstow, California, ... is presented to help predict costs of future solar thermal central receiver plants. In this paper, the Solar One...

H. F. Norris

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

68

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

69

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

70

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

71

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

72

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

73

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

74

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

75

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

76

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

77

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

78

Cost?Based Optimization of a Papermaking Wastewater Regeneration Recycling System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wastewater can be regenerated for recycling in an industrial process to reduce freshwater consumption and wastewater discharge. Such an environment friendly approach will also lead to cost savings that accrue due to reduced freshwater usage and wastewater discharge. However the resulting cost savings are offset to varying degrees by the costs incurred for the regeneration of wastewater for recycling. Therefore systematic procedures should be used to determine the true economic benefits for any water?using system involving wastewater regeneration recycling. In this paper a total cost accounting procedure is employed to construct a comprehensive cost model for a paper mill. The resulting cost model is optimized by means of mathematical programming to determine the optimal regeneration flowrate and regeneration efficiency that will yield the minimum total cost.

Long Huang; Xiao Feng; Khim H. Chu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total cost of ownership model is described for low temperature proton exchange membrane stationary fuel cell systems for combined heat and power (CHP) applications from 1-250kW and backup power applications from 1-50kW. System designs and functional specifications for these two applications were developed across the range of system power levels. Bottom-up cost estimates were made for balance of plant costs, and detailed direct cost estimates for key fuel cell stack components were derived using design-for-manufacturing-and-assembly techniques. The development of high throughput, automated processes achieving high yield are projected to reduce the cost for fuel cell stacks to the $300/kW level at an annual production volume of 100 MW. Several promising combinations of building types and geographical location in the U.S. were identified for installation of fuel cell CHP systems based on the LBNL modelling tool DER CAM. Life-cycle modelling and externality assessment were done for hotels and hospitals. Reduced electricity demand charges, heating credits and carbon credits can reduce the effective cost of electricity ($/kWhe) by 26-44percent in locations such as Minneapolis, where high carbon intensity electricity from the grid is displaces by a fuel cell system operating on reformate fuel. This project extends the scope of existing cost studies to include externalities and ancillary financial benefits and thus provides a more comprehensive picture of fuel cell system benefits, consistent with a policy and incentive environment that increasingly values these ancillary benefits. The project provides a critical, new modelling capacity and should aid a broad range of policy makers in assessing the integrated costs and benefits of fuel cell systems versus other distributed generation technologies.

University of California, Berkeley; Wei, Max; Lipman, Timothy; Mayyas, Ahmad; Chien, Joshua; Chan, Shuk Han; Gosselin, David; Breunig, Hanna; Stadler, Michael; McKone, Thomas; Beattie, Paul; Chong, Patricia; Colella, Whitney; James, Brian

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

80

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

82

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

83

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement Damodara Poojary, Jacques Nicole,...

84

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

85

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

86

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

87

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

88

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

89

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

90

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

91

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

92

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

93

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

94

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

95

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

96

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

97

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

98

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

99

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

100

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

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101

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

102

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

103

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

104

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

105

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

106

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

107

Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems DE-FC02-99EE50587 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge in the development of fuel cell system technologies by providing cost and manufacturing analysis. · To develop ­ Presented results to the fuel cell industry for feedback and incorporated this into a revised baseline cost

108

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

In 2004, DOE has selected TIAX to evaluate the lifecycle cost and WTW energy use and GHG emissions of various hydrogen storage options. Water Electrolyzer Water Electrolyzer...

109

Using a total landed cost model to foster global logistics strategy in the electronics industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global operation strategies have been widely used in the last several decades as many companies and industries have taken advantage of lower production costs. However, in choosing a location, companies often only consider ...

Jearasatit, Apichart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Exergoeconomic analysis of a district heating system for geothermal energy using specific exergy cost method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study presents the exergoeconomic analysis and evaluation in order to provide cost based information and suggests possible locations/components in a GDHS (geothermal district heating system) for improving the cost effectiveness. The analysis is based on the SPECO (specific exergy costing) method, and used to calculate exergy-related parameters and display cost flows for all streams and components. As a real case study, the Afyon GDHS in Turkey is considered based on actual operational data. The obtained results show that the unit exergy cost of heat produced by the Afyon GDHS is calculated as average 5624 $/h. The HEX (heat exchanger)-III among all components should be improved quickly due to the high total operating cost rate and relative cost difference. The HEX-I and PM (pump)-V have the highest exergoeconomic factors among all other system components due to the high owning and operating costs of these components. The heat production costs per exergy unit for all the \\{HEXs\\} decrease due to the high exergy destruction cost rate of the system, while the well head temperature and ambient temperature increase. The SPECO method may be used to improve the cost effectiveness according to exergy rates in \\{GDHSs\\} as a thermal system.

Mehmet Ali Alkan; Ali Keçeba?; Nurettin Yamankaradeniz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System Discussion Fuel Cell Tech Team FreedomCar Detroit. MI October 20, 2004 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140-2390 Ref D0006 SFAA No. DE-SCO2- 98EE50526 Topic 1 Subtopic 1C Agenda EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 1 1 Project Overview 2 Compressed Hydrogen Storage Cost 3 2004 System Cost Update 4 Appendix Project Overview Approach EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 2 In our final year of the project, we assessed the cost of compressed hydrogen storage and updated the overall system cost projection. Task 1: PEMFC System Technology Synopsis Task 2: Develop Cost Model and Baseline Estimates Task 3: Identify Opportunities for System Cost Reduction Tasks 4, 5, 6 & 7: Annual Updates

112

Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Cost Reductions for Municipal Recycling Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Cost Reductions for Municipal Recycling Systems ... An evaluation of the energy, greenhouse gas, and costs savings associated with logistics and infrastructure improvements to a curbside recycling program is presented. ... MSW recycling has been found to be costly for most municipalities compared to landfill disposal. ...

Mikhail Chester; Elliot Martin; Nakul Sathaye

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

market outlook. References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCost-BenefitAnalysisofSmartGridTechnologiesThroughSystemSimulations&oldid514355"...

114

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis, held April 16, 2013.

115

Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

campus, which includes 750 buildings. Photo courtesy of Texas A&M University Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University Recovery Act...

116

Webinar: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis, originally presented on April 16, 2013.

117

Filter system cost comparison for integrated gasification combined cycle and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assess the relative cost of components and sub-systems for a hot gas particulate cleanup system a cost comparison between the filter systems for two advanced coal-based power plants was conducted. Assessing component and sub-system costs permits the most beneficial areas for product improvement to be identified. The results from this study are presented. The filter system is based on a Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filter Concept which is designed to operate with ceramic candle filters. The Foster Wheeler second Generation 453 MWe (net) Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) and the KRW 458 MWe (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants are used for the comparison. The comparison presents the general differences of the two power plants and the process related filtration conditions for PFBC and IGCC systems. The results present the conceptual designs for the PFBC and IGCC filter systems as well as a cost summary comparison. The cost summary comparison includes the total plant cost, the fixed operating and maintenance cost, the variable operating and maintenance cost and the effect on the cost of electricity for the two filter systems. The most beneficial areas for product improvement are identified.

Dennis, R.A.; McDaniel, H.M. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center; Buchanan, T.; Chen, H.; Harbaugh, L.B.; Klett, M.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Reading, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

119

Electrical energy storage systems: A comparative life cycle cost analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Large-scale deployment of intermittent renewable energy (namely wind energy and solar PV) may entail new challenges in power systems and more volatility in power prices in liberalized electricity markets. Energy storage can diminish this imbalance, relieving the grid congestion, and promoting distributed generation. The economic implications of grid-scale electrical energy storage technologies are however obscure for the experts, power grid operators, regulators, and power producers. A meticulous techno-economic or cost-benefit analysis of electricity storage systems requires consistent, updated cost data and a holistic cost analysis framework. To this end, this study critically examines the existing literature in the analysis of life cycle costs of utility-scale electricity storage systems, providing an updated database for the cost elements (capital costs, operational and maintenance costs, and replacement costs). Moreover, life cycle costs and levelized cost of electricity delivered by electrical energy storage is analyzed, employing Monte Carlo method to consider uncertainties. The examined energy storage technologies include pumped hydropower storage, compressed air energy storage (CAES), flywheel, electrochemical batteries (e.g. lead–acid, NaS, Li-ion, and Ni–Cd), flow batteries (e.g. vanadium-redox), superconducting magnetic energy storage, supercapacitors, and hydrogen energy storage (power to gas technologies). The results illustrate the economy of different storage systems for three main applications: bulk energy storage, T&D support services, and frequency regulation.

Behnam Zakeri; Sanna Syri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

presentation presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information page 1 Overview * Base Period: - 100% complete * Manufacturing costs * Materials costs (particularly precious Timeline Barriers - Feb 17, 2006 to Feb. 16, 2008 * Option year 1 of 3: - 65% complete - Started Feb 16, 2008 metal catalysts) Characteristic Units 2008 2010 2015 Stack Cost $/kW e (net) - $25 $15 - $325K (2 year base period) - $182k (opt. yr. 1) - Contractor share: $0 * Funding for FY 2008 * Extensive interaction with Collaborations System Cost $/kW e (net) - $45 $30 * Funding for FY 2008 - $182k industry/researchers to solicit design & manufacturing metrics as input to cost analysis. page 2 Started Feb 16, 2008 Budget * Total project funding DOE Cost Targets

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A steady-state measurement system for total hemispherical emissivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A steady-state calorimetric technique was developed for measuring the total hemispherical emissivity of a conductive material. The system uses a thin strip of the conductive sample electrically heated by alternating current to high temperatures in a vacuum chamber. The emissivity was measured in a central region of the sample with an approximately uniform temperature distribution. Considering the influences of the gray body assumption, wire heat losses, effects of residual gas and conductive heat loss from the region to the rest of the strip, the emissivity was accurately determined by solving the inverse one-dimension steady-state heat transfer problem. The emissivities of various metal samples (nickel and 45# steel) were measured to verify the system accuracy. And the results were then analyzed to estimate the relative errors of emissivity arising from the gray body assumption, wire heat losses, effects of residual gas, non-uniform temperature distribution and the measurement uncertainty of emissivity. In the temperature range from 700 to 1300 K, the accuracy is acceptable for practical applications within the total measurement uncertainties of 1.1%. To increase the system applicability, some issues related to sample specifications, heating power control and temperature uniformity of sample test section were discussed. Thus, this system can provide accurate measurements of the total hemispherical emissivity of conductive samples at high temperatures.

Tairan Fu; Peng Tan; Chuanhe Pang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

123

Reducing total fulfillment at costs at Amazon EU through network design optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A key supply chain management issue encountered by any business requiring a distribution system is in designing its distribution network. A distribution network configuration has both direct and indirect ongoing effects ...

Merriam, Ken (Ken A.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen costing approximately $2.87/kg, still above the DOE's 2010 $2.50/kg target. We also began laboratory testing of reforming ethanol, which we showed is currently the least expensive approach to making renewable hydrogen. Extended testing of neat ethanol in micro-reactors was successful, and we also were able to reform E-85 acquired from a local fueling station for 2,700 hours, although some modifications were required to handle the 15% gasoline present in E-85. We began initial tests of a catalyst-coated wall reformer tube that showed some promise in reducing the propensity to coke with E-85. These coated-wall tests ran for 350 hours. Additional resources would be required to commercialize an ethanol reformer operating on E-85, but there is no market for such a product at this time, so this ethanol reformer project was moth-balled pending future government or industry support. The two main objectives of this project were: (1) to design, build and test a steam methane reformer and pressure swing adsorption system that, if scaled up and mass produced, could potentially meet the DOE 2015 cost and efficiency targets for on-site distributed hydrogen generation, and (2) to demonstrate the efficacy of a low-cost renewable hydrogen generation system based on reforming ethanol to hydrogen at the fueling station.

C.E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President; Principal Investigator, and

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) + Bonus Depreciation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) + Bonus Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) + Bonus Depreciation (2008-2012) Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) + Bonus Depreciation (2008-2012) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Wind Water Solar Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Program Info Start Date 1986 Program Type Corporate Depreciation Provider U.S. Internal Revenue Service Under the federal Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS), businesses may recover investments in certain property through depreciation deductions. The MACRS establishes a set of class lives for various types of property, ranging from three to 50 years, over which the property may be

126

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Colorado Program Type Line Extension Analysis Provider Colorado Public Utilities Commission At the request of a customer or a potential customer, Colorado electric utilities are required to conduct a cost comparison of a photovoltaic (PV) system to any proposed distribution line extension if the customer or potential customer provides the utility with load data (estimated monthly kilowatt-hour usage) requested by the utility to conduct the comparison, and if the customer's or potential customer's peak demand is estimated to be less than 25 kilowatts (kW). In performing the comparison analysis, the

127

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vince Contini, Kathya Mahadevan, Fritz Eubanks, Vince Contini, Kathya Mahadevan, Fritz Eubanks, Jennifer Smith, Gabe Stout and Mike Jansen Battelle April 16, 2013 Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Fuel Cells for Material Handling Applications 2 Presentation Outline * Background * Approach * System Design * Fuel Cell Stack Design * Stack, BOP and System Cost Models * System Cost Summary * Results Summary 3 * 10 and 25 kW PEM Fuel Cells for Material Handling Equipment (MHE) applications Background 5-year program to provide feedback to DOE on evaluating fuel cell systems for stationary and emerging markets by developing independent models and cost estimates * Applications - Primary (including CHP) power, backup power, APU, and material handling * Fuel Cell Types - 80°C PEM, 180°C PEM, SOFC technologies

128

Financing; A Cost Effective Alternative When Upgrading Energy Efficient Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in order to effectively compete in the marketplace. One obvious method of reducing costs and improving productivity is to upgrade old, antiquated equipment such as lighting to more modern energy efficient systems. Most projects provide a return...

Ertle, J. M.

129

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System Discussion Fuel Cell Tech Team FreedomCar Detroit. MI October 20, 2004 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge Presentation 3 A fuel cell vehicle would contain the PEMFC system modeled in this project along with additional

130

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

07 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems...

131

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Application Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the...

132

DOE Hydrogen Program Record 10004, Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Record Program Record Record #: 10004 Date: September 16, 2010 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010 Update to: Record 9012 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 16, 2010 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2010 technology and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $51/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: In fiscal year 2010, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2009 cost analyses of 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2010 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2]. Both cost estimates are based on performance at beginning of life.

133

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Project ID: 207 Principal Investigator: Stephen Lasher Keywords: Hydrogen storage; costs Purpose The purpose of this analysis is to help guide researchers and developers toward promising R&D and commercialization pathways by evaluating the various on-board hydrogen storage technologies on a consistent basis. Performer Principal Investigator: Stephen Lasher Organization: TIAX, LLC Address: 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140 Telephone: 617-498-6108 Email: lasher.stephen@tiaxllc.com Additional Performers: Matt Hooks, TIAX, LLC; Mark Marion, TIAX, LLC; Kurtis McKenney, TIAX, LLC; Bob Rancatore, TIAX, LLC; Yong Yang, TIAX, LLC Sponsor(s) Name: Sunita Satyapal

134

Comparison of high-speed rail and maglev system costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper compares the two modes of transportation, and notes important similarities and differences in the technologies and in how they can be implemented to their best advantage. Problems with making fair comparisons of the costs and benefits are discussed and cost breakdowns based on data reported in the literature are presented and discussed in detail. Cost data from proposed and actual construction projects around the world are summarized and discussed. Results from the National Maglev Initiative and the recently-published Commercial Feasibility Study are included in the discussion. Finally, estimates will be given of the expected cost differences between HSR and maglev systems implemented under simple and complex terrain conditions. The extent to which the added benefits of maglev technology offset the added costs is examined.

Rote, D.M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.6 mb) 1.6 mb) Appendix A - Photovoltaic (PV) Cost and Performance Characteristics for Residential and Commercial Applications (1.0 mb) Appendix B - The Cost and Performance of Distributed Wind Turbines, 2010-35 (0.5 mb) Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Release date: August 7, 2013 Distributed generation in the residential and commercial buildings sectors refers to the on-site generation of energy, often electricity from renewable energy systems such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines. Many factors influence the market for distributed generation, including government policies at the local, state, and federal level, and project costs, which vary significantly depending on time, location, size, and application.

137

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid… (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Cost Modeling and Design Techniques for Integrated Package Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Modeling and Design Techniques for Integrated Package Distribution Systems Karen R. Smilowitz and Carlos F. Daganzo December 23, 2005 Abstract Complex package distribution systems are designed using-scale integrated distribution networks. While the network design problem is quite complex, we demonstrate

Smilowitz, Karen

139

The embedded energy costs in solar energy systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper compares the results of net energy analyses performed for active solar thermal and photovoltaic energy systems with that of conventional power generating systems. Current U.S. solar technology commercialization programs are discussed from the viewpoint of embedded (hidden) material and resource costs.

Baron, S.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis for Condensate Receiving System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to determine the life-cycle costs of several options relevant to the Condensate Removal System serving the Compressed Air System (CAS) at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The best option (least present value) will be selected as the preferred configuration to construct.

C Mellen

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

142

Development of a Method Using BIM Technology to Determine the Utility Bill and Total Cost of Ownership of a Single-family Home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Note: Numbers generated from Autodesk Green Building Studio & Google Mortgage Calculator Source: Created in Microsoft Excel 22 In the first method I was able to successfully establish the utility bill and the total cost of ownership.... Note: Numbers generated from Autodesk Green Building Studio & Google Mortgage Calculator Source: Created in Microsoft Excel 22 In the first method I was able to successfully establish the utility bill and the total cost of ownership...

McGarity, Ashley

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.gwec.net/index.php?id=131 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/spain-installed-wind-capacity-website Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs This website presents an overview of total installed wind energy capacity in Spain per year from 2000 to 2010. The page also presents the main market developments from 2010; a policy summary; a discussion of the revision in feed-in tariffs in 2010; and a future market outlook. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cost-Benefit_Analysis_of_Smart_Grid_Technologies_Through_System_Simulations&oldid=514355"

144

Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Fact Sheet...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Fact Sheet, 2011 Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Fact Sheet, 2011 Cummins Power Generation, in collaboration...

145

Residential photovoltaic flywheel storage system performance and cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A subscale prototype of a flywheel energy storage and conversion system for use with photovoltaic power systems of residential and intermediate load-center size has been designed, built and tested by MIT Lincoln Laboratory. System design, including details of such key components as magnetic bearings, motor generator, and power-conditioning electronics, are described. Performance results of prototype testing are given and indicate that this system is the equal of or superior to battery and inverter systems for the same application. Results of cost and user-worth analysis show that residential systems are economically feasible in stand-alone and in utility-interactive applications.

Hay, R.D.; Millner, A.R.; Jarvinen, P.O.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Renewable build-up pathways for the US: Generation costs are not system costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transition to a future electricity system based primarily on wind and solar PV is examined for all regions in the contiguous US. We present optimized pathways for the build-up of wind and solar power for least backup energy needs as well as for least cost obtained with a simplified, lightweight model based on long-term high resolution weather-determined generation data. In the absence of storage, the pathway which achieves the best match of generation and load, thus resulting in the least backup energy requirements, generally favors a combination of both technologies, with a wind/solar PV energy mix of about 80/20 in a fully renewable scenario. The least cost development is seen to start with 100% of the technology with the lowest average generation costs first, but with increasing renewable installations, economically unfavorable excess generation pushes it toward the minimal backup pathway. Surplus generation and the entailed costs can be reduced significantly by combining wind and solar power, and/or a...

Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Jacobson, Mark Z; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

DFMA Cost Estimates of Fuel-Cell/Reformer Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Car Technical Barriers Addressed: Fuel Flexible Processors Technical Barriers N: Cost Component designs of complete automotive FC power systems: · Onboard gasoline fuel processor and PEM fuel cell ·Fuel cell stacks ·Air supply and humidification ·Thermal management ·Water management ·Fuel Supply

148

Reducing Life Cycle Cost By Energy Saving in Pump Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pumps consume about 15% of all electricity generated world wide. In the USA alone this accounts for over 130TWh per annum. A saving of only 1% would amount to $80 million in electricity cost. The importance of energy saving, in pump systems...

Bower, J. R.

149

Forecasting the Costs of Automotive PEM Fuel Cell Systems: Using Bounded Manufacturing Progress Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s pilot-scale PEM fuel cell manufactunng cost, and theproductaon, PEM fuel cell systems could cost $35 - 90/kW,is how PEM fuel cell system manufactunng costs might evolve

Lipman, Timonthy E.; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Development of a Low-Cost Rotary Steerable Drilling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project had the goal to develop and commercialize a low-cost rotary steerable system (LCRSS) capable of operating downhole at conventional pressures and temperatures to reduce operating costs by a minimum of 50% and lost-in-hole charges by at least 50% over the currently offered systems. The LCRSS system developed under this project does reduce operating costs by 55% and lost-in-hole charges by at least 50%. The developed product is not commercializable in its current form. The overall objective was to develop and commercialize a low cost rotary steerable system (LCRSS) capable of operating downhole at conventional pressures and temperatures (20,000 psi/150 C) while reducing the operating costs by 50% and the lost-in-hole charges by 50% over the currently available systems. The proposed reduction in costs were to be realized through the significant reduction in tool complexity, a corresponding increase in tool reliability as expressed in the mean-time between failure (MTBF), and a reduction in the time and costs required to service tools after each field operation. Ultimately, the LCRSS system was to be capable of drilling 7 7/8 in. to 9 5/8 in. borehole diameters. The project was divided into three Phases, of which Phases I & II were previously completed and reported on, and are part of the case file. Therefore, the previously reported information is not repeated herein. Phase III included the fabrication of two field ready prototypes that were to be subjected to a series of drilling tests at GTI Catoosa, DOE RMOTC, and at customer partnering wells, if possible, as appropriate in the timing of the field test objectives to fully exercise all elements of the LCRSS. These tests were conducted in an iterative process based on a performance/reliability improvement cycle with the goal of demonstrating the system met all aspects required for commercial viability. These tests were conducted to achieve continuous runs of 100+ hours with well trajectories that fully exercised the tool's build/turn/drop/hold target capabilities and its higher end ratings for bit weight, torque and rotary speed. The tool teardowns were rigorously analyzed at the conclusion of each field run to assess component wear rates and to fully document any detrimental behavior(s) observed.

Roney Nazarian

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hybrid energy system cost analysis: San Nicolas Island, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the local wind resource and evaluates the costs and benefits of supplementing the current diesel-powered energy system on San Nicolas Island, California (SNI), with wind turbines. In Section 2.0 the SNI site, naval operations, and current energy system are described, as are the data collection and analysis procedures. Section 3.0 summarizes the wind resource data and analyses that were presented in NREL/TP 442-20231. Sections 4.0 and 5.0 present the conceptual design and cost analysis of a hybrid wind and diesel energy system on SNI, with conclusions following in Section 6. Appendix A presents summary pages of the hybrid system spreadsheet model, and Appendix B contains input and output files for the HYBRID2 program.

Olsen, T.L.; McKenna, E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

RTO heat recovery system decreases production costs and provides payback  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of a heat recovery system to an existing regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) was considered, tested, and selected for decreasing production costs at a pressure sensitive tape manufacturing facility. Heat recovery systems on RTO's are less common than those on other thermal oxidizers (e.g., recuperative) because RTO's, by the nature of the technology, usually provide high thermal efficiencies (without the application of external heat recovery systems). In this case, the production processes were integrated with the emission controls by applying an external heat recovery system and by optimizing the design and operation of the existing drying and cure ovens, RTO system, and ductwork collection system. Integration of these systems provides an estimated annual production cost savings of over $400,000 and a simplified capital investment payback of less than 2 years, excluding possible savings from improved dryer operations. These additional process benefits include more consistent and simplified control of seasonal dryer performance and possibly production throughput increases. The production costs savings are realized by substituting excess RTO heat for a portion of the infrared (IR) electrical heat input to the dryers/ovens. This will be accomplished by preheating the supply air to the oven zones with the excess RTO heat (i.e., heat at the RTO exceeding auto-thermal conditions). Several technologies, including direct air-to-air, indirect air-to-air, hot oil-to-air, waste heat boiler (steam-to-air) were evaluated for transferring the excess RTO heat (hot gas) to the ovens. A waste heat boiler was selected to transfer the excess RTO heat to the ovens because this technology provided the most economical, reliable, and feasible operation. Full-scale production test trials on the coating lines were performed and confirmed the IR electrical costs could be reduced up to 70%.

Lundquist, P.R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Average System Cost Methodology : Administrator's Record of Decision.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant features of average system cost (ASC) methodology adopted are: retention of the jurisdictional approach where retail rate orders of regulartory agencies provide primary data for computing the ASC for utilities participating in the residential exchange; inclusion of transmission costs; exclusion of construction work in progress; use of a utility's weighted cost of debt securities; exclusion of income taxes; simplification of separation procedures for subsidized generation and transmission accounts from other accounts; clarification of ASC methodology rules; more generous review timetable for individual filings; phase-in of reformed methodology; and each exchanging utility must file under the new methodology within 20 days of implementation by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission of the ten major participating utilities, the revised ASC will substantially only affect three. (PSB)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distributed Generation System Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

155

Relationship of the HACCP system to Total Quality Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Webster’s Dictionary (1989) defines quality as ‘a degree of excellence or superiority in kind’. The American Society for Quality Control (ASQC, 1987) specifies that quality is ‘the totality of feat...

N. B. Webb; J. L. Marsden

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Economizer system cost effectiveness: Accounting for the influence of ventilation rate on sick leave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIZER SYSTEM COST EFFECTIVENESS: ACCOUNTING FOR THEand economic benefits of an economizer ventilation controlanalyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs

Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

THE TOTAL PETROLEUM SYSTEM--THE NATURAL FLUID NETWORK THAT CONSTRAINS THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter PS THE TOTAL PETROLEUM SYSTEM--THE NATURAL FLUID NETWORK THAT CONSTRAINS THE ASSESSMENT Survey Click here or on this symbol in the toolbar to return. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WORLD PETROLEUM.................................................................................................................PS-2 Total Petroleum System

Laughlin, Robert B.

158

A capital cost comparison of commercial ground-source heat pump systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides a capital cost comparison of commercial ground source heat pump systems. The study includes groundwater systems, ground-coupled systems and hybrid systems.

Rafferty, K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid a significant mismatch between supply and demand. Power ...

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

New compressor systems seen paring refrigeration costs 15%  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manufacturers claim that a parallel arrangement of three to five compressors of varying capacities can lower a store's refrigerating costs over 15%. The energy savings come from the more-precise matching of compressor capacity with refrigeration demand. The 500 stores that have installed uneven compressor systems are achieving a payback in under a year. Because it is important for controls to match a system for maximum efficiency, manufacturers are introducing tailor-made microprocessor controllers. A table summarizes three supermarket case histories. (DCK)

Barber, J.

1983-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PEMFC technology for transportation must be competitive with internal combustion engine powertrains in a number of key metrics, including performance, life, reliability, and cost. Demonstration of PEMFC cost competitiveness has its own challenges because the technology has not been applied to high volume automotive markets. The key stack materials including membranes, electrodes, bipolar plates, and gas diffusion layers have not been produced in automotive volumes to the exacting quality requirements that will be needed for high stack yields and to the evolving property specifications of high performance automotive stacks. Additionally, balance-of-plant components for air, water, and thermal management are being developed to meet the unique requirements of fuel cell systems. To address the question of whether fuel cells will be cost competitive in automotive markets, the DOE has funded this project to assess the high volume production cost of PEM fuel cell systems. In this report a historical perspective of our efforts in assessment of PEMFC cost for DOE is provided along with a more in-depth assessment of the cost of compressed hydrogen storage is provided. Additionally, the hydrogen storage costs were incorporated into a system cost update for 2004. Assessment of cost involves understanding not only material and production costs, but also critical performance metrics, i.e., stack power density and associated catalyst loadings that scale the system components. We will discuss the factors influencing the selection of the system specification (i.e., efficiency, reformate versus direct hydrogen, and power output) and how these have evolved over time. The reported costs reflect internal estimates and feedback from component developers and the car companies. Uncertainty in the cost projection was addressed through sensitivity analyses.

Eric J. Carlson

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

162

An Adaptive Tree Code for Computing Total Potential Energy in Classical Molecular Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Adaptive Tree Code for Computing Total Potential Energy in Classical Molecular Systems Zhong, 2000 Abstract A tree code algorithm is presented for rapid computation of the total potential energy are presented for a variety of systems. Keywords: adaptive tree code; total potential energy; nonbonded

Duan, Zhong-Hui

163

Solar gas turbine systems: Design, cost and perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combination of high solar shares with high conversion efficiencies is one of the major advantages of solar gas turbine systems compared to other solar-fossil hybrid power plants. Pressurized air receivers are used in solar tower plants to heat the compressed air in the gas turbine to temperatures up to 1000 °C. Therefore solar shares in the design case of 40% up to 90% can be realized and annual solar shares up to 30% can be achieved in base load. Using modern gas turbine systems in recuperation or combined cycle mode leads to conversion efficiencies of the solar heat from around 40% up to more than 50%. This is an important step towards cost reduction of solar thermal power. Together with the advantages of hybrid power plants—variable solar share, fully dispatchable power, 24 h operation without storage—solar gas turbine systems are expected to have a high potential for market introduction in the mid term view. In this paper the design and performance assessment of several prototype plants in the power levels of 1 MW, 5 MW and 15 MW are presented. Advanced software tools are used for design optimization and performance prediction of the solar tower gas turbine power plants. Detailed cost assumptions for the solarized gas turbine, the solar tower plant and further equipment as well as for operation and maintenance are presented. Intensive performance and economic analysis of the prototype plants for different locations and capacity factors are shown. The cost reduction potential through automation and remote operation is revealed.

Peter Schwarzbözl; Reiner Buck; Chemi Sugarmen; Arik Ring; Ma Jesús Marcos Crespo; Peter Altwegg; Juan Enrile

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Integrated Ice Storage/Sprinkler HVAC System Sharply Cuts Energy Costs and Air-Distribution First Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated ice thermal storage/sprinkler HVAC systems developed and applied by the author in several commercial applications shift a major portion of electric utility demand to cheaper off-peak hours, while also reducing significantly the first cost...

Meckler, G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Cost estimation of functional and physical changes made to complex systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current cost estimation practices rely on statistically relating physical parameters of a system to historical cost data. Unfortunately, this method is unable to effectively communicate the increasing complexity of system ...

Jeziorek, Peter Nicholas, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement Cyber Security Standards New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement Cyber...

167

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2013 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

168

The effects of the implementation of grey water reuse systems on construction cost and project schedule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a positive or negative effect on the design team’s decision to implement a grey water reuse system: capital cost, maintenance cost, LEED credits, local plumbing codes, project schedule, local water conservation issues, complexity of the system, etc...

Kaduvinal Varghese, Jeslin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Fact Sheet...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

system for a CHP project less than 1 megawatt (MW) in size. Low-Cost Packaged Combined Heat and Power System with Reduced Emissions More Documents & Publications Low-Cost...

170

 Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) cost study: analysis of first cost tradeoffs in UFAD systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is served by VAV fan coil units (FCU) with variable speedwith regard to terminal fan coil unit costs. Since the model

Webster, Tom; Benedek, Corinne; Bauman, Fred

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Cost/benefit analysis for video security systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dr. Don Hush and Scott Chapman, in conjunction with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of the University of New Mexico (UNM), have been contracted by Los Alamos National Laboratories to perform research in the area of high security video analysis. The first phase of this research, presented in this report, is a cost/benefit analysis of various approaches to the problem in question. This discussion begins with a description of three architectures that have been used as solutions to the problem of high security surveillance. An overview of the relative merits and weaknesses of each of the proposed systems is included. These descriptions are followed directly by a discussion of the criteria chosen in evaluating the systems and the techniques used to perform the comparisons. The results are then given in graphical and tabular form, and their implications discussed. The project to this point has involved assessing hardware and software issues in image acquisition, processing and change detection. Future work is to leave these questions behind to consider the issues of change analysis - particularly the detection of human motion - and alarm decision criteria. The criteria for analysis in this report include: cost; speed; tradeoff issues in moving primative operations from software to hardware; real time operation considerations; change image resolution; and computational requirements.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Teaching auscultation visually with low cost system, is it feasible?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cardiac auscultation can generate important information in the diagnosis of diseases. The sounds that the cardiac system provides are understood in the frequency range of human hearing but in a region of low sensitivity. This project aims to build a low cost didactic software/hardware set for teaching cardiac auscultation technique in Brazilian universities. The frequencies of interest to describe the human cardiac cycle were found in the range of 20 Hz to 1 kHz which includes low frequencies where available low-cost transducers usually have large errors. To create the system an optimization of the geometry of the chestpiece is being programmed with finite element simulations; meanwhile digital filters for specific frequencies of interest and an interface based on MATLAB are being developed. There were needed filters for the gallops (20 to 70 Hz) heart beats (20 to 100 Hz) ejection murmurs (100 to 500 Hz) mitral stenosis (30 to 80 Hz) and regurgitations (200 to 900 Hz). The FEM simulation of a chestpiece demonstrates high signaling levels on the desired frequency range which can be used with the filters to obtain specific information. Furthermore the ideal signal recording equipments will be defined implemented and tested.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation reports on the status of mass production cost estimation for direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell systems.

174

Waterflood control system for maximizing total oil recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A control system and method for determining optimal fluid injection pressure is based upon a model of a growing hydrofracture due to waterflood injection pressure. This model is used to develop a control system optimizing the injection pressure by using a prescribed injection goal coupled with the historical times, pressures, and volume of injected fluid at a single well. In this control method, the historical data is used to derive two major flow components: the transitional component, where cumulative injection volume is scaled as the square root of time, and a steady-state breakthrough component, which scales linearly with respect to time. These components provide diagnostic information and allow for the prevention of rapid fracture growth and associated massive water break through that is an important part of a successful waterflood, thereby extending the life of both injection and associated production wells in waterflood secondary oil recovery operations.

Patzek, Tadeusz Wiktor (Oakland, CA); Silin, Dimitriy Borisovich (Pleasant Hill, CA); De, Asoke Kumar (San Jose, CA)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

175

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An advanced exhaust aftertreatment system developed to meet EPA 2010 and final Tier 4 emission regulations show substantial improvements in system performance while reducing system cost

176

Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

buildings consumed over 392,000 billion Btu of site- buildings consumed over 392,000 billion Btu of site- delivered energy for buildings during FY 2007 at a total cost of $6.5 billion. [1] Earlier data indicate that about 10% of this is used to heat water. [2] Targeting energy consumption in Federal buildings, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires new Federal buildings and major renovations to meet 30% of their hot water demand with solar energy, provided it is cost-effective over the life of the system. In October 2009, President Obama expanded the energy reduction and performance requirements of EISA and its subsequent regulations with his Executive Order 13514. Federal facilities having financial difficulty meeting the EISA mandate and executive order (e.g., facilities with natural

177

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description This effort will support the expansion of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), supporting DOE Strategic Themes of "energy security" and sub goal of "energy diversity"; reducing the Nation's dependence on foreign oil while improving our environment. A 50 MW has been chosen as a design point, so that the project may also assess how different machinery approaches will change the costing - it is a mid point in size where multiple solutions exist that will allow the team to effectively explore the options in the design space and understand the cost.

178

An LMI approach to reliable guaranteed cost control of discrete-time systems with actuator failure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the reliable guaranteed cost control problem for discrete-time systems with actuator failures and a given quadratic cost function. The problem is to design a reliable guaranteed cost state feedback control law which can tolerate ... Keywords: Actuator failure, Guaranteed cost control, LMI, Reliable control

Li Yu

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Cost-effective treatment looks at entire production system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The determination of cost-effectiveness is best undertaken after the most advantageous approach to solving the problem is selected. Focusing the approach on the injection well could result in the addition of corrosion inhibitor, paraffin inhibitor, biocide and scale inhibitor, with the possible incorporation of a flotation system and a filter. Alternatively, the approach can focus on treating the problem at the battery. The approach highlighted in this paper focuses on the initial effort on defining and solving the problems occurring at the producing well. Field histories of such programs carried out in the Persian Basin illustrate that this approach reduced the battery workload. The next phase focuses on solving problems that originate at the battery to reduce the injection well load.

Evans, S. (Conoco Inc., Houston, TX (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

 Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) cost study: analysis of first cost tradeoffs in UFAD systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is served by VAV fan coil units (FCU) with variable speedwith regard to terminal fan coil unit costs. Since the modelfan powered boxes with hot water reheat coils. Because it is a constant volume unit,

Webster, Tom; Benedek, Corinne; Bauman, Fred

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Sharing the Total Cost of Ownership of Electric Vehicles: A Study on the Application of Game Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and constituent systems (customers, vehicle producers, energy suppliers, telecommunication operators, states

de Weck, Olivier L.

182

H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) (a) Total Compensation System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) H.38 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (SEP 2013) (a) Total Compensation System The Contractor shall develop, implement and maintain formal policies, practices and procedures to be used in the administration of its compensation system consistent with FAR 31.205-6 and DEAR 970.3102-05-6; "Compensation for Personal Services" ("Total Compensation System"). DOE-approved standards, if any, shall be applied to the Total Compensation System. The Contractor's Total Compensation System shall be fully documented, consistently applied, and acceptable to the Contracting Officer. Periodic appraisals of contractor performance with respect to the Contractors' Total Compensation System will be conducted. (1) The description of the Contractor Employee Compensation Program should

183

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Automotive and MHE Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on AddThis.com...

184

Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from of work done by the field, W*= -W. Bring q1 from , W *= 0 since no electric F yet #12;Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from the work done by an external

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

185

Extreme Balance of System Hardware Cost Reduction | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Research Corporation: Solar, Install, Mount, Production, Labor, Equipment (SIMPLE BOS) Solexel and Owens Corning: Development and Productization of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost...

186

Robust Energy Cost Optimization of Water Distribution System with ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy cost optimization of a water-supply network is a very important ..... ci(t) is the cost of pumping in a unit of water from source # i in period t (in ... of the pump, ? is an appropriate constant factor, and ?(t) is the price of energy (H is measured.

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

187

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5005: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 versus 2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Date: March 20, 2005 5 Date: March 20, 2005 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 vs 2005 Originator: Patrick Davis Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: May 22, 2006 Item: "Reduced the high-volume cost of automotive fuel cells from $275/kW (50kW system) in 2002 to $110/kW (80kW system) in 2005." Supporting Information: In 2002, TIAX reported a cost of $324/kW for a 50-kW automotive PEM fuel cell system operating on gasoline reformate, based on their modeling of projected cost for 500,000 units per year. See Eric Carlson et al., "Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stack/System." U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Progress Report. (2002) at http://www.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/33098_sec4-1.pdf. Also see "Cost Modeling of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automobiles," Eric Carlson et al., SAE

188

An Experiment to Improve Cost Estimation and Project Tracking for Software and Systems Integration Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Experiment to Improve Cost Estimation and Project Tracking for Software and Systems Integration to improve cost estimation and project tracking. 1. Introduction In order to remain competitive, ICL (as well for integration projects, to reduce time to market and to reduce costs without detriment to the quality

Henderson, Peter

189

Cost goals for a residential photovoltaicthermal liquid collector system set in three northern locations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study compares the allowable costs for a residential PV/T liquid collector system with those of both PV-only and side-by-side PV and thermal collector systems. Four types of conventional energy systems provide backup: ...

Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

FACILITIES ENGINEER WEST CHICAGO Execute capital projects for manufacturing facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost estimation, system design, equipment sizing ENGINEERING: Lead capital project design, development and execution for facility and utility capital Utilities systems (Vacuum, Hydraulics, Waste Water treatment, etc.) o Buildings and grounds, including

Heller, Barbara

191

Heat pump systems and their costs from the perspective of insurance companies, users and environment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This report is based on a project which aims to evaluate the costs for the heat pump system from the perspective of Swedish insurance… (more)

Trang, Leon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Cost Effective, Integrated and Smart Radioactive Safeguard System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photographic Experts Group LED Light Emitting Diode MC&A Material Cost & Acoounting MDI Multiple Document Interface MJPEG Motion JPEG MMS Microsoft Media Services MPEG Motion Pictures Expert Group NDA Non-Destructive Analysis NSSPI Nuclear Security... Photographic Experts Group LED Light Emitting Diode MC&A Material Cost & Acoounting MDI Multiple Document Interface MJPEG Motion JPEG MMS Microsoft Media Services MPEG Motion Pictures Expert Group NDA Non-Destructive Analysis NSSPI Nuclear Security...

Singh, Harneet

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

Energy Management System Lowers U.S. Navy Energy Costs Through PV System Interconnection (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet the U.S. Navy's energy goals, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) spent two years collaborating on demonstrations that tested market-ready energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration. One such technology - an energy management system - was identified as a promising method for reducing energy use and costs, and can contribute to increasing energy security.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Low-Cost Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manufacturable Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management IIPS Number 16910 Low Low - - Cost Cost Manufacturable Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management PEM Water Management IIPS Number 16910 IIPS Number 16910 Ward TeGrotenhuis, Susie Stenkamp, Curt Lavender Pacific Northwest National Laboratories Richland, WA HFCIT Kick Off Meeting February 2007 2 Project objective: Create a low cost and passive PEM water management system Project objective: Project objective: Create a low cost Create a low cost and passive PEM water management system and passive PEM water management system Specific Targets Addressed for 3.4.2 Automotive-Scale: 80 kWe Integrated Transportation Fuel Cell Power Systems Operating on Direct Hydrogen

195

Gelatin/graphene systems for low cost energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we introduce the possibility to use a low cost, biodegradable material for temporary energy storage devices. Here, we report the use of biologically derived organic electrodes composed of gelatin ad graphene. The graphene was obtained by mild sonication in a mixture of volatile solvents of natural graphite flakes and subsequent centrifugation. The presence of exfoliated graphene sheets was detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The homogeneous dispersion in gelatin demonstrates a good compatibility between the gelatin molecules and the graphene particles. The electrical characterization of the resulting nanocomposites suggests the possible applications as materials for transient, low cost energy storage device.

Landi, Giovanni [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, FernUniversität Hagen, 58084 Hagen (Germany); Fedi, Filippo; Sorrentino, Andrea; Iannace, Salvatore [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials (IMCB-CNR), Piazzale Enrico Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Italy); Neitzert, Heinz C. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Land-Based Wind Plant Balance-of-System Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 30% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understand the BOS costs for wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by industry partners. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, foundations for various wind turbines, transportation, civil work, and electrical arrays. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and geographic characteristics. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine wind plant costs associated with turbine sizes ranging from 1-6 MW and wind plant sizes ranging from 100-1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the capital investment cost and the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrate the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US wind plants.

Mone, C.; Maples, B.; Hand, M.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Redox Flow Battery (RFB) with Low-cost Electrolyte and Membrane Technologies - Thomas Kodenkandath, ITN Energy Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovative, high energy density Mn-V based RFB electrolytes as a Innovative, high energy density Mn-V based RFB electrolytes as a low-cost alternate to all-Vanadium systems * Low-cost membrane technology, based on renewable biopolymer Chitosan with improved proton conduction & chemical stability, adaptable to Mn-V system * Scale-up of electrolyte and membrane technologies in pursuit of ARPA-E's goal for a 2.5kW/10kWh RFB stack with integrated BoS at a total cost of ~$1000/unit and ~1.2 m 3 footprint ITN Energy Systems, Inc., Littleton, CO 2.5kW/10kWh Redox Flow Battery (RFB) with Low-cost Electrolyte and Membrane Technologies $2.1 M, 33-month program awarded by ARPA-E Sept 7, 2012 Dr. Thomas Kodenkandath High-Performance, Low-cost RFB through Electrolyte & Membrane Innovations Technology Summary

198

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas Justin A. Hogan,1 sequestration sites for possible leaks of the CO2 gas from underground reservoirs, a low-cost multispectral are then flagged for closer inspection with in-situ CO2 sensors. The system is entirely self

Shaw, Joseph A.

199

A TEST OF EARTHQUAKE EARLY WARNING SYSTEM USING LOW COST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail: drymwu@ntu.edu.tw 2 Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 70101 Tainan, Taiwan Abstract The earthquake early warning (EEW) research group at the National Taiwan University (NTU) and one is available, a cost-effective seismic network dedicated to EEW or rapid re- porting is highly favored

Wu, Yih-Min

200

The Potential for Low-Cost Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concern over the possibility of global climate change as a result of anthropogenic greenhouse gas buildup in the atmosphere is resulting in increased interest in renewable energy technologies. The World Bank recently sponsored a study to determine whether solar thermal power plants can achieve cost parity with conventional power plants. The paper reviews the conclusions of that study.

Price, H. W. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Carpenter, S. (Enermodal Engineering Limited)

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The impacts of duct design on life cycle costs of central residential heating and air-conditioning systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many central residential HVAC systems in the U.S. operate at high external static pressures due to a combination of system restrictions. Undersized and constricted ductwork are thought to be key culprits that lead to excess external static pressures in many systems, although the magnitude of energy impacts associated with restrictive ductwork and the costs or benefits associated with addressing the problem are not well known. Therefore, this work uses annual energy simulations of two typical new single-family homes in two separate climates in the United States (Austin, TX and Chicago, IL) to predict the impacts of various external static pressure ductwork designs from independent HVAC contractors (using both flexible and rigid sheet metal ductwork materials) on annual space conditioning energy use. Results from the simulations are combined with estimates of the initial installation costs of each duct design made by each contractor to evaluate the total life cycle costs or savings of using lower pressure duct designs in the two homes over a 15-year life cycle. Lower pressure ductwork systems generally yielded life cycle cost savings, particularly in homes with PSC blowers and particularly when making comparisons with constant ductwork materials (i.e., comparing flex only or rigid only).

Brent Stephens

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Total supply chain cost model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sourcing and outsourcing decisions have taken on increased importance within Teradyne to improve efficiency and competitiveness. This project delivered a conceptual framework and a software tool to analyze supply chain ...

Wu, Claudia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Total Quality Commissioning for HVAC Systems to Assure High Performance Throughout the Whole Life Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL QUALITY COMMISSIONING FOR HVAC SYSTEMS TO ASSURE HIGH PERFORMANCE THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE LIFE CYCLE By: Grahame E. Maisey, P.E., and Beverly Milestone, LEED AP Building Services Consultants INTRODUCTION Current HVAC systems... are not coming close to approaching life cycle performance expectations for energy, operation and maintenance, occupant comfort and productivity and longevity. HVAC systems in buildings claiming to be sustainable, with integrated, energy conscious design...

Maisey, G.; Milestone, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

System Cost Analysis for an Interior Permanent Magnet Motor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to provide an assessment of the cost structure for an interior permanent magnet ('IPM') motor which is designed to meet the 2010 FreedomCAR specification. The program is to evaluate the range of viable permanent magnet materials for an IPM motor, including sintered and bonded grades of rare earth magnets. The study considers the benefits of key processing steps, alternative magnet shapes and their assembly methods into the rotor (including magnetization), and any mechanical stress or temperature limits. The motor's costs are estimated for an annual production quantity of 200,000 units, and are broken out into such major components as magnetic raw materials, processing and manufacturing. But this is essentially a feasibility study of the motor's electromagnetic design, and is not intended to include mechanical or thermal studies as would be done to work up a selected design for production.

Peter Campbell

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Small Wind Guidebook/What Do Wind Systems Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

What Do Wind Systems Cost What Do Wind Systems Cost < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information What Do Wind Systems Cost?

206

Element One Reduces Cost of Hydrogen Leak Detection Systems ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Begins for "America's Next Top Energy Innovator" SiNode Systems - Advanced silicon graphene batteries. | Photo courtesy of Sinode Systems. Startup Success: Energy Department...

207

Coupled robot-flow injection analysis system for fully automated determination of total polyphenols in olive oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coupled robot-flow injection analysis system for fully automated determination of total polyphenols in olive oil ...

Jose A. Garcia-Mesa; M. Dolores Luque de Castro; Miguel Valcarcel

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Metrics for the cost of proprietary information exchange languages in intelligent systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The increasing number of intelligent software components is accompanied by an increasing number of proprietary information exchange languages between components. One of the challenges for the smart technology worker is to achieve intelligent system component ... Keywords: information, information exchange languages, information exchange standards, intelligent system components, intelligent systems, interoperability, interoperability cost metrics, interoperability costs, interoperability metrics, interoperability risk metrics, metrics, proprietary exchange languages, return on investment, standard languages, standards

John Horst; Nathan Hartman; George Wong

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Optimal Tariff Period Determination Cost of electricity generation is closely related to system demand. In general, the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Tariff Period Determination Cost of electricity generation is closely related to system setting is giving signal to customers the time variant cost of supplying electricity. Since the costs demand. In general, the generation cost is higher during system peak period, and vice versa. In Hong Kong

211

Optimization and life-cycle cost of health clinic PV system for a rural area in southern Iraq using HOMER software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the need for electricity of rural areas in southern Iraq and proposes a photovoltaic (PV) solar system to power a health clinic in that region. The total daily health clinic load is 31.6 kW h and detailed loads are listed. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) optimization computer model for distributed power, ''HOMER,'' is used to estimate the system size and its life-cycle cost. The analysis shows that the optimal system's initial cost, net present cost, and electricity cost is US$ 50,700, US$ 60,375, and US$ 0.238/kW h, respectively. These values for the PV system are compared with those of a generator alone used to supply the load. We found that the initial cost, net present cost of the generator system, and electricity cost are US$ 4500, US$ 352,303, and US$ 1.332/kW h, respectively. We conclude that using the PV system is justified on humanitarian, technical, and economic grounds. (author)

Al-Karaghouli, Ali; Kazmerski, L.L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) Tracking Systems: Costs & Verification Issues (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on REC tracking systems: how they are used in the voluntary REC market, a comparison of REC systems fees and information regarding how they treat environmental attributes.

Heeter, J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Complex Technical Systems Operation, Reliability, Availability, Safety and Cost Optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methods based on the results of the joint model linking a semi-Markov modeling of the system operation processes with a multistate approach to system reliability and safety and the linear programming are prop...

Krzysztof Ko?owrocki; Joanna Soszy?ska-Budny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Totally tubular: the mystery behind function and origin of the brain ventricular system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Totally tubular: the mystery behind function and origin of the brain ventricular system Laura Anne School, 240 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA, USA A unique feature of the vertebrate brain is the ventricular by neu- roepithelium. While CSF is critical for both adult brain function and embryonic brain development

Lowery, Laura Anne

215

November 2010, IDC Retail Insights #GRI224949 Checkout System Cost of Ownership: The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 2010, IDC Retail Insights #GRI224949 Checkout System Cost of Ownership: The Fundamental Parker November 2010 I D C R E T A I L I N S I G H T S O P I N I O N IDC Retail Insights published two checkout technologies to help retailers understand the differences among all the cost components involving

216

Forecasting the Costs of Automotive PEM Fuel Cell Systems: Using Bounded Manufacturing Progress Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel cell stacks (Savote (1998)) Estimating manufactunng costfuel cell stacks, $20/kWfor fuel processors, and $20/kWfor "balance of plant" auxlhary components These costCosts of Automotive PEM Fuel Cell Systems (PEM)fuel cell stack

Lipman, Timonthy E.; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement Cyber Security Standards New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement Cyber Security Standards Funded under the Department of Energy's National SCADA Test Bed Program, Sandia National Laboratories recently released a new software tool that will aid energy utility owners in mapping and visualizing their control system networks-a critical first step in meeting the North American Electric Reliability Corporation's Critical Infrastructure Protection (NERC CIP) standards. New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement Cyber Security Standards More Documents & Publications Advanced Network Toolkit for Assessments and Remote Mapping (ANTFARM)

218

Estimating SCR installation costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EUCG surveyed 72 separate US installations of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired units totalling 41 GW of capacity to identify the systems' major cost drivers. The results, summarized in this article, provide excellent first-order estimates and guidance for utilities considering installing the downstream emissions-control technology. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Marano, M.; Sharp, G. [American Electric Power (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Low Cost, High Impact Cable Condition Monitoring System Improves...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

and control. To address cable aging, the nuclear industry has been looking for a test system that can help with automated maintenance and condition monitoring of cables....

220

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record 12020: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Record Record Record #: 12020 Date: August 21, 2012 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2012 Update to: Record 11012 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 14, 2012 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2012 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $47/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: The DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program supports analysis projects that perform detailed analysis to estimate cost status of fuel cell systems, updated on an annual basis [1]. In fiscal year 2012, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) updated their 2011 cost analysis of an 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell system, based on 2012 technology and projected to a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive...

222

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Application: 2009 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application: 2009 Update This report is the third annual update of a...

223

Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation: September 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of sensitivity and Monte Carlo analyses on PEM fuel cell components and the overall system are presented including the most important cost factors and the effects of selected scenarios.

Carlson, E. J.; Kopf, P.; Sinha, J.; Sriramulu, S.; Yang, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Applied Materials Develops an Advanced Epitaxial Growth System to Bring Down LED Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With the help of DOE funding, Applied Materials has developed an advanced epitaxial growth system for gallium nitride (GaN) LED devices that decreases operating costs, increases internal quantum efficiency, and improves binning yields.

225

Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltaic Energy Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltaic Energy Systems, a report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

226

Case Studies of Energy Information Systems and Related Technology: Operational Practices, Costs, and Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs...

Motegi, N.; Piette, M. A.; Kinney, S.; Dewey, J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System Cost – 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about the cost of automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems.

228

Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems Karen Klonsky1 The USDA established the National Organic Program (NOP) to develop national standards for organically produced agricultural products and establish an organic certification program

Ferrara, Katherine W.

229

Energy-Environment-Cost Tradeoffs in Planning Energy Systems for an Urban Area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multi-objective optimization model in which three objectives, i.e., primary energy consumption, CO2 emission and cost are considered, has been developed for planning future energy systems in an urban area. The ...

Hideharu Sugihara; Kiichiro Tsuji

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Modeling of Performance, Cost, and Financing of Concentrating Solar, Photovoltaic, and Solar Heat Systems (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster, submitted for the CU Energy Initiative/NREL Symposium on October 3, 2006 in Boulder, Colorado, discusses the modeling, performance, cost, and financing of concentrating solar, photovoltaic, and solar heat systems.

Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christiansen, C.

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

231

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

233

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

234

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2007, 2010, and 2015, and is the first annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

235

Simplified thermoeconomic approach to cost allocation in acombined cycle cogeneration and district energy system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1997 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering SIMPLIFIED THERMOECONOMIC APPROACH TO COST ALLOCATION IN A COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION AND DISTRICT ENERGY SYSTEM A Thesis By JASON GRAHAM FLEMING... (Member) Jerald Caton (Head of Department) May 1997 lviajor Sui&ject: lviechanical Engineering ABSTRACT Simplified Thermoeconomic Approach to Cost Allocation in a Combined Cycle Cogeneration and District Energy System. (May 1997) Jason Graham...

Fleming, Jason Graham

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

237

The Thermodynamic and Cost Benefits of Floating Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The application of a floating cooling concept to evaporative heat rejection systems can have significant impact on improving plant performance. The floating cooling concept refers to the optimization of yearly plant output and energy consumption by taking...

Svoboda, K. J.; Klooster, H. J.; Johnnie, D. H., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Identifying the relative importance of energy and water costs in hydraulic transport systems through a combined physics- and cost-based indicator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Modern long distance ore pipeline systems are subject to strong costs, both from the economic and environmental standpoints. The task of assessing the relative importance of energy and water consumption without a detailed engineering analysis is often not obvious. In the present paper, the relative importance of water and energy unit costs is assessed by a novel dimensionless formulation accounting for the essential hydraulic and cost elements that conform the slurry transport. It is found that, for conditions resembling those of copper and iron concentrate pipelines, the ratio between energy and water costs has a wide range, depending on the particular transport conditions and unit cost scenarios. Although operating at similar volume fractions, results indicate that energy/water cost relations may differ between copper and iron concentrate pipelines and local conditions, thus suggesting the need to explicitly include energy and water cost in the design strategy.

Christian F. Ihle; Aldo Tamburrino; Santiago Montserrat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems

240

Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Water Heating Systems: Life-Cycle Analyses and Opportunities for Cost Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conference paper regarding research in potential cost-savings measures for cold-climate solar domestic water hearing systems.

Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.; Hillman, T.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study describes how Mid-South Metallurgical implemented several recommendations resulting from a plant-wide energy assessment from DOE's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at Tennessee Technological University. This included installing new furnace insulation, implementing an electrical demand system, installing energy efficient equipment on its natural gas furnace burner tubes, and upgrading its lighting. Through these upgrades, the commercial heat treating business cut its overall energy use by 22%, reduced its peak demand by 21%, and decreased its total energy costs by 18%.

242

Benchmarking Non-Hardware Balance-of-System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems Using a Bottom-Up Approach and Installer Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photovoltaic System Prices in the United States: Current Drivers and Costsoft” costs— for residential and commercial photovoltaic (of-System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems Using a

Ardani, Kristen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Amonix, Inc. Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic Polymer-Based PV For Building Integrated Commercial Applications,Flexable Integrated PV System,Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to

244

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Office Record Office Record Record #: 13012 Date: September 18, 2013 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 Update to: Record 12020 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: October 16, 2013 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2013 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $67/kW when manufactured at a volume of 100,000 units/year, and $55/kW at 500,000 units/year. Rationale: The DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Office supports projects that perform detailed analysis to estimate cost status of fuel cell systems, updated on an annual basis [1]. In fiscal year 2013, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) updated their 2012 cost analysis of an 80-kW

245

Fast Low-Cost Multiple Sensor Readout System  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low resolution data acquisition system is presented. The data acquisition system has a plurality of readout modules serially connected to a controller. Each readout module has a FPGA in communication with analog to digital (A/D) converters, which are connected to sensors. The A/D converter has eight bit or lower resolution. The FPGA detects when a command is addressed to it and commands the A/D converters to convert analog sensor data into digital data. The digital data is sent on a high speed serial communication bus to the controller. A graphical display is used in one embodiment to indicate if a sensor reading is outside of a predetermined range.

Carter-Lewis, David (Ames, IA); Krennich, Frank (Ames, IA); Le Bohec, Stephane (Ames, IA); Petry, Dirk (College Park, MD); Sleege, Gary (Marshalltown, IA)

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

246

Cost Analysis of a Concentrator Photovoltaic Hydrogen Production System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of efficient, renewable methods of producing hydrogen are essential for the success of the hydrogen economy. Since the feedstock for electrolysis is water, there are no harmful pollutants emitted during the use of the fuel. Furthermore, it has become evident that concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) systems have a number of unique attributes that could shortcut the development process, and increase the efficiency of hydrogen production to a point where economics will then drive the commercial development to mass scale.

Thompson, J. R.; McConnell, R. D.; Mosleh, M.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Total and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building HVAC Systems Using Model Predictive Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combination of the total energy consumption and the peakalso reduces the total energy consumption of the occupancyTotal and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building

Maasoumy, Mehdi; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Measurement of the total energy of an isolated system by an internal observer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the situation in which an observer internal to an isolated system wants to measure the total energy of the isolated system (this includes his own energy, that of the measuring device and clocks used, etc...). We show that he can do this in an arbitrarily short time, as measured by his own clock. This measurement is not subjected to a time-energy uncertainty relation. The properties of such measurements are discussed in detail with particular emphasis on the relation between the duration of the measurement as measured by internal clocks versus external clocks.

S. Massar; S. Popescu

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

249

Cost Study for Manufacturing of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems can be designed to produce electricity from fossil fuels at extremely high net efficiencies, approaching 70%. However, in order to penetrate commercial markets to an extent that significantly impacts world fuel consumption, their cost will need to be competitive with alternative generating systems, such as gas turbines. This report discusses a cost model developed at PNNL to estimate the manufacturing cost of SOFC power systems sized for ground-based distributed generation. The power system design was developed at PNNL in a study on the feasibility of using SOFC power systems on more electric aircraft to replace the main engine-mounted electrical generators [Whyatt and Chick, 2012]. We chose to study that design because the projected efficiency was high (70%) and the generating capacity was suitable for ground-based distributed generation (270 kW).

Weimar, Mark R.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Gotthold, David W.; Whyatt, Greg A.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

A comparative application of the Repository Integration Program (RIP) to Total System Performance Assessment, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year (FY) 1991 and FY 1992, Sandia National Laboratory and Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory were assigned the responsibility to generate initial Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) of the Yucca Mountain site. The analyses performed by these organizations (called TSPA-1991) are reported in Barnard et al(1992) and Eslinger et al. (1993). During this same time period, Golder Associates Inc. was assigned the task of generating a model capable of analyzing the total system performance of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The developed model, called Repository Integration Program (RIP), is documented in Kossik and Hachey (1993), Miller et al. (1993), and Golder Associates Inc. (1993). In FY 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of TSPA-2. Prior to initiating the next TSPA iteration, it was decided that it would be valuable to evaluate the applicability of RIP for use in this iteration. Therefore, analyses were conducted to compare the results generated by RIP to those reported in TSPA-1991. In particular, the aim was to generate a RIP input data set as equivalent as possible to that documented in Barnard et al. (1992) and to analyze the total system performance (as well as the performance of the individual subsystem components of the waste package/Engineered Barrier System (EBS), unsaturated gaseous flow and transport, unsaturated aqueous flow and transport, saturated flow and transport, and disruptive processes/events). The performance measure for comparison with the results of TSPA-1991 is the cumulative release of radionuclides to the accessible environment over a 10,000-year period following closure normalized to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) release limits specified in 40 CFR 191.

NONE

1993-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

251

Total Measurement Uncertainty for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Segmented Gamma Scan Assay System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) for the Canberra manufactured Segmented Gamma Scanner Assay System (SGSAS) as employed at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In this document, TMU embodies the combined uncertainties due to all of the individual random and systematic sources of measurement uncertainty. It includes uncertainties arising from corrections and factors applied to the analysis of transuranic waste to compensate for inhomogeneities and interferences from the waste matrix and radioactive components. These include uncertainty components for any assumptions contained in the calibration of the system or computation of the data. Uncertainties are propagated at 1 sigma. The final total measurement uncertainty value is reported at the 95% confidence level. The SGSAS is a gamma assay system that is used to assay plutonium and uranium waste. The SGSAS system can be used in a stand-alone mode to perform the NDA characterization of a container, particularly for low to medium density (0-2.5 g/cc) container matrices. The SGSAS system provides a full gamma characterization of the container content. This document is an edited version of the Rocky Flats TMU Report for the Can Scan Segment Gamma Scanners, which are in use for the plutonium residues projects at the Rocky Flats plant. The can scan segmented gamma scanners at Rocky Flats are the same design as the PFP SGSAS system and use the same software (with the exception of the plutonium isotopics software). Therefore, all performance characteristics are expected to be similar. Modifications in this document reflect minor differences in the system configuration, container packaging, calibration technique, etc. These results are supported by the Quality Assurance Objective (QAO) counts, safeguards test data, calibration data, etc. for the PFP SGSAS system. Other parts of the TMU analysis utilize various modeling techniques such as Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) and In Situ Object Counting Software (ISOCS).

WESTSIK, G.A.

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

252

Adult Football Helmet Ratings A total of 10 adult football helmet models were evaluated using the STAR evaluation system for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adult Football Helmet Ratings May 2011 A total of 10 adult football helmet models were evaluated in this group #12;NR: Not Recommended Adams A2000 Pro Elite STAR Value: 1.700 Cost: $199.95 Adult Football Helmet Ratings May 2011 Note: Any player in any sport can sustain a head injury with even the very best

Lu, Chang

253

Coal-Fueled Diesel Technology Assessment Study: systems performance and cost comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the performance of diesel engines operating on coal-based fuels and compares their power generation costs with those of corresponding oil-burning prime movers. Similar performance and cost comparisons are also presented for an alternative prime mover, the direct-fired gas turbine in both a simple-cycle and a regenerative-cycle configuration. The coal-based fuels under consideration include micronized coal, coal slurries, and coal-derived gaseous fuels. The study focuses on medium-speed diesel engines for locomotive, marine, small stationary power, and industrial cogeneration applications in the 1000 to 10,000 kW size range. This report reviews the domestic industrial and transportation markets for medium-speed engines currently using oil or gas. The major problem areas involving the operation of these engines on coal-based fuels are summarized. The characteristics of available coal-based fuels are discussed and the costs of various fuels are compared. Based on performance data from the literature, as well as updated cost estimates originally developed for the Total Energy Technology Alternatives Studies program, power generation costs are determined for both oil-fueled and coal-fueled diesel engines. Similar calculations are also performed for direct-fired gas turbines. The calculations illustrate the sensitivity of the power generation cost to the associated fuel cost for these prime movers. The results also show the importance of reducing the cost of available coal-based fuels, in order to improve the economic competitiveness of coal-fueled prime movers relative to engines operating on oil or gas. 50 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

Holtz, R.E.; Krazinski, J.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Simplified, low?cost, efficient, acoustic levitation system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently I have improved apparatus for the acoustic levitation of a drop of one liquid in another making it practical to build for anyone who has an oscillaior and audio amplifier with response to 50 kHz a current probe an inexpensive oscilloscope and a lead zirconate titanate cylinder of the right size. This piezoelectric cylinder (1.5?in. o.d. and length 0.125?in. thickness) is epoxied near the center of a foot long piece of standard 30?mm o.d. pyrex tube. A hollow piston with o?ring seal and O. 005?in. diaphragm acts as an excellent bottom pressure?release reflector of acoustic energy as is the top air—liquid interface leading to strong acoustic standing waves at particular resonance frequencies. Optimum frequencies are determined by observing the input current to the transducer as the oscillator is tuned between 47 and 55 kHz and as liquid and piston levels are adjusted. Benzene droplets in water have been levitated with only a fraction of a watt input to the transducer. More details of this simple system will be described. [Work supported by U. S. Office of Naval Research and NSF Heat Transfer Program.

Robert E. Apfel

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen In this paper we present DrillEdge - a commercial and award winning software system that monitors oil that provides real-time deci- sion support when drilling oil wells. Decisions are supported through analyzing

Aamodt, Agnar

256

Evaluation of Cost Effective Sensor Combinations for a Vehicle Precrash Detection System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Cost Effective Sensor Combinations for a Vehicle Precrash Detection System John of vehicle safety will benefit greatly from precrash detection ­ the ability of a motor vehicle to predict for ongoing research in developing an integrated object detection and avoidance precrash sensing system

Birdsong, Charles

257

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle System Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system using ASPEN. ASPEN is a steady-state chemical process-flow Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system. This study aims at developing a base case analysis

Frey, H. Christopher

258

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is the sixth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis conducted by Strategic Analysis under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. This 2012 update will cover current status technology updates since the 2011 report, as well as introduce a 2012 bus system analysis considered alongside the automotive system.

259

Cost and performance analysis of concentrating solar power systems with integrated latent thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Integrating TES (thermal energy storage) in a CSP (concentrating solar power) plant allows for continuous operation even during times when solar irradiation is not available, thus providing a reliable output to the grid. In the present study, the cost and performance models of an EPCM-TES (encapsulated phase change material thermal energy storage) system and HP-TES (latent thermal storage system with embedded heat pipes) are integrated with a CSP power tower system model utilizing Rankine and s-CO2 (supercritical carbon-dioxide) power conversion cycles, to investigate the dynamic TES-integrated plant performance. The influence of design parameters of the storage system on the performance of a 200 MWe capacity power tower CSP plant is studied to establish design envelopes that satisfy the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative requirements, which include a round-trip annualized exergetic efficiency greater than 95%, storage cost less than $15/kWht and LCE (levelized cost of electricity) less than 6 ˘/kWh. From the design windows, optimum designs of the storage system based on minimum LCE, maximum exergetic efficiency, and maximum capacity factor are reported and compared with the results of two-tank molten salt storage system. Overall, the study presents the first effort to construct and analyze LTES (latent thermal energy storage) integrated CSP plant performance that can help assess the impact, cost and performance of LTES systems on power generation from molten salt power tower CSP plant.

K. Nithyanandam; R. Pitchumani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Abstract--In an open access power market, power tracing is a very important issue as it can help allocate the total cost of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it a desired method for transmission pricing. This work has been supported by the National Science increasing complexity and the associated computations costs. Index Terms--Electricity market, transmission pricing, Short Run Marginal Cost (SRMC). I. INTRODUCTION LECTRICITY MARKET design and operation have

Cañizares, Claudio A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A comprehensive power loss, efficiency, reliability and cost calculation of a 1 MW/500 kWh battery based energy storage system for frequency regulation application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Battery based energy storage system (ESS) has tremendous diversity of application with an intense focus on frequency regulation market. An ESS typically comprised of a battery and a power conversion system. A calculation of performance parameters is performed in this research. The aim is to formulate an in-depth analysis of the ESS in terms of power losses of the semiconductor and electrical devices, efficiency, reliability and cost which would foster various research groups and industries around the globe to improve their future product. In view of this, a relation between the operating conditions and power losses is established to evaluate the efficiency of the system. The power loss calculation presented in this paper has taken into account the conduction and switching losses of the semiconductor devices. Afterwards, the Arrhenius Life Stress relation is adopted to calculate the reliability of the system by considering temperature as a covariate. And finally, a cost calculation is executed and presented as a percentage of total cost of the ESS. It has been found that the power loss and efficiency of the ESS at rated power is 146 kW and 85% respectively. Furthermore, the mean time between failures of the ESS is 8 years and reliability remains at 73% after a year. The major cost impact observed is for battery and PCS as 58% and 16% respectively. Finally, it has been determined that further research is necessary for higher efficient and lower cost system for high penetration of energy storage system in the market.

Md Arifujjaman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Date: October 7, 2009 2 Date: October 7, 2009 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2009 Update to: Record 8019 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: October 7, 2009 Item: The cost of an 80-kW automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system operating on direct hydrogen and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year is $61/kW for 2009 technology in 2009 dollars ($51/kW in 2002 dollars for comparison with targets). Rationale: In fiscal year 2009, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2008 cost analyses of 80-kW direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2009 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2]. DTI and TIAX use Design for Manufacturing and Assembly

263

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Date: August 17, 2011 2 Date: August 17, 2011 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2011 Update to: Record 10004 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 7, 2011 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2011 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $49/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: In fiscal year 2011, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) 2 updated the 2010 Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) cost analysis of 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems, based on 2011 technology and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year [1]. Results from the analysis were communicated to the DOE

264

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 8002: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

02 Date: October 31, 2008 02 Date: October 31, 2008 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2007 Update to: Record 5005 Originator: Nancy Garland and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: April 3, 2009 Item: The cost of an 80-kW automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system operating on direct hydrogen and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year is $94/kW for 2007 technology in 2007 dollars ($82/kW in 2002 dollars for comparison with targets). Rationale: In fiscal year 2007, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2006 cost analyses of direct hydrogen, 80-kW, PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2007 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2].

265

Technical and cost analyses of two different heat storage systems for residential micro-CHP plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The heat storage system represents a key component for micro-cogeneration plants since it permits to store the unused thermal energy during electricity production for a later use. Nevertheless, it also represents a consistent additional cost that has to be taken into account in order to evaluate the profitability of the micro-CHP system with respect to the separate generation. In this paper the results of a technical and of a cost analysis of two different types of thermal energy storage systems for residential micro-CHP plants are presented. Indeed, in the present work hot water thermal energy storage systems and latent heat thermal energy storage systems have been dimensioned for different micro-CHP systems producing electrical and thermal energy for two different buildings situated in Italy. For each analysed micro-CHP system an adequate thermal energy storage capacity is estimated on the basis of the operational logic and of the electric and thermal loads, and the sizing of the cylindrical tank and of the coil heat exchanger relative to both types of thermal energy storage systems is performed. Comparisons in terms of components cost between hot water thermal energy storage systems and latent heat thermal energy storage systems are performed as well.

L. Mongibello; M. Capezzuto; G. Graditi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

COST EFFECTIVE SIMULATION OF THE HYBRID SOLAR/WIND AND DIESEL ENERGY SYSTEM IN RURAL AREA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the optimization of a hybrid energy system model. Currently in Sarawak people living in the rural areas still depend on diesel generators to generate electricity. This increases the demand for fossil fuel creates noise pollution and toxic gas is emitted to the environment. Hence hybrid energy systems were introduced to replace this conventional energy system as well as improving the living standard in the villages. In this paper several hybrid energy system configurations were investigated in order to find out the most cost effective hybrid system through Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewability (Homer) software. Homer simulates optimizes and analyzes the sensitivity variables for each of the system configurations.

Ee. Y. Sim; Nader Barsoum

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Jeff Tappen; M.A. Wasiolek; D.W. Wu; J.F. Schmitt

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Tappen, J. J.; Wasiolek, M. A.; Wu, D. W.; Schmitt, J. F.; Smith, A. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

269

Structure, energy and cost efficiency evaluation of three different lightweight construction systems used in low-rise residential buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article presents the analysis of the structure, energy and cost efficiency of three lightweight structural systems – wood light frames (WLF), lightweight steel frames (LGSF) and 3D sandwich (3DSP) panels – during their useful life. The structural systems focussed upon in this study are commonly used in Eastern Europe with specific reference to Turkey. The structural analysis and design was carried out using ETABS while EnergyPlus was used in the analysis of the energy consumption of the buildings. The results of the structural analysis of the three alternative construction systems show that 3DSP has better structural behaviour in terms of resistance against lateral loads. The thermal performance evaluation of the walls and ceilings shows that the WLF and LGSF walls have better insulation values (12.5% lower U-value) while the roof construction of the 3DSP has much better insulation performance (70% lower U-value). Moreover, the building designed with 3DSP requires 11% less energy for total heating and cooling during one year. The information for the building industry in Turkey shows that the cost of construction for 3DSP construction is 34.6% lower than for WLF and 27.7% lower than LGSF.

Sareh Naji; O?uz Cem Çelik; U. Johnson Alengaram; Mohd Zamin Jumaat; Shahaboddin Shamshirband

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

"We have 7 cogen systems and are very pleased with the cost savings."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems at Sanger High School. With funding from a utility rebate and an Energy Commission low interest,760,000 kWh Annual Energy Cost Savings: $62,048 Loan Amount: $232,400 after PG&E rebate Simple Payback: 3

271

A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the New Orleans Flood Protection System Stphane Hallegatte1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such a hurricane protection a rational investment, even if countervailing risks and moral hazard issues1 A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the New Orleans Flood Protection System Stéphane Hallegatte1 Center for Environmental Sciences and Policy, Stanford University, and Centre International de Recherche sur l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

272

Reducing the Energy Penalty Costs of Postcombustion CCS Systems with Amine-Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Widespread CCS will happen only in a CO2-constrained electricity system, where electricity prices will be affected by a number of possible changes including further development of demand response, increased demand for electric vehicles, higher penetration of renewable sources, the retirement of older generation capacity, and increased operating costs of fossil-fired generators. ...

Dalia Patińo-Echeverri; David C. Hoppock

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller...

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Project Profile: Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, is collaborating with Curtin University (CU) to evaluate new metal hydride materials for thermal energy storage (TES) that meet the SunShot cost and performance targets for TES systems.

275

NLG Systems Evaluation: a framework to measure impact on and cost for all stakeholders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Nathalie Colineau a Ross Wilkinson b CSIRO ­ ICT Centre a Building E6B Macquarie University Campus, North 2601, Australia {cecile.paris, nathalie.colineau, ross.wilkinson}@csiro.au 1 Enlarging the view framework that allows for all the stakeholders, capturing who benefits from the system and at what cost. 2

Paris, CĂ©cile

276

Levelized Electricity Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of levelized energy costs responds to the necessity of disclosing the ... in order to recover the total life cycle cost of energy production. This chapter charts the effectiveness of levelized cost fo...

Nuno Luis Madureira

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Minimum Cost Operation Mode and Minimum Loss Operation Mode of Power System – Operation Mode Selection Based on Voltage Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two formulae – an optimal P-Q generation formula for minimum system cost and an optimal MW allocation formula for minimum system loss – are described in this paper. The author defines two kinds of power system operation

Sang-Joong Lee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and grid owners. Energy (and cost) savings might be found inSystem to Offset Peak Energy Cost at a Wastewater TreatmentSavings Estimation (GWh) Energy Costs Current Other Total

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Time-cost analysis of a quantum key distribution system clocked at 100 MHz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the realization of a quantum key distribution (QKD) system clocked at 100 MHz. The system includes classical postprocessing implemented via software, and is operated over a 12 km standard telecommunication dark fiber in a real-world environment. A time-cost analysis of the sifted, error-corrected, and secret key rates relative to the raw key rate is presented, and the scalability of our implementation with respect to higher secret key rates is discussed.

Xiaofan Mo; Itzel Lucio Martinez; Philip Chan; Chris Healey; Steve Hosier; Wolfgang Tittel

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Marginal Cost of Steam and Power from Cogeneration Systems Using a Rational Value-Allocation Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Gwaiz, BS EE Energy Conservation Engineer Saudi Aramco, Ras Tanura, Saudi Arabia majid.gwaiz@aramco.com ABSTRACT The problem of pricing steam and power from cogeneration systems has confounded engineers, economists, and accountants for a very... MARGINAL COST OF STEAM AND POWER FROM COGENERATION SYSTEMS USING A RATIONAL VALUE-ALLOCATION PROCEDURE Jimmy D Kumana, MS ChE Energy Conservation Specialist Saudi Aramco, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia jimmy.kumana@aramco.com Majid M Al...

Kumana, J. D.; Al-Gwaiz, M. M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fermilab Central Computing Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is developed as part of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update under the provisions of DOE Document 6430.1, Chapter XIII-21, Section 14, paragraph a. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis and should be considered as a supplement to the Title I Design Report date March 1986 wherein energy related issues are discussed pertaining to building envelope and orientation as well as electrical systems design.

Krstulovich, S.F.

1986-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

A system-level cost-of-energy wind farm layout optimization with landowner modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work applies an enhanced levelized wind farm cost model, including landowner remittance fees, to determine optimal turbine placements under three landowner participation scenarios and two land-plot shapes. Instead of assuming a continuous piece of land is available for the wind farm construction, as in most layout optimizations, the problem formulation represents landowner participation scenarios as a binary string variable, along with the number of turbines. The cost parameters and model are a combination of models from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Windustiy. The system-level cost-of-energy (COE) optimization model is also tested under two land-plot shapes: equally-sized square land plots and unequal rectangle land plots. The optimal COEs results are compared to actual COE data and found to be realistic. The results show that landowner remittances account for approximately 10% of farm operating costs across all cases. Irregular land-plot shapes are easily handled by the model. We find that larger land plots do not necessarily receive higher remittance fees. The model can help site developers identify the most crucial land plots for project success and the optimal positions of turbines, with realistic estimates of costs and profitability. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Chen, Le [Ames Laboratory; MacDonald, Erin [Ames Laboratory

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen-from- Hydrogen-from- Ethanol: A Distributed Production System Presented at the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Meeting Laurel, Maryland Tuesday, November 6, 2007 H 2 Gen Innovations, Inc. Alexandria, Virginia www.h2gen.com 2 Topics * H 2 Gen Reformer System Innovation * Natural Gas Reformer - Key performance metrics - Summary unique H2A inputs * Ethanol Reformer - Key performance metrics - Summary unique H2A inputs * Questions from 2007 Merit Review 3 H 2 Gen Innovations' Commercial SMR * Compact, low-cost 115 kg/day natural gas reformer proven in commercial practice [13 US Patents granted] * Built-in, unique, low-cost PSA system * Unique sulfur-tolerant catalyst developed with SĂĽd Chemie 4 DOE Program Results * Task 1- Natural Gas Reformer Scaling:

285

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interviews, and gathering energy and cost data. Similarly,of an EIS? Quantifying the energy and cost-savings benefitssystems enable building energy and cost savings in three

Granderson, Jessica

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Performance and cost of automotive fuel cell systems with ultra-low platinum loadings.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automotive polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system with ultra-low platinum loading (0.15 mg-Pt cm{sup -2}) has been analyzed to determine the relationship between its design-point efficiency and the system efficiency at part loads, efficiency over drive cycles, stack and system costs, and heat rejection. The membrane electrode assemblies in the reference PEFC stack use nanostructured, thin-film ternary catalysts supported on organic whiskers and a modified perfluorosulfonic acid membrane. The analyses show that the stack Pt content can be reduced by 50% and the projected high-volume manufacturing cost by >45% for the stack and by 25% for the system, if the design-point system efficiency is lowered from 50% to 40%. The resulting penalties in performance are a <1% reduction in the system peak efficiency; a 2-4% decrease in the system efficiency on the urban, highway, and LA92 drive cycles; and a 6.3% decrease in the fuel economy of the modeled hybrid fuel-cell vehicle on the combined cycle used by EPA for emission and fuel economy certification. The stack heat load, however, increases by 50% at full power (80 kW{sub e}) but by only 23% at the continuous power (61.5 kW{sub e}) needed to propel the vehicle on a 6.5% grade at 55 mph. The reduced platinum and system cost advantages of further lowering the design-point efficiency from 40% to 35% are marginal. The analyses indicate that thermal management in the lower efficiency systems is very challenging and that the radiator becomes bulky if the stack temperature cannot be allowed to increase to 90-95 C under driving conditions where heat rejection is difficult.

Ahluwalia, R.; Wang, X.; Kwon, K.; Rousseau, A.; Kalinoski, J.; James, B.; Marcinkoski, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE); (Directed Technologies Inc.); (ED)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation: September 30, 2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Subcontract Report Subcontract Report Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell NREL/SR-560-39104 Systems for Transportation December 2005 September 30, 2005 E.J. Carlson, P. Kopf, J. Sinha, S. Sriramulu, and Y. Yang TIAX LLC Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute â—Ź Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation September 30, 2005 E.J. Carlson, P. Kopf, J. Sinha, S. Sriramulu, and Y. Yang TIAX LLC Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL Technical Monitor: K. Wipke Prepared under Subcontract No. KACX-5-44452-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-560-39104 December 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy

288

Interim Report: Coiled Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using Cost Effective Vessel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOCUMENT TITLE: DOCUMENT TITLE: Self Supporting Riser Technology to Enable Coiled Tubing Intervention for Deepwater Wells Document No.: 08121-1502-12 RPSEA PROJECT TITLE: Coil Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using a Cost Effective Vessel RPSEA Project No.: 08121-1502 01 April 2011 Charles R. Yemington, PE Project Manager Nautilus International 400 North Sam Houston Parkway East, Suite 105 Houston, Texas 77060 RPSEA Project No.: 08121-1502 Coiled Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using a Cost Effective Vessel RPSEA Project 08121-1502 01 April 2011 Page 2 of 91 LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Nautilus International, LLC. as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA). RPSEA members, the

289

Reducing Building Energy Costs Using Optimized Operation Strategies for Constant Volume Air Handling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SDCVP 67.380 $153.200 $41.800 $195.000 $2.89 measured energy consumption for each building. The horizontal axis is the ambient temperature. The venical axis is the average daily energy consumption in MMBtulhr. Figure 5 compares the predicted...REDUCING BUILDING ENERGY COSTS USING OPTIMIZED OPERATION STRATEGIES FOR CONSTANT VOLUME AIR HANDLING SYSTEMS Mingsheng Liu, her Atha, Agarni Reddy Ed White David Claridge and Jeff Haberl Department of Physical Plant Texas A&M University...

Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; White, E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A proposed cost-benefit analysis model for physical form analysis for a futuristic submarine decision support system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes a model for cost-benefit analysis for physical form selection of a decision support tool, primarily to support system acquisition decisions that need to be made early in the system life cycle. By ...

Bhattacharjee, Dhiman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Cost structure of a postcombustion CO{sub 2} capture system using CaO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the basic economics of an emerging concept for CO{sub 2} capture from flue gases in power plants. The complete system includes three key cost components: a full combustion power plant, a second power plant working as an oxy-fired fluidized bed calciner, and a fluidized bed carbonator interconnected with the calciner and capturing CO{sub 2} from the combustion power plant. The simplicity in the economic analysis is possible because the key cost data for the two major first components are well established in the open literature. It is shown that there is clear scope for a breakthrough in capture cost to around 15 $/t of CO{sub 2} avoided with this system. This is mainly because the capture system is generating additional power (from the additional coal fed to the calciner) and because the avoided CO{sub 2} comes from the capture of the CO{sub 2} generated by the coal fed to the calciner and the CO{sub 2} captured (as CaCO{sub 3}) from the flue gases of the existing power plant, that is also released in the calciner. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

J. Carlos Abanades; G. Grasa; M. Alonso; N. Rodriguez; E.J. Anthony; L.M. Romeo [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, (CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Low-Cost Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems for Mild Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In FY99, Solar Heating and Lighting set the goal to reduce the life-cycle cost of saved-energy for solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems in mild climates by 50%, primarily through use of polymer technology. Two industry teams (Davis Energy Group/SunEarth (DEG/SE) and FAFCO) have been developing un-pressurized integral-collector-storage (ICS) systems having load-side heat exchangers, and began field-testing in FY04. DEG/SE?s ICS has a rotomolded tank and thermoformed glazing. Based upon manufacturing issues, costs, and poor performance, the FAFCO team changed direction in late FY04 from an un-pressurized ICS to a direct thermosiphon design based upon use of pool collectors. Support for the teams is being provided for materials testing, modeling, and system testing. New ICS system models have been produced to model the new systems. A new ICS rating procedure for the ICS systems is undergoing testing and validation. Pipe freezing, freeze protection valves, and overheating have been tested and analyzed.

Burch, J.; Christensen, C.; Merrigan, T.; Hewett, R.; Jorgensen, G.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Potential impacts of artificial intelligence expert systems on geothermal well drilling costs:  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geothermal research Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has as one of its goals to reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells by 25 percent. To attain this goal, DOE continuously evaluates new technologies to determine their potential in contributing to the Program. One such technology is artifical intelligence (AI), a branch of computer science that, in recent years, has begun to impact the marketplace in a number of fields. Expert systems techniques can (and in some cases, already have) been applied to develop computer-based ''advisors'' to assist drilling personnel in areas such as designing mud systems, casing plans, and cement programs, optimizing drill bit selection and bottom hole asssembly (BHA) design, and alleviating lost circulation, stuck pipe, fishing, and cement problems. Intelligent machines with sensor and/or robotic directly linked to AI systems, have potential applications in areas of bit control, rig hydraulics, pipe handling, and pipe inspection. Using a well costing spreadsheet, the potential savings that could be attributed to each of these systems was calculated for three base cases: a dry steam well at The Geysers, a medium-depth Imerial Valley well, and a deep Imperial Valley well. Based on the average potential savings to be realized, expert systems for handling lost circulations problems and for BHA design are the most likely to produce significant results. Automated bit control and rig hydraulics also exhibit high potential savings, but these savings are extremely sensitive to the assumptions of improved drilling efficiency and the cost of these sytems at the rig. 50 refs., 19 figs., 17 tabs.

Satrape, J.V.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

294

Levelized costs of electricity and direct-use heat from Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GEOPHIRES (GEOthermal energy for the Production of Heat and Electricity (“IR”) Economically Simulated) is a software tool that combines reservoir wellbore and power plant models with capital and operating cost correlations and financial levelized cost models to assess the technical and economic performance of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). It is an upgrade and expansion of the “MIT-EGS” program used in the 2006 “Future of Geothermal Energy” study. GEOPHIRES includes updated cost correlations for well drilling and completion resource exploration and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) and flash power plants. It also has new power plant efficiency correlations based on AspenPlus and MATLAB simulations. The structure of GEOPHIRES enables feasibility studies of using geothermal resources not only for electricity generation but also for direct-use heating and combined heat and power (CHP) applications. Full documentation on GEOPHIRES is provided in the supplementary material. Using GEOPHIRES the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) and the levelized cost of heat (LCOH) have been estimated for 3 cases of resource grade (low- medium- and high-grade resource corresponding to a geothermal gradient of 30 50 and 70?°C/km) in combination with 3 levels of technological maturity (today's mid-term and commercially mature technology corresponding to a productivity of 30 50 and 70?kg/s per production well and thermal drawdown rate of 2% 1.5% and 1%). The results for the LCOE range from 4.6 to 57 ˘/kWhe and for the LCOH from 3.5 to 14 $/MMBTU (1.2 to 4.8 ˘/kWhth). The results for the base-case scenario (medium-grade resource and mid-term technology) are 11 ˘/kWhe and 5 $/MMBTU (1.7 ˘/kWhth) respectively. To account for parameter uncertainty a sensitivity analysis has been included. The results for the LCOE and LCOH have been compared with values found in literature for EGS as well as other energy technologies. The key findings suggest that given today's technology maturity electricity and direct-use heat from EGS are not economically competitive under current market conditions with other energy technologies. However with moderate technological improvements electricity from EGS is predicted to become cost-effective with respect to other renewable and non-renewable energy sources for medium- and high-grade geothermal resources. Direct-use heat from EGS is calculated to become cost-effective even for low-grade resources. This emphasizes that EGS for direct-use heat may not be neglected in future EGS development.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Cost effective designs for integrating new electronic turbine control systems into existing steam power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different cost-effective approaches have been developed for integrating new digital turbine control systems into existing power plants. The devices under consideration range from self contained actuators which replace the existing hydraulic and mechanical servomotor components, linear proportional actuators, which mechanically drive the original servomotor pilot relays, to electro-hydraulic converters which provide a control pressure to the existing hydraulic servomotor pilot relays. These devices significantly reduce the implementation cost, while still providing most of the benefits that can be gained through greater utilization of the new electronic control capabilities. These three design approaches are analyzed for control performance, failure modes, long-term maintenance issues, and applicability to specific turbine configurations.

Nguyen, T.V. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Economizer system cost effectiveness: Accounting for the influence of ventilation rate on sick leave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimated the health, energy, and economic benefits of an economizer ventilation control system that increases outside air supply during mild weather to save energy. A model of the influence of ventilation rate on airborne transmission of respiratory illnesses was used to extend the limited data relating ventilation rate with illness and sick leave. An energy simulation model calculated ventilation rates and energy use versus time for an office building in Washington, DC with fixed minimum outdoor air supply rates, with and without an economizer. Sick leave rates were estimated with the disease transmission model. In the modeled 72-person office building, our analyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs by approximately $2000 and, in addition, reduces sick leave. The financial benefit of the decrease in sick leave is estimated to be between $6,000 and $16,000. This modelling suggests that economizers are much more cost effective than currently recognized.

Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Parametric study of the total system life cycle cost of an alternate nuclear waste management strategy using deep boreholes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Department of Energy recently submitted a license application for the Yucca Mountain repository to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, yet even the most optimistic timetable projects that the repository will not now ...

Moulton, Taylor Allen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon futures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low energy Carbon emissions a b s t r a c t Decarbonizing electricity production is central to reducing of resource cost scenarios, most coal power plants would be replaced by solar, wind, gas, and/or nuclear

Kammen, Daniel M.

300

Monitoring System Used to Optimize Compressed Air System Efficiency, Cut Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1994, Thomson Consumer Electronics (RCA), an international manufacturer of electronics equipment purchased a UtillTRACK® Monitoring System for a plant in Indianapolis, Indiana. The system monitored gas and electric meters, substations, main...

Holmes, W. A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and natural gas energy savings: Electrical energy savings (gas energy cost savings: Electrical energy cost savings ($/sf) = Electrical energy savings (kBtu/sf) × National

Granderson, Jessica

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy information systems are the web-based software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems used to store, analyze, and display building energy data. They often include analysis methods such as baselining, benchmarking, load profiling, and energy anomaly detection. This report documents a large-scale assessment of energy information system (EIS) uses, costs, and energy benefits, based on a series of focused case study investigations that are synthesized into generalizable findings. The overall objective is to provide organizational decision makers with the information they need to make informed choices as to whether or not to invest in an EIS--a promising technology that can enable up to 20 percent site energy savings, quick payback, and persistent low-energy performance when implemented as part of best-practice energy management programs.

Granderson, Jessica; Lin, Guanjing; Piette, Mary Ann

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

303

Energy, cost, and CO 2 emission comparison between radiant wall panel systems and radiator systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of this paper is to evaluate the possibility of application or replacement of radiators with low-temperature radiant panels. This paper shows the comparison results of operations of 4 space heating systems: the low-temperature radiant panel system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WOI), the low-temperature radiant panel system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WI), the radiator system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (the classical heating system) (RH-WOI), and the radiator system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (RH-WI). The operation of each system is simulated by software EnergyPlus. The investigation shows that the PH-WI gives the best results. The RH-WOI has the largest energy consumption, and the largest pollutant emission. However, the PH-WI requires the highest investment.

Milorad Boji?; Dragan Cvetkovi?; Marko Mileti?; Jovan Maleševi?; Harry Boyer

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Energy, cost, and CO 2 emission comparison between radiant wall panel systems and radiator systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of this paper is to evaluate the possibility of application or replacement of radiators with low-temperature radiant panels. This paper shows the comparison results of operations of 4 space heating systems: the low-temperature radiant panel system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WOI), the low-temperature radiant panel system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WI), the radiator system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (the classical heating system) (RH-WOI), and the radiator system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (RH-WI). The operation of each system is simulated by software EnergyPlus. The investigation shows that the PH-WI gives the best results. The RH-WOI has the largest energy consumption, and the largest pollutant emission. However, the PH-WI requires the highest investment.

Boji?, Milorad; Mileti?, Marko; Maleševi?, Jovan; Boyer, Harry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A simple and low-cost measurement system for switched reluctance motor drive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a low cost digital measurement system for measuring the voltage, current and flux linkage and rotor position of switched reluctance motor (SRM) drive. The digital measurement scheme was developed using a eZdsp TMS320F2812 board along with CCS-IDE environment. The graphical window allows plotting the current, voltage, flux linkage and rotor position waveforms of SRM with a high degree of accuracy and presentation of results. The complete digital measurement scheme of the SRM incorporating the magnetic characteristics implementation algorithm is experimentally implemented and validated using a digital signal processor board TMS320F2812 for SRM drive.

M. Marsaline Beno; N.S. Marimuthu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Large two-dimensional electronic systems: Self-consistent energies and densities at low cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We derive a self-consistent local variant of the Thomas-Fermi approximation for (quasi-) two-dimensional (2D) systems by localizing the Hartree term. The scheme results in an explicit orbital-free representation of the electron density and energy in terms of the external potential, the number of electrons, and the chemical potential determined upon normalization. We test the method over a variety 2D nanostructures by comparing to the Kohn-Sham 2D local-density approximation (LDA) calculations up to 600 electrons. Accurate results are obtained in view of the negligible computational cost. We also assess a local upper bound for the Hartree energy.

E. Räsänen; S. Pittalis; G. Bekçio?lu; I. Makkonen

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Constructed Costs of a Net-Zero Office Building Facility: Research Support Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado Operational: August 2010 Constructed cost: $259/ft2 to achieve 50% less energy use than code Constructed cost of similar office buildings in area: $225 to $300/ft2 Reaching Net-Zero: A 1.27 MW photovoltaic system was added to the project in two phases to bring the system to net-zero. This system was financed through a power purchase agreement and did not add to the constructed cost of the building. If those costs were included in the capital costs, the total constructed cost would have been 291/ft2 to reach net-zero energy use. Learn more about the Research Support

308

Cost viability of a base isolation system for the seismic protection of a steel high-rack structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study the effects and costs of implementing a base isolation system for the mitigation of the seismic risk of an existing externally-braced steel frame rack structure are analysed by means of nonlinear...

Vojko Kilar; Simon Petrov?i?; David Koren…

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Cost and Area Comparison Per Student of the Public Elementary Schools in Texas based on the Project Delivery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been shown that there exists a correlation between the cost of construction of elementary schools and the project delivery systems. Previous research showed that Competitive Sealed proposal contract method of construction is $4000 cheaper...

Goyal Rakesh, Sheetal

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

310

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems – Projected Performance and Cost Parameters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This program record from the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program provides information about the projected performance and cost parameters of on-board hydrogen storage systems.

311

Grazing Strategies for Beef Production Escalating energy costs and alternative cropping systems for biofuels production have  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for biofuels production have dramatically increased costs of fertilizer, seed, and feed grains. These increased

312

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

information NREL has developed the following cost of energy tools: System Advisor Model (SAM): https:sam.nrel.gov SAM makes performance predictions and cost of...

313

Impact of Generator Flexibility on Electric System Costs and Integration of Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flexibility of traditional generators plays an important role in accommodating the increased variability and uncertainty of wind and solar on the electric power system. Increased flexibility can be achieved with changes to operational practices or upgrades to existing generation. One challenge is in understanding the value of increasing flexibility, and how this value may change given higher levels of variable generation. This study uses a commercial production cost model to measure the impact of generator flexibility on the integration of wind and solar generators. We use a system that is based on two balancing areas in the Western United States with a range of wind and solar penetrations between 15% and 60%, where instantaneous penetration of wind and solar is limited to 80%.

Palchak, D.; Denholm, P.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Objectivity or advocacy: probability theory and capital costing at the Bell System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the Bell Telephone System's blending of depreciation knowledge and probability theory in order to control debate before government regulators in the early 1900s. By combining statistics and accounting, Bell created a system for estimating capital cost expiration firmly grounded in mathematical science, developing methodologies which used averaging techniques to determine trends in asset life obscured by random fluctuations in actual retirements. Concurrently, complexity derived from the application of probability theory gave the telephone company significant advantages in regulatory debates. The advanced mathematics employed formed a knowledge barrier, inhibiting potential encroachments by regulators on corporate prerogatives. This study expands our understanding of the acquisition and use of knowledge within the firm by investigating advocacy's role in the development of depreciation accounting. As depreciation knowledge spread beyond Bell, regulators examined equity issues related to the firm's depreciation practices, resulting in some relatively minor changes to Bell's depreciation policies.

Deirdre M. Collier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The logger’s fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Steam System Assessment Tool (SSAT): Estimating Steam System Energy, Cost, and Emission Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Industrial Technology Program BestPractices Steam effort is developing a number of software tools to assist industrial energy users to improve the efficiency of their steam system. A major new Best...

Wright, A.; Bealing, C.; Eastwood, A.; Tainsh, R.; Hahn, G.; Harrell, G.

317

Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original goal of this Phase II Superconductivity Partnership Initiative project was to build and operate a prototype Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system using high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils wound from continuously processed dip-coated BSCCO 2212 tape conductor. Using dip-coated tape, the plan was for MRI magnet coils to be wound to fit an established commercial open geometry, 0.2 Tesla permanent magnet system. New electronics and imaging software for a prototype higher field superconducting system would have added significantly to the cost. However, the use of the 0.2 T platform would allow the technical feasibility and the cost issues for HTS systems to be fully established. Also it would establish the energy efficiency and savings of HTS open MRI compared with resistive and permanent magnet systems. The commercial goal was an open geometry HTS MRI running at 0.5 T and 20 K. This low field open magnet was using resistive normal metal conductor and its heat loss was rather high around 15 kolwatts. It was expected that an HTS magnet would dissipate around 1 watt, significantly reduce power consumption. The SPI team assembled to achieve this goal was led by Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology (OST), who developed the method of producing commercial dip coated tape. Superconductive Components Inc. (SCI), a leading US supplier of HTS powders, supported the conductor optimization through powder optimization, scaling, and cost reduction. Oxford Magnet Technology (OMT), a joint venture between Oxford Instruments and Siemens and the world’s leading supplier of MRI magnet systems, was involved to design and build the HTS MRI magnet and cryogenics. Siemens Magnetic Resonance Division, a leading developer and supplier of complete MRI imaging systems, was expected to integrate the final system and perform imaging trials. The original MRI demonstration project was ended in July 2004 by mutual consent of Oxford Instruments and Siemens. Between the project start and that date a substantial shift in the MRI marketplace occurred, with rapid growth for systems at higher fields (1.5 T and above) and a consequent decline in the low field market (<1.0 T). While the project aim appeared technically attainable at that time, the conclusion was reached that the system and market economics do not warrant additional investment. The program was redirected to develop BSCCO 2212 multifilament wire development for high field superconducting magnets for NMR and other scientific research upon an agreement between DOE and Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology. The work t took place between September, 2004 and the project end in early 2006 was focused on 2212 multifilamentary wire. This report summarizes the technical achievements both in 2212 dip coated for an HTS MRI system and in BSCCO 2212 multifilamentary wire for high field magnets.

Kennth Marken

2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

318

Cost-Effectiveness: Implication for Bonneville and Utility Programs Council document 2007-23 August 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cost-Effectiveness: Implication for Bonneville and Utility Programs Council document 2007 found to be cost effective if the electric system paid all the costs. Council plan conservation targets are based on availability of conservation that passes this Total Resource Cost (TRC) test. Since its first

319

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis After determining the best greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction strategies using renewable energy, a Federal agency should estimate the cost of implementing them in a building or buildings. There are several cost factors that need to be considered when developing a renewable energy project. Capital costs, fixed and variable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs and in the case of biomass and waste-to-energy projects, fuel costs all contribute to the total cost of operating a renewable energy system. The levelized system cost takes into account these

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

3-Port Single-Stage PV & Battery Converter Improves Efficiency and Cost in Combined PV/Battery Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to impressive cost reductions in recent years, photovoltaic (PV) generation is now able to produce electricity at highly competitive prices, but PV’s inherent intermittency reduces the potential value of this energy. The integration of battery storage with PV will be transformational by increasing the value of solar. Utility scale systems will benefit by firming intermittency including PV ramp smoothing, grid support and load shifting, allowing PV to compete directly with conventional generation. For distributed grid-tied PV adding storage will reduce peak demand utility charges, as well as providing backup power during power grid failures. The largest long term impact of combined PV and battery systems may be for delivering reliable off-grid power to the billions of individuals globally without access to conventional power grids, or for billions more that suffer from daily power outages. PV module costs no longer dominate installed PV system costs. Balance-of-System (BOS) costs including the PV inverter and installation now contribute the majority of installed system costs. Battery costs are also dropping faster than installation and battery power converter systems. In each of these separate systems power converters have become a bottleneck for efficiency, cost and reliability. These bottlenecks are compounded in hybrid power conversion systems that combine separate PV and battery converters. Hybrid power conversion systems have required multiple power converters hardware units and multiple power conversion steps adding to efficiency losses, product and installation costs, and reliability issues. Ideal Power Converters has developed and patented a completely new theory of operation for electronic power converters using its indirect EnergyPacket Switching™ topology. It has established successful power converter products for both PV and battery systems, and its 3-Port Hybrid Converter is the first product to exploit the topology’s capability for the industry’s first single-stage multi-port hybrid power converter. This unique low cost approach eliminates the hybrid power conversion bottlenecks when integrating batteries into PV systems. As result this product will significantly accelerate market adoption of these systems.

Bundschuh, Paul [Ideal Power

2013-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

322

Life cycle cost study for coated conductor manufacture by electron beam and pulsed laser deposition systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of this study establish a framework for evaluation of the cost impact of many performance parameters in coated conductor manufacturing systems. Since the cost and concepts are based on early developmental results and engineering judgment, the study should be updated periodically based on latest data to enhance its usefulness. The study should be expanded to include other promising processes under consideration or development for manufacture of coated conductors. Review of this study by as wide a group of experts from industry, national laboratories and universities as possible is desirable to facilitate improving accuracy of the estimates and communication on the issues involved. The results for the case of achieving the $10/kA-m goal at a J{sub c} of 10{sup 5} a/cm{sup 2} applicable to applications requiring a magnetic field perpendicular to the direction of current flow may be viewed as somewhat discouraging. However, there is ample margin for improvement due to continued development and engineering that could enable meeting the goal of $10/kA-m.

Chapman, J.N.

1999-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Costs for Integrating Wind into the Future ERCOT System with Related Costs for Savings in CO2 Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The supply from wind increased by more than 200% between 2006 and 2009 (Texas now has the largest installed capacity for wind of all of the states in the U.S., reflecting in large measure the incentives introduced by the PUC in 2005 to fund connections of new systems in CREZ to the existing grid). ... The contribution from wind is particularly important in winter when demand is at a seasonal minimum (impacting thus differentially the shape of the residual coal-gas curve to the right of the demand curve in Figure 2b). ... Banunarayanan, V.; Miller, N.; Chahal, A.; Zandt, D. V.; Freeman, L.; Walling, M.; Martinez, J.; Walling, R. A.Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Ancillary Services Requirements; GE Energy: Fairfield, Connecticut, March 28, 2008, 2008; p 254. ...

Xi Lu; Michael B. McElroy; Nora A. Sluzas

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

324

Total and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building HVAC Systems Using Model Predictive Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inputs. The idea of modeling building thermal behavior usingThe detail of building thermal modeling is pre- sented in [Modeling and optimal control algorithm design for hvac systems in energy efficient buildings,’’

Maasoumy, Mehdi; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Feature-based investment cost estimation based on modular design of a continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous studies of continuous manufacturing processes have used equipment-factored cost estimation methods to predict savings in initial plant investment costs. In order to challenge and validate the existing methods of ...

Collins, Donovan (Donovan Scott)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Issue #4: Are High Efficiency Hot Water Heating Systems Worth the Cost?  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

What are realistic energy savings associated with the latest advanced and forthcoming water heating technologies and are they cost effective?

327

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update March 26, 2009 v.30.2021.052209 Prepared by: Brian D. James & Jeffrey A. Kalinoski One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared for: Contract No. GS-10F-0099J to the U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gas and pollutants than

328

Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Process heating plays a key role in producing steel, aluminum, and glass and in manufacturing products made from these materials. Faced with regulatory and competitive pressures to control emissions and reduce operating costs, metal and glass manufacturers are considering a variety of options for reducing overall energy consumption. As 38% of the energy used in U.S. industrial plants is consumed for process heating applications, metal and glass manufacturers are discovering that process heating technologies provide significant opportunities for improving industrial productivity, energy efficiency, and global competitiveness. This fact sheet is the first in a series to describe such opportunities that can be realized in industrial systems by conducting plant-wide assessments (PWA).

329

Metabolic systems cost-benefit analysis for interpreting network structure and regulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......metabolic pathways The trade-off between capital investment costs and operating costs...and do not include maintenance energy expenditures. The in silico representation of the...operating costs were defined as the expenditure of substrate, either glucose or oxygen......

Ross P. Carlson

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Techno-Economic Feasibility of Highly Efficient Cost-Effective Thermoelectric-SOFC Hybrid Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems have the potential to generate exhaust gas streams of high temperature, ranging from 400 to 800 C. These high temperature gas streams can be used for additional power generation with bottoming cycle technologies to achieve higher system power efficiency. One of the potential candidate bottoming cycles is power generation by means of thermoelectric (TE) devices, which have the inherent advantages of low noise, low maintenance and long life. This study was to analyze the feasibility of combining coal gas based SOFC and TE through system performance and cost techno-economic modeling in the context of multi-MW power plants, with 200 kW SOFC-TE module as building blocks. System and component concepts were generated for combining SOFC and TE covering electro-thermo-chemical system integration, power conditioning system (PCS) and component designs. SOFC cost and performance models previously developed at United Technologies Research Center were modified and used in overall system analysis. The TE model was validated and provided by BSST. The optimum system in terms of energy conversion efficiency was found to be a pressurized SOFC-TE, with system efficiency of 65.3% and cost of $390/kW of manufacturing cost. The pressurization ratio was approximately 4 and the assumed ZT of the TE was 2.5. System and component specifications were generated based on the modeling study. The major technology and cost barriers for maturing the system include pressurized SOFC stack using coal gas, the high temperature recycle blowers, and system control design. Finally, a 4-step development roadmap is proposed for future technology development, the first step being a 1 kW proof-of-concept demonstration unit.

Jifeng Zhang; Jean Yamanis

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Toward mitigating wind-uncertainty costs in power system operation: A demand response exchange market framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The intermittent nature of the wind generation poses an obstacle to high penetration of wind energy in electric power systems. Demand response (DR) increases the flexibility of the power system by allowing very fast upward/downward changes in the demand. This potential can be interpreted as the ability to provide fast upward/downward reserves, facilitating the utilization of the wind power in the power system. Demand response exchange (DRX) market is a separate market in which DR is treated as a virtual resource to be exchanged between DR buyers and sellers. The major advantage of the DRX market in comparison to other DR proposals is that it allocates benefits and payments across all participants, fairly. However, there are still obstacles to its integration into the existing power markets. This paper proposes a short-term framework for DRX market that considers the interactions between the DRX market and energy/reserve markets. The proposed framework is aimed at reducing the operational costs incurred by the uncertainty of the wind power and providing a fair mechanism for valuation of the DR as a virtual resource. A stochastic programming model is used to clear the DRX market considering the wind power production scenarios. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed DRX market framework, it is implemented on a simple and a realistic case study.

Javad Saebi; Mohammad Hossein Javidi; Majid Oloomi Buygi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13010: Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems - Current Performance and Cost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record Record #: 13010 Date: June 11, 2013 Title: Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems - Current Performance and Cost Originators: Scott McWhorter and Grace Ordaz Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: July 17, 2013 Item: This record summarizes the current status of the projected capacities and manufacturing costs of Type IV, 350- and 700-bar compressed hydrogen storage systems, storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen, for onboard light-duty automotive applications when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units per year. The current projected performance and cost of these systems are presented in Table 1 against the DOE Hydrogen Storage System targets. These analyses were performed in support of the Hydrogen Storage

333

A Feasibility Analysis for the Design of A Low-Cost High-Power Energy Storage System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Feasibility Analysis for the Design of A Low-Cost High-Power Energy Storage System Travis Mc://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/EnergyStorageSystem.pdf May 3, 2014 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664 of existing systems. Energy storage is a viable method for increasing the e ciency of a broad range of systems

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

334

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

Michael D. Durham

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Field Trial of a Low-Cost, Distributed Plug Load Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers have struggled to inventory and characterize the energy use profiles of the ever-growing category of so-called miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) because plug-load monitoring is cost-prohibitive to the researcher and intrusive to the homeowner. However, these data represent a crucial missing link to our understanding of how homes use energy, and we cannot control what we do not understand. Detailed energy use profiles would enable the nascent automated home energy management (AHEM) industry to develop effective control algorithms that target consumer electronics and other plug loads. If utility and other efficiency programs are to incent AHEM devices, they need large-scale datasets that provide statistically meaningful justification of their investments by quantifying the aggregate energy savings achievable. To address this need, we have investigated a variety of plug-load measuring devices available commercially and tested them in the laboratory to identify the most promising candidates for field applications. The scope of this report centers around the lessons learned from a field validation of one proof-of-concept system, called Smartenit (formerly SimpleHomeNet). The system was evaluated based on the rate of successful data queries, reliability over a period of days to weeks, and accuracy. This system offers good overall performance when deployed with up to ten end nodes in a residential environment, although deployment with more nodes and in a commercial environment is much less robust. We conclude that the current system is useful in selected field research projects, with the recommendation that system behavior is observed over time.

Auchter, B.; Cautley, D.; Ahl, D.; Earle, L.; Jin, X.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Cost Benefit Energy Analysis of the Building Envelope Systems with Ener-Habitat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract During the last decade, housing construction in Mexico has increased dramatically, despite the economic and financial crises, it is one of the main drivers of the Mexican economy; the government has supported programs to develop social housing in order to assist low-income families. This type of initiatives has allowed low-income people to own a place to live, but it has also promoted the spread of housing developments with house models of similar characteristics in the very diverse geographical and climatic zones of Mexico. Even though some of the dwellings have few differences depending on the region they belong to, they do not reflect climatic adaptations. The correct selection of the envelope materials is one of the first and most effective passive strategy that must be considered in the design of a housing. However, just selecting the materials by knowing their thermal properties is not enough to make an appropriate decision about the construction system. For this reason, we need a tool like Ener-Habitat, which allows a quick assessment of thermal and energy performance of a building system consisting of several layers, through the time-dependent calculation of heat transfer, suitable for high thermal mass materials, such as those generally used in Mexico and the climates of Mexico with high solar radiation and large temperature swing during the day. The study propose a method to analyze the cost and energy benefit of building systems, and as example analyzes some walls building systems, in a hot-dry climate city of Mexico, during the air conditioning season. This tool allows, at early stages of architectural design, quick assessments for decision taking on the building systems choice, in relation with better energy performance. Ener-Habitat was created by researchers from six academic institutions in Mexico and was funded by the National Council for Science and Technology and the Ministry of Energy of Mexico.

Jose Manuel Ochoa; Irene Marincic; Maria Guadalupe Alpuche; Enrique Alejandro Duarte; Ileana Gonzalez; Guadalupe Huelz; Guillermo Barrios

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The social costs of child abuse in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study calculates the social costs of child abuse in Japan. The items calculated included the direct costs of dealing with abuse and the indirect costs related to long-term damage from abuse during the fiscal year 2012 (April 1, 2012, to March 31, 2013). Based on previous studies on the social costs of child abuse and peripheral matters conducted in other countries, the present study created items for the estimable direct costs and indirect costs of child abuse, and calculated the cost of each item. Among indirect costs, future losses owing to child abuse were calculated using extra costs with a discount rate of 3%. The social cost of child abuse in Japan in the fiscal year 2012 was at least Ą1.6 trillion ($16 billion). The direct costs totaled Ą99 billion ($1 billion), and the indirect costs totaled Ą1.5 trillion ($15 billion). This sum of Ą1.6 trillion for only the year 2012 is almost equal to the total amount of damages of Ą1.9 trillion caused by the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami in Fukushima Prefecture. Moreover, abuse is a serious problem that occurs every year and has recurring costs, unlike a natural calamity. However, Japan has no system for calculating the long-term effects of abuse. Therefore, owing to the scarcity of data, the calculations in the present study may underestimate the true costs.

Ichiro Wada; Ataru Igarashi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Total analysis of surface structure and properties by UHV transfer system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) complex sample preparation and analysis system, which realizes a reliable surface science analyzing various characters on an identical surface. The system contains three sample-preparation-and-characterization chambers and five analysis chambers. They are (1) an electronic-properties-characterization chamber, (2) a magnetic-properties-characterization chamber, (3) an organic-molecule chamber, (4) UHV SEM, (5) a high-energy-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer, (6) a high-energy-resolution display-type spherical mirror analyzer, (7) a room-temperature (RT) STM, and (8) an optical-properties characterization chamber. A special sample holder is used with six electrodes on it, which enables accurate temperature measurement of a sample by connecting a thermocouple directly to the sample even if it is transferred. Four other electrodes can be used for construction of various circuits including evaporators. Some examples are shown.

Hiroshi Yamatani; Ken Hattori; Takahisa Matsuta; Takuji Ito; Tomohito Nohno; Madoka Hori; Yutaka Miyatake; Shigenori Konno; Tsukasa Tanaka; Yoji Hamada; Hiroshi Katagiri; Mikiharu Hibi; Toshiki Miyai; Mie Hashimoto; Keita Kataoka; Takeshi Tatsuta; Azusa N. Hattori; Naoto Higashi; Mitsunori Honda; Norifumi Masunaga; Hiroaki Mino; Shintaro Yasui; Janathul Nayeem; Tatsuya Shimizu; Nobuaki Takahashi; Yukako Kato; Chikako Sakai; Masashi Yoshimura; Sakura N. Takeda; Fumihiko Matsui; Hiroshi Daimon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

An investigation of simplified loss formula evaluation of total and incremental power system losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program ~ a o o ~ o a o o o o e a o o 11 Incremental Transmission Loss Calculation . . . . . . o 13 The Transmission System ~ a ~ o o ~ ~ o o o o o o 14 IVa RESULTS e ~ o a ~ ~ a a ~ e a o a ~ e ~ o a o o o IQ V SUMMARY a o o o a ~ o ~ a o 0 o o o ~ 0..., 1 X II tf g tf ff tf lt 4 0o9 50/ System Load ? Per Cent of Peak 1o06 f 1. 05 0 Xo1. 04 0 e 5 1, 03 1. 02 Ir 5 F. 1o01 4 tI 1o0 III II 0. 99 5 FIGURE IVa Simplified Loss Formula Evaluation of Pen- alty Faotor ? Bus 1 All...

Malinowski, James Henry

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

USE OF ONE-ON ANALYSIS TO EVALUATE TOTAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of analyses of the hypothetical performance of the various configurations of selected natural and engineered elements of the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear-waste repository. These analyses were conducted upon the recommendation of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (NWTRB) regarding an alternative approach to investigate the identified natural and engineered barriers and associated processes with respect to the postclosure performance of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The analyses were conducted per Technical Work Plan (TWP) TWP-MGR-PA-000011 REV 00, Section 3.2.4, Task 2, which states that the task involves ''Identification of barriers that are important to repository performance:'' by means of ''one-on'' analyses to gain a better understanding of repository performance relative to previously identified barriers.'' The ''One-on Analysis'' was performed per Administrative Procedure AP-SIII.9Q. The NWTRB previously reviewed similar analyses conducted by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) (EPRI 2002 [158069]). The approach of the investigation was to simulate the hypothetical performance of the repository after an arbitrarily chosen successive addition of each of the selected natural and engineered barrier components and associated processes that provide for the overall safety of the repository. Because the repository system will behave as an integrated system, the combined interaction of all the processes and barriers identified in this report will provide the ultimate repository performance as indicated in various performance-assessment analyses for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) M&O 2000 [153246]; Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2001 [155950]; and Williams 2001 [157307]. The analyses presented in this report should not be construed as an indication, for the chosen additive sequence, of the relative importance on any one barrier or process. Rather, the results of these analyses provide an indication of the relative performance of those barriers and processes and an understanding of their contribution to the overall performance of the proposed repository system. The analyses in this report considered the nominal-performance scenario only, and did not address performance following unlikely disruptive events (e.g., volcanic activity) (10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 63.342).

G.J. Saulnier Jr.

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cost Effective, High Efficiency Integrated Systems Approach To Auxiliary Electric Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CARAT program, carried out by Kinetic Art & Technology Corporation (KAT), has been one of the most commercially successful KAT R&D programs to date. Based on previous development of its technology, KAT designed, constructed and tested a highly efficient motor and controller system under this CARAT program with supplemental commercial funding. Throughout this CARAT effort, the technical objectives have been refined and refocused. Some objectives have been greatly expanded, while others have been minimized. The determining factor in all decisions to refocus the objectives was the commercial need, primarily the needs of KAT manufacturing partners. Several companies are employing the resulting CARAT motor and controller designs in prototypes for commercial products. Two of these companies have committed to providing cost share in order to facilitate the development. One of these companies is a major manufacturing company developing a revolutionary new family of products requiring the ultra-high system efficiency achievable by the KAT motor and controller technologies (known as Segmented ElectroMagnetic Array, or SEMA technology). Another company requires the high efficiency, quiet operation, and control characteristics afforded by the same basic motor and controller for an advanced air filtration product. The combined annual production requirement projected by these two companies exceeds one million units by 2005.

Roy Kessinger; Kanchan Angal; Steve Brewer; Steve Kraihanzel; Lenny Schrank; Jason Wolf

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cost Effective, High Efficiency Integrated Systems Approach to Auxilliary Electric Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CARAT program, carried out by Kinetic Art & Technology Corporation (KAT), has been one of the most commercially successful KAT R&D programs to date. Based on previous development of its technology, KAT designed, constructed and tested a highly efficient motor and controller system under this CARAT program with supplemental commercial funding. Throughout this CARAT effort, the technical objectives have been refined and refocused. Some objectives have been greatly expanded, while others have been minimized. The determining factor in all decisions to refocus the objectives was the commercial need, primarily the needs of KAT manufacturing partners. Several companies are employing the resulting CARAT motor and controller designs in prototypes for commercial products. Two of these companies have committed to providing cost share in order to facilitate the development. One of these companies is a major manufacturing company developing a revolutionary new family of products requiring the ultra-high system efficiency achievable by the KAT motor and controller technologies (known as Segmented ElectroMagnetic Array, or SEMA technology). Another company requires the high efficiency, quiet operation, and control characteristics afforded by the same basic motor and controller for an advanced air filtration product. The combined annual production requirement projected by these two companies exceeds one million units by 2005.

Roy Kessinger Jr.; Keith Seymour; Kanchan Angal; Jason Wolf; Steve Brewer; Leonard Schrank

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

343

Air-Microfluidics: Towards Lab-on-a-Chip Systems for Low-Cost Air-Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air-Microfluidics: Towards Lab-on-a-Chip Systems for Low-Cost Air-Quality Air-Microfluidics: Towards Lab-on-a-Chip Systems for Low-Cost Air-Quality Monitoring Speaker(s): Igor Paprotny Date: November 12, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Lara Gundel Air-microfluidic devices that monitor particles suspended in air, as opposed to liquids, can dramatically reduce the size and cost of future air-quality sensors. The use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies and wafer-scale integration permits the inclusion of many different sensors onto a small footprint. Benefits of air-microfluidics are many. For example, air-microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices can be used as portable sensors for tracking individual exposure to airborne pollutants. Such sensors will enable linking exposure and biometric information to

344

The development of a system to optimise production costs around complex electricity tariffs / R. Maneschijn.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Rising South African electricity prices and reduced sales following the 2008 economic recession have led cement manufacturers to seek ways to reduce production costs. Prior… (more)

Maneschijn, Raynard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Design, development, and applications of a low-cost, dynamic neutron radiography system utilizing the TAMU NSC TRIGA reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SC'IENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT. AND APPLICATIONS OF A LOW ? COST, DYNAMIC NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY SYSTEM UTILIZING THE TAMU NSC TRIGA REACTOR A...DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT. AND APPLICATIONS OF A LOW ? COST, DYNAMIC NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY SYSTEM UTILIZING THE TAMU NSC TRIGA REACTOR A Thesis SC'OTT PATRIC'If ItIIDGETT Submitted to the Ofhce of Graduate Studies of Texas AklVI I!niversity rn...

Midgett, Scott Patrick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

346

Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Startup Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

7th Conference for Systems Engineering Research Trading Project Costs and Benefits in Multi-Attribute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Hare International Airport · Airlines seari.mit.edu © 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 9 #12 (Boston, ca. 1982-2007) Projected cost (1985): $2.8bn Cost spent (2007): $22 bn (incl. interest Massachusetts Institute of Technology 5 #12;Approach (1)Introduction to case study: Airport Express for Chicago

de Weck, Olivier L.

349

Benchmarking Energy Efficiency, Power Costs and Carbon Emissions on Heterogeneous Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......interested in electricity costs and carbon emissions...proportional to energy use, but this turns...with the mix of energy sources such as...stations, nuclear and renewable, changing all the...kinds of metrics--energy efficiency, cost per simulation and......

Simon McIntosh-Smith; Terry Wilson; Amaurys Ávila Ibarra; Jonathan Crisp; Richard B. Sessions

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Monitoring System Used to Identify, Track and Allocate Peak Demand Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leasing space on the site. The most common way to distribute monthly electric costs within a facility when consumption by area or department is available through submetering or other means, is to apply the average cost per KWH from the utility bill...

Holmes, W. A.

351

Cost-effectiveness analysis of the SEAMIST{trademark} membrane system technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SEAMIST{trademark} is a new technology that consists of an airtight membrane liner that is pneumatically emplaced inside the borehole. The positive air pressure inside the liner maintains the integrity of the borehole structure. Sampling ports with attached tubing, absorbent collectors, or various in situ measuring devices can be fabricated into the liner and used for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), pesticides, herbicides, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, or radioactive substances. In addition, small instruments can be guided through the lined borehole and measurements taken inside at specified intervals. The purpose of this study is to analyze the cost and performance effectiveness of this new technology. To do so, the authors constructed five hypothetical scenarios in which utilization of the SEAMIST{trademark} system can address various needs of the Department of Energy`s environmental remediation program. Two of the scenarios involve vertical boreholes (or vertical instrument configurations) and two involve horizontal boreholes (or horizontal instrument configurations). The four scenarios jointly address contamination by VOCS, SVOCS, various water-soluble toxic substances, and low-level radioactive waste. One of the scenarios involves towing an instrument through a borehole and taking measurements of moisture levels in the surrounding soil.

Henriksen, A.D.; Booth, S.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

College of Engineering Request for Institutional Waiver of Indirect Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAF Number College of Engineering Request for Institutional Waiver of Indirect Cost Principal Investigator Sponsor Project Title Total Direct Costs Total Modified Direct Costs Full Indirect Costs Rate Full Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with Full IDC) Requested Indirect Costs Rate Requested Indirect

Kamat, Vineet R.

353

Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An analysis was performed to estimate the costs associated with storing and transporting hydrogen. These costs can be added to a hydrogen production cost to determine the total delivered cost of hydrogen.

354

Cost-effective upgrade of a focusing system for inelastic X-ray scattering experiments under high pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a scheme utilizing a set of low-cost and compact Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors for upgrading the optical system of the Taiwan Inelastic X-ray Scattering beamline at SPring-8 for high-pressure experiments using diamond-anvil cells. The scheme as implemented improves the focus to 13 µm × 16 µm with transmission of up to 72%.

Huang, C.-Y.

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

355

High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Modular HTGR systems design and cost summary. [Methane reforming; steam cycle-cogeneration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary description of the preconceptual design and energy product costs of the modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The reactor system was studied for two applications: (1) reforming of methane to produce synthesis gas and (2) steam cycle/cogeneration to produce process steam and electricity.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Obstacle detection and mapping in low-cost, low-power multi-robot systems using an Inverted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Obstacle detection and mapping in low-cost, low-power multi-robot systems using an Inverted with constrained memory capacity and processing power, and is called the Inverted Particle Filter. This method has circuits. An important benefit of this is reduced power consumption opening for new battery-powered

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

357

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon futures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low t Decarbonizing electricity production is central to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Exploiting intermittent be replaced by solar, wind, gas, and/or nuclear generation, with intermittent renewable sources providing

Kammen, Daniel M.

358

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 16, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2001 111 Reliability and Costs Optimization for Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methodology, using an evolutionary algorithm, for finding out the best distribution network reliability whileIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 16, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2001 111 Reliability and Costs Optimization for Distribution Networks Expansion Using an Evolutionary Algorithm Ignacio J. RamĂ­rez

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

359

Commissioning : The Total Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that rely on electronic control. Very frequently these systems and design features have not performed as expected. This can result in energy-efficiency losses. occupant complaints about comfort, indoor air quality problems. high operating costs...

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems Â… Projected Performance and Cost Parameters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record Record #: 9017 Date: July 02, 2010 Title: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems - Projected Performance and Cost Parameters Originators: Robert C. Bowman and Ned Stetson Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: August 10, 2010 This record summarizes the current technical assessments of hydrogen (H 2 ) storage system capacities and projected manufacturing costs for the scenario of high-volume production (i.e., 500,000 units/year) for various types of "on-board" vehicular storage systems. These analyses were performed within the Hydrogen Storage sub-program of the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Item: It is important to note that all system capacities are "net useable capacities" able to be delivered to the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a â��bottom-upâ� costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA�® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost city probably overstates the value of wind energy.wind energy conversion system in the South Bronx in New York City.

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The social cost of carbon: implications for modernizing our electricity system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The US government must use an official estimate of the “social cost of carbon” (SCC) to estimate carbon emission reduction benefits for proposed environmental standards expected to reduce CO2 emissions. The SCC i...

Laurie T. Johnson; Starla Yeh; Chris Hope

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of Urban Transit Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost of GHG emissions reductions to facilitate comparison with other approaches, such as vehicle replacement or enginecost of GHG emissions reductions to facilitate comparison with other approaches, such as vehicle replacement or engine

Griswold, Julia Baird

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Efficiency, Cost and Weight Trade-off in TE Power Generation System for Vehicle Exhaust Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It contains a detailed co-optimization of the thermoelectric module with the heat sink and a study of the tradeoff between the material cost and efficiency for the TE module and the heat sink. An optimum design is found.

366

A FMEA-Aided Equipment Life-Cycle-Cost Measurement System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research tries to establish an optimum life cycle cost (LCC) based strategy model of equipments’ purchasing and maintenance. The study integrates the technique of failure modes and effect analysis (FMEA) and...

Chee-cheng Chen; Hong Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Hydrogen Station Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Technical Status and Costs: Systems Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory commissioned an independent review of hydrogen compression, storage, and dispensing (CSD) for pipeline delivery of hydrogen and forecourt hydrogen production. The panel was asked to address the (1) cost calculation methodology, (2) current cost/technical status, (3) feasibility of achieving the FCTO's 2020 CSD levelized cost targets, and to (4) suggest research areas that will help the FCTO reach its targets. As the panel neared the completion of these tasks, it was also asked to evaluate CSD costs for the delivery of hydrogen by high-pressure tube trailer. This report details these findings.

Parks, G.; Boyd, R.; Cornish, J.; Remick, R.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Cost Effective Waste Heat Organic Rankine Cycle Applications and Systems Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conceptually, the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) power cycle has been well known to the engineering community for many years. Despite the rapid escalation of energy costs during the past decade, and a concerted, though somewhat belated, effort towards...

Rohrer, J. W.; Bronicki, L. Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

MN4602 Crouch 2004 REASSESSING WEAPON SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MN4602 Crouch 2004 REASSESSING WEAPON SYSTEM OPERATIONAL TEST & EVALUATION METHODOLOGIES LTC Thom support assessing a weapon systems true cost and performance characteristics? S1: Can/should cost methodologies adequately address weapon systems total ownership cost (TOC)? S3: Are there critical cost

370

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

371

Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of Urban Transit Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US cities (McGuckin and Srinivasan Figures 5.3 through 5.5 present the change in total GHG emissions

Griswold, Julia Baird

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quantify production, energy and cost characteristics of ironCost Total O&M Cost Energy Cost Raw Material Cost AnnualCost Total O&M Cost Energy Cost (other than Coking Coal and

Karali, Nihan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Cost estimate of electricity produced by TPV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A crucial parameter for the market penetration of TPV is its electricity production cost. In this work a detailed cost estimate is performed for a Si photocell based TPV system, which was developed for electrically self-powered operation of a domestic heating system. The results are compared to a rough estimate of cost of electricity for a projected GaSb based system. For the calculation of the price of electricity, a lifetime of 20 years, an interest rate of 4.25% per year and maintenance costs of 1% of the investment are presumed. To determine the production cost of TPV systems with a power of 12–20 kW, the costs of the TPV components and 100 EUR kW?1el,peak for assembly and miscellaneous were estimated. Alternatively, the system cost for the GaSb system was derived from the cost of the photocells and from the assumption that they account for 35% of the total system cost. The calculation was done for four different TPV scenarios which include a Si based prototype system with existing technology (?sys = 1.0%), leading to 3000 EUR kW?1el,peak, an optimized Si based system using conventional, available technology (?sys = 1.5%), leading to 900 EUR kW?1el,peak, a further improved system with future technology (?sys = 5%), leading to 340 EUR kW?1el,peak and a GaSb based system (?sys = 12.3% with recuperator), leading to 1900 EUR kW?1el,peak. Thus, prices of electricity from 6 to 25 EURcents kWh?1el (including gas of about 3.5 EURcents kWh?1) were calculated and compared with those of fuel cells (31 EURcents kWh?1) and gas engines (23 EURcents kWh?1).

Günther Palfinger; Bernd Bitnar; Wilhelm Durisch; Jean-Claude Mayor; Detlev Grützmacher; Jens Gobrecht

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

376

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

377

Cost-Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost?efficiency is a goal that has been integrated by policy makers into all modern health care systems to control the expansion of costs over time. It relates to maximizing the quality of a comparable unit ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Repair duration effects on distribution system reliability indices and customer outage costs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The distribution system is part of the electric power system that links the bulk transmission system and the individual customers. Approximately 80 percent of outages… (more)

Shakya, Binendra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Robust Cost Colorings Takuro Fukunaga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust Cost Colorings Takuro Fukunaga Magn´us M. Halld´orsson Hiroshi Nagamochi Abstract We consider graph coloring problems where the cost of a coloring is the sum of the costs of the colors, and the cost of a color is a monotone concave function of the total weight of the class. This models resource

HalldĂłrsson, MagnĂşs M.

380

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Proceedings of the International Electronics Packaging Education Conference (at the ECTC), May 30, 2006 Using Teardown Analysis as a Vehicle to Teach Electronic Systems Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2006 Using Teardown Analysis as a Vehicle to Teach Electronic Systems Manufacturing Cost Modeling Peter product teardowns and reverse engineering ideas has proven to be an effective vehicle for educating engineers involved in the design of electronic systems did not concern themselves with the cost

Sandborn, Peter

382

Novel System for Recalcitrance Screening Will Reduce Biofuels Production Costs, The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This new system will allow researchers to much more rapidly screen large numbers of samples This new system will allow researchers to much more rapidly screen large numbers of samples and identify the most promising biomass feedstocks for higher efficiency and lower cost bio- fuels conversion processes. NREL will be screening thousands of variants of different biomass feedstocks to link genetic traits with environmental factors that can enhance biomass conver- sion efficiencies. Identifying the genes controlling the anatomical, chemical, and morphologi- cal features of biomass is essential to develop the next generation of low-cost, easily convert- ible biomass feedstocks. To identify superior performing biomass feedstocks using approaches that account for natural diversity and randomness, researchers must measure the cell wall chemistry and recalcitrance

383

The Social Cost of Intercity Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,409 39,972 7,918 Total All Sources 18,536 60,863 19,890 #12;Air Pollution: Valuation Local Health Costs External to User (not necessarily to system) Result: Noise, Air Pollution, Congestion, Accidents Not: Water Pollution, Parking, Defense ... #12;Approach Air Highway Noise Air Pollution Congestion

Levinson, David M.

384

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System--A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location, Location, Location  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Develop a baseline cost model of a 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System, including all aspects of the project, from finding the resource through to operation, for a particularly challenging scenario: the deep, radioactively decaying granitic rock of the Pioneer Valley in Western Massachusetts.

385

Integrating the cold load pickup effect of reserve supplying demand response resource in social cost minimization based system scheduling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Expansion of smart grids and aggregator business facilitates the utilization of reserve supplying demand response (RSDR) resources. One of the loads that are increasingly used for reserve provision is air-conditioning load (ACL) that have cold load pickup (CLPU) or “payback” characteristics. With larger scale utilization of RSDR resources, as an effect of increasing DR aggregation business, CLPU characteristics of ACL can affect system optimal operation. Actual utilization time and duration of RSDR resources are probabilistic and affected by system scheduling and contingency occurrence. Therefore the CLPU effect of RSDR resources is probabilistic. This creates extra burden on the system reliability maintenance that should be considered from social cost minimization point of view. This complexity is addressed in this paper by modeling the extra expected load not supplied (ELNS) that the probabilistic CLPU of RSDR can impose on system. Then the aggregated RSDR resources, with CLPU characteristics, are integrated into day-ahead simultaneous system scheduling with the objective function of social cost minimization. This study showed that CLPU can have considerable effects on system scheduling and RSDR effectiveness. The proposed method of this paper proved to be useful for reducing the negative effects of CLPU while using RSDR resources.

Mahdi Behrangrad; Hideharu Sugihara; Tsuyoshi Funaki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Benchmarking Non-Hardware Balance of System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems Using a Data-Driven Analysis from PV Installer Survey Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Non-Hardware Non-Hardware Balance of System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems Using a Data-Driven Analysis from PV Installer Survey Results November 2012 Benchmarking Non-Hardware Balance of System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems Using a Data-Driven Analysis from PV Installer Survey Results NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 LBNL's work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot program under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 Technical Report DOE/GO-10212-3834 * November 2012 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway

388

Low-cost flywheel demonstration program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Applied Physics Laboratory/Department of Energy Low Cost Flywheel Demonstration Program was initiated on 1 October 1977 and was successfully concluded on 31 December 19'9. The total cost of this program was $355,190. All primary objectives were successfully achieved as follows: demonstration of a full-size, 1)kWh flywheel having an estimated cost in large-volume production of approximately $50/kWh; developmeNt of a ball-bearing system having losses comparable to the losses in a totally magnetic suspension system; successful and repeated demonstration of the low-cost flywheel in a complete flywheel energy-storage system based on the use of ordinary house voltage and frequency; and application of the experience gained in the hardware program to project the system design into a complete, full-scale, 30-kWh home-type flywheel energy-storage system.

None

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Current and future costs for parabolic trough and power tower systems in the US market.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is employed to estimate the current and future costs for parabolic trough and molten salt power towers in the US market. Future troughs are assumed to achieve higher field temperatures via the successful deployment of low melting-point, molten-salt heat transfer fluids by 2015-2020. Similarly, it is assumed that molten salt power towers are successfully deployed at 100MW scale over the same time period, increasing to 200MW by 2025. The levelized cost of electricity for both technologies is predicted to drop below 11 cents/kWh (assuming a 10% investment tax credit and other financial inputs outlined in the paper), making the technologies competitive in the marketplace as benchmarked by the California MPR. Both technologies can be deployed with large amounts of thermal energy storage, yielding capacity factors as high as 65% while maintaining an optimum LCOE.

Turchi, Craig (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Mehos, Mark Steven (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Small-Scale Low Cost Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in tasks seeking greater cell power density and lower cost through new cell designs, new cell materials and lower operating temperature is summarized. The design of the program required Proof-of-Concept unit of residential capacity scale is reviewed along with a summary of results from its successful test. Attachment 1 summarizes the status of cell development. Attachment 2 summarizes the status of generator design, and Attachment 3 of BOP design.

S. D. Vora

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Energy and cost analysis of a solar-hydrogen combined heat and power system for remote power supply using a computer simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simulation program, based on Visual Pascal, for sizing and techno-economic analysis of the performance of solar-hydrogen combined heat and power systems for remote applications is described. The accuracy of the submodels is checked by comparing the real performances of the system's components obtained from experimental measurements with model outputs. The use of the heat generated by the PEM fuel cell, and any unused excess hydrogen, is investigated for hot water production or space heating while the solar-hydrogen system is supplying electricity. A 5 kWh daily demand profile and the solar radiation profile of Melbourne have been used in a case study to investigate the typical techno-economic characteristics of the system to supply a remote household. The simulation shows that by harnessing both thermal load and excess hydrogen it is possible to increase the average yearly energy efficiency of the fuel cell in the solar-hydrogen system from just below 40% up to about 80% in both heat and power generation (based on the high heating value of hydrogen). The fuel cell in the system is conventionally sized to meet the peak of the demand profile. However, an economic optimisation analysis illustrates that installing a larger fuel cell could lead to up to a 15% reduction in the unit cost of the electricity to an average of just below 90 c/kWh over the assessment period of 30 years. Further, for an economically optimal size of the fuel cell, nearly a half the yearly energy demand for hot water of the remote household could be supplied by heat recovery from the fuel cell and utilising unused hydrogen in the exit stream. Such a system could then complement a conventional solar water heating system by providing the boosting energy (usually in the order of 40% of the total) normally obtained from gas or electricity. (author)

Shabani, Bahman; Andrews, John; Watkins, Simon [School of Aerospace Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

Time-cost analysis of a quantum key distribution system clocked at 100 MHz  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the realization of a quantum key distribution (QKD) system clocked at 100 MHz. The system includes classical postprocessing implemented via software, and is operated over a...

Mo, X F; Lucio-Martinez, I; Chan, P; Healey, C; Hosier, S; Tittel, W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems: State of the technology and user case studies.Systems and Related Technology: Operational Practices,Demonstrating how information technology can cut energy use

Granderson, Jessica

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to <25%, even at the same sorbent injection concentration. Other tests examined the impacts of fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

SU?E?T?322: Evaluation of Total Body Irradiation Technique Using 20 Diodes In?Vivo Dosimetry System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate a new Total Body Irradiation (TBI) technique using CT planning by 20 diodes real time in?vivo dosimetry system.Material and Methods: TBI treatment is typically performed at extended SSD ( 3 to 4 meters) under high energy x?rays (6 MV). Lateral treatment results in a more convenient setup but less dose uniformity as compared with AP/PA treatment. This study evaluated a new TBI treatment which is performed at 2 meter distance AP/PA. Matched oblique field plan was created by Eclipse TPS with CT simulated data from PIXY phantom; using MLC for lung blocking. Field in Field technique was applied to improve dose uniformity. A steel attenuator with transmission factor 0.55 for 6MV photon field is used to reduce dose rate to 5–20 cGy/min while a 5mm thick Lexan sheet is placed about 20 cm above patient to increase skin dose. Patients will lay supine and prone on a movable bed. Three AP and PA fields were used to deliver prescribed dose. A 20?diodes SunNuclear in?vivo dosimetry system was used for monitoring dose at different sites. Diodes were calibrated with attenuator to accommodate energy spectrum change. SSD dose rate angular dependence of diodes were measured. RadCalc MU verification software was also tested for agreement with TPS and measured data. Results: Attenuator could reduce the dose rate to about 13 cGy/min. By averaging the entrance and exit reading the doses at patients anatomical mid?line were measured and found to have good agreement with TPS (within 7% difference). Two dry?runs have demonstrated that the TBI plan can achieve and intended dose uniformity better than 10%. The RadCalc verification program agreed with TPS on average within 3%. Conclusion: CT?image based and TPS generated TBI plan is feasible. Diodes are suitable for both the TBI technique testing and dose monitoring.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs December 2, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis Learn how soft costs are contributing to the price of solar energy systems in the United States. Learn more about what the Energy Department is doing to lower soft costs and increase deployment of solar energy systems. | Infographic by SunShot Learn how soft costs are contributing to the price of solar energy systems in the United States. Learn more about what the Energy Department is doing to lower soft costs and increase deployment of solar energy systems. | Infographic by SunShot Addthis Related Articles Soft costs now account for more than 60% of the total price of installing residential solar energy systems. View the full infographic to learn more.

399

INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs December 2, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis Learn how soft costs are contributing to the price of solar energy systems in the United States. Learn more about what the Energy Department is doing to lower soft costs and increase deployment of solar energy systems. | Infographic by SunShot Learn how soft costs are contributing to the price of solar energy systems in the United States. Learn more about what the Energy Department is doing to lower soft costs and increase deployment of solar energy systems. | Infographic by SunShot Addthis Related Articles Soft costs now account for more than 60% of the total price of installing residential solar energy systems. View the full infographic to learn more.

400

Stationery and Emerging Market Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Kathya Mahadevan (Primary Contact), VinceContini, Matt Goshe, and Fritz Eubanks Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 Phone: (614) 424-3197 Email: mahadevank@battelle.org DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005250/001 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives To assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for stationary and emerging markets by developing independent cost models and costs estimates for manufacture and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NREL: News - NREL Reports Soft Costs Now Largest Piece of Solar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Release NR-6313 News Release NR-6313 NREL Reports Soft Costs Now Largest Piece of Solar Installation Total Cost December 2, 2013 Two detailed reports from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) find that solar financing and other non-hardware costs - often referred to as "soft costs" - now comprise up to 64% of the total price of residential solar energy systems, reflecting how soft costs are becoming an increasingly larger fraction of the cost of installing solar. "The two new reports, along with previous reports, provide a comprehensive look at the full cost of installing solar, while delineating and quantifying the various contributors to that final cost," NREL analyst Barry Friedman said. The first new report, "Benchmarking Non-Hardware Balance-of-System (Soft)

402

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

404

Cost Containment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost containment in health care involves a wide ... , the growth rate of expenditure or certain costs of health care services. These measures include ... patient education, etc. The reasons for increased cost ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

406

Low Cost Arc Fault Detection and Protection for PV Systems: January 30, 2012 - September 30, 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report for Tigo Energy Incubator project. The specific objective of this 18-month research effort was to develop an off-the-shelf arc-fault detector. The starting point of the project was a prototype detector that was constructed using discrete components and laboratory equipment. An intermediate objective was to build a technically viable detector using programmable components in the detector circuitry. The final objective was to build a commercially viable detector by reducing the cost of the circuitry through the use of more sophisticated programmable components and higher levels of integration.

McCalmont, S.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Calculator program aids well cost management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A TI-59 calculator program designed to track well costs on daily and weekly bases can dramatically facilitate the task of monitoring well expenses. The program computes the day total, cumulative total, cumulative item-row totals, and day-week total. For carrying these costs throughout the drilling project, magnetic cards can store the individual and total cumulative well expenses.

Doyle, C.J.

1982-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

408

Taking Another Look at Pumping Systems: Opportunities Go Well Beyond Just Energy Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

payback periods. Basing decisions, however, on total cost of ownership and established life-cycle cost methodologies provides compelling arguments to shift business decision-making away from initial cost considerations. Pumping systems account... payback periods. Basing decisions, however, on total cost of ownership and established life-cycle cost methodologies provides compelling arguments to shift business decision-making away from initial cost considerations. Pumping systems account...

Tutterow, V.; Walters, T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Physical Cost of Erasing Quantum Correlation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Erasure of information stored in a quantum state requires energy cost and is inherently an irreversible operation. If quantumness of a system is physical, does erasure of quantum correlation as measured by discord also need some energy cost? Here, we show that change in quantum correlation is never larger than the total entropy change of the system and the environment. The entropy cost of erasing correlation has to be at least equal to the amount of quantum correlation erased. Hence, quantum correlation can be regarded as genuinely physical. We show that the new bound leads to the Landauer erasure. The physical cost of erasing quantum correlation is well respected in the case of bleaching of quantum information, thermalization, and can have potential application for any channel leading to erasure of quantum correlation.

Arun Kumar Pati

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

410

Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems- Executive Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This brochure is a management tool that can help companies minimize waste and maximize energy efficiency for pumping systems.

411

A Low-Cost System for Measuring Horizontal Winds from Single-Engine Aircraft  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The implementation and accuracy of a low-rate (~1 Hz) horizontal wind measurement system is described for a fixed-wing aircraft without modification to the airframe. The system is based on a global positioning system (GPS) compass that provides ...

Stephen A. Conley; Ian C. Faloona; Donald H. Lenschow; Anna Karion; Colm Sweeney

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

High-sensitivity, and cost-effective system for infrared imaging of concealed objects in dynamic mode.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Novel, cost-efficient, and highly-sensitive IR imaging systems play an important role in homeland security functions. Technical limitations in the areas of sensitivity, contrast ratio, bandwidth and cost continue to constrain imaging capabilities. We have designed and prototyped a compact computer-piloted high sensitivity infrared imaging system. The device consists of infrared optics, cryostat, low-noise pre-amplifier, Analog-to-Digital hardware, feedback electronics, and unique image processing software. Important advantages of the developed system are: (i) Eight electronic channels are available for simultaneous registration of IR and visible images in multiple spectral ranges, (ii) Capability of real-time analysis such as comparing the 'sensed' image with 'reference' images from a database, (iii) High accuracy temperature measurement of multiple points on the image by referencing the radiation intensity from the object to a black body model, (iv) Image generation by real-time integration of images from multiple sensors operating from the visible to the terahertz range. The device was tested with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled, single-pixel HgCdTe detector for imaging in 8-12 microns range. The demonstrated examples of infrared imaging of concealed objects in static and dynamic modes include a hammer (metal head and wooden handle), plastic imitator of handguns hidden under clothes, powder in an envelope, and revealing complex wall structures under decorative plaster.

Gordiyenko, E.; Yefremenko, V.; Pearson, J.; Bader, S.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

414

Comparative study of Non -Tracking and Low Concentrating Photovoltaic systems Using Low -Cost Reflectors.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The traditional high concentrating photovoltaic systems have proved to be expensive as they use high grade silicon solar cells, highly specular reflecting materials and require… (more)

Hatwaambo, Sylvester

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Migration to Open-Standard Interorganizational Systems: Network Effects, Switching Costs and Path Dependency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

165. Katz, M. , and Shapiro, C. “Network Externalities,440. Katz, M. , and Shapiro, C. “Technology Adoption in the841. Katz, M. , and Shapiro, C. “Systems Competition and

Zhu, Kevin; Kraemer, Kenneth L.; Gurbaxani, Viijay; Xu, Sean

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University- Case Study, 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case study about the CHP system at the Texas A&M district energy campus in College Station, TX funded by the Recovery Act

417

Novel Combination of Enzyme Systems Could Lower Biofuel Costs (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two biomass-degrading enzyme systems that work in very different ways are shown to be more effective at releasing plant sugars when used together.

Not Available

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Novel Combination of Enzyme Systems Could Lower Biofuel Costs (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two biomass-degrading enzyme systems that work in very different ways are shown to be more effective at releasing plant sugars when used together.

Not Available

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Further Program Development for the Cost Minimizing Global Energy System Model GET-RC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The linear programming Global Energy Transition (GET) model covers the global energy system and is designed to meet exogenously given energy demand levels, subject to… (more)

Andersson, Magnus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Tracking the Sun II: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 BACK PAGE Tracking the Sun II: The Installed Cost of10-100 kW >100 kW Tracking the Sun II: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun II: The Installed Cost of

Barbose, Galen L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY LIFE CYCLE COST ESTIMATE ASSUMPTIONS DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this assumptions document is to provide general scope, strategy, technical basis, schedule and cost assumptions for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) life cycle cost (LCC) estimate and schedule update incorporating information from the Viability Assessment (VA) , License Application Design Selection (LADS), 1999 Update to the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate and from other related and updated information. This document is intended to generally follow the assumptions outlined in the previous MGR cost estimates and as further prescribed by DOE guidance.

R.E. Sweeney

2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

422

Cost effective lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-life replacement lamps for the incandescent lamp have been evaluated with regard to their cost effectiveness. The replacements include the use of energy buttons that extend lamp life as well as an adaptive fluorescent circline lamp that will fit into existing incandescent lamp sockets. The initial, operating, and replacement costs for one million lumen-hours are determined for each lamp system. We find the most important lighting cost component is the operating cost. Using lamps that are less efficient or devices that cause lamps to operate less efficiently are not cost-effective. The adaptive fluorescent circline lamp, even at an initial cost of $15.00, is the most cost effective source of illumination compared to the incandescent lamp and lamp systems examined. 3 refs., 6 tabs.

Morse, O.; Verderber, R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume I. Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. GEOCITY simulates the complete geothermal heating and cooling system, which consists of two principal parts: the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system. The reservoir and fluid transmission submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the reservoir and fluid transmission system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. Geothermal space heating is assumed to be provided by circulating hot water through radiators, convectors, fan-coil units, or other in-house heating systems. Geothermal process heating is provided by directly using the hot water or by circulating it through a process heat exchanger. Geothermal space or process cooling is simulated by circulating hot water through lithium bromide/water absorption chillers located at each building. Retrofit costs for both heating and cooling applications can be input by the user. The life-cycle cost of thermal energy from the reservoir and fluid transmission system to the distribution system and the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) to the end-users are calculated using discounted cash flow analysis.

Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

High resolution, low cost, privacy preserving human motion tracking system via passive thermal sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal imaging is powerful but expensive. This thesis presents an alternative thermal sensing system capable of tracking human motion by using a novel projection mechanism from an array of inexpensive single-bit thermal ...

Browarek, Sharmeen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Dealing With Load and Generation Cost Uncertainties in Power System Operation Studies: A Fuzzy Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power systems are currently facing a change of the paradigm that determined their operation and planning while being surrounded by multiple uncertainties sources. As a consequence, dealing with uncertainty is ...

Bruno André Gomes; Joăo Tomé Saraiva

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Production Cost Modeling of Cogenerators in an Interconnected Electric Supply System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Optimal State Electricity Supply System in Texas (OSEST) research project is part of the continuing Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) effort to identify possible improvements in the production, transmission, and use of electricity...

Ragsdale, K.

427

A new cost effective 3D measurement audit and model comparison system for verification tasks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new unified system application for the production audit in an aerospace industry is presented in this paper which comprises two key application tools such as (a) 3D PAMT (production audit measurement tool) and ...

Karthikeyan Vaiapury; Anil Aksay; Xinyu Lin…

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Method of calculating the cost of water and electrical power for nuclear desalination system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method of determining the economic factors of double-purpose systems is set out; this provides separate and fairly strict determinations of the expenses involved in the production of electrical power and fre...

Yu. I. Koryakin; A. A. Loginov; V. A. Chernyaev; I. I. Zakharov

1965-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

An adaptable, low cost test-bed for unmanned vehicle systems research.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? An unmanned vehicle systems test-bed has been developed. The test-bed has been designed to accommodate hardware changes and various vehicle types and algorithms. The… (more)

Goppert, James M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district heating system ­ and makes a proposal for a technical and economic improvement. Monitoring of water quality in district heating systems is necessary

431

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cost-Effective Design of a Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the battery cycle efficiency and state of health, characteristics of the supercapacitor bank, and dynamics energy storage system comprised of Li-ion batteries only. 1. INTRODUCTION Electric vehicles (EVs) have highly dependent on the intrinsic characteristics of Li-ion batteries. The cycle efficiency degradation

Pedram, Massoud

433

Integrated Chiller System Reduce Building Operation and Maintenance Costs in Cold Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although water-cooled chillers are more energy efficient than air-cooled chillers, a majority of chilled water systems use air-cooled chillers. In cold weather climates, air-cooled chillers are capable of functioning in low ambient temperatures...

Sheets, N.; Liu, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Combined heat and power systems for commercial buildings: investigating cost, emissions, and primary energy reduction based on system components.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Combined heat and power (CHP) systems produce electricity and useful heat from fuel. When power is produced near a building which consumes power, transmission… (more)

Smith, Amanda D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Private trucking costs and records  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were asked of the appro- priate officials in each case. Tbe interviewer observed the methods of keeping cost and operating statistics in order to determine the different systems in use and also to estimate the time and expense involved in keeping... TBB OHR4TIOI Oy TBBXR OMN TROCHE FLBBT@?1956 Losel Xaeareity Total Operation Rsysaeaa: Qrkviag Bayeaaes Motor tueL aa6 Oil Other operatiaO Bryaaeea 855, 104. 00 62?915 ?00 oO? 91?979?$65?00 040?0$7. 00 197 ' 725 ?00 62)054?667?00 911, 7...

Haning, Charles R

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Cost Estimator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

437

Operating Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

438

The evolution of total lightning and radar reflectivity characteristics of two mesoscale convective systems over Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) passed over the Houston Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network on 31 October 2005 and 21 April 2006. As the MCSs traverse the LDAR network, the systems slowly mature with a weakening convective line...

Hodapp, Charles Lee

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and posted 2/10/2011 and posted 2/10/2011 *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain $50,000 FONSI: uncertain Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $70,000 Attachment: Memo, Moody to Marcinowski, III, SUBJECT: NEPA 2011 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: Annual NEPA Planning Summary Environmental Assessments (EAs) Expected to be Initiated in the Next 12 Months Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Jan-11 Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones) South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Industrial Stormwater General Permit (IGP) # SCR000000 November 12, with an effective date of January

440

Benefit/cost framework for evaluating modular energy storage : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work documented in this report represents another step in the ongoing investigation of innovative and potentially attractive value propositions for electricity storage by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program. This study uses updated cost and performance information for modular energy storage (MES) developed for this study to evaluate four prospective value propositions for MES. The four potentially attractive value propositions are defined by a combination of well-known benefits that are associated with electricity generation, delivery, and use. The value propositions evaluated are: (1) transportable MES for electric utility transmission and distribution (T&D) equipment upgrade deferral and for improving local power quality, each in alternating years, (2) improving local power quality only, in all years, (3) electric utility T&D deferral in year 1, followed by electricity price arbitrage in following years; plus a generation capacity credit in all years, and (4) electric utility end-user cost management during times when peak and critical peak pricing prevail.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Schoenung, Susan M. (Longitude 122 West, Inc., Menlo Park, CA)

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Total solar house description and performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial attempt to apply the Total Solar concept to a residence in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, area is described. A very large storage capacity has made it possible to use only solar energy for meeting the heating, cooling and hot water needs for the entire year, with a parasitic power penalty of about 3500 kWh. Winter temperatures were maintained at 68/sup 0/F with 60/sup 0/F night setback, summer at 76/sup 0/F. Occupant intervention was negligible and passive overheat was minimized. The extra cost for the system, approximately $30,000 is readily amortized by the savings in purchased energy.

Starobin, L. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia); Starobin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Cost Shifting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cost shifting exists when a provider raises prices for one set of buyers because it has lowered prices for some other buyer. In theory, cost shifting can take place only if providers have unexploited market power. The empirical evidence on the extent of cost shifting is mixed. Taken as a whole, the evidence does not support the claims that cost shifting is a large and pervasive feature of the US health-care markets. At most, one can argue that perhaps one-fifth of Medicare payment reductions have been passed on to private payers. The majority of the rigorous studies, however, have found no evidence of cost shifting.

M.A. Morrisey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update September 30, 2010 Prepared by: Brian D. James, Jeffrey A. Kalinoski & Kevin N. Baum One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared under: Subcontract No. AGB-0-40628-01 to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 to the U.S. Department of Energy Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gasses and pollutants than

445

Aeronautical System Center's environmental compliance assessment and management program's cost-saving initiatives support the Air Force's acquisition reform initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Management directorate of ASC (ASC/EM) has the responsibility of providing government oversight for the Government Owned Contractor Operated Aircraft and Missile plants (GOCOs). This oversight is manifested as a landlord role where Air Force provides the funding required to maintain the plant facilities including buildings and utilities as well as environmental systems. By agreement the companies operating the plants are required to operate them in accordance with environmental law. Presently the GOCOs include Air Force Plant (AFP) 6 in Marietta Ga., AFP 4 in Fort Worth, Tx., AFP 44 in Tucson, Az., AFP 42 in Palmdale, Ca., and AFP PJKS in Denver, Co. Lockheed Martin corporation operates AFPs 4,6, PJKS and a portion of AFP 42 while AFP 44 is operated by Raytheon Missile Systems Company. Other GOCOs at AFP 42 are Northrup-Grumman, Boeing, and Cabaco, the facilities engineer. Since 1992 the Environmental Management division has conducted its Environmental Compliance Assessment and Management Program assessments (ECAMP) annually at each of the plants. Using DOD's ECAMP Team Guide and teams comprised of both Air Force and consultant engineering personnel, each plant is assessed for its environmental compliance well being. In the face of rising operational costs and diminishing budgets ASC/EM performed a comprehensive review of its ECAMP. As a result, the basic ECAMP program was improved to reduce costs without compromising on quality of the effort. The program retained its emphasis in providing a snap-shot evaluation of each Air Force plant's environmental compliance health supported by complete but tailored protocol assessments.

Meanor, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest that were varied included SO{sub 3} conditioning on/off, injection concentrations, and distribution spray patterns. The original test plan called for parametric testing of NORIT FGD carbon at 1, 3, and 10 lbs/MMacf. These injection concentrations were estimated based on results from the Pleasant Prairie tests that showed no additional mercury removal when injection concentrations were increased above 10 lbs/MMacf. The Brayton Point parametric test data indicated that higher injection concentrations would achieve higher removal efficiencies and should be tested. The test plan was altered to include testing at 20 lbs/MMacf. The first test at this higher rate showed very high removal across the second ESP (>80%). Unlike the ''ceiling'' phenomenon witnessed at Pleasant Prairie, increasing sorbent injection concentration resulted in further capture of vapor-phase mercury. The final phase of field-testing was a 10-day period of continuous injection of NORIT FGD carbon. During the first five days, the injection concentration was held at 10 lbs/MMacf, followed by nominally five days of testing at an injection concentration of 20 lbs/MMacf. The mercury removal, as measured by the semi-continuous emission monitors (S-CEM), varied between 78% and 95% during the 10 lbs/MMacf period and increased to >97% when the injection concentration was increased to 20 lbs/MMacf. During the long-term testing period, mercury measurements following EPA's draft Ontario Hydro method were conducted by TRC Environmental Corporation at both 10 and 20 lbs/MMacf test conditions. The Ontario Hydro data showed that the particulate mercury removal was similar between the two conditions of 10 or 20 lbs/MMacf and removal efficiencies were greater than 99%. Elemental mercury was not detected in any samples, so no conclusions as to its removal can be drawn. Removal of oxidized mercury, on the other hand, increased from 68% to 93% with the higher injection concentration. These removal rates agreed well with the S-CEM results.

Michael D. Durham

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

Overview of total system model used for the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A summary is presented for the total system model used to represent physical processes associated with the seven scenario classes (i.e., nominal conditions, early waste package (WP) failure, early drip shield (DS) failure, igneous intrusive events, igneous eruptive events, seismic ground motion events and seismic fault displacement events) considered in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The total system model estimates dose to an exposed individual resulting from radionuclide movement through the repository system and biosphere. Components of the total system model described in this presentation include models for (i) climate analysis, (ii) land surface infiltration and associated unsaturated zone flow, (iii) multi-scale thermal hydrology and engineered barrier system (EBS) thermal–hydrologic environment, (iv) EBS physical and chemical environment, (v) WP and DS degradation, (vi) drift seepage and drift wall condensation, (vii) waste form degradation and mobilization, (viii) water and radionuclide movement in the EBS and underlying unsaturated and saturated zones, (ix) radionuclide movement in the biosphere and resultant human exposure, and (x) processes specific to early WP and DS failures, intrusive and eruptive igneous events, and seismic ground motion and fault displacement events.

C.W. Hansen; J.T. Birkholzer; J. Blink; C.R. Bryan; Y. Chen; M.B. Gross; E. Hardin; J. Houseworth; R. Howard; R. Jarek; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P. Mariner; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; F.V. Perry; B. Robinson; D. Sassani; S.D. Sevougian; J.S. Stein; M. Wasiolek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Cost analysis guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Oxygenation cost estimates for Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capital and annual costs associated with reoxygenation of the turbine releases at Cherokee, Douglas and Norris Reservoirs using the small bubble injection technique developed for Ft. Patrick Henry Dam were computed. The weekly average dissolved oxygen (DO) deficits were computed for each reservoir for an average year (based on 16 years of records). The total annual cost of an oxygen supply and injection system for each reservoir is presented. 5 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Fain, T.G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Pipeline compressor station construction cost analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to provide a reference for pipeline compressor station construction costs by analysing individual compressor station cost components using historical compressor station cost data between 1992 and 2008. Distribution and share of these pipeline compressor station cost components are assessed based on compressor station capacity, year of completion, and locations. Average unit costs in material, labour, miscellaneous, land, and total costs are $866/hp, $466/hp, $367/hp, $13/hp, and $1,712/hp, respectively. Primary costs for compressor stations are material cost, approximately 50.6% of the total cost. This study conducts a learning curve analysis to investigate the learning rate of material and labour costs for different groups. Results show that learning rates and construction component costs vary by capacity and locations. This study also investigates the causes of pipeline compressor station construction cost differences. [Received: March 25, 2012; Accepted; 20 February 2013

Yipeng Zhao; Zhenhua Rui

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Peripherally Placed Totally Implantable Venous-access Port Systems of the Forearm: Clinical Experience in 763 Consecutive Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneously placed totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) of the forearm. Between January 2006 and October 2008, peripheral TIVAPs were implanted in 763 consecutive patients by ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. All catheters were implanted under local anesthesia and were tunneled subcutaneously. Indication, technical success, and complications were retrospectively analyzed according to Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) criteria. Presence of antibiotic prophylaxis, periprocedurally administered drugs (e.g., sedation), and laboratory results at the time of implantation were analyzed. Maintenance during the service interval was evaluated. In total, 327,499 catheter-days were analyzed. Technical success rate was 99.3%. Reasons for initial failure of implantation were either unexpected thrombosis of the subclavian vein, expanding tumor mass of the mediastinum, or failure of peripheral venous access due to fragile vessels. Mean follow-up was 430 days. There were 115 complications observed (15.1%, 0.03 per 100 catheter-days), of which 33 (4.3%) were classified as early (within 30 days from implantation) and 82 (10.7%) as late. Catheter-related venous thrombosis was found in 65 (8.5%) of 763 (0.02 per 100 catheter-days) TIVAPs. Infections were observed in 41 (5.4%) of 763 (0.01 per 100 catheter-days) devices. Other complications observed included dislocation of the catheter tip (0.8%), occlusion (0.1%), or rupture (0.1%) of the port catheter. Dislocated catheters were corrected during a second interventional procedure. In conclusion, implantation of percutaneously placed peripheral TIVAPs shows a high technical success rate and low risk of early complications when ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance are used. Late complications are observed three times as often as early complications.

Goltz, Jan P., E-mail: Goltz@roentgen.uni-wuerzburg.de; Scholl, Anne; Ritter, Christian O. [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology (Germany); Wittenberg, Guenther [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Bielefeld Gilead, Institute of Radiology (Germany); Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS YOU KNOW WHAT THE TUITION, STIPEND AND EQUIPMENT COSTS ARE YOU KNOW WHAT THE TOTAL COST IS CALCULATION IS USING THE 2010 FED F&A RATE FOR WSU OF 52% (.52) [ DIRECT COST ­ TUITION ­ STIPEND ­ EQUIPMENT] (.52 ) + DIRECT

Finley Jr., Russell L.

453

SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Reducing Non-Hardware Costs DOE supports efforts to dramatically reduce the non-hardware, balance of systems costs associated with solar energy systems. Representing as much as 64% of the total installed system price, these "soft costs" include: Customer Acquisition Financing and Contracting Permitting, Interconnection, and Inspection Installation and Performance Operations and Maintenance. To meet SunShot goals, the industry must innovate new ways to automate and speed processes that make it easier for consumers, businesses, utilities, solar companies, and others to install solar projects. For example, novel software solutions now allow solar companies to design systems and provide accurate quotes using satellite images rather than conducting full site visits.

454

cost savings  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

reduced the amount of time involved in the annual chemical inventory for a cost savings of 18,282. Other presentations covered SRNS' award-winning employee suggestion...

455

BPA's Costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BPAsCosts Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates...

456

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. Volume II contains all the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output. Both volumes include the complete table of contents and lists of figures and tables. In addition, both volumes include the indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual.

Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

1984-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

458

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2013 Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is the seventh annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis conducted by Strategic Analysis under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. The 2013 update covers fuel cell cost analysis of both light duty vehicle (automotive) and transit bus applications for only the current year (i.e., 2013).

459

Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

sunshot DOEGO-102012-3663 * September 2012 MOTIVATION Solar concentrators currently cost 150-250m 2 , which represents as much as half of the total installed cost for a...

460

Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Concentrators Concentrators California Institute of Technology/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Award Number:0595-1612 | April 18, 2013 | Ganapathi * Mirror module development has been approached with the goal of being applicable to all types of CSP systems * Several heliostat design options being considered to address driving requirements: * Facets that are compliant to winds > 35 mph * Deep structures for optimizing structural efficiency * Pointing accuracy achieved with mechanism design * Simple precision components * Easy on-site assembly with pre-fab components * Structural foam properties and strengthening trades being conducted to reduce overall costs with FEM models Goal: Typical costs for a concentrator (heliostat or parabolic dish) can range between 40-50% of the total costs. To meet SunShot

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total system cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Concentrators Concentrators California Institute of Technology/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Award Number:0595-1612 | January 15, 2013 | Ganapathi Thin Film mirror is ~40-50% cheaper and 60% lighter than SOA * Project leverages extensive space experience by JPL and L'Garde to develop a low-cost parabolic dish capable of providing 4 kW thermal. Key features: * Metallized reflective thin film material with high reflectivity (>93%) with polyurethane foam backing * Single mold polyurethane backing fabrication enables low cost high production manufacturing * Ease of panel installation and removal enables repairs and results in a low total life cycle cost * Deployment of multiple dishes enhances system level optimizations by simulating larger fields which addresses issues like shared resources

462

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

463

Cost Analysis: Technology, Competitiveness, Market Uncertainty...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

policy impacts on system financing, and to perform detailed levelized cost of energy (LCOE) analyses. This shows the path to cost-equalizing as envisioned under the...

464

External costs: an attempt to make power generation a fair game (case study Croatia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

External costs of electricity represent the monetary value of the environmental damage caused by electricity generation. They are here calculated applying the impact pathway methodology on Croatian specific conditions. This paper estimates the external costs of coal and gas fired power plants determined as main candidates for Croatian power system expansion till 2030. It is analyzed how the estimated external costs, when incorporated into total production costs, would affect the competitiveness of fossil-fired plants compared to other electricity generation options, i.e. how they influence the optimal expansion strategy of the Croatian power system.

Tea Kovacevic; Zeljko Tomsic; Nenad Debrecin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Title Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-19734 Year of Publication 1985 Authors Arasteh, Dariush K., Russell Johnson, Stephen E. Selkowitz, and Deborah J. Connell Conference Name 2nd Annual Symposium on Improving Building Energy Efficiency in Hot and Humid Climates Date Published 09/1985 Conference Location Texas A&M University Call Number LBL-19734 Abstract Fenestration performance in nonresidentialsbuildings in hot climates is often a large coolingsload liability. Proper fenestration design andsthe use of daylight-responsive dimming controls onselectric lights can, in addition to drasticallysreducing lighting energy, lower cooling loads,speak electrical demand, operating costs, chillerssizes, and first costs. Using the building energyssimulation programs DOE-2.1B and DOE-2.1C , wesfirst discuss lighting energy savings from daylighting.sThe effects of fenestration parametersson cooling loads, total energy use, peak demand,schiller sizes, and initial and operating costs aresalso discussed. The impact of daylighting, asscompared to electric lighting, on cooling requirementssis discussed as a function of glazingscharacteristics, location, and shading systems.

466

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 16, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2001 933 Discussion on "Review of Usage-Based Transmission Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Usage-Based Transmission Cost Allocation Methods Under Open Access" Juan Zolezzi, Hugh Rudnick., IEEE Trans. Power Systems, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 1218­1224, November 2000. Discussion of "Review of Usage comparing a variety of usage-based transmission charges. This discusser would like to make two points about

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad CatĂłlica de Chile)

467

Tools to support a model-based methodology for emission/immission and benefit/cost/risk analysis of wastewater systems that considers uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a set of tools developed to support an innovative methodology to design and upgrade wastewater treatment systems in a probabilistic way. For the first step, data reconstruction, two different tools were developed, one for situations ... Keywords: Cost-benefit analysis, Grid computing, Modelling and simulation, Risk, Software tools, Wastewater treatment plant design

Lorenzo Benedetti; Davide Bixio; Filip Claeys; Peter A. Vanrolleghem

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL 21,NO 3, AUGUST 2006 Reliability and Cost trade-off in Multi-Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution is developed in this paper. After global decomposition, an equation for reliability is derived1 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL 21,NO 3, AUGUST 2006 Reliability and Cost trade an optimization procedure for generation expansion and placement considering generation reliability in multi

469

Low-cost flywheel demonstration program. Final report, 1 October 1977-31 December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Applied Physics Laboratory/Department of Energy Low Cost Flywheel Demonstration Program was initiated on 1 October 1977 and was successfully concluded on 31 December 1979. The total cost of this program was $355,190. All primary objectives were successfully achieved as follows: demonstration of a full-size, 1-kWh flywheel having an estimated cost in large-volume production of approximately $50/kWh; development of a ball-bearing system having losses comparable to the losses in a totally magnetic suspension system; successful and repeated demonstration of the low-cost flywheel in a complete flywheel energy-storage system based on the use of ordinary house voltage and frequency; and application of the experience gained in the hardware program to project the system design into a complete, full-scale, 30-kWh home-type flywheel energy-storage system.

Rabenhorst, D.W.; Small, T.R.; Wilkinson, W.O.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application: 2009 Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis conducted by Directed Technologies (DTI), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE).

471

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to hydrogen storage vessels and compressors. Feedstock CostHydrogen Production Equipment Purifier Storage System Compressor Dispenser Additional Equipment Installation Costshydrogen equipment costs. Meyers [2] provides an in depth analyses of reformer, compressor, and storage equipment costs.

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Report on Inspection of Los Alamos National Laboratory's System for Controlling Cost Overruns on Work-for-Others Projects, IG-0369  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPORT ON INSPECTION OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY'S SYSTEM FOR CONTROLLING COST OVERRUNS ON WORK-FOR-OTHERS PROJECTS The Office of Inspections wants to make the distribution of its inspection reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, we are making this report available electronically through the Internet at the following alternative addresses: Department of Energy Headquarters Gopher gopher.hr.doe.gov Department of Energy Headquarters Anonymous FTP vml.hqadmin.doe.gov We are experimenting with various options to facilitate inspection report distrubution. Your comments would be

473

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

475

Historical pipeline construction cost analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to provide a reference for the pipeline construction cost, by analysing individual pipeline cost components with historical pipeline cost data. Cost data of 412 pipelines recorded between 1992 and 2008 in the Oil and Gas Journal are collected and adjusted to 2008 dollars with the chemical engineering plant cost index (CEPCI). The distribution and share of these 412 pipeline cost components are assessed based on pipeline diameter, pipeline length, pipeline capacity, the year of completion, locations of pipelines. The share of material and labour cost dominates the pipeline construction cost, which is about 71% of the total cost. In addition, the learning curve analysis is conducted to attain learning rate with respect to pipeline material and labour costs for different groups. Results show that learning rate and construction cost are varied by pipeline diameters, pipeline lengths, locations of pipelines and other factors. This study also investigates the causes of pipeline construction cost differences among different groups. [Received: October 13, 2010; Accepted: December 20, 2010

Zhenhua Rui; Paul A. Metz; Doug B. Reynolds; Gang Chen; Xiyu Zhou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process Final Report December 2001 This document is not an official copy and is for informational purposes only. CONTENTS Summary Objectives International perspective Recommendations for future assessments 1 Introduction 1.1 Background to the Yucca Mountain Project 1.2 Terms of reference, objectives and scope of the review 1.3 Conduct of the review 1.4 Organisation of this report 2 General Considerations 2.1 Regulatory perspective 2.2 Performance assessment rationale 2.3 General approach to performance assessment 2.4 Documentation 3 Sub-system methodology 3.1 Repository design

477

Life-cycle cost analysis of floating offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this article is to put forward a methodology in order to evaluate the Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) of a Floating Offshore Wind Farm (FOWF). In this paper CBS is evaluated linked to Life-Cycle Cost System (LCS) and taking into account each of the phases of the FOWF life cycle. In this sense, six phases will be defined: definition, design, manufacturing, installation, exploitation and dismantling. Each and every one of these costs can be subdivided into different sub-costs in order to obtain the key variables that run the life-cycle cost. In addition, three different floating platforms will be considered: semisubmersible, Tensioned Leg Platform (TLP) and spar. Several types of results will be analysed according to each type of floating platform considered: the percentage of the costs, the value of the cost of each phase of the life-cycle and the value of the total cost in each point of the coast. The results obtained allow us to become conscious of what the most important costs are and minimize them, which is one of the most important contributions nowadays. It will be useful to improve the competitiveness of floating wind farms in the future.

Castro-Santos Laura; Diaz-Casas Vicente

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Electricity costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... index is used to correct for inflation. The short answer is given by the Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The ... Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The cost per kWh of fuel. . . rose by 18.6 per cent (between 1979 ...

J.W. JEFFERY

1982-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

479

Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e.g., natural gas, coal, nuclear), preliminary results identify the level of renewable penetration at which a given advanced HES option (e.g., a nuclear hybrid) becomes increasingly more economical than a traditional electricity-only generation solution. Conditions are also revealed under which carbon resources may be better utilized as carbon sources for chemical production rather than as combustion material for electricity generation.

Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Vehicle Cost Vehicle Cost Calculator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on AddThis.com... Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Also

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481

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

user. An oil-based avoided cost although by thus providesoil costs as a measure of avoided costs. base If coal costssale, so-called avoided costs. * In fact, the implementation

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Mass-Production Cost Estimation for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Kevin Baum, Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski, Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005236 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Update 2011 automotive fuel cell cost model to include * latest performance data and system design information. Examine costs of fuel cell systems (FCSs) for light-duty * vehicle and bus applications.

483

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS, VOL. 11, NO. 1, MARCH 2010 243 Fig. 7. Cost comparison.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

state of the art of electric, hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles," Proc. IEEE, vol. 95, no. 4, pp. 704. Cost comparison. illustrates the vehicle motion behavior. After t = 2 s, the trajectory of the vehicle control one. Fig. 6 illustrates the vehicle motion behavior. The vehicle again tracks the path at nearly

Boyer, Edmond

484

Non-Hardware ("Soft") Cost-Reduction Roadmap for Residential and Small Commercial Solar Photovoltaics, 2013-2020  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this analysis is to roadmap the cost reductions and innovations necessary to achieve the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative's total soft-cost targets by 2020. The roadmap focuses on advances in four soft-cost areas: (1) customer acquisition; (2) permitting, inspection, and interconnection (PII); (3) installation labor; and (4) financing. Financing cost reductions are in terms of the weighted average cost of capital (WACC) for financing PV system installations, with real-percent targets of 3.0% (residential) and 3.4% (commercial).

Ardani, K.; Seif, D.; Margolis, R.; Morris, J.; Davidson, C.; Truitt, S.; Torbert, R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.