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Sample records for total quality management

  1. Total quality management implementation guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

  2. Total quality management program planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, P.T.; Spence, K.

    1994-05-01

    As government funding grows scarce, competition between the national laboratories is increasing dramatically. In this era of tougher competition, there is no for resistance to change. There must instead be a uniform commitment to improving the overall quality of our products (research and technology) and an increased focus on our customers` needs. There has been an ongoing effort to bring the principles of total quality management (TQM) to all Energy Systems employees to help them better prepare for future changes while responding to the pressures on federal budgets. The need exists for instituting a vigorous program of education and training to an understanding of the techniques needed to improve and initiate a change in organizational culture. The TQM facilitator is responsible for educating the work force on the benefits of self-managed work teams, designing a program of instruction for implementation, and thus getting TQM off the ground at the worker and first-line supervisory levels so that the benefits can flow back up. This program plan presents a conceptual model for TQM in the form of a hot air balloon. In this model, there are numerous factors which can individually and collectively impede the progress of TQM within the division and the Laboratory. When these factors are addressed and corrected, the benefits of TQM become more visible. As this occurs, it is hoped that workers and management alike will grasp the ``total quality`` concept as an acceptable agent for change and continual improvement. TQM can then rise to the occasion and take its rightful place as an integral and valid step in the Laboratory`s formula for survival.

  3. NREL: Building America Total Quality Management - 2015 Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL: Building America Total Quality Management - 2015 Peer Review NREL: Building America Total Quality Management - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Stacey Rothgeb, NREL View the ...

  4. NREL: Building America Total Quality Management - 2015 Peer Review |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy NREL: Building America Total Quality Management - 2015 Peer Review NREL: Building America Total Quality Management - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Stacey Rothgeb, NREL View the Presentation NREL: Building America Total Quality Management - 2015 Peer Review (2.43 MB) More Documents & Publications Home Performance with ENERGY STAR - 2014 BTO Peer Review NREL: Building America Total Quality Management - 2015 Peer Review R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material

  5. Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, N.

    1993-11-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

  6. Total Quality Management (TQM) concepts applied to instruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuccio, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    Drawing on DOE Order 5700.6C and other industry standards, this document presents several concepts and tools of Total Quality Management (TQM), a brief history of their use at EG&G Rocky Flats, and how they are being applied to address processes of instruction common to TAP. Concepts presented and applied include: statistical process control (SPC), e.g. using control charts, as an evaluation methodology for learners and instructors; TQM conceptual tools, e.g. brainstorming, affinity diagrams, and interrelationship digraphs, as a methodology for planning programs of instruction such as TAP; and team activities to construct instructional process systems.

  7. Total Quality Management (TQM) concepts applied to instruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuccio, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    Drawing on DOE Order 5700.6C and other industry standards, this document presents several concepts and tools of Total Quality Management (TQM), a brief history of their use at EG G Rocky Flats, and how they are being applied to address processes of instruction common to TAP. Concepts presented and applied include: statistical process control (SPC), e.g. using control charts, as an evaluation methodology for learners and instructors; TQM conceptual tools, e.g. brainstorming, affinity diagrams, and interrelationship digraphs, as a methodology for planning programs of instruction such as TAP; and team activities to construct instructional process systems.

  8. Total Quality Management at an Oak Ridge laboratory and the establishment of an internal quality program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorsey, J.G.

    1993-11-01

    In order for any laboratory to be successful today, it is imperative that a total commitment to quality management be the keystone of that laboratory. Modern industry has begun to recognize that it must reach beyond traditional Quality Assurance methods and enlist the participation of all members of the organization for their unique contributions to make their organizations truly excellent. This report discusses Total Quality Management in the Analytical Services Organization at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Laboratories are in the Y-12 Plant, which is one of three government sites located in Oak Ridge that are managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems for the Department of Energy (DOE).

  9. Quality assurance in the petroleum industry: Oil and gas industry Total Quality Management (TQM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penny, N.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of Total Quality Management (TQM) at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC), known as Elk Hills', and one of the largest oil and gas producing and processing facilities in the nation. NPRC is jointly owned by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and Chevron USA Inc. (CUSA), and is managed and operated by Bechtel Petroleum Operations Inc. (BPOI). This paper describes step-by-step methods for getting started in TQM in the oil and gas industry, including the essential quality systems ingredients. The paper also illustrates how the President's Award for Quality and Productivity Improvement and the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) can be used as the assessment standards and benchmarks for measuring TQM. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Comparison of approaches to Total Quality Management. Including...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; US DOE; PROGRAM MANAGEMENT; ...

  11. Integrating total quality management principles with the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedges, D.

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy has recently required its field offices, contractors, and subcontractors to implement DOE Order 5700.6C, ``Quality Assurance,`` for all work on waste management contracts. The order restructures the 18 criteria of NQA-1 and focuses on the role of management in achieving and assuring quality, performance of activities to achieve and assure quality, and management`s assessment of its performance for the purpose of identifying improvements to be made. The DOE order also introduces elements of the total quality management (TQM) philosophy, which were not present in DOE Order 5700.6B. The research community within DOE has recently issued a document entitled DOE Order 5700.6C Implementation Guide, which is more explicit about the integration of TQM principles with the implementation of DOE Order 5700.6C in research facilities. The Environmental Protection Agency is sponsoring a quality assurance standard (ANSI/ASQC E-4) to replace EPA`s QAMS 005/80. The new standard is consistent with DOE Order 5700.6C, and it also stresses the integration of TQM principles within the quality assurance process. This paper discusses the intent and philosophy of the 10 criteria of the new DOE order, the status of ANSI/ASQC E-4, and how to effectively integrate TQM principles into the quality assurance process as the conversion is made from NQA-1 to DOE Order 5700.6C. The purpose and value of DOE Order 5700.6C Implementation Guide for research will also be discussed.

  12. Total quality management (TQM) and the future of the environmental industry: Integration of quality tools and techniques among competing interests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bicknell, B.A.; Bicknell, K.D. )

    1993-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems facing industry, regulators, consultants and attorneys involved in the environmental arena is the lack of a functional method of prioritization of the seemingly unreconcilable interests of the varying entities involved in waste reduction, elimination and cleanup. This paper and presentation will address this problem by presenting methodology for problem solving that can be adopted by the competing interests to form a unified systems analysis that has enjoyed widespread use and success in both commercial business and industry, and other regulated government industries such as defense, aerospace and communication. The authors will employ specific examples of case studies with focus on hazardous waste reduction and how the quality tools and techniques commonly referred to as Total Quality Management (such as Quality Function Deployment, Experimental Design, Statistical Process Control and Functional Analysis) are and can be utilized in the process. The authors will illustrate the application of TQM techniques to areas such as process integration (e.g. implementation of the NEPA decision-making), as well as functional implementation in risk assessment, cost analysis and concurrent engineering (in the case of waste minimization technology development).

  13. Comparison of approaches to Total Quality Management. Including an examination of the Department of Energy`s position on quality management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of several qualitatively different approaches to Total Quality Management (TQM). The continuum ranges from management approaches that are primarily standards -- with specific guidelines, but few theoretical concepts -- to approaches that are primarily philosophical, with few specific guidelines. The approaches to TQM discussed in this paper include the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9000 Standard, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, Senge`s the Learning Organization, Watkins and Marsick`s approach to organizational learning, Covey`s Seven Habits of Highly Successful People, and Deming`s Fourteen Points for Management. Some of these approaches (Deming and ISO 9000) are then compared to the DOE`s official position on quality management and conduct of operations (DOE Orders 5700.6C and 5480.19). Using a tabular format, it is shown that while 5700.6C (Quality Assurance) maps well to many of the current approaches to TQM, DOE`s principle guide to management Order 5419.80 (Conduct of Operations) has many significant conflicts with some of the modern approaches to continuous quality improvement.

  14. Quality Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Quality Management, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security develops policies and procedures to ensure the classification and control of information is effective and...

  15. Quality assurance and data management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockrem, L.L.

    1998-01-12

    This report contains graphs and tables relating to quality assurance and data management for environmental quality at Hanford Reservation.

  16. Office of Quality Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Quality Management develops and interprets Government-wide policies and procedures and conducts training to ensure the accurate identification of information and documents that must be classified or controlled under statute or Executive order to protect the national security and controlled unclassified Official Use Only information for the effective operation of the Government.

  17. Total Ore Processing Integration and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch

    2006-01-30

    This report outlines the technical progress achieved for project DE-FC26-03NT41785 (Total Ore Processing Integration and Management) during the period 01 October through 31 December of 2005. Graphical analysis of blast patterns according to drill monitor data is continuing. Multiple linear regression analysis of 16 mine and mill variables (powder factor, two modeled size fractions, liberation index, predicted grind, total crude Fe, Satmagan Fe, sat ratio, DSC, geologic blend, ambient temperature, cobbing hours, feeder plugs, and percent feeder run time-of-mill time) indicates that December variations in plant performance are generally predictable (Figure 1). The outlier on December 28th coincides with low cobbing availability and equipment downtime. Mill productivity appeared to be most influenced, as usual, by ore quality as indicated by the liberation index--the higher the liberation index, the lower the throughput. The upcoming quarter will be concerned with wrapping up the work in progress, such as the detailed statistical analyses, and writing a final report. Hibtac Mine engineers are evaluating neural network software to determine its utility for modeling, and eventually predicting, mill throughput.

  18. Total Ore Processing Integration and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch; Richard Gertsch

    2004-06-30

    This report outlines the technical progress achieved for project DE-FC26-03NT41785 (Total Ore Processing Integration and Management) during the period 01 April through 30 June of 2004.

  19. Environmental Management (EM) Quality Procedures | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quality Procedure - Records Management Quality Procedure - MemoCorrespondence Control and Tracking Quality Procedure - Stop Work Quality Procedure - Supplier Qualification ...

  20. Total Ore Processing Integration and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch; Richard Gertsch

    2006-01-30

    This report outlines the technical progress achieved for project DE-FC26-03NT41785 (Total Ore Processing Integration and Management) during the period 01 July through 30 September of 2005. This ninth quarterly report discusses the activities of the project team during the period 1 July through 30 September 2005. Richard Gertsch's unexpected death due to natural causes while in Minnesota to work on this project has temporarily slowed progress. Statistical analysis of the Minntac Mine data set for late 2004 is continuing. Preliminary results raised several questions that could be amenable to further study. Detailed geotechnical characterization is being applied to improve the predictability of mill and agglomerator performance at Hibtac Mine.

  1. Quality Procedure - Records Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Records Management Quality Procedure - Records Management This procedure establishes the responsibilities and process for identifying and managing records, including quality records, generated by EM Headquarters Office of Standards and Quality Assurance personnel as well as Office of Standards and Quality Assurance representatives located in DOE EM Field Offices in accordance with EM-QA-001, Environmental Management Quality Assurance Program. Quality Procedure - Records Management (2.32 MB) More

  2. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-30

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Environment Department addresses its responsibilities through activities in a variety of areas. The need for a comprehensive management control system for these activities has been identified by the Department of Energy (DOE). The WM QA (Waste Management Quality Assurance) Plan is an integral part of a management system that provides controls necessary to ensure that the department`s activities are planned, performed, documented, and verified. This WM QA Plan defines the requirements of the WM QA program. These requirements are derived from DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, the LBL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP, LBL PUB-3111), and other environmental compliance documents applicable to WM activities. The requirements presented herein, as well as the procedures and methodologies that direct the implementation of these requirements, will undergo review and revisions as necessary. The provisions of this QA Plan and its implementing documents apply to quality-affecting activities performed by and for WM. It is also applicable to WM contractors, vendors, and other LBL organizations associated with WM activities, except where such contractors, vendors, or organizations are governed by their own WM-approved QA programs. References used in the preparation of this document are (1) ASME NQA-1-1989, (2) ANSI/ASQC E4 (Draft), (3) Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (LBL PUB-5352, Rev. 1), (4) LBL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP), LBL PUB-3111, 2/3/93. A list of terms and definitions used throughout this document is included as Appendix A.

  3. DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions. PDF icon qm6-14-13.pdf More Documents & Publications Version Tracking Document for DOE Challenge Homes, National ...

  4. Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) Waste Management Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HORHOTA, M.J.

    2000-12-21

    The Waste Management Project (WMP) is committed to excellence in our work and to delivering quality products and services to our customers, protecting our employees and the public and to being good stewards of the environment. We will continually strive to understand customer requirements, perform services, and activities that meet or exceed customer expectations, and be cost-effective in our performance. The WMP maintains an environment that fosters continuous improvement in our processes, performance, safety and quality. The achievement of quality will require the total commitment of all WMP employees to our ethic that Quality, Health and Safety, and Regulatory Compliance must come before profits. The successful implementation of this policy and ethic requires a formal, documented management quality system to ensure quality standards are established and achieved in all activities. The following principles are the foundation of our quality system. Senior management will take full ownership of the quality system and will create an environment that ensures quality objectives are met, standards are clearly established, and performance is measured and evaluated. Line management will be responsible for quality system implementation. Each organization will adhere to all quality system requirements that apply to their function. Every employee will be responsible for their work quality, to work safely and for complying with the policies, procedures and instructions applicable to their activities. Quality will be addressed and verified during all phases of our work scope from proposal development through closeout including contracts or projects. Continuous quality improvement will be an ongoing process. Our quality ethic and these quality principles constantly guide our actions. We will meet our own quality expectations and exceed those of our customers with vigilance, commitment, teamwork, and persistence.

  5. US South Coast Air Quality Management District SCAQMD | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    South Coast Air Quality Management District SCAQMD Jump to: navigation, search Name: US South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Place: Diamond Bar, California Zip: CA...

  6. WAP Memorandum 010: Quality Management Plan - Record Keeping...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10: Quality Management Plan - Record Keeping and Reporting WAP Memorandum 010: Quality Management Plan - Record Keeping and Reporting Effective: April 8, 2015 10 CFR 440.24 ...

  7. Quality Assurance Guide for Project Management - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2, Quality Assurance Guide for Project Management by John Makepeace Functional areas: Project Management, Quality Assurance and Oversight This Guide provides acceptable approaches...

  8. Project Hanford management contract quality improvement project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS, D.E.

    1999-03-25

    On July 13, 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Manager transmitted a letter to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) describing several DOE-RL identified failed opportunities for FDH to improve the Quality Assurance (QA) Program and its implementation. In addition, DOE-RL identified specific Quality Program performance deficiencies. FDH was requested to establish a periodic reporting mechanism for the corrective action program. In a July 17, 1998 response to DOE-RL, FDH agreed with the DOE concerns and committed to perform a comprehensive review of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) QA Program during July and August, 1998. As a result, the Project Hanford Management Contract Quality Improvement Plan (QIP) (FDH-3508) was issued on October 21, 1998. The plan identified corrective actions based upon the results of an in-depth Quality Program Assessment. Immediately following the scheduled October 22, 1998, DOE Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH-10) Enforcement Conference, FDH initiated efforts to effectively implement the QIP corrective actions. A Quality Improvement Project (QI Project) leadership team was assembled to prepare a Project Management Plan for this project. The management plan was specifically designed to engage a core team and the support of representatives from FDH and the major subcontractors (MSCs) to implement the QIP initiatives; identify, correct, and provide feedback as to the root cause for deficiency; and close out the corrective actions. The QI Project will manage and communicate progress of the process.

  9. Hanford Sampling Quality Management Plan (HSQMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyatt, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    HSQMP establishes quality requirements in response to DOE Order 5700. 6C and to 10 Code of Federal Regulations 830.120. HSQMP is designed to meet the needs of Richland Operations Office for controlling the quality of services provided by sampling operations. It is issued through the Analytical Services Program of the Waste Programs Division. This document describes the Environmental Sampling and Analysis Program activities considered to represent the best management activities necessary to achieve a sampling program with adequate control.

  10. Project Management Quality Assurance Guide, GPG 017 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Management Quality Assurance Guide, GPG 017 Project Management Quality Assurance Guide, GPG 017 LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT Good Practice Guide GPG-FM-017 Quality Assurance March 1996 Department of Energy Office of Field Management Office of Project and Fixed Asset Management Project Management Quality Assurance Guide, GPG 017 (303.89 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE-STD-1054-93 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - May 2013 Site Selection

  11. Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Product: Total Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases PropanePropylene Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other ...

  12. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases PropanePropylene Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel ...

  13. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.9 Q Q Q Heat Pump......7.7 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System......Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration ...

  14. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.9 Q Q Q Heat Pump......6.2 3.8 2.4 Steam or Hot Water System......Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information ...

  15. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management-Quality Assurance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements and Description | Department of Energy Management-Quality Assurance Requirements and Description Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management-Quality Assurance Requirements and Description A report detailling the requirements and description of the Quality Assurance program. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management-Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (566.23 KB) More Documents & Publications Quality Assurance Requirements Civilian Radioactive Waste

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Recommended Quality Management Provisions DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions. QM Cheklist.pdf (34.28 KB) More Documents & Publications Version Tracking Document for DOE Challenge Homes, National Program Requirements (Rev. 03) Washington DOE ZERH Program Requirements DOE Challenge Home, California

  17. Hanford Sampling Quality Management Plan (HSQMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyatt, J.E.

    1995-04-28

    This document provides a management tool for evaluating and designing the appropriate elements of a field sampling program. This document provides discussion of the elements of a program and is to be used as a guidance document during the preparation of project and/or function specific documentation. This document does not specify how a sampling program shall be organized. The HSQMP is to be used as a companion document to the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) DOE/RL-94-55. The generation of this document was enhanced by conducting baseline evaluations of current sampling organizations. Valuable input was received from members of field and Quality Assurance organizations. The HSQMP is expected to be a living document. Revisions will be made as regulations and or Hanford Site conditions warrant changes in the best management practices. Appendices included are: summary of the sampling and analysis work flow process, a user`s guide to the Data Quality Objective process, and a self-assessment checklist.

  18. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to

  19. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.5 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 3.9 2.4 1.5 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 4.4 3.2 1.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 3.5 2.4 1.1 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 3.2 2.1 1.1 2,500 to

  20. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7

  1. Total................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to

  2. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7

  3. Total...................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500............................................ 3.2 0.4 Q 0.6 1.7 0.4 500 to 999................................................... 23.8 4.8 1.4 4.2 10.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499............................................. 20.8 10.6 1.8 1.8 4.0 2.6 1,500 to 1,999............................................. 15.4 12.4 1.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 2,000 to 2,499............................................. 12.2 10.7 1.0 0.2 Q Q 2,500 to

  4. Total.........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3

  5. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1

  6. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4

  7. Quality Procedure - Management Assessment and Self-Assessment | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Management Assessment and Self-Assessment Quality Procedure - Management Assessment and Self-Assessment This procedure establishes the roles, responsibilities, requirements, and process for conducting Environmental Management (EM) Office of Standards and Quality Assurance management assessments and self-assessments. Effective management assessments and self-assessments are built on self-evaluation, work process analysis, clear communication with management, and honest feedback that

  8. Total...........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9

  9. WAP Memorandum 010: Quality Management Plan - Record Keeping and Reporting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 10: Quality Management Plan - Record Keeping and Reporting WAP Memorandum 010: Quality Management Plan - Record Keeping and Reporting Effective: April 8, 2015 10 CFR 440.24 requires Grantees and Subgrantees administering the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) keep records as the Department of Energy (DOE) shall require. WAP Memorandum 15-10 Quality Management Plan addresses record keeping and reporting. The attached draft Client File Checklist identifies elements

  10. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management-Quality Assurance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Quality Assurance Requirements Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document Root Cause Analysis Report In Response to Condition Report 5223 Regarding Emails ...

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions. QM Cheklist.pdf (34.28 KB) More Documents & Publications Version Tracking Document for DOE Challenge Homes, ...

  12. DOE ZERH Webinar: Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a quality management program in their business. The focus will be on facilitating builder transition to high-performance homes, minimizing builder risk during that ...

  13. Establishing the Office of Environmental Management Quality Assurance Corporate Board

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this memorandum is to introduce the Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board which implements EM'S policy and guidance and promotes lessons...

  14. Quality Assurance Guide for Project Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-27

    This Guide provides acceptable approaches for implementing the Quality Assurance requirements and criteria of DOE O 413.3A related to the development and implementation of a Quality Assurance Program for the project. No cancellations.

  15. Integrating Environmental, Safety, and Quality Management System Audits |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Integrating Environmental, Safety, and Quality Management System Audits Integrating Environmental, Safety, and Quality Management System Audits August 2009 Presenter: David Skipper, UT-Battelle Track 7-2 Topics Covered: External registration/validation of management systems is desirableUT-Battelle registrations ISO 9001 for isotope development process ISO 14001 for all UT-Battelle activities OHSAS 18001 for all UT-Battelle activities ISO 17025 for metrology laboratory

  16. Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar (Text

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Version) | Department of Energy Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar (Text Version) Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar, Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home, presented in October 2014. Watch the presentation. GoToWebinar voice: The broadcast is now starting. All attendees are in listen-only mode. Lindsay Parker: Hi, everyone. We're really glad that you can make it here

  17. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes: Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Bianco, M.; Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) Teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  18. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes. Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Bianco, M.; Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  19. Quality Assurance Guide for Project Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-27

    This Guide provides information to assist U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Project Directors (FPD) and their Integrated Project Teams (IPT) in carrying out their Quality Assurance (QA)-related roles and responsibilities.

  20. DOE ZERH Webinar: Quality Management Systems for ZERH

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Description:The session will provide background and guidance for how Zero Energy Ready Home builders can integrate a quality management program in their business. The focus will be on facilitating...

  1. Quality Management System Guidelines- Building America Top Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality management system tools were customized for residential construction by BSC, IBACOS, and PHI, for use by builders, trades, and designers to help eliminate mistakes that would require high-cost rework.

  2. Quality assurance management plan (QAPP) special analytical support (SAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-05-20

    It is the policy of Special Analytical Support (SAS) that the analytical aspects of all environmental data generated and processed in the laboratory, subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Energy or other project specific requirements, be of known and acceptable quality. It is the intention of this QAPP to establish and assure that an effective quality controlled management system is maintained in order to meet the quality requirements of the intended use(s) of the data.

  3. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  4. Waste management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report contains a summary of the groundwater and surface-water quality monitoring activities to be performed during the 1993 calendar year at the Department of Energy Y- 12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). Monitoring activities will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes: (1) the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR), (2) the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (UEFPCHR), and (3) the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR). The BCHR and UEFPCHR are located within Bear Creek Valley (BCV) and the CRHR is located south of the Y-12 Plant on Chestnut Ridge (Figure 2).

  5. Waste management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tung, Kam

    1992-06-01

    This report contains a summary of the groundwater and surface-water quality monitoring activities to be performed during the 1993 calendar year at the Department of Energy Y- 12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). Monitoring activities will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes: (1) the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR), (2) the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (UEFPCHR), and (3) the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR). The BCHR and UEFPCHR are located within Bear Creek Valley (BCV) and the CRHR is located south of the Y-12 Plant on Chestnut Ridge (Figure 2).

  6. Air quality/energy management review of production facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, J.W.

    1995-06-01

    This is the only presentation that integrates energy management and air quality. You will learn how to reduce energy operating costs while minimizing air pollution. This presentation is condensed from a full day course focusing on hands-on techniques for conducting an air quality/energy management review of your operation or plant. The stringent (Non-attainment for PM{sub 10}, Ozone and CO) South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) of Southern California rules and regulations are applied to the die casting (metals) industry as well as other production processes. Examples and a case study of real energy intensive production facilities will be used. Developing options for air quality improvement with energy cost control are the key goals of the presentation. Also, the review techniques can be used to determine the {open_quotes}maximum potential to emit{close_quotes} as required for the new Federal EPA, Title V requirements. The outline of the one day course is provided to give the overall scope covered during performing an Air Quality/Energy Management Review of a Production Facility.

  7. Legacy Management CERCLA Sites. Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riddle, Donna L.

    2007-05-03

    S.M. Stoller Corporation is the contractor for the Technical Assistance Contract (TAC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) operations. Stoller employs a management system that applies to all programs, projects, and business management systems funded through DOE-LM task orders. The management system incorporates the philosophy, policies, and requirements of health and safety, environmental compliance, and quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of project planning and implementation. Health and safety requirements are documented in the Health and Safety Manual (STO 2), the Radiological Control Manual (STO 3), the Integrated Safety Management System Description (STO 10), and the Drilling Health and Safety Requirements (STO 14). Environmental compliance policy and requirements are documented in the Environmental Management Program Implementation Manual (STO 11). The QA Program is documented in the Quality Assurance Manual (STO 1). The QA Manual (STO 1) implements the specific requirements and philosophy of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance. This manual also includes the requirements of other standards that are regularly imposed by customers, regulators, or other DOE orders. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 830, “Quality Assurance Requirements,” ANSI/ASQC E4-2004, “Quality Systems for Environmental Data and Technology Programs – Requirements with Guidance for Use,” and ISO 14001-2004, “Environmental Management Systems,” have been included. These standards are similar in content. The intent of the QA Manual (STO 1) is to provide a QA management system that incorporates the requirements and philosophy of DOE and other customers within the QA Manual. Criterion 1, “Quality Assurance Program,” identifies the fundamental requirements for establishing and implementing the QA management system; QA Instruction (QAI) 1.1, “QA Program Implementation,” identifies the TAC organizations that have responsibility for

  8. Acquisition Guide Chapter 71.3, Data Reporting- Quality Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is new Acquisition Guide Chapter 71.3, Data Reporting - Quality Management. This Guide Chapter summarizes responsibilities for ensuring that the reporting of Federal and Departmental procurement and financial assistance data are timely, accurate and current. The Guide Chapter will be updated appropriately as additional Government-wide guidance is issued.

  9. Re-engineering the Federal planning process: A total Federal planning strategy, integrating NEPA with modern management tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccleston, C.H.

    1997-09-05

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 was established by Congress more than a quarter of a century ago, yet there is a surprising lack of specific tools, techniques, and methodologies for effectively implementing these regulatory requirements. Lack of professionally accepted techniques is a principal factor responsible for many inefficiencies. Often, decision makers do not fully appreciate or capitalize on the true potential which NEPA provides as a platform for planning future actions. New approaches and modem management tools must be adopted to fully achieve NEPA`s mandate. A new strategy, referred to as Total Federal Planning, is proposed for unifying large-scale federal planning efforts under a single, systematic, structured, and holistic process. Under this approach, the NEPA planning process provides a unifying framework for integrating all early environmental and nonenvironmental decision-making factors into a single comprehensive planning process. To promote effectiveness and efficiency, modem tools and principles from the disciplines of Value Engineering, Systems Engineering, and Total Quality Management are incorporated. Properly integrated and implemented, these planning tools provide the rigorous, structured, and disciplined framework essential in achieving effective planning. Ultimately, the goal of a Total Federal Planning strategy is to construct a unified and interdisciplinary framework that substantially improves decision-making, while reducing the time, cost, redundancy, and effort necessary to comply with environmental and other planning requirements. At a time when Congress is striving to re-engineer the governmental framework, apparatus, and process, a Total Federal Planning philosophy offers a systematic approach for uniting the disjointed and often convoluted planning process currently used by most federal agencies. Potentially this approach has widespread implications in the way federal planning is approached.

  10. Achieving adequate BMP`s for stormwater quality management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones-Lee, A.; Lee, G.F.

    1994-12-31

    There is considerable controversy about the technical appropriateness and the cost-effectiveness of requiring cities to control contaminants in urban stormwater discharges to meet state water quality standards equivalent to US EPA numeric chemical water quality criteria. At this time and likely for the next 10 years, urban stormwater discharges will be exempt from regulation to achieve state water quality standards in receiving waters, owing to the high cost to cities of the management of contaminants in the stormwater runoff-discharge so as to prevent exceedances of water quality standards in the receiving waters. Instead of requiring the same degree of contaminant control for stormwater discharges as is required for point-source discharges of municipal and industrial wastewaters, those responsible for urban stormwater discharges will have to implement Best Management Practices (BMP`s) for contaminant control. The recommended approach for implementation of BMP`s involves the use of site-specific evaluations of what, if any, real problems (use impairment) are caused by stormwater-associated contaminants in the waters receiving that stormwater discharge. From this type of information BMP`s can then be developed to control those contaminants in stormwater discharges that are, in fact, impairing the beneficial uses of receiving waters.

  11. Waste management and quality assurance: Reasonable co-existence?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bresson, J.F.

    1989-11-01

    Implementing Chapter 3, Low-Level Waste Management, of DOE Order 5820-2, ``Radioactive Waste Management`` has created a major change in the operating philosophy of DOE`s prime contractors. So has the decision of May 1, 1987, when it was made clear that EPA has regulatory authority over DOE`s mixed waste. Suddenly two additional items became clear. First, DOE and its contractors were going to learn more about composition of low-level and low-level mixed waste than ever before. Second, low-level waste management was about to become a more focused, formal program, complete with needs for: (1) waste form identification, (2) program documentation; and (3) assurance that DOE`s waste does in fact comply with applicable requirements. The importance of the above items is clearly emphasized by the inclusion of Data Quality Objectives in the Waste Acceptance Criteria section of DOE 5820-2 Chapter 3 guidance called Data Quality Objectives, (DQO). Simply put, the purpose of the DQO is to identify the quality (and quantity) of information necessary to convince a regulator or decision maker that enough is known about DOE`s low-level and low-level mixed waste to allow safe disposal. The main objectives of the DOE and EPA shallow land burial requirements are to: (1) generate, with documented evidence, waste forms which are chemically inert and immobile, such that the waste will not tend to move about in the disposal medium; (2) select a disposal medium which would not let the wastes move about anyway; and (3) build some barriers around the wastes as emplaced in burial grounds, to provide additional assurance that buried wastes will stay in place. Compliance with these requirements must be demonstrated by quality data which describes the entire series of compliance activities.

  12. Determination of total and isotopic uranium by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, F.L.; Bolin, R.N.; Feller, M.T.; Danahy, R.J.

    1995-04-01

    At the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in southwestern Ohio, ICP-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), with sample introduction by peristaltic pumping, is used to determine total and isotopic uranium (U-234, U-235, U-236 and U-238) in soil samples. These analyses are conducted in support of the environmental cleanup of the FEMP site. Various aspects of the sample preparation and instrumental analysis will be discussed. Initial sample preparation consists of oven drying to determine moisture content, and grinding and rolling to homogenize the sample. This is followed by a nitric/hydrofluoric acid digestion to bring the uranium in the sample into solution. Bismuth is added to the sample prior to digestion to monitor for losses. The total uranium (U-238) content of this solution and the U{sup 235}/U{sup 238} ratio are measured on the first pass through the ICP-MS. To determine the concentration of the less abundant U{sup 234} and U{sup 236} isotopes, the digestate is further concentrated by using Eichrom TRU-Spec extraction columns before the second pass through the ICP-MS. Quality controls for both the sample preparation and instrumental protocols will also be discussed. Finally, an explanation of the calculations used to report the data in either weight percent or activity units will be given.

  13. Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) Waste Management Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VOLKMAN, D.D.

    1999-10-27

    This document is the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH), that implements the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC), HNF-MP-599, Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) document, and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement with Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), Sections 6.5 and 7.8. WHM is responsible for the treatment, storage, and disposal of liquid and solid wastes generated at the Hanford Site as well as those wastes received from other US Department of Energy (DOE) and non-DOE sites. WMH operations include the Low-Level Burial Grounds, Central Waste Complex (a mixed-waste storage complex), a nonradioactive dangerous waste storage facility, the Transuranic Storage Facility, T Plant, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facility, 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility, the 242-A Evaporator, 300 Area Treatment Effluent Disposal Facility, the 340 Facility (a radioactive liquid waste handling facility), 222-S Laboratory, the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility, and the Hanford TRU Waste Program.

  14. Environmental assessment of air quality, noise and cooling tower drift from the Jersey City Total Energy Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.T.; Kolb, J.O.

    1980-06-01

    This assessment covers three specific effects from the operation of the Total Energy (TE) demonstration: (1) air quality from combustion emissions of 600 kW diesel engines and auxiliary boilers fueled with No. 2 distillate oil, (2) noise levels from TE equipment operation, (3) cooling tower drift from two, 2220 gpm, forced-draft cooling towers. For the air quality study, measurements were performed to determine both the combustion emission rates and ground-level air quality at the Demonstration site. Stack analysis of NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, CO, particulates, and total hydrocarbons characterized emission rates over a range of operating conditions. Ground-level air quality was monitored during two six-week periods during the summer and winter of 1977. The noise study was performed by measuring sound levels in db(A) in the area within approximately 60 m of the CEB. The noise survey investigated the effects on noise distribution of different wind conditions, time of day or night, and condition of doors - open or closed - near the diesel engines in the CEB. In the cooling tower study, drift emission characteristics were measured to quantify the drift emission before and after cleaning of the tower internals to reduce fallout of large drift droplets in the vicinity of the CEB.

  15. Quality management at Argonne National Laboratory: Status, accomplishments, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    In April 1992, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) launched the implementation of quality management (QM) as an initiative of the Laboratory Director. The goal of the program is to seek ways of improving Laboratory performance and effectiveness by drawing from the realm of experiences in the global total quality management movement. The Argonne QM initiative began with fact finding and formulating a strategy for implementation; the emphasis is that the underlying principles of QM should be an integral part of how the Laboratory is managed and operated. A primary theme that has guided the Argonne QM initiative is to consider only those practices that offer the potential for real improvement, make sense, fit the culture, and would be credible to the broad population. In October 1993, the Laboratory began to pilot a targeted set of QM activities selected to produce outcomes important to the Laboratory--strengthening the customer focus, improving work processes, enhancing employee involvement and satisfaction, and institutionalizing QM. This report describes the results of the just-concluded QM development and demonstration phase in terms of detailed strategies, accomplishments, and lessons learned. These results are offered as evidence to support the conclusion that the Argonne QM initiative has achieved value-added results and credibility and is well positioned to support future deployment across the entire Laboratory as an integrated management initiative. Recommendations for follow-on actions to implement future deployment are provided separately.

  16. Development of a Total Energy, Environment and Asset Management (TE2AM tm) Curriculum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-31

    The University of Wisconsin Department of Engineering Professional Development (EPD) has completed the sponsored project entitled, Development of a Total Energy, Environment and Asset Management (TE2AM™) Curriculum. The project involved the development of a structured professional development program to improve the knowledge, skills, capabilities, and competencies of engineers and operators of commercial buildings. TE2AM™ advances a radically different approach to commercial building design, operation, maintenance, and end-­‐of-­‐life disposition. By employing asset management principles to the lifecycle of a commercial building, owners and occupants will realize improved building performance, reduced energy consumption and positive environmental impacts. Through our commercialization plan, we intend to offer TE2AM™ courses and certificates to the professional community and continuously improve TE2AM™ course materials. The TE2AM™ project supports the DOE Strategic Theme 1 -­‐ Energy Security; and will further advance the DOE Strategic Goal 1.4 Energy Productivity. Through participation in the TE2AM™ curriculum, engineers and operators of commercial buildings will be eligible for a professional certificate; denoting the completion of a prescribed series of learning activities. The project involved a comprehensive, rigorous approach to curriculum development, and accomplished the following goals: 1. Identify, analyze and prioritize key learning needs of engineers, architects and technical professionals as operators of commercial buildings. 2. Design and develop TE2AM™ curricula and instructional strategies to meet learning needs of the target learning community. 3. Establish partnerships with the sponsor and key stakeholders to enhance the development and delivery of learning programs. 4. Successfully commercialize and sustain the training and certificate programs for a substantial time following the term of the award. The project team was

  17. DOE ZERH Webinar: Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home DOE ZERH Webinar: Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home The session will provide background and guidance for how Zero Energy Ready Home builders can integrate a quality management program in their business. The focus will be on facilitating builder transition to high-performance homes, minimizing builder risk during that transition, and ensuring consistent delivery on the HPH value proposition. The

  18. The Quality of Management and of the Science and Engineering at the NNSA National Security Laboratories

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Quality of Management and of the Science and Engineering at the NNSA National Security Laboratories was presented to CRENEL 9/15/2014.

  19. Quality Assurance Management System Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-06-17

    This Guide provides information on principles and practices used to establish and implement an effective quality assurance program or quality management system in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 830. Cancels DOE G 414.1-2. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2B.

  20. Ava Holland Joins DOE Carlsbad Field Office As Quality Assurance Manager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ava Holland Joins DOE Carlsbad Field Office As Quality Assurance Manager CARLSBAD, N.M., February 12, 2002 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office today announced the appointment of Ava Holland as Manager of Quality Assurance. Holland is responsible for DOE's Quality Assurance Program as required to comply with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. In this role, she provides oversight to ensure the safe characterization, transportation

  1. Proceedings for air quality management programs: A workshop on lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streit, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    The coordinators of this project at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo proposed a workshop to bring together an international group of experts to present both the lessons of history and the current practices in air quality management around the world. The workshop would also serve as a forum for presenting the accomplishments and plans of this project and for receiving comments from the assembled group. The workshop was favored with an outstanding set of speakers who represented a broad spectrum of experience. Their papers are presented in this volume. The total attendance was forty-four (see List of Participants) with representation from numerous interested Mexican institutions. Individual reports are processed separately for the database.

  2. Revision of Army regulation (AR) 200-2, environmental effects of Army actions, and the application of total quality mangement (TQM) principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkel, H,K.; Robitaille, P.

    1995-12-01

    AR 200-2 is the Army`s implementing regulation to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and DoD`s NEPA Directive DoDD 6050.1. AR 200-2 was last revised in the late 1980s and since then the scope of Army NEPA compliance activities have significantly increased, and NEPA practice and case law are continually changing. The purpose of revising AR 200-2 is to provide Army personel with clear and Concise guidance on how to meet their NEPA compliance requirements. The revision process included reviewing the current AR 200-2 to identify areas and topics needing clarification or modification; conferring with Army NEPA personnel to obtain views on NEPA compliance practices and procedures; conducting a review and analysis of significant, recent developments in NEPA case law; reviewing other federal NEPA implementing regulations to identify useful, transferrable concepts; preparing a {open_quotes}strawman{close_quotes} version of AR 200-2 to use as a starting point in the revision process; coordinating and consolidating input from the AR 200-2 Revisions Steering Committee; and responding to review comments. A draft version of AR 200-2 has been completed and informal Army-wide comments have been addressed. Some of the issues that the AR 200-2 Revisions Steering Committee considered during the revision effort included expanding the list of categorical exclusions, determining the appropriate length for the public comment period for environmental assessments prior to approval of the finding of no significant impact, determining the appropriate level of analysis for Army actions abroad, and determining whether Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation Liability Act (CERCLA) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) actions should be addressed under NEPA. Total Quality Management (TQM) principles were applied during the revision process. GroupSystems{trademark} software was used as a vehicle to enhance total group participation from managers to practitioners.

  3. Application of air classification and formulation to manage feedstock cost, quality and availability for bioenergy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Hartley, Damon; Jindra, Michael A.; Aston, John E.; Thompson, David N.

    2016-04-22

    Biomass such as agricultural residues, energy crops and yard waste has significant potential to be used as renewable feedstocks for production of fuels, chemicals and energy. However, in a given location, biomass availability, cost and quality can vary markedly. Strategies to manage these traits must be identified and implemented so that consistent low-cost and high-quality feedstocks can be delivered to biorefineries year round. In this study, we examine air classification as a method to mitigate high ash concentrations in corn stover, switchgrass, and grass clippings. Formulation techniques were then used to produce blends that met ash quality and biomass quantitymore » specifications at the lowest possible cost for biopower and biochemical conversion applications. It was found that air classification can separate the biomass into light fractions which contain concentrated amounts of elemental ash components introduced through soil contamination such as sodium, alumina, silica, iron and titania; and heavy fractions that are depleted in these components and have relatively lower total ash content. Light fractions of corn stover and grass clippings were found to be suitable for combustion applications since they had less propensity to slag than the whole biomass material. The remaining heavy fractions of corn stover or grass clippings could then be blended with switchgrass to produce blends that met the 5% total ash specifications suggested for biochemical conversions. However, ternary blends of the three feedstocks were not possible due to the high ash content of grass clippings. Lastly, it was determined that air classification by itself was not suitable to prepare these feedstocks for pyrolysis due to high ash content.« less

  4. Establishing the Office of Environmental Management Quality Assurance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    lessons learned throughout the EM complex; and @ Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Continuous improvement of the overall EM cleanup performance by sustaining a quality...

  5. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Quality Management System Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This Top Innovation profile describes quality management system tools that were customized for residential construction by BSC, IBACOS, and PHI, for use by builders, trades, and designers to help eliminate mistakes that would require high-cost rework.

  6. Safety and quality management and administration Fiscal Year 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagan, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    The mission of the Emergency, Safety, and Quality Services (ESQ) management and Program Integration is to provide leadership for the ESQ Department, coordinate business management activities of the ESQ department, and the programs it supports, as well as to plan organize, direct, and control other activities that require department-wide coordination. Primary activities include providing strategic and business planning and reporting support to ESQ management; developing and documenting ESQ management systems and procedures; coordinating ESQ`s self-assessment and Award Fee self evaluation efforts; coordinating the ESQ departments`s communication, total quality, cost savings, and productivity efforts; and tracking ESQ commitments and staffing data. This program element also provides program direction and performance assessment for the ESH&Q division of ICF KH. The ESH&Q Division educates ICF KH management and employees to protect personnel and the environment; identifies, interprets and inspects to requirements; provides administrative and field support; performs final acceptance of construction; assesses effectiveness of ICF KH programs and processes, and performs baseline ESH&Q assessments.

  7. NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC : evaluation and selection of tools for the quality environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouchard, Julie F.; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Vigil, Dena M.; Edwards, Harold Carter (Org. 1444 : Multiphysics Simulation Technology)

    2011-05-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Nuclear Waste Management Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. These M&S capabilities are to be managed, verified, and validated within the NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC quality environment. M&S capabilities and the supporting analysis workflow and simulation data management tools will be distributed to end-users from this same quality environment. The same analysis workflow and simulation data management tools that are to be distributed to end-users will be used for verification and validation (V&V) activities within the quality environment. This strategic decision reduces the number of tools to be supported, and increases the quality of tools distributed to end users due to rigorous use by V&V activities. This report documents an evaluation of the needs, options, and tools selected for the NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC quality environment. The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Nuclear Waste Management Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC) program element is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to assess quantitatively the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. This objective will be fulfilled by acquiring and developing M&S capabilities, and establishing a defensible level of confidence in these M&S capabilities. The foundation for assessing the level of confidence is based upon

  8. Quality Management | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Qualifying Wood Stove Deduction Qualifying Wood Stove Deduction < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Biomass Maximum Rebate $500 Program Info Sector Name State State Arizona Program Type Rebate Amount Total cost, exclusive of taxes, interest and other finance charges Summary This incentive allows Arizona taxpayers to deduct the cost of converting an existing wood fireplace to a qualifying wood stove, a qualified wood fireplace, or a qualified gas-fired fireplace. The cost to

  9. Cost Quality Management Assessment for the Idaho Operations Office. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The Office of Engineering and Cost Management (EM-24) conducted a Cost Quality Management Assessment of EM-30 and EM-40 activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory on Feb. 3--19, 1992 (Round I). The CQMA team assessed the cost and cost-related management activities at INEL. The Round II CQMA, conducted at INEL Sept. 19--29, 1994, reviewed EM-30, EM-40, EM-50, and EM-60 cost and cost-related management practices against performance objectives and criteria. Round II did not address indirect cost analysis. INEL has made measurable progress since Round I.

  10. Quality Assurance Plan for Transportation Management Division Transportation Training Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) implemented new rules requiring minimum levels of training for certain key individuals who handle, package, transport, or otherwise prepare hazardous materials for transportation. In response to these rules, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Transportation Management Division (TMD), has developed a transportation safety training program. This program supplies designed instructional methodology and course materials to provide basic levels of DOT training to personnel for whom training has become mandatory. In addition, this program provides advanced hazardous waste and radioactive material packaging and transportation training to help personnel achieve proficiency and/or certification as hazardous waste and radioactive material shippers. This training program does not include site-specific or task-specific training beyond DOT requirements.

  11. Technologies for improved soil carbon management and environmental quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reicosky, D.C.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to create an environmental awareness of and to provide insight into the future balance of environment and economic issues in developing new technologies that benefit the farmer, the public, and agricultural product sales. Agricultural impacts of tillage-induced CO{sub 2} losses are addressed along with new and existing technologies to minimize tillage-induced flow of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, Emphasis is placed on the carbon cycle and the cost of environmental damage to illustrate the need for improved technologies leading to reduced environmental impacts by business ventures. New technologies and concepts related to methods of tillage and stover management for carbon sequestration with the agricultural production systems are presented. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Waste management R&D Quality Assurance: An alternative approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosseau, D.A.; Harlan, C.P.; Cochrell, R.C.

    1991-02-01

    This paper summarizes the development and initial implementation of a Quality Assurance (QA) Program for technical activities associated with assessing compliance of an existing DOE nuclear waste site with applicable environmental regulations. The requirements for establishing the QA program are defined, along with the approach and emphasis used to develop the program. The structure of the program and the various levels of QA plans and procedures are briefly discussed. Initial implementation efforts are summarized. The QA program was developed by and for the project participants and was structured according to the major technical requirements of the project. The QA plans and procedures are written for the convenience and use of the technical staff and not merely to satisfy auditor expectations. Every effort was made to avoid an 18-point approach typical of many QA programs patterned after the dictates of the industry recognized ``national consensus standards.`` Flexibility is emphasized due to the nature of the research and development activities associated with the technical program. Recommendations are provided for using this alternative approach to QA program development for similar technical efforts elsewhere. 10 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  13. Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) Quality Assurance Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-02-20

    The scope of the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) is to provide technical and integration support to Fluor Hanford, Inc., including operable unit investigations at 300-FF-5 and other groundwater operable units, strategic integration, technical integration and assessments, remediation decision support, and science and technology. This Quality Assurance Management Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project).

  14. 71.3 - Data Reporting ¬タモ Quality Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    71.3 (May 2011) 1 Data Reporting - Quality Management References Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 4.6 - Contract Reporting Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) Guidance - Improving Acquisition Data Quality for FY 2009 and 2010 Policy Flash 2010-82 - Subaward Reporting for Federal Funding and Transparency Act of 2006 (FFATA) Acquisition Guide Chapter 19.0 - Small Business Programs - An Overview Acquisition Guide Chapter 42.15 - Contractor Past Performance Information

  15. Farm operator perceptions of water quality protective pest management practices: Selected survey findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, R.; Blair, J.; Webb, B.

    1995-12-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture often poses a tension between water quality and environmental protection goals on the one hand and the viability of food supplies on the other hand. Pesticides used for field crops (e.g., corn, soy beans and wheat) have been detected in waterbodies, and according to some studies, are apparently finding their way into water supplies. A considerable amount of discretion is allowed in farm operator`s choice of pest management practices, and voluntary behavior becomes an important factor in promoting environmentally protective practices. Thus, it is important to know the attitudes of farmers who make pest management decisions including pesticide choices, toward the use of various water quality protective pest management practices. A number of studies show that more general environmental attitudes reflect a general world view that shapes attitudes toward particular environmental issues. This paper addresses the relationship between the more general environmental attitudes of farmers to their attitudes toward water quality issues and pest management practices which are protective of water quality. Some of the personal tradeoffs farmers are willing to make to enhance environmental controls on pesticides are also explored. Results are based on preliminary findings from a survey of farm operators who grow corn, soybeans and other field crops in three eastern states. The survey was conducted via a mail questionnaire to 2,700 farmers with telephone follow-up during the Fall of 1994. Implications of the findings for pest management in general are discussed.

  16. Managing the analysis of air quality impacts under NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Y.B.; Leslie, A.C.D.

    1995-12-31

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) mandates the analysis and evaluation of potential impacts of major Federal actions having the potential to affect the environment. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify an array of new air quality issues appropriate for analysis in compliance with NEPA. An example is emissions of the 189 hazardous air pollutants identified in Title III. The utility industry estimates that more than 2.4 billion pounds of toxic pollutants were emitted to the atmosphere in 1988, with the potential for resultant adverse health impacts such as cancer, reproductive effects, birth defects, and respiratory illness. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provides Federal funds for projects that utilize coal as the primary fuel, including the approximately 45 projects funded over the past ten years under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Provision of Federal funds brings these projects under NEPA review. While electric steam generating units greater than 25 MW are currently excluded from regulatory review for the 189 air toxics listed in Title III, they are not, due to their potential impacts, excluded from NEPA review when Federally funded, in whole or in part. The authors will discuss their experiences drawn from NEPA evaluations of coal-fired power projects, the differences between regulatory requirements and NEPA requirements, source categories, major and area sources, conformity, maximum achievable control technology, mandatory licensing, radionuclides, visibility, toxics found to be emitted from coal combustion, public involvement, citizen suits, the bounty system, and how NEPA review can result in beneficial changes to proposed projects through mitigation measures to avoid or minimize potentially adverse environmental impacts.

  17. Real-Time Water Quality Management in the Grassland Water District

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josphine R.; Taylor, Christophe M.; Marciochi, Don; Lower, Scott; Woodruff, Veronica; Wright, Diane; Poole, Tim

    2004-12-10

    The purpose of the research project was to advance the concept of real-time water quality management in the San Joaquin Basin by developing an application to drainage of seasonal wetlands in the Grassland Water District. Real-time water quality management is defined as the coordination of reservoir releases, return flows and river diversions to improve water quality conditions in the San Joaquin River and ensure compliance with State water quality objectives. Real-time water quality management is achieved through information exchange and cooperation between shakeholders who contribute or withdraw flow and salt load to or from the San Joaquin River. This project complements a larger scale project that was undertaken by members of the Water Quality Subcommittee of the San Joaquin River Management Program (SJRMP) and which produced forecasts of flow, salt load and San Joaquin River assimilative capacity between 1999 and 2003. These forecasts can help those entities exporting salt load to the River to develop salt load targets as a mechanism for improving compliance with salinity objectives. The mass balance model developed by this project is the decision support tool that helps to establish these salt load targets. A second important outcome of this project was the development and application of a methodology for assessing potential impacts of real-time wetland salinity management. Drawdown schedules are typically tied to weather conditions and are optimized in traditional practices to maximize food sources for over-wintering wildfowl as well as providing a biological control (through germination temperature) of undesirable weeds that compete with the more proteinaceous moist soil plants such as swamp timothy, watergrass and smartweed. This methodology combines high resolution remote sensing, ground-truthing vegetation surveys using established survey protocols and soil salinity mapping using rapid, automated electromagnetic sensor technology. This survey methodology

  18. Project Hanford management contract quality assurance program implementation plan for nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibb, E.K.

    1997-10-15

    During transition from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Management and Operations (M and O) contract to the Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Management and Integration (M and I) contract, existing WHC policies, procedures, and manuals were reviewed to determine which to adopt on an interim basis. Both WHC-SP-1131,Hanford Quality Assurance Program and Implementation Plan, and WHC-CM-4-2, Quality Assurance Manual, were adopted; however, it was recognized that revisions were required to address the functions and responsibilities of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC). This Quality Assurance Program Implementation Plan for Nuclear Facilities (HNF-SP-1228) supersedes the implementation portion of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. The revised Quality Assurance (QA) Program is documented in the Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD), HNF-MP-599. That document replaces the QA Program in WHC-SP-1131, Rev. 1. The scope of this document is limited to documenting the nuclear facilities managed by FDH and its Major Subcontractors (MSCS) and the status of the implementation of 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, at those facilities. Since the QA Program for the nuclear facilities is now documented in the QAPD, future updates of the information provided in this plan will be by letter. The layout of this plan is similar to that of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide an overview of the Project Hanford QA Program. A list of Project Hanford nuclear facilities is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides the status of facility compliance to 10 CFR 830.120. Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 provide requested exemptions, status of open items, and references, respectively. The four appendices correspond to the four projects that comprise Project Hanford.

  19. Quality management systems for fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) sterile insect technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caceres, C.; Robinson, A.; Shelly, T.; Hendrichs, J.

    2007-03-15

    The papers presented in this issue are focused on developing and validating procedures to improve the overall quality of sterile fruit flies for use in area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programs with a sterile insect technique (SIT) component. The group was coordinated and partially funded by the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, under a five-year Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Quality Assurance in Mass-Reared and Released Fruit Flies for Use in SIT Programmes'. Participants in the CRP from 16 countries came from both basic and applied fields of expertise to ensure that appropriate and relevant procedures were developed. A variety of studies was undertaken to develop protocols to assess strain compatibility and to improve colonization procedures and strain management. Specific studies addressed issues related to insect nutrition, irradiation protocols, field dispersal and survival, field cage behavior assessments, and enhancement of mating competitiveness. The main objective was to increase the efficiency of operational fruit fly programs using sterile insects and to reduce their cost. Many of the protocols developed or improved during the CRP will be incorporated into the international quality control manual for sterile tephritid fruit flies, standardizing key components of the production, sterilization, shipment, handling, and release of sterile insects. (author) [Spanish] Los articulos presentados en este numero se enfocan en el desarrollo y la validacion de procedimientos para mejorar la calidad total de moscas de las frutas esteriles para su uso en programas de manejo integrado de plagas en donde la tecnica del insecto esteril (TIE) es uno de los componentes clave. El grupo fue coordinado y parcialmente financiado por la Division Conjunta de Tecnicas Nucleares para la Alimentacion y la Agricultura de la FAO/OIEA, Viena, Austria, por un periodo de

  20. MO-E-9A-01: Risk Based Quality Management: TG100 In Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huq, M; Palta, J; Dunscombe, P; Thomadsen, B

    2014-06-15

    One of the goals of quality management in radiation therapy is to gain high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. To accomplish these goals professional societies such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) has published many quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC), and quality management (QM) guidance documents. In general, the recommendations provided in these documents have emphasized on performing device-specific QA at the expense of process flow and protection of the patient against catastrophic errors. Analyses of radiation therapy incidents find that they are most often caused by flaws in the overall therapy process, from initial consult through final treatment, than by isolated hardware or computer failures detectable by traditional physics QA. This challenge is shared by many intrinsically hazardous industries. Risk assessment tools and analysis techniques have been developed to define, identify, and eliminate known and/or potential failures, problems, or errors, from a system, process and/or service before they reach the customer. These include, but are not limited to, process mapping, failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), fault tree analysis (FTA), and establishment of a quality management program that best avoids the faults and risks that have been identified in the overall process. These tools can be easily adapted to radiation therapy practices because of their simplicity and effectiveness to provide efficient ways to enhance the safety and quality of treatment processes. Task group 100 (TG100) of AAPM has developed a risk-based quality management program that uses these tools. This session will be devoted to a discussion of these tools and how these tools can be used in a given radiotherapy clinic to develop a risk based QM program. Learning Objectives: Learn how to design a process map for a radiotherapy process. Learn how to perform a FMEA analysis for a given process. Learn what

  1. Management and overview Quality Assurance Program Plan. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office (DOE/ UMTRA-PO) is the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) organization charged with the responsibility of managing and coordinating the activities of the various participating organizations and support contractors working on the UMTRA Project. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes how the DOE/UMTRA-PO, as assisted by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC), performs the quality assurance (QA) aspects of managing and coordinating UMTRA Project activities. This QAPP was developed to comply with DOE Order 5700.6A, August, 1981, and AL Order 5700.6B, April, 1984, which contain the criteria applicable to Project QA activities.

  2. Stormwater runoff water quality evaluation and management program for hazardous chemical sites: Development issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, G.F.; Jones-Lee, A.

    1998-12-31

    The deficiencies in the typical stormwater runoff water quality monitoring from hazardous chemical sites and an alternative approach (Evaluation Monitoring) for monitoring that shifts the monitoring program from periodic sampling and analysis of stormwater runoff for a suite of chemical parameters to examining the receiving waters to determine what, if any, water quality use impairments are occurring due to the runoff-associated constituents is presented in this paper. Rather than measuring potentially toxic constituents such as heavy metals in runoff, the monitoring program determines whether there is aquatic life toxicity in the receiving waters associated with the stormwater runoff. If toxicity is found, its cause is determined and the source of the constituents causing the toxicity is identified through forensic analysis. Based on this information, site-specific, technically valid stormwater runoff management programs can be developed that will control real water quality impacts caused by stormwater runoff-associated constituents.

  3. Quality Assurance Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGarrah, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    In order to provide clients with quality products and services, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has established and implemented a formal quality assurance program. These management controls are documented in this manual (PNL-MA-70) and its accompanying standards and procedures. The QA Program meets the basic requirements and supplements of ANSI/ASME NQA-1, Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities, as interpreted for PNL activities. Additional, the quality requirements are augmented to include the Total Quality approach defined in the Department of Energy Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance. This manual provides requirements and an overview of the administrative procedures that apply to projects and activities.

  4. Standard Review Plan for Environmental Restoration Program Quality Management Plans. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Manual Environmental Restoration Program Quality System Requirements (QSR) for the Hanford Site, defines all quality requirements governing Hanford Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities. The QSR requires that ER Program participants develop Quality Management Plans (QMPs) that describe how the QSR requirements will be implemented for their assigned scopes of work. This standard review plan (SRP) describes the ER program participant responsibilities for submittal of QMPs to the RL Environmental Restoration Division for review and the RL methodology for performing the reviews of participant QMPS. The SRP serves the following functions: acts as a guide in the development or revision of QMPs to assure that the content is complete and adequate; acts as a checklist to be used by the RL staff in their review of participant QMPs; acts as an index or matrix between the requirements of the QSR and implementing methodologies described in the QMPs; decreases the time and subjectivity of document reviews; and provides a formal, documented method for describing exceptions, modifications, or waivers to established ER Program quality requirements.

  5. The CHPRC Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) Quality Assurance Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-03

    The scope of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC) Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) is for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory staff to provide technical and integration support to CHPRC. This work includes conducting investigations at the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit and other groundwater operable units, and providing strategic integration, technical integration and assessments, remediation decision support, and science and technology. The projects under this Master Project will be defined and included within the Master Project throughout the fiscal year, and will be incorporated into the Master Project Plan. This Quality Assurance Management Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the CHPRC Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) and all releases associated with the CHPRC Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project. The plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  6. Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Holm, L.

    2010-01-05

    This paper describes a new approach to environmental decision support for salinity management in the San Joaquin Basin of California that focuses on web-based data sharing using YSI Econet technology and continuous data quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius.

  7. Quality Assurance Management System Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830.120 and DOE O 414.1

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-06-17

    DOE Elements and DOE contractors should consult this Guide in order to develop and implement effective management systems that are consistent with the Department's quality expectations and that support the Safety Management System Policy, DOE P 450.4. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2A. Does not cancel other directives.

  8. Spatiotemporal nonpoint source pollution water quality management framework using bi-directional model-GIS linkage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faizullabhoy, M.S.; Yoon, J.

    1999-07-01

    A framework for water quality assessment and management purposes was developed. In this framework, a bilateral linkage was implemented between the distributed model, Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution Model (AGNPS) and the Geographic Information System (GIS) to investigate a spatiotemporal nonpoint source pollution problem from a 750-acre watershed in the NSGA (Naval Security Group Activity) Northwest base at the Virginia/North Carolina border. AGNPS is an event-based, distributed parameter model that simulates runoff and the transport of sediment and nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from predominantly agricultural watersheds. In this study rather than manually implementing AGNPS simulation, extracted data are integrated in an automated fashion through a direct bilateral linkage framework between the AGNPS model engine and the GIS. This bilateral linkage framework resulted in a powerful, up-to-date tool that would be capable of monitoring and instantaneously visualizing the transport of any pollutant as well as effectively identifying critical areas of the nonpoint source (NPS) pollution. The framework also allowed the various what if scenarios to support the decision-making processes. Best Management Practices (BMP) for the watershed can be generated in a close loop iterative scheme, until predefined management objectives are achieved. Simulated results showed that the optimal BMP scenario achieved an average reduction of about 41% in soluble and sediment-attached nitrogen and about 62% reduction in soluble and sediment phosphorus from current NPS pollution levels.

  9. LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE SUPPLIES OF BIOENERGY FEEDSTOCK AND ENHANCED SOIL QUALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth, Jr.

    2012-09-01

    Agriculture can simultaneously address global food, feed, fiber, and energy challenges provided our soil, water, and air resources are not compromised in doing so. As we embark on the 19th Triennial Conference of the International Soil and Tillage Research Organization (ISTRO), I am pleased to proclaim that our members are well poised to lead these endeavors because of our comprehensive understanding of soil, water, agricultural and bio-systems engineering processes. The concept of landscape management, as an approach for integrating multiple bioenergy feedstock sources, including biomass residuals, into current crop production systems, is used as the focal point to show how these ever-increasing global challenges can be met in a sustainable manner. Starting with the 2005 Billion Ton Study (BTS) goals, research and technology transfer activities leading to the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Revised Billion Ton Study (BT2) and development of a residue management tool to guide sustainable crop residue harvest will be reviewed. Multi-location USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Renewable Energy Assessment Project (REAP) team research and on-going partnerships between public and private sector groups will be shared to show the development of landscape management strategies that can simultaneously address the multiple factors that must be balanced to meet the global challenges. Effective landscape management strategies recognize the importance of nature’s diversity and strive to emulate those conditions to sustain multiple critical ecosystem services. To illustrate those services, the soil quality impact of harvesting crop residues are presented to show how careful, comprehensive monitoring of soil, water and air resources must be an integral part of sustainable bioenergy feedstock production systems. Preliminary analyses suggest that to sustain soil resources within the U.S. Corn Belt, corn (Zea mays L.) stover should not be harvested if average grain

  10. Total Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & < Imports -

  11. Software quality in 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.

    1997-11-01

    For many years, software quality assurance lagged behind hardware quality assurance in terms of methods, metrics, and successful results. New approaches such as Quality Function Deployment (QFD) the ISO 9000-9004 standards, the SEI maturity levels, and Total Quality Management (TQM) are starting to attract wide attention, and in some cases to bring software quality levels up to a parity with manufacturing quality levels. Since software is on the critical path for many engineered products, and for internal business systems as well, the new approaches are starting to affect global competition and attract widespread international interest. It can be hypothesized that success in mastering software quality will be a key strategy for dominating global software markets in the 21st century.

  12. Country Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Country Total Percent of U.S. total Canada 61,078 1% China 3,323,297 57% Germany 154,800 3% Japan 12,593 0% India 47,192 1% South Korea 251,105 4% All Others 2,008,612 34% Total 5,858,677 100% Table 7 . Photovoltaic module import shipments by country, 2014 (peak kilowatts) Note: All Others includes Cambodia, Czech Republic, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan and Turkey Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic

  13. Groundwater quality assessment plan for single-shell waste management area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SM Narbutovskih

    2000-03-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a first determination groundwater quality assessment at the Hanford Site. This work was performed for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement during the time period 1996--1998. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if waste from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY had entered the groundwater at levels above the drinking water standards (DWS). The resulting assessment report documented evidence demonstrating that waste from the WMA has, most likely, impacted groundwater quality. Based on 40 CFR 265.93 [d] paragraph (7), the owner-operator must continue to make the minimum required determinations of contaminant level and of rate/extent of migrations on a quarterly basis until final facility closure. These continued determinations are required because the groundwater quality assessment was implemented prior to final closure of the facility.

  14. State Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State Total Percent of U.S. total Alabama 482 0.0% Alaska 81 0.0% Arizona 194,476 3.3% Arkansas 336 0.0% California 3,163,120 53.0% Colorado 47,240 0.8% Connecticut 50,745 0.9% Delaware 6,600 0.1% District of Columbia 751 0.0% Florida 18,593 0.3% Georgia 47,660 0.8% Hawaii 78,329 1.3% Illinois 5,795 0.1% Indiana 37,016 0.6% Iowa 14,281 0.2% Kansas 1,809 0.0% Kentucky 520 0.0% Louisiana 12,147 0.2% Maine 1,296 0.0% Maryland 63,077 1.1% Massachusetts 157,415 2.6% Michigan 4,210 0.1% Minnesota

  15. Software quality for 1997 - what works and what doesn`t?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.

    1997-11-01

    This presentation provides a view of software quality for 1997 - what works and what doesn`t. For many years, software quality assurance lagged behind hardware quality assurance in terms of methods, metrics, and successful results. New approaches such as Quality Function Development (WFD) the ISO 9000-9004 standards, the SEI maturity levels, and Total Quality Management (TQM) are starting to attract wide attention, and in some cases to bring software quality levels up to a parity with manufacturing quality levels.

  16. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlaw, Pamela D.

    1999-12-31

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 51st set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP-LI) that were received on or before December 2, 1999.

  17. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlaw, Pamela D.; Berne, Anna

    2000-06-30

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 52nd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP-LII) that were received on or before June 3, 2000.

  18. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.; Pan, V.

    1995-07-03

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 42st set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLII) that were received on or before June 1, 1995. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 2 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

  19. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlaw, P.D.; Minick, S.K.

    1998-07-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 48th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVIII) that were received on or before June 1, 1998.

  20. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlaw, P.D.

    1998-01-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 4 days after the reporting deadline via the Internet at www.eml.doe.gov. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 47th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVII) that were received on or before December 1, 1997.

  1. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 43rd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIII) that were received on or before December 1, 1995. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 2 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Quality Hardware and Machine Co - IL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    11 Quality Hardware and Machine Co - IL 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: QUALITY HARDWARE AND MACHINE CO. (IL.11) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Ravenswood Venture Marden Manufacturing Co. IL.11-1 IL.11-2 Location: 5823/5849 North Ravenswood Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.11-3 Evaluation Year: 1990 IL.11-4 IL.11-5 Site Operations: From 1944 to 1945, entered into subcontracts with the University of Chicago to furnish personnel,

  3. Results of phase 1 groundwater quality assessment for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narbutovskih, S.M.

    1998-02-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a Phase 1 (or first determination) groundwater quality assessment for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY has impacted groundwater quality. This report will document the evidence demonstrating that the WMA has impacted groundwater quality.

  4. Quality assurance project plan for ground water monitoring activities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPP) applies specifically to the field activities and laboratory analysis performed for all RCRA groundwater projects conducted by Hanford Technical Services. This QAPP is generic in approach and shall be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual groundwater monitoring plans.

  5. Final Report Implementing Office of Management and Budget Information Dissemination Quality Guidelines (DOE, 2002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This DOE guidelines sets forth policy and procedures to ensure and maximize the quality, utility, objectivity, and integrity of the information that DOE disseminates to members of the public. DOE has prepared this final report pursuant to OMB government-wide guidelines under section 515 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2001.

  6. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Quality Management System Guidelines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management System tools customized for residential construction are ready for use by builders, trades, and designers to help eliminate mistakes that would require high-cost rework. Unlike many manufacturing industries, home construction is usually accomplished through the cooperation of several businesses, including the designer; the architect; the builder; site supervisors; HVAC, plumbing, electrical, framing, roofing, insulation and other contractors; manufacturers and suppliers of materials

  7. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Quality Management System Guidelines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    management system tools customized for residential construction are ready for use by builders, trades, and designers to help eliminate mistakes that would require high-cost rework. Unlike many manufacturing industries, home construction is usually accomplished through the cooperation of several businesses, including the designer; the architect; the builder; site supervisors; HVAC, plumbing, electrical, framing, roofing, insulation and other contractors; manufacturers and suppliers of materials

  8. West Village Community: Quality Management Processes and Preliminary Heat Pump Water Heater Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dakin, B.; Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.; German, A.

    2012-11-01

    West Village, a multi-use project underway at the University of California Davis, represents a ground-breaking sustainable community incorporating energy efficiency measures and on-site renewable generation to achieve community-level Zero Net Energy (ZNE) goals. The project when complete will provide housing for students, faculty, and staff with a vision to minimize the community's impact on energy use by reducing building energy use, providing on-site generation, and encouraging alternative forms of transportation. This focus of this research is on the 192 student apartments that were completed in 2011 under Phase I of the West Village multi-year project. The numerous aggressive energy efficiency measures implemented result in estimated source energy savings of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. There are two primary objectives of this research. The first is to evaluate performance and efficiency of the central heat pump water heaters as a strategy to provide efficient electric water heating for net-zero all-electric buildings and where natural gas is not available on site. In addition, effectiveness of the quality assurance and quality control processes implemented to ensure proper system commissioning and to meet program participation requirements is evaluated. Recommendations for improvements that could improve successful implementation for large-scale, high performance communities are identified.

  9. West Village Community. Quality Management Processes and Preliminary Heat Pump Water Heater Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dakin, B.; Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.; German, A.

    2012-11-01

    West Village, a multi-use project underway at the University of California Davis, represents a ground-breaking sustainable community incorporating energy efficiency measures and on-site renewable generation to achieve community-level Zero Net Energy (ZNE) goals. When complete, the project will provide housing for students, faculty, and staff with a vision to minimize the community’s impact on energy use by reducing building energy use, providing on-site generation, and encouraging alternative forms of transportation. This focus of this research is on the 192 student apartments that were completed in 2011 under Phase I of the West Village multi-year project. The numerous aggressive energy efficiency measures implemented result in estimated source energy savings of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. There are two primary objectives of this research. The first is to evaluate performance and efficiency of the central heat pump water heaters as a strategy to provide efficient electric water heating for net-zero all-electric buildings and where natural gas is not available on site. In addition, effectiveness of the quality assurance and quality control processes implemented to ensure proper system commissioning and to meet program participation requirements is evaluated. Recommendations for improvements that could improve successful implementation for large-scale, high performance communities are identified.

  10. Process-based quality management for clinical implementation of adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Camille E.; Santanam, Lakshmi; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been the focus of considerable research and developmental work due to its potential therapeutic benefits. However, in light of its unique quality assurance (QA) challenges, no one has described a robust framework for its clinical implementation. In fact, recent position papers by ASTRO and AAPM have firmly endorsed pretreatment patient-specific IMRT QA, which limits the feasibility of online ART. The authors aim to address these obstacles by applying failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to identify high-priority errors and appropriate risk-mitigation strategies for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated ART. Methods: An experienced team of two clinical medical physicists, one clinical engineer, and one radiation oncologist was assembled to perform a standard FMEA for intensity-modulated ART. A set of 216 potential radiotherapy failures composed by the forthcoming AAPM task group 100 (TG-100) was used as the basis. Of the 216 failures, 127 were identified as most relevant to an ART scheme. Using the associated TG-100 FMEA values as a baseline, the team considered how the likeliness of occurrence (O), outcome severity (S), and likeliness of failure being undetected (D) would change for ART. New risk priority numbers (RPN) were calculated. Failures characterized by RPN ≥ 200 were identified as potentially critical. Results: FMEA revealed that ART RPN increased for 38% (n = 48/127) of potential failures, with 75% (n = 36/48) attributed to failures in the segmentation and treatment planning processes. Forty-three of 127 failures were identified as potentially critical. Risk-mitigation strategies include implementing a suite of quality control and decision support software, specialty QA software/hardware tools, and an increase in specially trained personnel. Conclusions: Results of the FMEA-based risk assessment demonstrate that intensity-modulated ART introduces different (but not necessarily

  11. Quality assurance in China: a sleeping tiger awakens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baehr, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    The People`s Republic of China has undergone major economic reform in the past decade producing a new free-market system that is distinctly Chinese. The Chinese realize that to be successful in world trade, quality management and export trading must be given the highest priority in China`s strategic economic plans. Many manufacturing companies are now implementing Total Quality Management (TQM) and the ISO 9000 i quality management standards. A first hand survey of the quality movement in China today is the objective of this paper.

  12. Quality assurance plan for the data acquisition and management system for monitoring the fuel oil spill at the Sandia National Laboratories installation in Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peerenboom, J.P.; Leser, C.C.; Ramsey, G.M.; Widing, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    In February 1975, the accidental puncture of an underground transfer line buried about 4 ft below the ground surface at the SNL installation in Livermore, California, resulted in the release of approximately 225.5 m{sup 3} of No. 2 diesel fuel. This report describes the formal quality assurance plan that will be used for the data acquisition and management system developed to monitor a bioremediation pilot study by Argonne National Laboratory in association with Sandia National Laboratories. The data acquisition and management system will record the site data during the bioremediation effort and assist users in site analysis. The designs of the three major subsystems of this system are described in this report. Quality assurance criteria are defined for the management, performance, and assessment of the system. Finally, the roles and responsibilities for configuration management of this system are defined for the entire life cycle of the project.

  13. Quality-of-Life Assessment After Palliative Interventions to Manage Malignant Ureteral Obstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monsky, Wayne Laurence; Molloy, Chris; Jin, Bedro; Nolan, Timothy; Fernando, Dayantha; Loh, Shaun; Li, Chin-Shang

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Malignancies may cause urinary tract obstruction, which is often relieved with placement of a percutaneous nephrostomy tube, an internal double J nephro-ureteric stent (double J), or an internal external nephroureteral stent (NUS). We evaluated the affect of these palliative interventions on quality of life (QoL) using previously validated surveys. Methods: Forty-six patients with malignancy related ureteral obstruction received nephrostomy tubes (n = 16), double J stents (n = 15), or NUS (n = 15) as determined by a multidisciplinary team. QoL surveys were administered at 7, 30, and 90 days after the palliative procedure to evaluate symptoms and physical, social, functional, and emotional well-being. Number of related procedures, fluoroscopy time, and complications were documented. Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman's test were used to compare patients at 7, 30, and 90 days. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to assess correlations between clinical outcomes/symptoms and QoL. Results: Responses to QoL surveys were not significantly different for patients receiving nephrostomies, double J stents, or NUS at 7, 30, or 90 days. At 30 and 90 days there were significantly higher reported urinary symptoms and pain in those receiving double J stents compared with nephrostomies (P = 0.0035 and P = 0.0189, respectively). Significantly greater fluoroscopy time was needed for double J stent-related procedures (P = 0.0054). Nephrostomy tubes were associated with more frequent minor complications requiring additional changes. Conclusion: QoL was not significantly different. However, a greater incidence of pain in those receiving double J stents and more frequent tube changes in those with nephrostomy tubes should be considered when choosing palliative approaches.

  14. A research study to determine the effect of Total Quality Management (TQM) on employee morale in Plant Procedures Division at EG&G, Rocky Flats, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, E.F.

    1994-01-01

    EG&G at Rocky Flats, Golden, Colorado, experienced a high amount of low morale, due to the plant site having been designated to close, and the uneasiness of the working force was very visible. Some employees accepted early retirement in October 1992, however, all received letters of 120 days notice in March 1993, and were advised several cuts Would be made by October 1, 1993. This information alone caused many insecurities in employees, and caused morale to decrease even more. This is an in depth study of morale, which was upgraded in Plant Procedures Group (PPG), through the effect of TQM. The primary research included a survey of employees with results included. The study also increased additional questions in PPG, some of which were added to the agenda of the Process Improvement Team (PIT) to improve PPG in the eyes of customers. Statistics did show that morale improved, not necessarily because of TQM or the progress of the Process Improvement Team (PIT), but due to efforts of the staff implementing the principles of TQM the best they knew how.

  15. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-09-29

    To establish an effective management system [i.e., quality assurance programs (QAPs)] using the performance requirements of this Order, coupled with technical standards where appropriate. Cancels DOE O 414.1.

  16. Quantifying And Predicting Wood Quality Of Loblolly And Slash Pine Under Intensive Forest Management Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard F. Daniels; Alexander Clark III

    2006-05-04

    The forest industry will increasingly rely on fast-growing intensively managed southern pine plantations to furnish wood and fiber. Intensive silvicultural practices, including competition control, stand density control, fertilization, and genetic improvement are yielding tremendous gains in the quantity of wood production from commercial forest land. How these technologies affect wood properties was heretofore unknown, although there is concern about the suitability of fast-grown wood for traditional forest products. A four year study was undertaken to examine the effects of these intensive practices on the properties of loblolly and slash pine wood by applying a common sampling method over 10 existing field experiments. Early weed control gets young pines off to a rapid start, often with dramatically increased growth rates. This response is all in juvenile wood however, which is low in density and strength. Similar results are found with early Nitrogen fertilization at the time of planting. These treatments increase the proportion of juvenile wood in the tree. Later, mid-rotation fertilization with Nitrogen and Phosphorus can have long term (4-8 year) growth gains. Slight reductions in wood density are short-lived (1-2 years) and occur while the tree is producing dense, stiff mature wood. Impacts of mid-rotation fertilization on wood properties for manufacturing are estimated to be minimal. Genetic differences are evident in wood density and other properties. Single family plantings showed somewhat more uniform properties than bulk improved or unimproved seedlots. Selection of genetic sources with optimal wood properties may counter some of the negative impacts of intensive weed control and fertilization. This work will allow forest managers to better predict the effects of their practices on the quality of their final product.

  17. management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5%2A en Management and Budget http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsmanagementandbudget

  18. Urban runoff quality management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    This new manual of practice, jointly produced by the Water Environment Federation and American Society of Civil Engineers, focuses on the protection and enhancement of urban water resources by controlling the transport of constituents into urban waterways by urban stormwater runoff. The manual emphasizes control of constituent discharges, reflecting the fact that chemical and particulate constituents in urban stormwater runoff play a key role in determining the negative effects of that runoff.

  19. Barge Truck Total

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

  20. management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5%2A en Management and Budget http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsmanagementandbudget

    P...

  1. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management ... managers, and other information system development and maintenance professionals with ...

  2. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-29

    This Order ensures that the quality of DOE/NNSA products and services meets or exceeds the customer's expectations. This Order cancels DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance, dated 9-29-99, and Attachment 1, paragraph 8, and Attachment 2, paragraph 22, of DOE O 440.1A, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees, dated 3-27-98. Cancels: DOE O 414.1A and DOE O 440.1A, parts as noted.

  3. Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water QualityManagement for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2004-12-20

    The San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration Program (SJRRP) has recognized the potential importance of real-time monitoring and management to the success of the San Joaquin River (SJR) restoration endeavor. The first step to realizing making real-time management a reality on the middle San Joaquin River between Friant Dam and the Merced River will be the installation and operation of a network of permanent telemetered gauging stations that will allow optimization of reservoir releases made specifically for fish water temperature management. Given the limited reservoir storage volume available to the SJJRP, this functionality will allow the development of an adaptive management program, similar in concept to the VAMP though with different objectives. The virtue of this approach is that as management of the middle SJR becomes more routine, additional sensors can be added to the sensor network, initially deployed, to continue to improve conditions for anadromous fish.

  4. Proposal for a Guide for Quality Management Systems for PV Manufacturing: Supplemental Requirements to ISO 9001-2008 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norum, P.; Sinicco, I.; Eguchi, Y.; Lokanath, S.; Zhou, W.; Brueggemann, G.; Mikonowicz, A.; Yamamichi, M.; Kurtz, S.

    2013-09-01

    This technical specification provides a guideline for photovoltaic module manufacturers to produce modules that, once the design has proven to meet the quality and reliability requirements, replicate such design in an industrial scale without compromising its consistency with the requirements.

  5. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  6. Quality Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Policy It is the policy of the Department of Energy to establish quality requirements to ensure that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks posed by the facility or activity and its work. The Department implements this policy through the QA Order and the QA rule directives to ensure quality assurance requirements are clearly specified for the broad spectrum of work performed by DOE and its contractors.

  7. Quality Procedure - Document Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control Quality Procedure - Document Control This procedure establishes the responsibilities and process for preparing, managing, and revising EM Headquarters Office of Standards and Quality Assurance controlled documents in accordance with EM-QA-001, Environmental Management Quality Assurance Program. Quality Procedure - Document Control (2.6 MB) More Documents & Publications Quality Procedure - Supplier Qualification Quality Procedure - Approved Suppliers List Quality Procedure - Records

  8. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  9. Weapons Quality Assurance Qualification Standard

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Emphasis preferred on quality assurance, statistics, DOE-STD-1025-2008 7 mathematics, production management, industrial management, computer science, engineering, engineering ...

  10. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Klusek, C.S.

    1993-07-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 38th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXXVIII) that were received on or before June 2, 1993.

  11. Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

    2009-10-01

    Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

  12. Updated Proposal for a Guide for Quality Management Systems for PV Manufacturing. Supplemental Requirements to ISO 9001-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramu, Govind; Yamamichi, Masaaki; Zhou, Wei; Mikonowicz, Alex; Lokanath, Sumanth; Eguchi, Yoshihito; Norum, Paul; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this Technical Specification is to provide a guideline for manufacturers of photovoltaic (PV) modules to produce modules that, once the design is proven to meet the quality and reliability requirements, replicate the design on an industrial scale without compromising its consistency with the requirements.

  13. Quality Procedure - Supplier Qualification | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supplier Qualification Quality Procedure - Supplier Qualification This procedure establishes the responsibilities and process for supplier qualification activities conducted by Environmental Management (EM) Headquarters (HQ) Office of Standards and Quality Assurance in accordance with EM-QA-001, Environmental Management Quality Assurance Program. Quality Procedure - Supplier Qualification (2.03 MB) More Documents & Publications Quality Procedure - Approved Suppliers List Quality Procedure -

  14. Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trible, T.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    This quality plan describes the system used by Characterization Project management to achieve quality. This plan is comprised on eleven quality policies which, when taken together, form a management system deployed to achieve quality. This quality management system is based on the customer`s quality requirements known as the `RULE`, 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance.

  15. Using performance parameters, metrified performance objectives, and quality management assessments to improve the effectiveness of research organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodnarczuk, M

    1995-04-01

    This paper begins by raising the issue of whether the theoretical model of customer-suppliers-products-services usefully describes the activities of laboratory life, using a case study from Fermilab. After describing scientific activities as work, not volunteerism, I present a model that has four performance parameters that can be used to evaluate DOE-funded research laboratories: (1) Do they have a well-defined management system? (2) Are they doing good science? (3) Are they managing their resources effectively? (4) Are they responsive to their customers? From these four parameters I describe how to metrify performance objectives, then use them to evaluate research organizations. I describe these performance objectives within the context of views I have published elsewhere, and according to Stephen R. Covey`s metaphor of production/production capability (P/PC) balance in his book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

  16. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management system - An Italian case study on the quality of MSW data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianchini, A.; Pellegrini, M.; Saccani, C.

    2011-09-15

    This paper analyses the way numerical data on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) quantities are recorded, processed and then reported for six of the most meaningful Italian Districts and shows the difficulties found during the comparison of these Districts, starting from the lack of homogeneity and the fragmentation of the data indispensable to make this critical analysis. These aspects are often ignored, but data certainty are the basis for serious MSW planning. In particular, the paper focuses on overall Source Separation Level (SSL) definition and on the influence that Special Waste (SW) assimilated to MSW has on it. An investigation was then necessary to identify new parameters in place of overall SSL. Moreover, these parameters are not only important for a waste management system performance measure, but are fundamental in order to design and check management plan and to identify possible actions to improve it.

  17. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per...

  18. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  19. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  20. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

  1. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per...

  2. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  3. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

  4. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

  5. Parallel Total Energy

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-21

    This is a total energy electronic structure code using Local Density Approximation (LDA) of the density funtional theory. It uses the plane wave as the wave function basis set. It can sue both the norm conserving pseudopotentials and the ultra soft pseudopotentials. It can relax the atomic positions according to the total energy. It is a parallel code using MP1.

  6. U.S. Total Exports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Egypt ... Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total ...

  7. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-07-12

    To establish an effective management system [i.e., quality assurance programs(QAPs)] using the performance requirements of this Order, coupled with technical standards where appropriate. Change 1, dated 7/12/01, facilitates the Department's organizational transition necessitated by establishment of the NNSA. (Attachment 2 of this Order is canceled by DOE O 470.2B.) Cancels: DOE O 414.1

  8. Management and Independent Assessments Guide for Use with 10 CFR, Part 830, Subpart A, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance; DOE M 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Manual; and DOE O 226.1A

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-04-18

    Management and Independent Assessments Guide for Use with 10 CFR, Part 830, Subpart A, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance; DOE M 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Manual; and DOE O 226.1A

  9. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE G 414.1-1B, Management and Independent Assessments Guide for Use with 10 CFR, Part 830, Subpart A, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance; DOE M 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Manual; and DOE O 226.1A

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-04-18

    This memorandum provides justification for revising DOE G 414.1-1B, Management and Independent Assessments Guide for Use With 10 CFR, Part 830, Subpart A, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance; DOE M 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Manual; and DOE O 226.1A, Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy.

  10. Summary Max Total Units

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water

  11. SU-C-BRD-05: Implementation of Incident Learning in the Safety and Quality Management of Radiotherapy: The Primary Experience in a New Established Program with Advanced Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, R; Wang, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the implementation and effectiveness of incident learning for the safety and quality of radiotherapy in a new established radiotherapy program with advanced technology. Methods: Reference to the consensus recommendations by American Association of Physicist in Medicine, an incident learning system was specifically designed for reporting, investigating, and learning of individual radiotherapy incidents in a new established radiotherapy program, with 4D CBCT, Ultrasound guided radiotherapy, VMAT, gated treatment delivered on two new installed linacs. The incidents occurring in external beam radiotherapy from February, 2012 to January, 2014 were reported. Results: A total of 33 reports were analyzed, including 28 near misses and 5 incidents. Among them, 5 originated in imaging for planning, 25 in planning, 1 in plan transfer, 1 in commissioning and 1 in treatment delivery. Among them, three near misses originated in the safety barrier of the radiotherapy process. In terms of error type, 1 incident was classified as wrong patient, 7 near misses/incidents as wrong site, 6 as wrong laterality, 5 as wrong dose, 7 as wrong prescription, and 7 as suboptimal plan quality. 5 incidents were all classified as grade 1/2 of dosimetric severity, 1 as grade 0, and the other 4 as grade 1 of medical severity. For the causes/contributory factors, negligence, policy not followed, inadequate training, failure to develop an effective plan, and communication contributed to 19, 15, 12, 5 and 3 near misses/incidents, respectively. The average incident rate per 100 patients treated was 0.4; this rate fell to 0.28% in the second year from 0.56% in the first year. The rate of near miss fell to 1.24% from 2.22%. Conclusion: Effective incident learning can reduce the occurrence of near miss/incidents, enhance the culture of safety. Incident learning is an effective proactive method for improving the quality and safety of radiotherapy.

  12. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  13. ARM - Measurement - Total carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total carbon The total concentration of carbon in all its organic and non-organic forms. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including

  14. Characterization of contaminants in oil shale residuals and the potential for their management to meet environmental quality standards. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt-Collerus, J.J.

    1984-02-01

    Some general aspects of various oil shale processes developed for scale-up to commercial size modular units are described. The overall magnitude of an envisioned commercial shale oil operation and the magnitude of resulting potentially polluting residues in particular solid residues from retorting oil shale and associated operations and wastewater from retort streams and other sources are considered. The potential problems ensuing from self-oxidation of stockpiles of oil shale and from residual carbonaceous retorted oil shale disposed above ground and/or from in situ retorting operations are examined. Some methods for managing self-heating processes are suggested. The most plausible method of avoiding potential self-heating for retorted oil shale is to oxidize as much as possible of the organic carbon present by utilizing a process that will produce low carbon or carbon-free retorted oil shale residues. In the case of unretorted oil shale, the dimensions and shapes of the stockpiles should be designed such that heat build-up is eliminated or kept to a minimum.

  15. Quality Procedure - Audits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Audits Quality Procedure - Audits This procedure establishes the responsibilities and process for scheduling, planning, performing, and reporting Quality Assurance (QA) audits of EM-QA-001, Environmental Management Quality Assurance Program implementation at EM Headquarters and Field Office programs, facilities and projects. Quality Procedure - Audits (5.04 MB) More Documents & Publications Quality Procedure - Document Control Quality Procedure - Supplier Qualification Quality Procedure -

  16. WE-D-9A-06: Open Source Monitor Calibration and Quality Control Software for Enterprise Display Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevins, N; Vanderhoek, M; Lang, S; Flynn, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Medical display monitor calibration and quality control present challenges to medical physicists. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate and share experiences with an open source package that allows for both initial monitor setup and routine performance evaluation. Methods: A software package, pacsDisplay, has been developed over the last decade to aid in the calibration of all monitors within the radiology group in our health system. The software is used to calibrate monitors to follow the DICOM Grayscale Standard Display Function (GSDF) via lookup tables installed on the workstation. Additional functionality facilitates periodic evaluations of both primary and secondary medical monitors to ensure satisfactory performance. This software is installed on all radiology workstations, and can also be run as a stand-alone tool from a USB disk. Recently, a database has been developed to store and centralize the monitor performance data and to provide long-term trends for compliance with internal standards and various accrediting organizations. Results: Implementation and utilization of pacsDisplay has resulted in improved monitor performance across the health system. Monitor testing is now performed at regular intervals and the software is being used across multiple imaging modalities. Monitor performance characteristics such as maximum and minimum luminance, ambient luminance and illuminance, color tracking, and GSDF conformity are loaded into a centralized database for system performance comparisons. Compliance reports for organizations such as MQSA, ACR, and TJC are generated automatically and stored in the same database. Conclusion: An open source software solution has simplified and improved the standardization of displays within our health system. This work serves as an example method for calibrating and testing monitors within an enterprise health system.

  17. Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trimble, D.J.

    1995-10-02

    These Quality Policies (QPs) describe the Quality Management System of the Tank Waste Characterization Project (hereafter referred to as the Characterization Project), Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Quality Policies and quality requirements described herein are binding on all Characterization Project organizations. To achieve quality, the Characterization Project management team shall implement this Characterization Project Quality Management System.

  18. Quality Assurance | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quality Assurance The Quality Assurance & Continuous Improvement Department has the critical role of working with the U.S. Department of Energy and other regulators on the environment, health and safety; self-assessment and quality assurance. The department's goal is to devise, integrate and manage activities, programs and systems that make it possible for the lab, its employees and its contractors deliver services and products that perpetuate environmental, integrated safety and quality

  19. Total DOE/NNSA

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Actuals 2009 Actuals 2010 Actuals 2011 Actuals 2012 Actuals 2013 Actuals 2014 Actuals 2015 Actuals Total DOE/NNSA 4,385 4,151 4,240 4,862 5,154 5,476 7,170 7,593 Total non-NNSA 3,925 4,017 4,005 3,821 3,875 3,974 3,826 3765 Total Facility 8,310 8,168 8,245 8,683 9,029 9,450 10,996 11,358 non-NNSA includes DOE offices and Strategic Parternship Projects (SPP) employees NNSA M&O Employee Reporting

  20. EM Quality Assurance Centralized Training Platform Project Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Management Quality Assurance EM Quality Assurance Centralized Training Platform Project Plan for 2009-2010 EM Quality Assurance Centralized Training Platform Project...

  1. Results of Phase I groundwater quality assessment for single-shell tank waste management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, V.G.; Chou, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Phase I, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment for the Richland Field Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-RL), in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area (WMA) S-SX has impacted groundwater quality. The WMA is located in the southern portion of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and consists of the 241-S and 241-SX tank farms and ancillary waste systems. The unit is regulated under RCRA interim-status regulations (40 CFR 265, Subpart F) and was placed in assessment groundwater monitoring (40 CFR 265.93 [d]) in August 1996 because of elevated specific conductance and technetium-99, a non-RCRA co-contaminant, in downgradient monitoring wells. Major findings of the assessment are summarized below: (1) Distribution patterns for radionuclides and RCRA/dangerous waste constituents indicate WMA S-SX has contributed to groundwater contamination observed in downgradient monitoring wells. (2) Drinking water standards for nitrate and technetium-99 are currently exceeded in one RCRA-compliant well (299-W22-46) located at the southeastern comer of the SX tank farm. (3) Technetium-99, nitrate, and chromium concentrations in downgradient well 299-W22-46 (the well with the highest current concentrations) appear to be declining after reaching maximum concentrations in May 1997. (4) Cesium-137 and strontium-90, major constituents of concern in single-shell tank waste, were not detected in any of the RCRA-compliant wells in the WMA network, including the well with the highest current technetium-99 concentrations (299-W22-46). (5) Low but detectable strontium-90 and cesium-137 were found in one old well (2-W23-7), located inside and between the S and SX tank farms.

  2. Line Management Perspective: Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Matthew Moury, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety, Security and Quality Programs, Office of Environmental Management. EFCOG Integrated Safety Management Work Planning and Control.

  3. Quality Assurance Corporate Board

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance Corporate Board is an executive board that includes both senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor representatives who are...

  4. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    76 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 27 24 86 134 65 24 192 171 1189 423 PAY PLAN SES 96 EX 4 EJ/EK 60 EN 05 39 EN 04 159 EN 03 21 EN 00 8 NN (Engineering) 398 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 1165 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 54 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 325 GS 15 3 GS 14 1 GS 13 1 GS 10 1 Total includes 2318 permanent and 17 temporary employees. DIVERSITY 2335 1559 66.8% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 33.2% National

  5. Quality Assurance and Configuration Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These involvements include significant responsibility on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP), the Hanford Tank Waste ...

  6. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 2 1 4 9 4 0 20 25 57 37 PAY PLAN SES 7 EJ/EK 3 EN 04 11 EN 00 3 NN (Engineering) 30 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 102 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management (NA-APM) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 159 87 54.7% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 45.3% SES EJ/EK EN 04 EN 00 NN NQ NU 4.4% 1.9% 6.9% 1.9% 18.9% 64.2% 1.9% 1.3% 0.6%

  7. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 2 2 6 1 0 0 5 9 4 PAY PLAN SES 1 EJ/EK 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 27 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer (NA-IM) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 30 13 43.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 56.7% SES EJ/EK NQ NU 3.3% 3.3% 90.0% 3.3% 3.3% 6.7% 6.7% 20.0% 3.3% 0.0% 0.0% 16.7% 30.0% 13.3% SUPERVISORS

  8. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 2 2 11 31 1 3 18 35 46 63 PAY PLAN SES 9 EJ/EK 1 EN 04 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 194 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 7 DIVERSITY 212 78 36.8% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 63.2% Associate Administrator for Management & Budget (NA-MB) As of March 21, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 04 NQ NU 4.2% 0.5% 0.5% 91.5% 3.3% 0.9% 0.9% 5.2% 14.6% 0.5% 1.4% 8.5% 16.5% 21.7% 29.7% SUPERVISORS

  9. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 2 1 5 12 4 0 20 27 54 37 PAY PLAN SES 4 EJ/EK 2 EN 04 11 EN 03 3 EN 00 6 NN (Engineering) 29 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 104 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management (NA-APM) As of September 5, 2015 DIVERSITY 162 85 52.5% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 47.5% SES EJ/EK EN 04 EN 03 EN 00 NN NQ NU 2.5% 1.2% 6.8% 1.9% 3.7%

  10. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 2 2 4 1 0 0 5 10 4 PAY PLAN SES 1 EJ/EK 1 EN 05 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 25 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 DIVERSITY 29 14 48.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 51.7% Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer (NA-IM) As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 05 NQ NU 3.4% 3.4% 3.4% 86.2% 3.4% 3.4% 6.9% 6.9% 13.8% 3.4% 0.0% 0.0% 17.2%

  11. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 2 11 31 1 4 18 34 45 60 PAY PLAN SES 8 EJ/EK 1 EN 04 2 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 189 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 7 DIVERSITY 207 76 36.7% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 63.3% Associate Administrator for Management & Budget (NA-MB) As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 04 NQ NU 3.9% 0.5% 1.0% 91.3% 3.4% 0.5% 1.0% 5.3% 15.0% 0.5% 1.9% 8.7% 16.4% 21.7% 29.0% Prepared by

  12. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface ...

  13. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  14. Risk Management RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Modules that address key functional areas of project management, engineering and design, safety, environment, security, and quality assurance, grouped by each specific CD phase. ...

  15. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Checklist | Department of Energy SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners, project managers, configuration managers, and other information system development and maintenance professionals with guidance in identifying and planning software configuration management (SCM)

  16. Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    2002-05-10

    Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

  17. Configuration Management Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Configuration Management Plan Configuration Management Plan This template is used for documenting the configuration management methodology, tools, techniques, roles and responsibilities and tasks for a systems development project. Configuration Management Plan (96.89 KB) More Documents & Publications SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management Checklist NMMSS Software Quality Assurance Plan Software Configuration Management (SCM) A Practical Guide

  18. Underlying Quality Principles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These principles are consistent with Integrated Safety Management Policy, P 450.4A and support ISM implementation. 1. Define Policies and Objectives--Ensure they are Understood and Accepted. Management must set expectations for the organization as a whole before employees can do their jobs, satisfy their customers, and strive to improve the quality of their work. This is accomplished by developing and implementing specific policies and objectives that reflect the operating philosophy of the facility's management. Once these policies and objectives have been established, all managers must take the necessary actions to ensure that each employee shares their vision of the organization's purpose.

  19. U.S. Total Exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barbados Total To Brazil Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Canada Eastport, ID Calais, ME Detroit, MI Marysville, MI Port Huron, MI Crosby, ND Portal, ND Sault St. Marie, MI St. Clair, MI Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Egypt Freeport, TX Total to India

  20. Teaching Managers How to Manage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hylko, J.M.

    2006-07-01

    Following graduation from a college or university with a technical degree, or through years of experience, an individual's training and career development activities typically focus on enhancing technical problem-solving skills. However, as these technical professionals, herein referred to as 'Techies', advance throughout their careers, they may be required to accept and adapt to the role of being a manager, and must undergo a transition to learn and rely on new problem-solving skills. However, unless a company has a specific manager-trainee class to address this subject and develop talent from within, an employee's management style is learned and developed 'on the job'. Both positive and negative styles are nurtured by those managers having similar qualities. Unfortunately, a negative style often contributes to the deterioration of employee morale and ultimate closing of a department or company. This paper provides the core elements of an effective management training program for 'Teaching Managers How to Manage' derived from the Department of Energy's Integrated Safety Management System and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration 's Voluntary Protection Program. Discussion topics and real-life examples concentrate on transitioning an employee from a 'Techie' to a manager; common characteristics of being a manager; the history and academic study of management; competition, change and the business of waste management; what to do after taking over a department by applying Hylko's Star of Success; command media; the formal and informal organizational charts; chain of command; hiring and developing high-degree, autonomous employees through effective communication and delegation; periodic status checks; and determining if the program is working successfully. These common characteristics of a strong management/leadership culture and practical career tips discussed herein provide a solid foundation for any company or department that is serious about developing

  1. Total Eolica | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eolica Jump to: navigation, search Name: Total Eolica Place: Spain Product: Project developer References: Total Eolica1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  2. Total..............................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North

  3. Total............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

  4. Total..............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269

  5. Total...............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs

  6. Total...............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs

  7. Total...............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2

  8. Total...............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs

  9. Total.................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat

  10. Total.................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment........ 1.2 N Q Q 0.2 0.4 0.2 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment........... 109.8 14.7 7.4 12.4 12.2 18.5 18.3 17.1 9.2 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............. 109.1 14.6 7.3 12.4 12.2 18.2 18.2 17.1 9.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It............... 0.8 Q Q Q Q 0.3 Q N Q Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas................................................... 58.2 9.2 4.9 7.8 7.1 8.8 8.4 7.8 4.2 Central

  11. Total..................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central

  12. Total...................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing

  13. Total...................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 37.8 3.4 2.2 7.0 3.1 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 9.7 0.6 0.5 1.0 0.6 Window/Wall Units.......................................... 28.9 14.9 2.3 3.5 6.0 2.1 1 Unit........................................................... 14.5 6.6 1.0 1.6 4.2 1.2 2

  14. Total.......................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.6 15.1 5.5 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.9 5.3 1.6 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 13.7 9.8 3.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 9.3 6.8 2.5 2.................................................................. 16.2 2.9 1.9 1.0 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 1.5 1.1 0.4 Number of Laptop PCs

  15. Total.......................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.9 8.4 3.4 2.................................................................. 16.2 3.5 2.2 1.3 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.1 1.5 0.6 Number of Laptop PCs

  16. Total.......................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs

  17. Total........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1

  18. Total........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing

  19. Total........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 40.1 21.2 6.9 12.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 Q Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 13.6 5.6 2.3 5.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.0 4.4

  20. Total........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0

  1. Total...........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat

  2. Total...........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat

  3. Total...........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat

  4. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat

  5. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a

  6. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a

  7. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat

  8. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat

  9. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a

  10. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat

  11. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat

  12. Total..............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5

  13. Total..............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a

  14. Total..............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer .......................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer....................................... 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1......................................................................... 50.3 3.1 3.4 3.4 5.4 2......................................................................... 16.2 0.7 1.1 1.2 2.2 3 or More............................................................ 9.0 0.3

  15. Total..............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5

  16. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  17. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  18. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.0 1.6 0.3 1.1 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 8.3 4.2 1.3 2.7 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 15.0 8.1 2.7 4.2 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 10.9 6.0 1.8 3.1 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9

  19. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  20. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  1. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week.....................................................

  2. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  3. Total.........................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less

  4. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Basements Basement in Single-Family Homes and Apartments in 2-4 Unit Buildings ... Attics Attic in Single-Family Homes and Apartments in 2-4 Unit Buildings ...

  5. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Climate region 3 Very coldCold 31,898 30,469 28,057 28,228 21,019 30,542 25,067 Mixed-humid 27,873 26,716 24,044 26,365 21,026 27,096 22,812 Mixed-dryHot-dry 12,037 10,484 7,628 ...

  6. Total..........................................................

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......Central Air-Conditioning...... 65.9 1.1 6.4 6.4 ...

  7. Total..........................................................

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent......1.3 1.2 0.8 0.4 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  8. Total..........................................................

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 80,000 or More 60,000 to 79,999 ... Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 80,000 or More 60,000 to 79,999 ...

  9. Total..........................................................

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Table HC7.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line ... Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 80,000 or More Space Heating ...

  10. Total..........................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Table HC7.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line ... Table HC7.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line ...

  11. Total..........................................................

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Living Space Characteristics Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 Million ... Living Space Characteristics Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 Million ...

  12. Total..........................................................

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Table HC7.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty ... Table HC7.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty ...

  13. Total..........................................................

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line ... Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 40,000 to 59,999 60,000 to 79,999 ...

  14. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,001 to 5,000 2,777 8,041 10,232 2.9 786 56 5,001 to 10,000 1,229 8,900 9,225 7.2 965 62 10,001 to 25,000 884 14,105 14,189 16.0 994 65 25,001 to 50,000 332 11,917 11,327 35.9 1,052 72 50,001 to 100,000 199 13,918 12,345 69.9 1,127 80 100,001 to 200,000 90 12,415 11,310 137.9 1,098 89 200,001 to 500,000 38 10,724 10,356 284.2 1,035 99 Over 500,000 8 7,074 9,196 885.0 769 117 Principal building activity Education 389 12,239 10,885 31.5 1,124 53 Food sales 177 1,252 1,172 7.1 1,067 121 Food

  15. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,001 to 5,000 2,777 8,041 10,232 2.9 786 56 5,001 to 10,000 1,229 8,900 9,225 7.2 965 62 10,001 to 25,000 884 14,105 14,189 16.0 994 65 25,001 to 50,000 332 11,917 11,327 35.9 1,052 72 50,001 to 100,000 199 13,918 12,345 69.9 1,127 80 100,001 to 200,000 90 12,415 11,310 137.9 1,098 89 200,001 to 500,000 38 10,724 10,356 284.2 1,035 99 Over 500,000 8 7,074 9,196 885.0 769 117 Principal building activity Education 389 12,239 10,885 31.5 1,124 53 Food sales 177 1,252 1,172 7.1 1,067 121 Food

  16. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,001 to 5,000 2,777 8,041 10,232 2.9 786 56 5,001 to 10,000 1,229 8,900 9,225 7.2 965 62 10,001 to 25,000 884 14,105 14,189 16.0 994 65 25,001 to 50,000 332 11,917 11,327 35.9 1,052 72 50,001 to 100,000 199 13,918 12,345 69.9 1,127 80 100,001 to 200,000 90 12,415 11,310 137.9 1,098 89 200,001 to 500,000 38 10,724 10,356 284.2 1,035 99 Over 500,000 8 7,074 9,196 885.0 769 117 Principal building activity Education 389 12,239 10,885 31.5 1,124 53 Food sales 177 1,252 1,172 7.1 1,067 121 Food

  17. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Median square feet per building (thousand) Median square feet per worker Median operating hours per week Median age of buildings (years) All buildings 5,557 87,093 88,182 5.0 1,029 50 32 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,777 8,041 10,232 2.8 821 49 37 5,001 to 10,000 1,229 8,900 9,225 7.0 1,167 50 31 10,001 to 25,000 884 14,105 14,189 15.0 1,444 56 32 25,001 to 50,000 332 11,917 11,327 35.0 1,461 60 29 50,001 to 100,000 199 13,918 12,345 67.0 1,442 60 26 100,001 to 200,000 90

  18. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Housing Units (millions) UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported) Living Space ... Housing Units (millions) UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported) Living Space ...

  19. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Housing Units (millions) UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural ... Housing Units (millions) UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural ...

  20. Total..........................................................

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 ...

  1. Total..........................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy ...

  2. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Per Household Member Average Square Feet Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC1.2.2 ...

  3. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment...... 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment...... 93.3 ...

  4. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 41.8 2,603 2,199 1,654 941 795 598 1-Car Garage...... 9.5 2,064 1,664 1,039 775 624 390 2-Car Garage......

  5. Total..........................................................

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Average Square Feet per Apartment in a -- Apartments (millions) Major Outside Wall Construction Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, Steel)...... 35.3 3.5 1,286 1,090 325 852 786 461 ...

  6. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units ... At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

  7. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units ... At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

  8. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table ... At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

  9. Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Quality Air Quality Tour The Laboratory calculates the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) to determine effects of Laboratory operations on the public.

  10. Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Quality Air Quality Tour The Laboratory calculates the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) to determine effects of Laboratory operations on the public. Open full...

  11. Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Quality Air Quality Tour The Laboratory calculates the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) to determine effects of Laboratory operations on the public.

  12. Quality Assurance Checklists for Energy.gov Web Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy.gov Content Management System Quality Assurance Checklists for Energy.gov Web Requirements Quality Assurance Checklists for Energy.gov Web Requirements For Office of ...

  13. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program. QAP 49 summary of evaluations of 3217 reported analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlaw, P.D.

    1998-12-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 4 days after the reporting deadline via the Internet at www.eml.doe.gov. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 49th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIX) that were received on or before December 1, 1998.

  14. Quality Assurance Requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements Quality Assurance Requirements The QARD provides the framework for both the achievement and verification of quality. Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (1.37 MB) More Documents & Publications Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management-Quality Assurance Requirements and Description QA Corporate Board Meeting - December 2013 Protocol for EM Review/Field Self-Assessment of Site Specific Quality Assurance Programs/Quality Implementation Plans

  15. EFCOG Integrated Safety Management Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Matthew Moury, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety, Security and Quality Programs, Office of Environmental Management

  16. Quality engineering as a discipline of study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, Rachel R.; Hoover, Marcey L.

    2012-12-01

    The current framework for quality scholarship in the United States ranges from the training and education of future quality engineers, managers, and professionals to focused and sustained research initiatives that, through academic institutions and other organizations, aim to improve the knowledge and application of quality across a variety of sectors. Numerous quality journals also provide a forum for professional dissemination of information.

  17. Total Dissolved Gas Effects on Fishes of the Lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrath, Kathy E.; Dawley, Earl; Geist, David R.

    2006-03-31

    Gas supersaturation problems generated by spill from dams on the Columbia River were first identified in the 1960s. Since that time, considerable research has been conducted on effects of gas supersaturation on aquatic life, primarily juvenile salmonids. Also since that time, modifications to dam structures and operations have reduced supersaturated gas levels produced by the dams. The limit for total dissolved gas saturation (TDGS) as mandated by current Environmental Protection Agency water quality standards is 110%. State management agencies issue limited waivers to water quality, allowing production of levels of up to 120% TDGS to facilitate the downstream migration of juvenile salmonids. Recently, gas supersaturation as a water quality issue has resurfaced as concerns have grown regarding chronic effects of spill-related total dissolved gas on salmonids, including incubating embryos and larvae, resident fish species, and other aquatic organisms. Because of current concerns, and because the last comprehensive review of research on supersaturation effects on fishes was conducted in 1997, we reviewed recent supersaturation literature to identify new or ongoing issues that may not be adequately addressed by the current 110% TDGS limit and the 120% TDGS water quality waiver. We found that recent work supports older research indicating that short-term exposure to levels up to 120% TDGS does not produce acute effects on migratory juvenile or adult salmonids when compensating depths are available. Monitoring programs at Snake and Columbia river dams from 1995 to the early 2000s documented a low incidence of significant gas bubble disease or mortality in Columbia River salmonids, resident fishes, or other taxa. We did, however, identify five areas of concern in which total dissolved gas levels lower than water quality limits may produce sublethal effects on fishes of the Columbia River. These areas of concern are 1) sensitive and vulnerable species or life stages, 2

  18. Management concepts and safety applications for nuclear fuel facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisner, H.; Scotti, R.S.; Delicate, W.S.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents an overview of effectiveness of management control of safety. It reviews several modern management control theories as well as the general functions of management and relates them to safety issues at the corporate and at the process safety management (PSM) program level. Following these discussions, structured technique for assessing management of the safety function is suggested. Seven modern management control theories are summarized, including business process reengineering, the learning organization, capability maturity, total quality management, quality assurance and control, reliability centered maintenance, and industrial process safety. Each of these theories is examined for-its principal characteristics and implications for safety management. The five general management functions of planning, organizing, directing, monitoring, and integrating, which together provide control over all company operations, are discussed. Under the broad categories of Safety Culture, Leadership and Commitment, and Operating Excellence, key corporate safety elements and their subelements are examined. The three categories under which PSM program-level safety issues are described are Technology, Personnel, and Facilities.

  19. A total risk assessment methodology for security assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar, Richard; Pless, Daniel J.; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Silva, Consuelo Juanita; Rhea, Ronald Edward; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

    2009-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a new collaborative risk assessment method to enable decision makers to fully consider the interrelationships between threat, vulnerability, and consequence. A five-step Total Risk Assessment Methodology was developed to enable interdisciplinary collaborative risk assessment by experts from these disciplines. The objective of this process is promote effective risk management by enabling analysts to identify scenarios that are simultaneously achievable by an adversary, desirable to the adversary, and of concern to the system owner or to society. The basic steps are risk identification, collaborative scenario refinement and evaluation, scenario cohort identification and risk ranking, threat chain mitigation analysis, and residual risk assessment. The method is highly iterative, especially with regard to scenario refinement and evaluation. The Total Risk Assessment Methodology includes objective consideration of relative attack likelihood instead of subjective expert judgment. The 'probability of attack' is not computed, but the relative likelihood for each scenario is assessed through identifying and analyzing scenario cohort groups, which are groups of scenarios with comparable qualities to the scenario being analyzed at both this and other targets. Scenarios for the target under consideration and other targets are placed into cohort groups under an established ranking process that reflects the following three factors: known targeting, achievable consequences, and the resources required for an adversary to have a high likelihood of success. The development of these target cohort groups implements, mathematically, the idea that adversaries are actively choosing among possible attack scenarios and avoiding scenarios that would be significantly suboptimal to their objectives. An adversary who can choose among only a few comparable targets and scenarios (a

  20. PREDICTION OF TOTAL DISSOLVED GAS EXCHANGE AT HYDROPOWER DAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem; Pasha, MD Fayzul K; Stewart, Kevin M; Bender, Merlynn; Schneider, Michael L.

    2012-07-01

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in waters released at hydropower dams can cause gas bubble trauma in fisheries resulting in physical injuries and eyeball protrusion that can lead to mortality. Elevated TDG pressures in hydropower releases are generally caused by the entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin. The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. These dam operations are constrained by state and federal water quality standards for TDG saturation which balance the benefits of spillway operations designed for Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed fisheries versus the degradation to water quality as defined by TDG saturation. In the 1970s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), under the federal Clean Water Act (Section 303(d)), established a criterion not to exceed the TDG saturation level of 110% in order to protect freshwater and marine aquatic life. The states of Washington and Oregon have adopted special water quality standards for TDG saturation in the tailrace and forebays of hydropower facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers where spillway operations support fish passage objectives. The physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been studied throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and routine water quality monitoring programs. These data have been used to quantify the relationship between project operations, structural properties, and TDG exchange. These data have also been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange to support real-time TDG management decisions. These empirically based predictive models have been developed for specific projects and account for both the fate of spillway and

  1. EERE Program Management Guide - Chapter 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... stabilizing nuclear materials, managing and ... quality, and science. Powerful accelerators, light sources, neutron beam ... technologies, lightweight materials, vehicle ...

  2. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 1993 Family Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factor: Less than 5,000 5,000...

  3. ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a

  4. Simulating and evaluating best management practices for integrated landscape management scenarios in biofuel feedstock production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ha, Miae; Wu, May

    2015-09-08

    Sound crop and land management strategies can maintain land productivity and improve the environmental sustainability of agricultural crop and feedstock production. With this study, it evaluates a strategy of incorporating landscape design and management concepts into bioenergy feedstock production. It examines the effect of land conversion and agricultural best management practices (BMPs) on water quality (nutrients and suspended sediments) and hydrology. The strategy was applied to the watershed of the South Fork Iowa River in Iowa, where the focus was on converting low-productivity land to provide cellulosic biomass and implementing riparian buffers. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) wasmore » employed to simulate the impact at watershed and sub-basin scales. The study compared the representation of buffers by using trapping efficiency and area ratio methods in SWAT. Landscape design and management scenarios were developed to quantify water quality under (i) current land use, (ii) partial land conversion to switchgrass, and (iii) riparian buffer implementation. Results show that implementation of vegetative barriers and riparian buffer can trap the loss of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and sediment significantly. The effect increases with the increase of buffer area coverage. Implementing riparian buffer at 30 m width is able to produce 4 million liters of biofuels. When low-productivity land (15.2% of total watershed land area) is converted to grow switchgrass, suspended sediment, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and nitrate loadings are reduced by 69.3%, 55.5%, 46.1%, and 13.4%, respectively. The results highlight the significant role of lower-productivity land and buffers in cellulosic biomass and provide insights into the design of an integrated landscape with a conservation buffer for future bioenergy feedstock production.« less

  5. Simulating and evaluating best management practices for integrated landscape management scenarios in biofuel feedstock production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ha, Miae; Wu, May

    2015-09-08

    Sound crop and land management strategies can maintain land productivity and improve the environmental sustainability of agricultural crop and feedstock production. With this study, it evaluates a strategy of incorporating landscape design and management concepts into bioenergy feedstock production. It examines the effect of land conversion and agricultural best management practices (BMPs) on water quality (nutrients and suspended sediments) and hydrology. The strategy was applied to the watershed of the South Fork Iowa River in Iowa, where the focus was on converting low-productivity land to provide cellulosic biomass and implementing riparian buffers. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was employed to simulate the impact at watershed and sub-basin scales. The study compared the representation of buffers by using trapping efficiency and area ratio methods in SWAT. Landscape design and management scenarios were developed to quantify water quality under (i) current land use, (ii) partial land conversion to switchgrass, and (iii) riparian buffer implementation. Results show that implementation of vegetative barriers and riparian buffer can trap the loss of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and sediment significantly. The effect increases with the increase of buffer area coverage. Implementing riparian buffer at 30 m width is able to produce 4 million liters of biofuels. When low-productivity land (15.2% of total watershed land area) is converted to grow switchgrass, suspended sediment, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and nitrate loadings are reduced by 69.3%, 55.5%, 46.1%, and 13.4%, respectively. The results highlight the significant role of lower-productivity land and buffers in cellulosic biomass and provide insights into the design of an integrated landscape with a conservation buffer for future bioenergy feedstock production.

  6. Project Manager's Guide to Managing Impact and Process Evaluation Studies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Project Manager's Guide to Managing Impact and Process Evaluation Studies Project Manager's Guide to Managing Impact and Process Evaluation Studies This report provides a step-by-step approach to help managers of EERE evaluation projects create and manage objective, high quality, independent, and useful impact and process evaluations. It provides information to help with the following: Determine why, what and when to evaluate; identify the questions that need to be

  7. Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.

    1993-06-01

    The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) is intended to document the quality assurance of the Environmental Monitoring Program. The Quality Assurance Project Plan has two parts and is written to become a chapter in the Environmental Monitoring Plan. Part A describes the management responsibilities and activities performed to assure the quality of the Environmental Monitoring Program. Part B covers the documentation requirements for changes in the Monitoring Program, and provides details on control of the design and implementation of quality assurance activities.

  8. CATEGORY Total Procurement Total Small Business Small Disadvantaged

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CATEGORY Total Procurement Total Small Business Small Disadvantaged Business Woman Owned Small Business HubZone Small Business Veteran-Owned Small Business Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business FY 2013 Dollars Accomplished $1,049,087,940 $562,676,028 $136,485,766 $106,515,229 $12,080,258 $63,473,852 $28,080,960 FY 2013 % Accomplishment 54.40% 13.00% 10.20% 1.20% 6.60% 2.70% FY 2014 Dollars Accomplished $868,961,755 $443,711,175 $92,478,522 $88,633,031 $29,867,820 $43,719,452 $26,826,374

  9. FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund

  10. Quality Assurance Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Quality Control Technician; Quality Assurance Inspector; Quality Assurance Representative

  11. Implementation guide for use with suspect/counterfeit items: Requirements of DOE O 440.1, worker protection management; 10 CFR 830.120; and DOE 5700.6C, quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 440.1, Worker Protection Management For DOE Federal and Contractors Employees, [7] sets forth requirements for DOE and its contractors to implement suspect and counterfeit items (S/CI) controls as part of the quality assurance (QA) programs required by 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 830.120 [8] or DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance [9]. DOE G-830.120, Implementation Guide for Use with 10 CFR Part 830.120, Quality Assurance, [10] provides additional guidance on establishing and implementing effective QA processes to control S/CIs. DOE O 232.1, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations, [11] specifies requirements for reporting S/CIs under the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS). DOE promulgated the requirements and guidance to control or eliminate the hazards posed by S/CIs, which can lead to unexpected equipment failures and undue risks to the DOE mission, the environment, and personnel. This Guide is a compendium of information contained in the referenced DOE directives and other documents concerning S/CI controls. It incorporates, updates, and supersedes earlier guidance issued in Plan for the Suspect/Counterfeit Products Issue in the Department of Energy, dated October 1993, [4] and in memoranda issued by Defense Programs (DP) [12-16] and other DOE program offices. This guidance was developed to strengthen the procurement process, identify and eliminate S/CIs, and improve the reporting of S/CIs. The information in this Guide, when implemented by DOE and its contractors, will satisfy the S/CI requirements contained in the referenced DOE directives.

  12. Quality at Y-12, part 2Or: Looking at Y-12 weapons quality ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    After seeing how all the other contractor sites in the Nuclear Weapons Complex were organized, ... on quality to line managers, and monitor the manufacturing and inspection processes. ...

  13. Maui Smart Grid Demonstration Project Managing Distribution System Resources for Improved Service Quality and Reliability, Transmission Congestion Relief, and Grid Support Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-09-30

    The Maui Smart Grid Project (MSGP) is under the leadership of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The project team includes Maui Electric Company, Ltd. (MECO), Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc. (HECO), Sentech (a division of SRA International, Inc.), Silver Spring Networks (SSN), Alstom Grid, Maui Economic Development Board (MEDB), University of Hawaii-Maui College (UHMC), and the County of Maui. MSGP was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC26-08NT02871, with approximately 50% co-funding supplied by MECO. The project was designed to develop and demonstrate an integrated monitoring, communications, database, applications, and decision support solution that aggregates renewable energy (RE), other distributed generation (DG), energy storage, and demand response technologies in a distribution system to achieve both distribution and transmission-level benefits. The application of these new technologies and procedures will increase MECO’s visibility into system conditions, with the expected benefits of enabling more renewable energy resources to be integrated into the grid, improving service quality, increasing overall reliability of the power system, and ultimately reducing costs to both MECO and its customers.

  14. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle ...

  15. Total Number of Operable Refineries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge

  16. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2008 $134,832 FY2009 $142,578 FY2010 $299,878 FY2011 $169,878 Cumulative Fee Paid $747,166 Contract Period: September 2007 - October 2012 $31,885,815 C/P/E Environmental Services, LLC DE-AM09-05SR22405/DE-AT30-07CC60011/SL14 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee $357,223 $597,797 $894,699 EM Contractor Fee Site: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Contract Name: SLAC Environmental Remediation December 2012 $1,516,646 Fee

  17. ARM - Data Quality Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quality Program DQ Resources Data Quality Assessment and Control Report (PDF, 747KB) Data Quality Office Data Quality Problem Reporting (DQPR) Contact Us Submit Data Quality ...

  18. Quality Procedure - Stop Work | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stop Work Quality Procedure - Stop Work This Quality Procedure establishes the Office of Standards and Quality Assurance authority, responsibilities, and instructions to direct that unsafe work be stopped, during the execution and operations of its activities, specifically in oversight activities. this procedure is utilized and accomplished upon coordination with management of the Environmental Management (EM) Headquarters and Field Office. This procedure also provides provisions for the restart

  19. NMMSS Software Quality Assurance Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NMMSS Software Quality Assurance Plan NMMSS Software Quality Assurance Plan The Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) for the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguard System (NMMSS) software upgrade project (an actual DOE software development project) can be used as a template to facilitate the creation of the SQA plan for your particular project NMMSS Software Quality Assurance Plan (164.99 KB) More Documents & Publications Configuration Management Plan Software Configuration Management

  20. Design Storm for Total Retention.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Title: Design Storm for "Total Retention" under Individual Permit, Poster, Individual ... International. Environmental Programs Design Storm for "Total Retention" under ...

  1. Integrated Landscape Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 23, 2015 Ian Bonner Idaho National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Sustainability Technology Area 4.2.1.20 Integrated Landscape Management 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office PROJECT GOAL * OBJECTIVE - Develop model based innovative landscape design methods that estimate increased biomass availability, improve soil, water, and air quality, and reduce grower losses through subfield management decisions.

  2. U.S. Total Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    St. Clair, MI International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake

  3. Office of Standards and Quality Assurance Correspondence | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Services » Program Management » Quality Assurance » Office of Standards and Quality Assurance Correspondence Office of Standards and Quality Assurance Correspondence The Safety, Security, and Quality Programs (EM-40) and subsequently the Office of Standards and Quality Assurance (EM-43) place a large emphasis on the fact that the Environmental Management (EM) work of safely cleaning up the environmental legacy of the Cold War is performed in the Field. A primary role of our

  4. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

    2012-06-30

    nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs

  5. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-06-17

    This Order ensures that the quality of DOE/NNSA products and services meets or exceeds the customers' expectations. Cancels DOE O 414.1B and DOE N 411.1. Canceled by DOE O 414.1D.

  6. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-25

    The Order defines roles and responsibilities for providing quality assurance for DOE products and services.Admin Chg 1, dated 5-8-13, supersedes DOE O 414.1D.

  7. Quality Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    QP001 Revision 0 Effective October 15, 2001 QUALITY PROGRAM Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date:__________ Jude M. Clark Approved by: _______________________________________________ Date: ______________ Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-QP001 Revision 0 2 2001 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Objectives 3 2.0 Scope 3 3.0 Documentation 3 4.0 Prerequisites 4 5.0 Exclusions 5 6.0 Quality

  8. Total Imports of Residual Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S. Total 9,010 5,030 8,596 6,340 4,707 8,092 1936-2016 PAD District 1 3,127 2,664 2,694 1,250 1,327 2,980 1981-2016 Connecticut 1995-2015 Delaware 280 1995-2016 Florida 858 649 800 200 531 499 1995-2016 Georgia 210 262 149 106 1995-2016 Maine 1995-2015 Maryland 84 1995-2016 Massachusetts 1995-2015 New Hampshire 1995-2015 New Jersey 1,283 843 1,073 734 355 1,984 1995-2016 New York 234 824 210 196 175 1995-2016 North Carolina 1995-2011

  9. Total Imports of Residual Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. Total 133,646 119,888 93,672 82,173 63,294 68,265 1936-2015 PAD District 1 88,999 79,188 59,594 33,566 30,944 33,789 1981-2015 Connecticut 220 129 1995-2015 Delaware 748 1,704 510 1,604 2,479 1995-2015 Florida 15,713 11,654 10,589 8,331 5,055 7,013 1995-2015 Georgia 5,648 7,668 6,370 4,038 2,037 1,629 1995-2015 Maine 1,304 651 419 75 317 135 1995-2015 Maryland 3,638 1,779 1,238 433 938 539 1995-2015 Massachusetts 123 50 78 542 88 1995-2015 New

  10. Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 79,674 137,928 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 61,327 106,995 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 15,991 27,500 1984-2014 Connecticut 8,800 7,437

  11. IOI Construction Field Manager | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a wealth of first hand field experience managing construction analyses, site logistics, construction safety, trade management, scheduling and commissioning the quality...

  12. Final Report Implementing Office of Management and Budget Information...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Report Implementing Office of Management and Budget Information Dissemination Quality Guidelines (DOE, 2002) Final Report Implementing Office of Management and Budget ...

  13. Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments S. Bottone and S. Moore Mission Research ... assessment of the quality of incoming data based on internal consistency checks, ...

  14. Developing a quality plan within an R&D organization using a graded approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younger, A.F.; Ellis, E.W.

    1994-04-01

    Rocky Flats is a Department of Energy facility that is managed by EG&G, Inc. The facility, located in Golden, Colorado, employs approximately 7,500 employees. Rocky Flats began operation in 1953 producing components for nuclear weapons, but in 1992, due to changing world conditions, the facility`s mission was changed. The new mission is to decontaminate and decommission the plant and make it ready for economic development for possible new business opportunities. The facility`s mission today is geared toward environmental cleanup from the wastes that were generated during the past 40 years. With these changes came a change in management philosophy that has encouraged more open communications, employee involvement, additional training for employees, and an emphasis on providing quality products and services applying Total Quality Management principles. The changing mission of the plant along with the change in management philosophy required a great deal of adjustment by employees. During this time, the Department of Energy and EG&G management was striving to incorporate these changes as quickly as possible. As part of this change, the Department of Energy required a quality program be implemented in Technology Development, which is the organization responsible for researching and developing new technologies for the environmental cleanup of the plant.

  15. Total-derivative supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Uekusa, Nobuhiro

    2010-05-15

    On an interval compactification in supersymmetric theory, boundary conditions for bulk fields must be treated carefully. If they are taken arbitrarily following the requirement that a theory is supersymmetric, the conditions could give redundant constraints on the theory. We construct a supersymmetric action integral on an interval by introducing brane interactions with which total-derivative terms under the supersymmetry transformation become zero due to a cancellation. The variational principle leads equations of motion and also boundary conditions for bulk fields, which determine boundary values of bulk fields. By estimating mass spectrum, spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in this simple setup can be realized in a new framework. This supersymmetry breaking does not induce a massless R axion, which is favorable for phenomenology. It is worth noting that fermions in hyper-multiplet, gauge bosons, and the fifth-dimensional component of gauge bosons can have zero-modes (while the other components are all massive as Kaluza-Klein modes), which fits the gauge-Higgs unification scenarios.

  16. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing...

  17. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

  18. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  19. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

  20. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

  1. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" ...

  2. ,"Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports" ...

  3. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" ...

  4. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption ... 9:10:34 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption ...

  5. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption ... 9:10:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption ...

  6. SOPP-43, EM-23 Quality Assurance Oversight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POLICY: The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance program requirements and expectations are documented in the EM Quality Assurance Program (QAP), EM-QA-001, dated October 2008. The QAP is the EM management system to ensure that all EM organizations "do work correctly." The QAP meets the requirements of DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830 Subpart A "Quality Assurance Requirements." The QAP demonstrates how QA and the Integrated Safety

  7. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1981-07-21

    To provide Department of Energy (DOE) policy, set forth principles, and assign responsibilities for establishing, implementing, and maintaining programs of plans and actions to assure quality achievement in DOE programs. Cancels DOE O 5700.6, dated 1-16-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.6B, dated 9-23-1986.

  8. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1981-01-16

    To provide Department of Energy (DOE) policy, set forth principles, and assign responsibilities for establishing, implementing, and maintaining programs of plans and actions to assure quality achievement in DOE programs. Canceled by DOE O 5700.6A, dated 7-21-1981.

  9. Quality Procedure - Approved Suppliers List | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approved Suppliers List Quality Procedure - Approved Suppliers List This procedure establishes the responsibilities, process, and records for developing and maintaining the Approved Suppliers List (ASL) for EM Headquarters Office of Standards and Quality Assurance in accordance with EM-QA-001, Environmental Management Quality Assurance Program. Quality Procedure - Approved Suppliers List (2.06 MB) More Documents & Publications Quality Procedure - Supplier Qualification Quality Procedure -

  10. Prediction of Total Dissolved Gas (TDG) at Hydropower Dams throughout the Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasha, MD Fayzul K; Hadjerioua, Boualem; Stewart, Kevin M; Bender, Merlynn; Schneider, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. The entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin cause elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) saturation. Physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been characterized throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and at real-time water quality monitoring stations. These data have been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange which are site specific and account for the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant transport and exchange in route to the downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the findings from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow for the formulation of optimal water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases.

  11. THOMAS JOHNSON, JR. Associate Deputy Manager U.S. Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    functions at SRS, which include: human resources; organizational culture, safety and quality assurance; budget formulation and implementation; project planning, management,...

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Idaho National Engineering...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of Environmental Management Radioactive ... missions of environmental quality, energy resources, science, and national security. ... concentration of nuclear reactors. 52 test ...

  13. Integrating Environmental, Safety, and Quality Management System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Approach to Sustainability that Improves Environmental and Safety Performance Utilizing Bacteria for Sustainable Manufacturing of Low-Cost Nanoparticles Performance Analysis of ...

  14. Report: Acquisition, Project Management, and Quality Assurance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... into a performance baseline with scope, costs, and schedules based on an immature design ... EM's project reporting, analyses, and forecasting. o EM plans to move to a web-based ...

  15. ZERH Webinar: Quality Management Systems for ZERH

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

  16. Building America Teams Technical Quality Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9302014 2. Monthly Status Reporting; 15 th of the ... and communities with strategic early adopters, Building ... Houses Studied by Building America (2000-present) 13 ...

  17. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  18. Quality Assurance Exchange April 2009, Volume 5 Issue 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Quality Assurance ExchangeA pril 2009, Volume 5 Issue 1 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Quality Assurance Policy and Assistance IN THE SPOTLIGHT: GEORGE DETSIS, PROGRAM MANAGER Analytical Services Program Office of Corporate Safety Programs

  19. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... by" "petroleum refineries, rather than purchased ... ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column ... 324,"Petroleum and Coal ...

  20. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  1. NS&T Management Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-09-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  2. Quality Assurance Checklists for Energy.gov Websites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Use these quality assurance (QA) checklists for websites and Web pages in energy.gov's Drupal content management system to ensure they meet mandatory requirements:

  3. Oregon Department of Environmental Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    its decision-making. DEQ is responsible for protecting and enhancing Oregon's water and air quality, for cleaning up spills and releases of hazardous materials, for managing the...

  4. Understanding DOE Quality Assurance Requirements and ASME NQA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Materials for the Understanding DOE Quality Assurance Requirements and ASME NQA-1 For Application in DOE Nuclear ... DOE Nuclear Projects, A Management Overview and ...

  5. EM Quality Assurance Program (EM-QA-001 Revision 1)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this document is to describe the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance Program (QAP).

  6. Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... of Record for Nuclear Facilities, September 3, 2009 Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management Procedure EM-3.4, Rev ... including safety, security, and quality assurance. ...

  7. EM Quality Assurance Program (EM-QA-001 Revision 0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Previous revision of the Environmental Management Quality Assurance Program. The program is the EM management system to ensure we"do work correctly." This document has been superseded by Revision 1...

  8. Air quality committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Committees on air quality, coal, forest resources, and public lands and land use report on legislative, judicial, and administrative developments in 1979. There was no new significant air quality legislation, but a number of lawsuits raised questions about State Implementation Plans, prevention of significant deterioration, the Clean Air Act Amendments, new source performance standards, and motor vehicle emissions. Efforts to increase coal utilization emphasized implementation of the Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 and the Surface Mining Program. New legislation protects certain forest products from exploitation and exportation. Forest-related lawsuits focused on the RARE II process. Land-use legislation modified credit assistance to coastal zones and the language of interstate land sales, established a new agency to consolidate flood-insurance programs, and added protection to archaeological resources. Land-use-related lawsuits covered coastal zone management, interstate land sales, Indian reservations, and land-use planning in the context of civil rights, antitrust action, exclusionary zoning, comprehensive planning, and regional general welfare. Other suits addressed grants, leasing, claims, grazing rights, surveys, and other matters of public lands concern. Administrative actions centered on implementing the Coastal Zone Management Act, establishing the Council of Energy Resource Tribes, and developing guidelines for energy development. 147 references. (DCK)

  9. Contacts for Information Collection Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Collection Management Contacts for Information Collection Management Information Collection Program, and Information Quality Guidelines Christina Rouleau, IM-23 Records Management Division Office of the CIO US Department of Energy 301-903-6227 Christina.Rouleau

  10. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 634 578 46 1 Q 116.4 106.3...

  11. Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain.

  12. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 269 277 185 R 159 170 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 127,417 112,268

  13. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  14. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 620 914 819 R 921 895 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 6,802 9,075

  15. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

  16. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 276 322 270 R 357 310 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 2,092 1,854

  17. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 188 239 211 200 200 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  18. Coal quality control in the context of international standards ISO 9000-2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freidina, E.V.; Botvinnik, A.A.; Dvornikova, A.N.

    2008-11-15

    The paper sets forth scientific foundations and organizational-technical environment offered by ISO 9000 standards that are oriented to product quality management and, thus, product quality planning. The authors describe the results of coal product quality planning with using the QFD methodology, present a model of coal quality control through the coal product life cycle and mining technologies. It is proposed to evaluate the quality management efficiency by the coefficient of concordance between the product quality and consumer's demands.

  19. Data Driven Quality Assurance and Quality Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Data Driven Quality Assurance & Quality Control," Patrick Roche, Conservation Services Group. Provides an overview of data QA/QC system design.

  20. Nuclear Safety Software & Quality Assurance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety Software & Quality Assurance Nuclear Safety Software & Quality Assurance Nuclear Safety Software & Quality Assurance In support of DOE O 410.1, Central Technical Authority Responsibilities Regarding Nuclear Safety Requirements, the Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) provides operational awareness, oversight, and assistance to Environmental Management (EM) Headquarters, field offices, and their contractors in the areas of nuclear safety Quality Assurance (QA) and Software Quality

  1. Total Dissolved Gas Monitoring in Chum Salmon Spawning Gravels Below Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Panther, Jennifer L.; Dawley, Earl

    2007-01-30

    At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted research to determine whether total dissolved gas concentrations are elevated in chum salmon redds during spring spill operations at Bonneville Dam. The study involved monitoring the total dissolved gas levels at egg pocket depth and in the river at two chum salmon spawning locations downstream from Bonneville Dam. Dissolved atmospheric gas supersaturation generated by spill from Bonneville Dam may diminish survival of chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon when sac fry are still present in the gravel downstream from Bonneville Dam. However, no previous work has been conducted to determine whether total dissolved gas (TDG) levels are elevated during spring spill operations within incubation habitats. The guidance used by hydropower system managers to provide protection for pre-emergent chum salmon fry has been to limit TDG to 105% after allowing for depth compensation. A previous literature review completed in early 2006 shows that TDG levels as low as 103% have been documented to cause mortality in sac fry. Our study measured TDG in the incubation environment to evaluate whether these levels were exceeded during spring spill operations. Total dissolved gas levels were measured within chum salmon spawning areas near Ives Island and Multnomah Falls on the Columbia River. Water quality sensors screened at egg pocket depth and to the river were installed at both sites. At each location, we also measured dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, and water depth to assist with the interpretation of TDG results. Total dissolved gas was depth-compensated to determine when levels were high enough to potentially affect sac fry. This report provides detailed descriptions of the two study sites downstream of Bonneville Dam, as well as the equipment and procedures employed to monitor the TDG levels at the study sites. Results of the monitoring at

  2. Comprehensive stormwater management study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, T. ); Alter, M. ); Wassum, R.H. )

    1994-02-01

    This article examines Tucson, Arizona's approach to stormwater management. The topics of the article include the quantity and quality of stormwater, developing the stormwater master plan, meeting environmental and regulatory constraints. Tucson's comprehensive, watershed by watershed approach to public works planning and stormwater program development is described.

  3. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7,026 7,063 6,327 R 6,165 6,118 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  4. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7,397 8,388 8,538 R 9,843 10,150 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  5. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 California - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,580 1,308 1,423 R 1,335 1,118 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  6. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,813 30,101 32,000 R 32,468 38,346 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  7. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Florida - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 17,182 16,459 19,742

  8. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells

  9. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Idaho - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0

  10. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 50 40 40 R 34 36 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,697 2,114

  11. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Iowa - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0

  12. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,145 25,758 24,697 R 23,792 24,354 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  13. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,670 14,632 17,936 R 19,494 19,256 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  14. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,137 21,235 19,792 R 19,528 19,251 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  15. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Maine - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0

  16. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 10,100 11,100 10,900 R 10,550 10,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  17. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,979 5,732 1,669 R 1,967 1,645 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  18. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 53 100 R 26 28 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 R 8 8 From

  19. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Montana - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,059 6,477 6,240 5,754 5,754 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  20. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Nevada - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 R 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 3 From Oil Wells

  1. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 44,748 32,302 28,206 R 27,073 27,957 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From

  2. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 New York - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,736 6,157 7,176 R 6,902 7,119 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  3. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,931 46,717 35,104 R 32,664 32,967 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  4. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 44,000 41,238 40,000 39,776 40,070 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  5. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 26 24 27 R 26 28 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,407 1,344 770 770

  6. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 44,500 54,347 55,136 R 53,762 70,400 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals

  7. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 230 210 212 R 1,089 1,024 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,144

  8. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Texas - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 95,014 100,966 96,617 97,618 98,279 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  9. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Utah - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,075 6,469 6,900 R 7,030 7,275 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 328,135

  10. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7,470 7,903 7,843 R 7,956 7,961 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  11. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,498 56,813 50,700 R 54,920 60,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals

  12. WIPP Project Records Management Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Records Management Handbook provides the WIPP Project Records Management personnel with a tool to use to fulfill the requirements of the WIPP Records Program and direct their actions in the important area of records management. The handbook describes the various project areas involved in records management, and how they function. The handbook provides the requirements for Record Coordinators and Master Record Center (MRC) personnel to follow in the normal course of file management, records scheduling, records turnover, records disposition, and records retrieval. More importantly, the handbook provides a single reference which encompasses the procedures set fourth in DOE Order 1324.2A, Records Disposition'' ASME NQA-1, Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities'' and DOE-AL 5700.6B, General Operations Quality Assurance.'' These documents dictate how an efficient system of records management will be achieved on the WIPP Project.

  13. SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Jonathan Charles

    2016-01-01

    This document describes the software development practice areas and processes which contribute to the ability of SWiFT software developers to provide quality software. These processes are designed to satisfy the requirements set forth by the Sandia Software Quality Assurance Program (SSQAP). APPROVALS SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan (SAND2016-0765) approved by: Department Manager SWiFT Site Lead Dave Minster (6121) Date Jonathan White (6121) Date SWiFT Controls Engineer Jonathan Berg (6121) Date CHANGE HISTORY Issue Date Originator(s) Description A 2016/01/27 Jon Berg (06121) Initial release of the SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan

  14. Integrated Safety Management Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Management » Quality Assurance » Integrated Safety Management Policy Integrated Safety Management Policy This Integrated Safety Management (ISM) System Description (ISMSD) defines how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) integrates environment, safety, and health requirements and controls into Federal work activities, and oversees implementation of ISM within EM federal and contractor activities. It explains our safety values, objectives and

  15. Evaluation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Analytical Laboratory quality assurance program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pietri, C.E.; Bracey, J.T.

    1985-02-01

    Destructive analysis is used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through its Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL) to verify, in part, the inventory of nuclear materials at nuclear facilities. The reliability and quality of these meassurements must be assured in a systematic manner. The Division of Safeguards Evaluation, IAEA, required assistance in developing and implementing the quality assurance measures for the analytical procedures used in the destructive analysis of these safeguards samples. To meet these needs an ISPO POTAS Task D.53 was instituted in which consultants would review with IAEA staff the procedures used (or proposed) at SAL for the destructive analysis of safeguards samples and the statistical evaluation of the resulting measurement data at Headquarters. The procedures included analytical methods, qualtiy control measures, and the treatment of data from these activities. Based on this review, modifications to the system, if required, would be recommended which would provide routine assurance to management that these procedures are functioning properly to achieve safeguards objectives. In the course of this review, the sample handling procedures, measurement control activities, analytical methods, reference materials, calibration procedures, statistical analysis of data, and data management system were studied and evaluated. The degree to which SAL (as a total system) achieved laboratory quality assurance was assessed by comparison to accepted standards of quality assurance. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Air quality data systems integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Row, V.K.; Wilson, J.F.

    1998-12-31

    Traditionally, data used for compliance with air quality programs are obtained from various sources within the plant, on site lab, or perhaps from a product movement accounting program. For the most part, the data processing and subsequent calculations and reports were handled individually, thus generating huge spreadsheets and mounds of process data in paper format. The natural reaction to this overwhelming data management problem is to search for an off-the-shelf software package that will hopefully cover all of the plant`s needs for compliance with air quality regulations. Rather than searching for or trying to custom build a single electronic system, the authors suggest using internet browsing software to create links between existing repositories of air quality data and related information.

  17. Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. McNeish

    2002-09-13

    ''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issue (KTI) agreements, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (CNWRA 2002 [158449]), and 10 CFR Part 63. This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are utilized in this document.

  18. Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. McNeish

    2003-12-08

    ''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

  19. Protocol for EM Review/Field Self-Assessment of Site Specific Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assurance Programs/Quality Implementation Plans | Department of Energy Services » Program Management » Quality Assurance » Protocol for EM Review/Field Self-Assessment of Site Specific Quality Assurance Programs/Quality Implementation Plans Protocol for EM Review/Field Self-Assessment of Site Specific Quality Assurance Programs/Quality Implementation Plans Review protocol and lines of inquiry that are used as basis for technical review and approval of site-specific quality assurance

  20. RAVEN Quality Assurance Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cogliati, Joshua Joseph

    2015-09-01

    This report discusses the quality assurance activities needed to raise the Quality Level of Risk Analysis in a Virtual Environment (RAVEN) from Quality Level 3 to Quality Level 2. This report also describes the general RAVEN quality assurance activities. For improving the quality, reviews of code changes have been instituted, more parts of testing have been automated, and improved packaging has been created. For upgrading the quality level, requirements have been created and the workflow has been improved.

  1. Fuel cell gas management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DuBose, Ronald Arthur

    2000-01-11

    A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

  2. 2009 Total Energy Production by State | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Total Energy Production by State 2009 Total Energy Production by State 2009 Total Energy Production by State...

  3. Quality assurance program plan for Building 327

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanke, J.M.

    1997-05-22

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) provides an overview of the quality assurance program for Building 327. The program applies to the facility safety structures, systems, and components and to activities that could affect safety structures, systems, and components. Adherence to the quality assurance program ensures the following: US Department of Energy missions and objectives are effectively accomplished; Products and services are safe, reliable, and meet or exceed the requirements and expectations of the user; Hazards to the public, to Hanford Site and facility workers, and to the environment are minimized. The format of this Quality Assurance Program Plan is structured to parallel that of 10 CFR 83 0.120, Quality Assurance Requirements. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) provides information on how the Quality Assurance Program is implemented for the 324 Building B-Cell Safety Cleanout Project (BCCP). This QAPP is responsive to the Westinghouse Hanford Company Quality Assurance Program and Implementation Plan, WHC-SP 113 1, for 10 CFR 830.120, Nuclear Safety Management, Quality Assurance Requirements; and DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance. This QAPP supersedes PNNL PNL-MA-70 QAP Quality Assurance Plan No. WTC-050 Rev. 2, issue date May 3, 1996.

  4. Cell Total Activity Final Estimate.xls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WSSRAP Cell Total Activity Final Estimate (calculated September 2002, Fleming) (Waste streams & occupied cell volumes from spreadsheet titled "cell waste volumes-8.23.02 with macros.xls") Waste Stream a Volume (cy) Mass (g) 2 Radiological Profile 3 Nuclide Activity (Ci) 4 Total % of Total U-238 U-234 U-235 Th-228 Th-230 Th-232 Ra-226 Ra-228 Rn-222 5 Activity if > 1% Raffinate Pits Work Zone (Ci) Raffinate processed through CSS Plant 1 159990 1.49E+11 Raffinate 6.12E+01 6.12E+01

  5. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colley, J.S.

    1992-08-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a entral Environmental Restoration Division'' to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization's objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

  6. REMM: The Riparian Ecosystem Management Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrance, R.; Altier, L.S.; Williams, R.G.; Inamdar, S.P.; Sheridan, J.M.; Bosch, D.D.; Hubbard, R.K.; Thomas, D.L.

    2000-03-01

    Riparian buffer zones are effective in mitigating nonpoint source pollution and have been recommended as a best management practice (BMP). The Riparian Ecosystem Management Model (REMM) has been developed for researchers and natural resource agencies as a modeling tool that can help quantify the water quality benefits of riparian buffers under varying site conditions. Processes simulated in REMM include surface and subsurface hydrology; sediment transport and deposition; carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus transport, removal, and cycling; and vegetation growth. Management options, such as vegetation type, size of the buffer zone, and biomass harvesting also can be simulated. REMM can be used in conjunction with upland models, empirical data, or estimated loadings to examine scenarios of buffer zone design for a hillslope. Evaluation of REMM simulations with field observations shows generally good agreement between simulated and observed data for groundwater nitrate concentrations and water table depths in a mature riparian forest buffer. Sensitivity analysis showed that changes that influenced the water balance or soil moisture storage affected the streamflow output. Parameter changes that influence either hydrology or rates of nutrient cycling affected total N transport and plant N uptake.

  7. Deactivation Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose here is to provide information for specific aspects of project management that apply to deactivation. Overall management of deactivation projects should use a traditional project...

  8. TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more...

  9. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    -3,826 Total Supply 854,673 908,380 892,923 R 900,232 828,785 See footnotes at end of ... Gas Annual 165 Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, ...

  10. EQUUS Total Return Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: EQUUS Total Return Inc Place: Houston, Texas Product: A business development company and VC investor that trades as a closed-end fund. EQUUS is...

  11. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    as known volumes of natural gas that were the result of leaks, damage, accidents, migration, andor blow down. Notes: Totals may not add due to independent rounding. Prices are...

  12. Habitat planning, maintenance and management working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico (GOM), called {open_quotes}America`s Sea,{close_quotes} is actually a small ocean basin covering over 1.5 million square kilometers. Because of the multiple uses, diversity, and size of the Gulf`s resources, management is shared by a number of governmental agencies including the Minerals Management Service, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission, National Marine Fisheries Service, the US Coast Guard, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the five Gulf states fisheries agencies. All of these entities share a common goal of achieving optimum sustainable yield to maximize geological, biological, social, and economic benefits from these resources. These entities also share a common theme that the successful management of the northern GOM requires maintenance and enhancement of both the quantity and quality of habitats. A closer look at the GOM shows the sediment to be clearly dominated by vast sand and mud plains. These soft bottom habitats are preferred by many groundfish and shrimp species and, thus, have given rise to large commercial fisheries on these stocks. Hard bottom and reef habitats, on the other hand, are limited to approximately 1.6% of the total area of the Gulf, so that, while there are high demands by commercial and recreational fishermen for reef associated species, the availability of habitat for these stocks is limited. The thousands of oil and gas structures placed in the Gulf have added significant amounts of new hard substrate. The rigs-to-reefs concept was a common sense idea with support from environmental user groups and the petroleum industry for preserving a limited but valuable habitat type. As long as maximizing long-term benefits from the Gulf s resources for the greatest number of users remains the goal, then programs such as Rigs-to-Reefs will remain an important tool for fisheries and habitat managers in the Gulf.

  13. ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Net broadband total irradiance The difference between upwelling and downwelling, covering longwave and shortwave radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each

  14. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy that comes from some continuous range of directions, at wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, that is being emitted downwards. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following

  15. Department of Energy Information Quality Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About this site » Department of Energy Information Quality Guidelines Department of Energy Information Quality Guidelines Information Quality The Department of Energy's Information Quality Guidelines are developed in accordance with Section 515, Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act (Pub.L. 106-554). The law directed the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to issue government-wide guidelines that "provide policy and procedural guidance to Federal Agencies for ensuring and

  16. 2010 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan 2010 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan This Project Plan is jointly developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG), to provide execution support to the EM Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board. The Board serves a vital and critical role in ensuring that the EM mission is completed safely, correctly, and efficiently. 2010 Quality Assurance Improvement Project

  17. 2012 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan 2012 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan This Project Plan is jointly developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG), to provide execution support to the EM Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board. The Board serves a vital and critical role in ensuring that the EM mission is completed safely, correctly, and efficiently. 2012 Quality Assurance Improvement

  18. 2014 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan 2014 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan This Project Plan is jointly developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG), to provide execution support to the EM Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board. The Board serves a vital and critical role in ensuring that the EM mission is completed safely, correctly, and efficiently. 2014 Quality Assurance Improvement

  19. 2015 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan 2015 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan This Project Plan is jointly developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG), to provide execution support to the EM Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board. The Board serves a vital and critical role in ensuring that the EM mission is completed safely, correctly, and efficiently. 2015 Quality Assurance Improvement

  20. Conference Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-03

    To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

  1. Forecasting Water Quality & Biodiversity

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Forecasting Water Quality & Biodiversity March 25, 2015 Cross-cutting Sustainability ... that measure feedstock production, water quality, water quantity, and biodiversity. ...

  2. HSS Quality Initiatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Colette Broussard, Office of Quality Assurance Policy and Assistance, Office of Nuclear Safety, Quality Assurance and Environment Track 9-2

  3. An operational health physics quality assurance program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costigan, S.A.; McAtee, J.L. III; Somers, W.M.; Huchton, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, stipulates QA requirements for all DOE activities. This order is now codified as 10CFR830.120, Nuclear Safety Management, Quality Assurance Requirements, which is applicable to DOE nuclear facilities. A Quality Assurance Management Plan (QAMP) was developed by the Health Physics Operations Group (ESH-1) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of the ESH-1 QAMP is to ensure that operational radiation protection activities meet the criteria outlined in DOE Order 5700.6C, DOE-ER-STD-6001-92 and 10CFR830.120. The ten required elements are QA Program, Personal Training and Qualifications, Quality Improvement, Documents and Records, Work Processes, Design, Procurement, Inspection and Acceptance Testing, Management Assessment and Independent Assessment. The QAMP has been useful for the development of QAMPs at nuclear facilities and has helped ensure uniformity of institutional requirements where Health Physics services are deployed to facilities. To implement a subset of QAMP requirements, a Quality Assurance Self-Evaluation Program (QASE) was established. This program provides a novel self-audit mechanism for the formal identification and correction of non-conforming items related to Operational Health Physics. Additionally, the QASE is a useful management tool for Radiological Control Technician Supervisors and staff and provides a tracking mechanism for ongoing problem areas. Data have been Collected for two calendar years on a number of concerns that fall into four general categories: radiological posting and labeling, instrumentation, monitoring requirements, and radiological documents/records.

  4. Quality Assurance Source Requirements Traceability Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MURTHY, R., NAYDENOVA, A., DEKLEVER, R., BOONE, A.

    2006-01-30

    At the Yucca Mountain Project the Project Requirements Processing System assists in the management of relationships between regulatory and national/industry standards source criteria, and Quality Assurance Requirements and Description document (DOE/R W-0333P) requirements to create compliance matrices representing respective relationships. The matrices are submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assist in the commission's review, interpretation, and concurrence with the Yucca Mountain Project QA program document. The tool is highly customized to meet the needs of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Office of Quality Assurance.

  5. Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) January 28...

  6. Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) Better Buildings Residential Network ...

  7. Special Study of The Department of Energy's Management of Suspect...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Protection Management; 10CFR820; and DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance) establishes specific ... DOE directives that have been cancelled (such as DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance). ...

  8. Determine metrics and set targets for soil quality on agriculture residue and energy crop pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; David Muth

    2013-09-01

    There are three objectives for this project: 1) support OBP in meeting MYPP stated performance goals for the Sustainability Platform, 2) develop integrated feedstock production system designs that increase total productivity of the land, decrease delivered feedstock cost to the conversion facilities, and increase environmental performance of the production system, and 3) deliver to the bioenergy community robust datasets and flexible analysis tools for establishing sustainable and viable use of agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops. The key project outcome to date has been the development and deployment of a sustainable agricultural residue removal decision support framework. The modeling framework has been used to produce a revised national assessment of sustainable residue removal potential. The national assessment datasets are being used to update national resource assessment supply curves using POLYSIS. The residue removal modeling framework has also been enhanced to support high fidelity sub-field scale sustainable removal analyses. The framework has been deployed through a web application and a mobile application. The mobile application is being used extensively in the field with industry, research, and USDA NRCS partners to support and validate sustainable residue removal decisions. The results detailed in this report have set targets for increasing soil sustainability by focusing on primary soil quality indicators (total organic carbon and erosion) in two agricultural residue management pathways and a dedicated energy crop pathway. The two residue pathway targets were set to, 1) increase residue removal by 50% while maintaining soil quality, and 2) increase soil quality by 5% as measured by Soil Management Assessment Framework indicators. The energy crop pathway was set to increase soil quality by 10% using these same indicators. To demonstrate the feasibility and impact of each of these targets, seven case studies spanning the US are presented

  9. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    total downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, at specrally-resolved wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, is being emitted upwards and downwards into a radiation field and transferred across a surface area (real or imaginary) in a hemisphere of directions. Categories Radiometric Instruments

  10. Assuring quality in high-consequence engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, Marcey L.; Kolb, Rachel R.

    2014-03-01

    In high-consequence engineering organizations, such as Sandia, quality assurance may be heavily dependent on staff competency. Competency-dependent quality assurance models are at risk when the environment changes, as it has with increasing attrition rates, budget and schedule cuts, and competing program priorities. Risks in Sandia's competency-dependent culture can be mitigated through changes to hiring, training, and customer engagement approaches to manage people, partners, and products. Sandia's technical quality engineering organization has been able to mitigate corporate-level risks by driving changes that benefit all departments, and in doing so has assured Sandia's commitment to excellence in high-consequence engineering and national service.

  11. SAPHIRE 8 Software Quality Assurance Oversight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt G. Vedros

    2011-09-01

    The software quality assurance oversight consists of updating and maintaining revision control of the SAPHIRE 8 quality assurance program documentation and of monitoring revision control of the SAPHIRE 8 source code. This report summarizes the oversight efforts through description of the revision control system (RCS) setup, operation and contents. Documents maintained under revision control include the Acceptance Test Plan (ATP), Configuration Management Plan, Quality Assurance Plan, Software Project Plan, Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM), System Test Plan, SDP Interface Training Manual, and the SAPHIRE 8, 'New Features and Capabilities Overview'.

  12. Track 9: Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 9: Quality Assurance

  13. Best Practices in Industrial Data Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Best Practices in Industrial Data Management Moderator: Paul Scheihing, AMO This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Industrial Data Management What is energy data management?  Monitoring  Recording  Analyzing  Reporting  Verification Strategic Importance of Robust Data Management  Provides data with a purpose  Without purpose, you can lose focus and drown in all of the data  Results in high quality data 

  14. Total internal reflection laser tools and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zediker, Mark S.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Kolachalam, Sharath K.; Grubb, Daryl L.

    2016-02-02

    There is provided high power laser tools and laser heads that utilize total internal reflection ("TIR") structures to direct the laser beam along a laser beam path within the TIR structure. The TIR structures may be a TIR prism having its hypotenuse as a TIR surface.

  15. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    R 196 184 Total Supply 2,627 2,619 2,689 R 2,855 2,928 See footnotes at end of table. 0 ... Gas Annual 105 Table S13. Summary statistics for natural gas - Hawaii, 2010-2014 - ...

  16. The Leica TCRA1105 Reflectorless Total Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaudreault, F.

    2005-09-06

    This poster provides an overview of SLAC's TCRA1105 reflectorless total station for the Alignment Engineering Group. This instrument has shown itself to be very useful for planning new construction and providing quick measurements to difficult to reach or inaccessible surfaces.

  17. Total pressing Indonesian gas development, exports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-24

    Total is on track to become Indonesia's leading gas exporter by the turn of the century. Total's aggressive development of its Mahakam Delta acreage in East Kalimantan is intended to keep pace with growing liquefied natural gas demand, mainly from Japan but also increasingly from South Korea and Taiwan. A frantic scramble is under way among natural gas suppliers in the Pacific Rim region, particularly those with current LNG export facilities, to accommodate projections of soaring natural gas demand in the region. Accordingly, Total's Indonesian gas production goal is the centerpiece of a larger strategy to become a major player in the Far East Asia gas scene. Its goals also fall in line with Indonesia's. Facing flat or declining oil production while domestic oil demand continues to soar along with a rapidly growing economy, Indonesia is heeding some studies that project the country could become a net oil importer by the turn of the century. The paper describes Total's Far East strategy, the Mahakam acreage which it operates, the shift to gas development, added discoveries, future development, project spending levels, and LNG export capacity.

  18. Improvement of the management of residual waste in areas without...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    management scenarios for residual waste were compared by life cycle assessment (LCA). ... On the contrary the quality of the recyclables extracted can significantly modify the eco ...

  19. Independent Oversight Review of Management of Safety Systems...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management of Safety Systems at the Oak Ridge Transuranic Waste Processing Center and ... of Safety, Health and Quality DWOL Duty Waste Operations Lead EM Office of Environmental ...

  20. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 69% Line Item 67% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to FY10). TPC is Total

  1. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    First Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Actual & Forecast FY 2011 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 90% Line Item 79% Line Item 71% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY09 to FY11). TPC is Total

  2. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    First Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 84% Construction 83% Cleanup 85% 77% Pre-CAP 86% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost.

  3. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 88% Construction 87% Cleanup 89% 77% Pre-CAP 92% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost.

  4. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 87% Construction 87% Cleanup 87% 77% Pre-CAP 90% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost.

  5. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Final FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Final Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 86% Construction 87% Cleanup 84% 77% Pre-CAP 89% Post-CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost.

  6. Country/Continent Total Percent of U.S. Total Africa/Europe

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    peak kilowatts Country/Continent Total Percent of U.S. Total Africa/Europe 53,898 29% Asia/Australia 107,460 59% South/Central America 11,692 6% Canada 4,378 2% Mexico 5,556 3% Total 182,984 100% Table 8. Destination of photovoltaic module export shipments, 2014 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report.'

  7. Power management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C.; Johnson, Kris W.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2007-10-02

    A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

  8. Data Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Management Data Management PDSF and IHEP, in Beijing, China, are the two main computing facitilies for the Daya Bay experiment with PDSF being used primarily by North American ...

  9. MANAGEMENT ALERT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    COMMISSION FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert: Review of Allegations of Improper Disclosure of Confidential, Nonpublic...

  10. Fractionated total body irradiation for metastatic neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kun, L.E.; Casper, J.T.; Kline, R.W.; Piaskowski, V.D.

    1981-11-01

    Twelve patients over one year old with neuroblastoma (NBL) metastatic to bone and bone marrow entered a study of adjuvant low-dose, fractionated total body irradiation (TBI). Six children who achieved a ''complete clinical response'' following chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide and adriamycin) and surgical resection of the abdominal primary received TBI (10 rad/fraction to totals of 100-120 rad/10-12 fx/12-25 days). Two children received concurrent local irradiation for residual abdominal tumor. The intervals from cessation of chemotherapy to documented progression ranged from 2-16 months, not substatially different from patients receiving similar chemotherapy and surgery without TBI. Three additional children with progressive NBL received similar TBI (80-120 rad/8-12 fx) without objective response.

  11. Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S.

    2000-01-01

    A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

  12. Understanding and Implementing DOE Quality Requirements and ASME NQA-1 in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Nuclear Projects, A Management Overview and Introduction, May 14, 2015 | Department of Energy Understanding and Implementing DOE Quality Requirements and ASME NQA-1 in DOE Nuclear Projects, A Management Overview and Introduction, May 14, 2015 Understanding and Implementing DOE Quality Requirements and ASME NQA-1 in DOE Nuclear Projects, A Management Overview and Introduction, May 14, 2015 Understanding and Implementing DOE Quality Requirements and ASME NQA-1 in DOE Nuclear Projects, A

  13. Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and

  14. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total net irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    net irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband total net irradiance The difference between upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available

  15. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, passes through a horizontal unit area in a downward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following

  16. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total upwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband total upwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, passes through a horizontal unit area in an upward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments.

  17. Order Module--DOE O 414.1D, QUALITY ASSURANCE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    14.1D, QUALITY ASSURANCE Order Module--DOE O 414.1D, QUALITY ASSURANCE "To ensure that DOE, including NNSA, products and services meet or exceed customers' requirements and expectations. To achieve quality for all work based upon the following principles: All work, as defined in this Order, is conducted through an integrated and effective management system. Management support for planning, organization, resources, direction, and control is essential to quality assurance (QA). Performance

  18. Signed Quality Assurance Hub Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    In a memorandum to the FieldSite Managers dated July 10, 2009, it was announced that the Office of Standards and Quality Assurance (EM-23) had deployed a pilot prototype web-based ...

  19. Quality Assurance Checklists for Energy.gov Web Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, use these quality assurance (QA) checklists for websites and Web pages in Energy.gov's content management system (CMS) to ensure they meet mandatory requirements:

  20. MOL.19980331.0174 PARTICULATE MATTEX AMBIENT A I R QUALITY

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MOL.19980331.0174 PARTICULATE MATTEX AMBIENT A I R QUALITY DATA REPORT FOR 1989 AND 1990 ... Applications International Corporation Technical & Management Support Services Las Vegas, ...

  1. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge ... INTRODUCTION The Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) is a land ...

  2. Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories, California Air Quality Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardizi, Leslee P.; Smith, Richard

    2009-06-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Air Quality Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Air Quality Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  4. Project Facilitation and Quality Assurance for Federal ESPCs | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Project Facilitation and Quality Assurance for Federal ESPCs Project Facilitation and Quality Assurance for Federal ESPCs Document offers guidance on how to agencies can qualify their own project facilitators after notifying the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program energy savings performance contract (ESPC) program manager in writing who they have designated to serve as the qualifying official and confirming their use of the qualification standards. Download

  5. Near-facility environmental monitoring quality assurance project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-11-24

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near facility environmental monitoring performed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations and supersedes WHC-EP-0538-2. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by waste management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations in implementing facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site.

  6. SOPP-43, EM-23 Quality Assurance Oversight | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Program Management » Quality Assurance » SOPP-43, EM-23 Quality Assurance Oversight SOPP-43, EM-23 Quality Assurance Oversight Procedure to describe the process that will be utilized by the EM Office of Standards and Quality Assurance to guide its activities related to oversight and audit of the EM Field/site, project, and vendor QA programs. SOPP-43, EM-23 Quality Assurance Oversight (408.14 KB) More Documents & Publications Protocol for EM Review/Field Self-Assessment of

  7. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total upwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband total upwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, at a wavelength between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, is being emitted upwards into a radiation field and transferred across a surface area (real or imaginary) in a hemisphere of directions. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered

  8. Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 55,664,448 58,258,830 59,769,444 57,512,994 58,675,008 61,890,990 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 18,219,180 17,965,794 17,864,868 16,754,388

  9. Total Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 7,835,436 8,203,062 7,068,306 5,668,530 4,883,466 3,942,750 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 3,339,162 3,359,265 2,667,576 1,906,700 1,699,418 1,393,068 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 318,184

  10. Total Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 54,100,092 56,093,645 57,082,558 57,020,840 58,107,155 60,827,930 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 17,821,973 18,136,965 17,757,005 17,382,566

  11. Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R. C.

    1998-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan documents the quality assurance activities for the Wastewater/Stormwater/Groundwater and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This QAPP was prepared in accordance with DOE guidance on compliance with 10CFR830.120.

  12. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, David O.; Montoya, Paul C.; Muir, James F.; Wayland, Jr., J. Robert

    1987-01-01

    An empirical method for the remote sensing of steam quality that can be easily adapted to downhole steam quality measurements by measuring the electrical properties of two-phase flow across electrode grids at low frequencies.

  13. IT Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality, error-free work holds down costs. Avoiding mistakes and rework saves valuable time, effort, and materials. Quality assurance provides the mechanisms for paying close attention to details...

  14. Maintaining System Air Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This tip sheet discusses how to maintain air quality in compressed air systems through proper use of equipment.

  15. Guidance for the Quality Assurance of Fire Protection Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This quality assurance document is intended to provide guidance for the DOE fire protection community in the continuing effort to ensure the reliability of fire protection systems. This guidance document applies the concepts of DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, to the management of fire protection systems.

  16. Health, Safety, & Quality Assurance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health, Safety, & Quality Assurance Health, Safety, & Quality Assurance Nuclear Safety and Worker Safety and Health training Nuclear Safety and Worker Safety and Health training PPPO's Safety and Health, Nuclear Safety, and Quality Assurance programs collectively ensure protection of public and worker health and safety and the environment. This is accomplished by empowering and holding accountable managers, employees and contractors to prioritize health, safety and environmental

  17. project management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Project Management and Systems Support http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsapmprojectmanagementandsystemssupport

  18. Bibliographic Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and more from varied resources and databases to organize references, keep notes to stay ahead of the game. Questions? 505-667-5809 Email Bibliographic management tools allow...

  19. acquisition management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the science, technology, and engineering base; and,

  20. Continue NNSA management reforms.
  1. Position Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-23

    The order prescribes the policies, responsibilities, and procedures for position management within (DOE). Canceled by DOE N 1321.140. Cancels DOE 3510.1

  2. project management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Project Management and Systems Support http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsapmprojectmanagementandsystemssupport

  3. Energy Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Management Utilize energy efficiency to improve your industrial customer's business performance without the cost of major capital improvements. Energy efficiency is not...

  4. Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 64,575 60,088 61,366 54,650 59,528 58,555 1980-2015 Alabama 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2014 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 2004-2014 Arizona 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2014 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2014 Colorado 5,148 4,268 4,412 4,077 4,120

  5. State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales (Megawatthours) (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A, 4B, 4D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total New England 47,211,525 53,107,038 19,107,433 557,463 119,983,459 Connecticut 12,777,579 12,893,531 3,514,798 168,552 29,354,460 Maine 4,660,605 3,984,570 3,357,486 0 12,002,661 Massachusetts 20,071,160 26,076,208 7,960,941 360,983 54,469,292 New Hampshire 4,510,487 4,464,530 1,969,064 0 10,944,081 Rhode Island 3,070,347 3,657,679 887,150 27,928

  6. EERE Program Management Guide - Appendix M | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M EERE Program Management Guide - Appendix M Appendix M provides information on support service contracts, which are a significant portion of the Department's total contracting ...

  7. Planning for quality stewardship: The sitewide environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, D.

    1995-12-01

    The U.S Department of Energy is responsible for managing many large tracts of Federal land throughout this country. These sites host the nation`s nuclear weapons complex, national laboratories, environmental restoration facilities, and serve other uses. The Department faces unique problems in administering this land. Many have multiple activities taking place at the same time; for example, a site may simultaneously be used for energy research, technology development, waste disposal and wildlife habitat. The sites often use radioactive and other hazardous materials and many are contaminated as a result of past management practices. In 1992 the Department institutes a policy, as stated in its National Environmental Policy Act regulations [10 CFR 1021], to prepare sitewide environmental impact statements for its large, multipurpose sites. For the first time, through the sitewide environmental impact statement process, the Department has an effective tool to plan for quality stewardship of the lands and resources entrusted to its care. The sitewide environmental impact statement is a specialized type of programmatic environmental impact statement which allows the Department to look at the geographically connected actions taking place at a given site. The sitewide statement allows a comprehensive look at the operational baseline for the entire site to determine the total cumulative impact of ongoing operations at the site. The Department can identify areas where a change in management practices would mitigate undesirable impacts; areas not at issue could continue under existing practices. As a result, an environmentally-sound operating envelope can be established. This, in turn, can serve in the future as a threshold to decide if new proposals would result in significant impacts to the site as a whole, to simplify future National Environmental Policy Act reviews.

  8. S-PRIME Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System Quality Assurance Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.M.

    1992-09-23

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP)describes how the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System Design and Technology Demonstration Project addresses the Quality Assurance requirements delineated in DOE Order 5700.6C and the Thermionic Program Management Plan 214PMP000001. The Quality Assurance Program is based on the following fundamental principles, which Rocketdyne endorses and the QA Project Manager and Program Manager shall enforce: Quality Achievement is a continuing responsibility of line organization at all levels; the Quality Assurance organization through the effective overview of work, gives additional assurance that specified requirements are met; risk is the fundamental consideration in determining to what extent the Quality Assurance Plan should be applied to items and processes; action is based on facts and analysis, customer driven quality, strong quality leadership and continuous improvement.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management Post Competitio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual Report Management Excellence Goals Driving Top ... Management. FY2013 6. Manage increases in scope by raising Federal staff levels by 1 FTE per year to a total of ...

  10. Total Particulate Matter Air Sampling Data (TEOM) from Los Alamos National Laboratory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    LANL measures the total particulate mass concentration in the air on a routine basis as well as during incidents that may affect ambient air. The collected data is added to the Air Quality Index (AQI). AQI is an index for reporting daily air quality. It tells you how clean or polluted your air is, and what associated health effects might be a concern for you. The AQI focuses on health effects you may experience within a few hours or days after breathing polluted air. EPA calculates the AQI for five major air pollutants regulated by the Clean Air Act.

  11. Corrective Action Plan for Environmenta' Management Headquarters

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corrective Action Plan for Environmenta' Management Headquarters Phase 2: Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on February 14~ 2014 Washington, DC 20585 August 2015 Corrective Action Plan for Environmental Management Headquarters Phase 2: Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on February 14, 2014 Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety, Security, and Quality Programs Environmental Management Approved by: Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for

  12. UMTRA technical assistance contractor quality assurance program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) provides the primary requirements for the integration of quality functions into all Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Project organization activities. The QAPP is the written directive authorized by the TAc Program Manager to accomplish this task and to implement procedures that provide the controls and sound management practices needed to ensure TAC contractual obligations are met. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance functions as management tools to ensure that all Project organization functions are executed in a manner that will protect public health and safety, promote the success of the Project, and meet or exceed contract requirements.

  13. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Matsekh, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  14. Organic Matter Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Cerri, Carlos C.

    2002-01-01

    Soil organic matter (S)M) is an essential attribute of soil quality with a key role in soil conservation and sustainable agriculture. Many practices-some involving land use changes-have been shown to increase SOM and thus received considerable attention for their possible role in climate change mitigation. Carbon sequestration in managed soils occurs when there is a net removal of atmospheric CO2 because of the balance between carbon inputs (net primary productivity) and outputs (soil respiration, management-related C emissions). Soil C sequestration has the additional appeal that all its practices conform to principles of sustainable agriculture (e.g., reduced tillage, erosion control, diverse cropping systems, improved soil fertility). Long-term field experiments have been instrumental to increase our understanding of SOM dynamics. This chapter presents fundamental concepts to guide readers on the role of SOM in sustainable agriculture and climate change mitigation.

  15. Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Q C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Quality A Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Assuranc view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) e (QA) e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the

  16. Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, John T.; Kunz, Walter E.; Cates, Michael R.; Franks, Larry A.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fissions are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for .sup.239 Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

  17. New York Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    New York Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ... Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Residential Deliveries New York Share of Total U.S. ...

  18. New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ... Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Residential Deliveries New Mexico Share of Total U.S. ...

  19. New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ... Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Residential Deliveries New Jersey Share of Total U.S. ...

  20. Minnesota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Minnesota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ... Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Residential Deliveries Minnesota Share of Total U.S. ...