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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Relationship of the HACCP system to Total Quality Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Webster’s Dictionary (1989) defines quality as ‘a degree of excellence or superiority in kind’. The American Society for Quality Control (ASQC, 1987) specifies that quality is ‘the totality of feat...

N. B. Webb; J. L. Marsden

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Total Quality Management and nuclear weapons: A historian`s perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total Quality Management (TQM) has become a significant management theme at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper discusses the historical roots of TQM at Los Alamos and how TQM has been used in the development of nuclear weapons.

Meade, R.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Managerial information behaviour: Relationships among Total Quality Management orientation, information use environments, and managerial roles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production process and customer information Low Total Quality Learning: continuous innovation and learning: exploration

Simard, C; Rice, Ronald E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Comparison of approaches to Total Quality Management. Including an examination of the Department of Energy`s position on quality management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of several qualitatively different approaches to Total Quality Management (TQM). The continuum ranges from management approaches that are primarily standards -- with specific guidelines, but few theoretical concepts -- to approaches that are primarily philosophical, with few specific guidelines. The approaches to TQM discussed in this paper include the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9000 Standard, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, Senge`s the Learning Organization, Watkins and Marsick`s approach to organizational learning, Covey`s Seven Habits of Highly Successful People, and Deming`s Fourteen Points for Management. Some of these approaches (Deming and ISO 9000) are then compared to the DOE`s official position on quality management and conduct of operations (DOE Orders 5700.6C and 5480.19). Using a tabular format, it is shown that while 5700.6C (Quality Assurance) maps well to many of the current approaches to TQM, DOE`s principle guide to management Order 5419.80 (Conduct of Operations) has many significant conflicts with some of the modern approaches to continuous quality improvement.

Bennett, C.T.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for measuring quality improvement is the cost of quality. Traditionally, comprehensive quality cost reports have regularly been issued in a fixed format to identify opportunities for improvement and provide guidelines for improvement over time. However, current...

Ratliff, William L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

A Total Quality Management (TQM) Approach for Energy Savings Through Employee Awareness and Building Upgrades to Improve Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A TOTAL QUALIn' MANAGEMENT (TQM) APPROACH FOR ENERGY SAVINGS THROUGH EMPLOYEE AWARENESS AND BUILDING UPGRADES TO IMPROVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY Daniel H. Stewart, Principal Engineer, Facilities Department, Rh6oe-Poulenc. Inc., Cranbury, NJ...) approach depends on the input from the end-users, clients, employees, power companies, various consultants and site operation management. This paper discusses the energy efficiency projects that are currently in progress at Rhone Poulenc's Corporate...

Stewart, D. H.

9

Total Light Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Light Management Light Management Why is saving Energy Important World Electricity Consumption (2007) Top 20 Countries 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 U n i t e d S t a t e s C h i n a J a p a n R u s s i a I n d i a G e r m a n y C a n a d a A f r i c a F r a n c e B r a z i l K o r e a , S o u t h U n i t e d K i n g d o m I t a l y S p a i n A u s t r a l i a T a i w a n S o u t h A f r i c a M e x i c o S a u d i A r a b i a I r a n Billion kWh Source: US DOE Energy Information Administration Lighting Control Strategies 4 5 6 Occupancy/Vacancy Sensing * The greatest energy savings achieved with any lighting fixture is when the lights are shut off * Minimize wasted light by providing occupancy sensing or vacancy sensing 7 8 Daylight Harvesting * Most commercial space has enough natural light flowing into it, and the amount of artificial light being generated can be unnecessary * Cut back on the production of artificial lighting by

10

Quality assurance and data management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains graphs and tables relating to quality assurance and data management for environmental quality at Hanford Reservation.

Lockrem, L.L.

1998-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

11

Office of Quality Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Quality Management develops and interprets Government-wide policies and procedures and conducts training to ensure the accurate identification of information and documents that must be classified or controlled under statute or Executive order to protect the national security and controlled unclassified Official Use Only information for the effective operation of the Government.

12

Quality Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Management Quality Management Quality Management The Office of Quality Management, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security develops policies and procedures to ensure the classification and control of information is effective and consistent. The Office of Quality Management also assists other Government agencies to meet the requirements contained in DOE-issued regulations concerning Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data. To meet these missions, the Office of Quality Management: Develops and revises DOE Regulations and Orders concerning Restricted Data, Formerly Restricted Data, Transclassified Foreign Nuclear Information, National Security Information, Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Official Use Only Responds to Mandatory Declassification Review Requests under

13

CSP 587: Software Quality Management S. Kan, Software Quality engineering, Addison-Wesley.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSP 587: Software Quality Management Texts S. Kan, Software Quality engineering, Addison hours · Quality Appraisal Programs 5 hours SEI's Capability Maturity Model ISO 9000 Total 45 hours CSP

Heller, Barbara

14

Quality Management Why bother Certificating?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) (Prevention) (Direction) BS 5750 1979-1987 ISO 9001/2/3 1987-2000 ISO 9001 2000, amended 2008 #12;5 What RECORDS / FORMS INTENT WHAT? PROOF HOW? WHY? #12;8 ISO 9001:2008 The Structure: ISO 9001 - Q Relationships ISO 9001:2008 Based on the 8 Quality Management Principles: #12;11 Quality Management Process

Paxton, Anthony T.

15

Rangeland Resource Management for Texans: Total Resource Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Total Resource Management approach helps ranchers make strategic, tactical and operational decisions for the best, most cost-effective use of resources. This publication offers step-by-step directions for implementing TRM for a profitable...

Hanselka, C. Wayne; Fox, William E.; White, Larry D.

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

Total Building Air Management: When Dehumidification Counts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANAGEMENT ASHRAE 62-89, and the much discussed amendments to this document, is changing the way that the commercial building industry conducts business. As Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) becomes a major theme of regulators, it also becomes a major concern... within the building industry, particularly in the commercial building industry. Failure to comply with industry standards can result in law suits and st. penalties. Every design build contractor, commercial architect, design engineer and commercial...

Chilton, R. L.; White, C. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Quality management system and accreditation of the in vivo monitoring laboratory at Karslruhe Institue of Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Laboratory, Institute for Radiation Research, Karlsruhe Institute...Development Quality Control Radiation Monitoring methods standards Radiation Protection methods standards...Radiometry methods standards Safety Software Total Quality Management......

B. Breustedt; U. Mohr; N. Biegard; G. Cordes

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WMG QAP is an integral part of a management system designed to ensure that WMG activities are planned, performed, documented, and verified in a manner that assures a quality product. A quality product is one that meets all waste acceptance criteria, conforms to all permit and regulatory requirements, and is accepted at the offsite treatment, storage, and disposal facility. In addition to internal processes, this QA Plan identifies WMG processes providing oversight and assurance to line management that waste is managed according to all federal, state, and local requirements for waste generator areas. A variety of quality assurance activities are integral to managing waste. These QA functions have been identified in the relevant procedures and in subsequent sections of this plan. The WMG QAP defines the requirements of the WMG quality assurance program. These requirements are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, Contractor Requirements Document, the LBNL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP), and other applicable environmental compliance documents. The QAP and all associated WMG policies and procedures are periodically reviewed and revised, as necessary, to implement corrective actions, and to reflect changes that have occurred in regulations, requirements, or practices as a result of feedback on work performed or lessons learned from other organizations. The provisions of this QAP and its implementing documents apply to quality-affecting activities performed by the WMG; WMG personnel, contractors, and vendors; and personnel from other associated LBNL organizations, except where such contractors, vendors, or organizations are governed by their own WMG-approved QA programs.

Waste Management Group

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

Project Management Quality Assurance Guide, GPG 017  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT Good Practice Guide GPG-FM-017 Quality Assurance March 1996 Department of Energy Office of Field Management Office of Project and Fixed Asset Management

20

Nutrient Management Module No. 12 Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient Management Module No. 12 Water Quality Considerations and Regulations by Susan Mc Management Competency Area II: Nutrient movement in soil and water. Objectives After completing this module issues 3.Become familiar with federal and state water quality regulations 4.Identify Best Management

Lawrence, Rick L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Life Cycle Asset Management - Quality Assurance -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

17 17 Quality Assurance March 1996 Department of Energy Office of Field Management Office of Project and Fixed Asset Management Contents GPG-FM-017 March 1996 iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Graded Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2. PRINCIPLES AND PROCESSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Goals, Principles and Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1.1 Quality Assurance Goals and Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1.2 Quality Assurance Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.2 Quality Assurance and Project Phases . . . . .

22

DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Management Provisions. qm6-14-13.pdf More Documents & Publications Version Tracking Document for DOE Challenge Homes, National Program Requirements (Rev. 03) DOE...

23

Quality Management and Job Quality: How the ISO 9001 Standard forQuality Management Systems Affects Employees and Employers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Job Quality: How the ISO 9001 Standard for Qualityhave examined how the ISO 9001 Quality Management Systemcompanies in California. ISO 9001 adopters subsequently had

Levine, David I.; Toffel, Michael W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus: The Long and Winding Road Andrew Sharpley #12;In the beginning Agriculture and water quality Targeted watershed P management Linking ecosystem;#12;Optimal soil PO concentrations for plant growth ~0.20 mg/L #12;For flowing waters ~0.01 to 0.10 mg/L #12

25

Water quality management plan for Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management plan provides an assessment of Cherokee Reservoir's current water quality, identifies those factors which affect reservoir water quality, and develops recommendations aimed at restoring or maintaining water quality at levels sufficient to support diverse beneficial uses. 20 references, 8 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

TOTAL ORE PROCESSING INTEGRATION AND MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lessons learned from ore segregation test No.3 were presented to Minntac Mine personnel during the reporting period. Ore was segregated by A-Factor, with low values going to Step 1/2 and high values going to Step 3. During the test, the mine maintained the best split possible for the given production and location constraints. During the test, Step 1&2 A-Factor was lowered more than Step 3 was raised. All other ore quality changes were not manipulated, but the segregation by A-Factor affected most of the other qualities. Magnetic iron, coarse tails, fine tails, silica, and grind changed in response to the split. Segregation was achieved by adding ore from HIS to the Step 3 blend and lowering the amount of LC 1&2 and somewhat lowering the amount of LC 3&4. Conversely, Step 1&2 received less HIS with a corresponding increase in LC 1&2. The amount of IBC was increased to both Steps about one-third of the way into the test. For about the center half of the test, LC 3&4 was reduced to both Steps. The most noticeable layer changes were, then: an increase in the HIS split; a decrease in the LC 1&2 split; adding IBC to both Steps; and lowering LC 3&4 to both Steps. Statistical analysis of the dataset collected during ordinary, non-segregated operation of the mine and mill is continuing. Graphical analysis of blast patterns according to drill monitor data was slowed by student classwork. It is expected to resume after the semester ends in May.

Leslie Gertsch; Richard Gertsch

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

27

Unit 10: Software Quality To introduce software quality management and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ¥ ISO 9001 Quality Systems - Model for Quality Assurance in Design/Development, Production, Installation intervals by management to ensure its continuing suitability, effectiveness and conformance with ISO 9001 with particular reference to the requirements of ISO 9000 and associated standards. Ð To introduce QFD

Finkelstein, Anthony

28

Application of Coal Fly Ash in Air Quality Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of Coal Fly Ash in Air Quality Management ... It has been found from the literature that fly ash possesses potential application in the management of air quality. ... Application of Zeolite Synthesized from Fly Ash in Air Quality Management ...

M. Ahmaruzzaman; V.K Gupta

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

Establishing the Office of Environmental Management Quality Assurance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Establishing the Office of Environmental Management Quality Assurance Corporate Board Establishing the Office of Environmental Management Quality Assurance Corporate Board The...

30

Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar (Text Version) Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text version...

31

Systems Engineering Introduction to Software Quality Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for quality management ISO 9001:2000 is a generic model of the quality process; ISO 9001:2008 clarifies ISO 9001:2000 ISO 9001:2008 applicable to any organisation that designs, develops and maintains products (or services) ISO 9000-3 interprets 9001 for software dev. 12 Features of ISO 9001:2008 Organisational

Bryson, Joanna J.

32

Report: Acquisition, Project Management, and Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Acquisition, Project Management, and Quality Assurance Acquisition, Project Management, and Quality Assurance September 30, 2009 Submitted by the EMAB Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee Background For FY 2009 EMAB was tasked to review the management and delivery of EM's Construction Projects and confirm whether or not the program is headed in the right direction or needs to make some adjustments in order to improve efficiency. EMAB reviewed and discussed the topics of Acquisition and Project Management during its public meetings. The Acquisition and Project Management subcommittee, comprised of Mr. G. Brian Estes, Dr. Lawrence Papay, and Mr. David Swindle, engaged in teleconferences on August 7 and September 4 with EM senior personnel. Findings and Observations Deputy Assistant Secretary Jack Surash provided an update on EM acquisition initiatives, and he

33

DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recommended Quality Recommended Quality Management Provisions RECOMMENDED QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROVISIONS QM Provision Builder Documentation & Verification Requirements Rater/Verifier Requirements QM #1: Project Documentation Complete construction documents shall be qualified as Designed to Earn ENERGY STAR and document all additional provisions and specifications required for DOE Challenge Home including mandatory provisions: 2012 IECC envelope insulation levels, ENERGY STAR windows, duct work in conditioned space, hot water distribution requirements requirements for indoor fixtures, EPA Indoor airPLUS checklist, and Renewable Energy Ready Home Checklists. Develop and store construction documents which, at a minimum, shall include all content required to consistently implement

34

Design decisions in workflow management and quality of work  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the design and implementation of a workflow management (WFM) system in a large Dutch social insurance organisation is described. The effect of workflow design decisions on the quality of work is explored theoretically and empirically, using the model of Zur Muehlen as a frame of reference. It was found among a total sample of 66 employees that there was no change in the experience of work quality before and after the introduction of the WFM system. There are however, significant differences in the quality of work before and after the WFM adoption if different functions are distinguished.

Benny M.E. De Waal; Ronald Batenburg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Project Hanford management contract quality improvement project management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 13, 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Manager transmitted a letter to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) describing several DOE-RL identified failed opportunities for FDH to improve the Quality Assurance (QA) Program and its implementation. In addition, DOE-RL identified specific Quality Program performance deficiencies. FDH was requested to establish a periodic reporting mechanism for the corrective action program. In a July 17, 1998 response to DOE-RL, FDH agreed with the DOE concerns and committed to perform a comprehensive review of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) QA Program during July and August, 1998. As a result, the Project Hanford Management Contract Quality Improvement Plan (QIP) (FDH-3508) was issued on October 21, 1998. The plan identified corrective actions based upon the results of an in-depth Quality Program Assessment. Immediately following the scheduled October 22, 1998, DOE Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH-10) Enforcement Conference, FDH initiated efforts to effectively implement the QIP corrective actions. A Quality Improvement Project (QI Project) leadership team was assembled to prepare a Project Management Plan for this project. The management plan was specifically designed to engage a core team and the support of representatives from FDH and the major subcontractors (MSCs) to implement the QIP initiatives; identify, correct, and provide feedback as to the root cause for deficiency; and close out the corrective actions. The QI Project will manage and communicate progress of the process.

ADAMS, D.E.

1999-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

36

CERTIFICATE OF APPROVAL Thisisto certifythat the Quality Management System of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CERTIFICATE OF APPROVAL Thisisto certifythat the Quality Management System of: Southwest Research been approved by Lloyd's Register Quality Assurance to the following Quality Management System Standards: ISO 9001 :2008 ANSIIISO/ ASQ Q9001-2008 The Quality Management System is applicable to: Research

Chapman, Clark R.

37

The University of Winnipeg Air Quality Management Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The University of Winnipeg Air Quality Management Policy TITLE: AIR QUALITY NUMBER: 90 & Sustainability) Purpose: The University of Winnipeg (the "University) Air Quality Management Policy ("Policy") establishes a framework within which the University will incorporate air quality management into its overall

Martin, Jeff

38

Challenges for Water Quality Best Management Practices Andrew Sharpley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR Agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPsChallenges for Water Quality Best Management Practices Andrew Sharpley Department of Crop, Soil

39

ZERH Webinar: Quality Management Systems for ZERH | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Webinar: Quality Management Systems for ZERH ZERH Webinar: Quality Management Systems for ZERH October 16, 2014 12:00PM to 1:00PM EDT GoToWebinar The U.S. Department of Energy Zero...

40

Wie beantrage ich das Zertifikat ,,Quality System Manager Junior"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wie beantrage ich das Zertifikat ,,Quality System Manager Junior" und was kostet es Jochem DGQ Quality System Manager - Junior - Die Zusatzqualifikation für Studierende der Technischen Universität Berlin #12;Was ist der Quality Systems Manager - Junior -? Die Bedeutung des Qualitätsmanagements

Berlin,Technische Universität

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Quantitative Quality Management through Defect Prediction and Statistical Process Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative Quality Management through Defect Prediction and Statistical Process Control Pankaj: To produce high quality software, the final software should have as few defects as possible. The task of quality management in a software project is to plan suitable quality control activities, and properly

Jalote, Pankaj

42

US South Coast Air Quality Management District SCAQMD | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Coast Air Quality Management District SCAQMD South Coast Air Quality Management District SCAQMD Jump to: navigation, search Name US South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Place Diamond Bar, California Zip CA 91765 Product String representation "The SCAQMD's Te ... nate emissions." is too long. References US South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. US South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is a company located in Diamond Bar, California . References ↑ "US South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=US_South_Coast_Air_Quality_Management_District_SCAQMD&oldid=352623

43

Water quality management library. 2. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of ten books offered in conjunction with Water Quality International, the Biennial Conference and Exposition of the International Association on Water Pollution Research and Control (IAWPRC). Volume 1, Activated Sludge Process, Design and Control, 2nd edition, 1998: Volume 2, Upgrading Wastewater Treatment Plants, 2nd edition, 1998: Volume 3, Toxicity Reduction, 2nd edition, 1998: Volume 4, Municipal Sewage Sludge Management, 2nd edition, 1998: Volume 5, Design and Retrofit of Wastewater Treatment Plants for Biological Nutrient Removal, 1st edition, 1992: Volume 6, Dynamics and Control of the Activated Sludge Process, 2nd edition, 1998: Volume 7: Design of Anaerobic Processes for the Treatment of Industrial and Municipal Wastes, 1st edition, 1992: Volume 8, Groundwater Remediation, 1st edition, 1992: Volume 9, Nonpoint Pollution and Urban Stormwater Management, 1st edition, 1995: Volume 10, Wastewater Reclamation and Reuse, 1st edition, 1998.

Eckenfelder, W.W.; Malina, J.F.; Patterson, J.W. [eds.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Managing For High-quality Hay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication highlights the factors determining hay quality and discusses fertility and water interaction, harvesting, quality losses and storage losses....

Stichler, Charles; Bade, David H.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

Benchmark quality total atomization energies of small polyatomic Jan M. L. Martin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benchmark quality total atomization energies of small polyatomic molecules Jan M. L. Martin Successive coupled-cluster CCSD T calculations in basis sets of spdf, spdfg, and spdfgh quality, combined with separate Schwartz-type extrapolations A B/(l 1/2) of the self-consistent field SCF and correlation energies

Martin, Jan M.L.

46

Managing Total Corporate Electricity/Energy Market Risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper starts with a short history of the use of value-at-risk techniques in financial risk management. The specific and often unique risk management challenges faced by electricity companies are then desc...

Alex Henney; Greg Keers

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

48

Establishing the Office of Environmental Management Quality Assurance Corporate Board  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DISTRIBUTIO DISTRIBUTIO FROM: DAE Y. CHUNG DEPUTY ASSISTA@SECRETARY FOR SAFETY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS SUBJECT: Establishing the Office of Environmental Management Quality Assurance Corporate Board The purpose of this memorandum is to introduce the Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board which implements EM'S policy and guidance and promotes lessons learned and best practices across the sites. The Corporate Board provides the management structure to integrate the independently managed federal and contractor QA Programs into a single corporate entity. The Board serves as a consensus-building body to facilitate institutionalization of a QA Management System across the EM-Complex. The Corporate Board concept originated from the EM Quality Improvement Initiative in

49

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

50

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

51

Building Air Quality Alliance Program fro Building Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor air quality (IAQ) has emerged as a major concern for building owners, managers, engineers and tenants. As the public recognizes the importance of healthy, comfortable. and productive indoor environments, their awareness and demand for good...

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Quality Management System Guidelines- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Quality management system tools were customized for residential construction by BSC, IBACOS, and PHI, for use by builders, trades, and designers to help eliminate mistakes that would require high-cost rework.

53

DOE ZERH Webinar: Quality Management Systems for ZERH  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Description:The session will provide background and guidance for how Zero Energy Ready Home builders can integrate a quality management program in their business. The focus will be on facilitating...

54

eQuality: An application of DDUCKS to process management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process management is a method for improving Boeing's business processes, however many aspects have...eQuality is a software system based on a framework called DDUCKS that is being designed to support the process...

Jeffrey M. Bradshaw; Peter Holm…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Quality Management | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quality Management Quality Management Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act Categorical Exclusion Determinations Contact Information Integrated Support Center Roxanne Purucker U.S. Department of Energy 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-2110 Larry Kelly U.S. Department of Energy 200 Administration Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 P: (865) 576-0885 Services Quality Management Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The ISC provides quality assurance expertise to the Office of Science's site offices in support of their federal oversight of the national laboratories. Effective quality assurance (QA) programs are essential for achieving a high level of efficiency and excellence in the design, construction, operation and maintenance of laboratory facilities, and in

56

A total system approach to sustainable pest?management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...therapeutics. Thus, the classic treadmill effect in pursuit of remediation of the symptoms persists (2) while tolls due to pests grow...management. In fact, many seem to view biotechnology as an innovative means for providing safe and effective tools that will essentially...

W. J. Lewis; J. C. van Lenteren; Sharad C. Phatak; J. H. Tumlinson III

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Quality assurance management plan (QAPP) special analytical support (SAS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is the policy of Special Analytical Support (SAS) that the analytical aspects of all environmental data generated and processed in the laboratory, subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Energy or other project specific requirements, be of known and acceptable quality. It is the intention of this QAPP to establish and assure that an effective quality controlled management system is maintained in order to meet the quality requirements of the intended use(s) of the data.

LOCKREM, L.L.

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

publication 426-042 Urban Water-Quality Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

publication 426-042 Urban Water-Quality Management Winterizing the Water Garden Lynnette Swanson. Prepare the pond for the winter months by managing the plants, cleaning the pond, and monitoring the water Traci Gilland, Extension Agent, Portsmouth Water gardens require maintenance throughout the year

Liskiewicz, Maciej

59

Legacy Management CERCLA Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

S.M. Stoller Corporation is the contractor for the Technical Assistance Contract (TAC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) operations. Stoller employs a management system that applies to all programs, projects, and business management systems funded through DOE-LM task orders. The management system incorporates the philosophy, policies, and requirements of health and safety, environmental compliance, and quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of project planning and implementation. Health and safety requirements are documented in the Health and Safety Manual (STO 2), the Radiological Control Manual (STO 3), the Integrated Safety Management System Description (STO 10), and the Drilling Health and Safety Requirements (STO 14). Environmental compliance policy and requirements are documented in the Environmental Management Program Implementation Manual (STO 11). The QA Program is documented in the Quality Assurance Manual (STO 1). The QA Manual (STO 1) implements the specific requirements and philosophy of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance. This manual also includes the requirements of other standards that are regularly imposed by customers, regulators, or other DOE orders. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 830, “Quality Assurance Requirements,” ANSI/ASQC E4-2004, “Quality Systems for Environmental Data and Technology Programs – Requirements with Guidance for Use,” and ISO 14001-2004, “Environmental Management Systems,” have been included. These standards are similar in content. The intent of the QA Manual (STO 1) is to provide a QA management system that incorporates the requirements and philosophy of DOE and other customers within the QA Manual. Criterion 1, “Quality Assurance Program,” identifies the fundamental requirements for establishing and implementing the QA management system; QA Instruction (QAI) 1.1, “QA Program Implementation,” identifies the TAC organizations that have responsibility for implementing the QA program requirements; and Appendix C of the QA Manual provides comparison tables that identify where the requirements of other standards are addressed in the QA Manual.

none,

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

60

Urban Air Quality Management: Detecting and Improving Indoor Ambient Air Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current air pollution management and air quality control are primarily focused on outdoor and ... which act as public spaces, contaminated indoor air could be public health hazards. In Singapore ... spend a subst...

T. L. Tan; Gissella B. Lebron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Rice Quality Factors: Implications For Management Decisions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These records accounted for 24, 26, and 27 percent, respectively, of Texas production during the years surveyed. The markets are located at Alvin, Danbury, Bay City, EI Campo, and Ganado. Data were available from two other markets but were not used because.... Yet this market had a much lower percentage of grades 1 and 2 than the other markets (Tables B.14-B.18). Overall, quality averaged about one grade lower at Alvin compared with quality at Bay City, Ganado, and EI Campo markets. Nearness...

Grant, Warren R.; Rister, Edward, M.; Brorsen, B. Wade

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

63

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

64

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

65

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

66

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

67

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

68

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

69

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

70

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

71

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

72

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

73

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

74

Total Quality Commissioning for HVAC Systems to Assure High Performance Throughout the Whole Life Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL QUALITY COMMISSIONING FOR HVAC SYSTEMS TO ASSURE HIGH PERFORMANCE THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE LIFE CYCLE By: Grahame E. Maisey, P.E., and Beverly Milestone, LEED AP Building Services Consultants INTRODUCTION Current HVAC systems... are not coming close to approaching life cycle performance expectations for energy, operation and maintenance, occupant comfort and productivity and longevity. HVAC systems in buildings claiming to be sustainable, with integrated, energy conscious design...

Maisey, G.; Milestone, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

76

Monitoring and Managing Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary San Francisco Estuary Institute and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring and Managing Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary San Francisco Estuary Institute;Contribution 517 Monitoring and Managing Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary San Francisco Estuary information generated each year on water quality in the Estu- ary accessible to water quality managers

77

Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text version of the webinar, Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home, presented in October 2014.

78

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing quality management Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

management... pillar, ... Source: Vardeman, Stephen B. - Departments of Statistics & Industrial Engineering, Iowa State University Collection: Mathematics 33 Quality...

79

Evaluating the Quality of Structured Environmental Management Decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structured decision making (SDM) approaches have been advocated as a means of improving the quality of environmental and related risk management decisions based largely on the self-reported behavior of decision makers. ... The goal of such an approach is to improve the available knowledge base so that participants can make choices that are informed by detailed scientific data and is similar in intent to many of the science-based initiatives in decision making now being undertaken by the EPA (25). ... These results point to a disconnect between subjects' ranking of management objectiveswhich the self-reported findings would suggest was driven by thoughtful analysis of the information providedand the prioritizing of manage ment problems, which appeared to be driven by some other mode of judgment, possibly the use of an affect-based heuristic. ...

Robyn S. Wilson; Joseph L. Arvai

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Quality management in the logistics function: a study of the Greek industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an exploratory survey investigating the status of quality management practices in the logistics function in the Greek industry. This is the first paper to provide information regarding quality management performance in the growing and challenging area of logistics in the Greek industry. The survey instrument contains information about the forces that encourage or discourage managers to implement quality initiatives in the logistics function, the quality methods and techniques that are currently in use, their overall satisfaction with the current level of quality management in logistics and their perceptions regarding the critical success factors for effective quality management in logistics. The findings of this survey are compared with related findings from similar surveys in other countries in order to generalise upon the results and draw meaningful conclusions. The logistics quality performance status generated by this exploratory study could be used by logistics managers as a benchmark tool or roadmap for future quality improvements.

Katerina Gotzamani; Fotis Vouzas; Pantelis Longinidis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Quality tools in science education  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At a recent Science Teachers’ State Convention I attended a session called “Quality Tools in Science Education” and was introduced to an approach to classroom management and student involvement modeled after an industry practice called TQM (total quality management).

Patricia Blanton

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) Waste Management Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH), that implements the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC), HNF-MP-599, Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) document, and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement with Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), Sections 6.5 and 7.8. WHM is responsible for the treatment, storage, and disposal of liquid and solid wastes generated at the Hanford Site as well as those wastes received from other US Department of Energy (DOE) and non-DOE sites. WMH operations include the Low-Level Burial Grounds, Central Waste Complex (a mixed-waste storage complex), a nonradioactive dangerous waste storage facility, the Transuranic Storage Facility, T Plant, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facility, 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility, the 242-A Evaporator, 300 Area Treatment Effluent Disposal Facility, the 340 Facility (a radioactive liquid waste handling facility), 222-S Laboratory, the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility, and the Hanford TRU Waste Program.

VOLKMAN, D.D.

1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

SEMI-AUTOMATIC VERIFICATION OF GEODATA FOR QUALITY MANAGEMENT AND UPDATING OF GIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEMI-AUTOMATIC VERIFICATION OF GEODATA FOR QUALITY MANAGEMENT AND UPDATING OF GIS P. Helmholz a WORDS: Automation, Change Detection, GIS, Quality, Updating ABSTRACT: The usefulness and acceptance of quality management, and furthermore, of the update of geodata systems (GIS). The presented system compares

84

Quality-Assurance and Data Management Plan for Groundwater Activities by the U.S. Geological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.....................................................................................................................................................1 Transition to Electronic Data ManagementQuality-Assurance and Data Management Plan for Groundwater Activities by the U.S. Geological Survey;#12;Quality-Assurance and Data Management Plan for Groundwater Activities by the U.S. Geological Survey

85

Management of Services Quality as a Tool to Increase Water Supply Companies’ Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The proof of necessity to control and manage service quality as a main factor for water supply enterprise efficiency increase is given in the article. Drinking water quality is reasoned to be a utility ... with a...

Olga Krakashova Dr.; Anna Pelevina Dr.; Vladimir Yaroslavtsev

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Understanding the role of trading in water quality management : based on U.S. experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research demonstrates an overview of the performance of water quality trading programs currently implemented within the U.S. The role of trading in water quality management is identified through systematical comparisons ...

Pharino, Chanathip

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Fixed-flowrate total water network synthesis under uncertainty with risk management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work addresses the problem of integrated water network synthesis under uncertainty with risk management. We consider a superstructure consisting of water sources, regenerators, and sinks that leads to a mixed-integer quadratically-constrained quadratic program (MIQCQP) for a fixed-flowrate total water network synthesis problem. Uncertainty in the problem is accounted for via a recourse-based two-stage stochastic programming formulation with discrete scenarios that gives rise to a multiscenario MIQCQP comprising network design in the first stage and its operation in the second stage acting as recourse. In addition, we extend the model to address risk management using the Conditional Value-at-Risk (CVaR) metric. Because a large number of scenarios is often required to capture the underlying uncertainty of the problem, causing the model to suffer from the curse of dimensionality, we propose a stepwise solution strategy to reduce the computational load. We illustrate this methodology on a case study inspired from the water network of a petroleum refinery in Malaysia. The presence of nonconvex bilinear terms necessitates the use of global optimization techniques for which we employ a new global MIQCQP solver, GAMS/GloMIQO and verify the solutions with BARON. Our computational results show that total water network synthesis under uncertainty with risk management problems can be solved to global optimality in reasonable time.

Cheng Seong Khor; Benoit Chachuat; Nilay Shah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The Quality of Management and of the Science and Engineering at the NNSA National Security Laboratories  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Quality of Management and of the Science and Engineering at the NNSA National Security Laboratories was presented to CRENEL 9/15/2014.

89

Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety thermal management system (BTMS) is an important and integral part of battery management system (BMS battery pack ecosystem. Fig. 1 corresponds a generic battery thermal management system operating

Andreasen, Søren Juhl

90

New indicator approaches for effective urban air quality management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of urban air quality at monitoring stations in developed countries have frequently involved the criteria gaseous pollutants, particulates, hazardous air pollutants, perceived air quality and relev...

Peter J. Peterson; W. Peter Williams

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Quality Assurance Management System Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides information on principles and practices used to establish and implement an effective quality assurance program or quality management system in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 830. Cancels DOE G 414.1-2. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2B.

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

92

Distrbuted Sensing Systems for Water Quality Assesment and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for environmental management, and in particular, waterenvironmental management efforts at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with a special focus on water-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

THE SCIENCE-POLICYINTERFACE:Using The Entire Scientific Toolbox To Enhance the Air Quality Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to have prevented further degradation in air quality, despite significant growth in population and economic activity. This chapter outlines development of a conceptual framework for an air-quality as an initial step to aid policy makers in designing and evaluating future management strategies. 5.1 THE AIR-QUALITY

94

A Model for Predicting Daily Peak Visitation and Implications for Recreation Management and Water Quality: Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Model for Predicting Daily Peak Visitation and Implications for Recreation Management and Water carrying capacity. Keywords Visitation model Á Recreation management Á Water quality Á River visitation Á Clark, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA 123 Environmental Management DOI 10.1007/s00267-008-9079-5 #12

95

Proceedings for air quality management programs: A workshop on lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coordinators of this project at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo proposed a workshop to bring together an international group of experts to present both the lessons of history and the current practices in air quality management around the world. The workshop would also serve as a forum for presenting the accomplishments and plans of this project and for receiving comments from the assembled group. The workshop was favored with an outstanding set of speakers who represented a broad spectrum of experience. Their papers are presented in this volume. The total attendance was forty-four (see List of Participants) with representation from numerous interested Mexican institutions. Individual reports are processed separately for the database.

Streit, G.E. [comp.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Strategisches Management und Strategiegenese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Im vorhergenden Kapitel wurden die theoretischen Grundlagen von Total Quality Management erläutert und differenzierte Untersuchungen zu Umsetzungsversuchen im betrachteten Unternehmen angestellt. Ergebnis dies...

Martin Boehme

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Quality Management System Guidelines - Building America Top Innovation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

guid-quality-mgnt.png The whole-building approach of constructing high performance homes requires a high degree of coordination and interdependencies between designers,...

98

Major: Ecological Systems Design, Air Quality Control and Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mechanics (Wang), 3 CP Air quality and health impact (Schleibinger, Wang, Wick), 3 CP Air Pollution Modeling pollution issues and control technology · Hands-on knowledge of state-of-the-art air quality monitoring questions · Solve complex problems from a system-oriented perspective · Understanding air pollution sources

Giger, Christine

99

Managing the quality of a resource with stock and flow controls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stock. Thus, we try to prevent the deterioration of environmental quality and to keep our roads wellManaging the quality of a resource with stock and flow controls Nathaniel Keohane a, , Benjamin Van Roy b , Richard Zeckhauser c a Yale University, United States b Stanford University, United States c

Van Roy, Ben

100

Quality management system in the CIEMAT Radiation Dosimetry Service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......spectrometry (NaI (Tl), low energy germanium and Fastscan detection...management system, an external auditor made a revision of the initial...CSN. 4 International Atomic Energy Agency. The management system...GS-R-3. 5 Internatinal Atomic Energy Agency. Application of the......

R. Martín; T. Navarro; A. M. Romero; M. A. López

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A landscape approach to sustainable forest management and habitat quality modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A landscape approach to sustainable forest management and habitat quality modelling Luque, S.(1) (1.luque@cemagref.fr ABSTRACT This work provides views and examples on how the holistic approach of landscape ecology can to be met by forest landscape managers. This is particular challenging nowadays because of the increasing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

102

Quality of Interaction for Sensor Network Energy-Efficient Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......18. IEEE, New York. The Computer...Sensor Network Energy-Efficient Management...295304. IEEE, New York. [19] Natu...a hybrid, energy-efficient...2005) An Energy-Efficient Unequal...597604. IEEE, New York. [23] Couto......

Wei Gong; Kebin Liu; Xiaoxu Li; Xin Miao; Tong Zhu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC : evaluation and selection of tools for the quality environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Nuclear Waste Management Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. These M&S capabilities are to be managed, verified, and validated within the NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC quality environment. M&S capabilities and the supporting analysis workflow and simulation data management tools will be distributed to end-users from this same quality environment. The same analysis workflow and simulation data management tools that are to be distributed to end-users will be used for verification and validation (V&V) activities within the quality environment. This strategic decision reduces the number of tools to be supported, and increases the quality of tools distributed to end users due to rigorous use by V&V activities. This report documents an evaluation of the needs, options, and tools selected for the NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC quality environment. The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Nuclear Waste Management Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC) program element is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to assess quantitatively the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. This objective will be fulfilled by acquiring and developing M&S capabilities, and establishing a defensible level of confidence in these M&S capabilities. The foundation for assessing the level of confidence is based upon the rigor and results from verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification (V&V and UQ) activities. M&S capabilities are to be managed, verified, and validated within the NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC quality environment. M&S capabilities and the supporting analysis workflow and simulation data management tools will be distributed to end-users from this same quality environment. The same analysis workflow and simulation data management tools that are to be distributed to end-users will be used for verification and validation (V&V) activities within the quality environment. This strategic decision reduces the number of tools to be supported, and increases the quality of tools distributed to end users due to rigorous use by V&V activities. NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC V&V and UQ practices and evidence management goals are documented in the V&V Plan. This V&V plan includes a description of the quality environment into which M&S capabilities are imported and V&V and UQ activities are managed. The first phase of implementing the V&V plan is to deploy an initial quality environment through the acquisition and integration of a set of software tools. An evaluation of the needs, options, and tools selected for the quality environment is given in this report.

Bouchard, Julie F.; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Vigil, Dena M.; Edwards, Harold Carter (Org. 1444 : Multiphysics Simulation Technology)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Total quality management in the civil engineering consultancy industry in South Africa / Danie Van Rensburg Botha.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Consulting Engineers worldwide, and in South Africa, render a professional service to clients consisting of project feasibility studies, planning reports, design, documentation and construction monitoring… (more)

Botha, Danie Van Rensburg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

User Information for the NARSTO Quality Management Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/NARSTO/ ). Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. NARSTO Quality Planning Handbook (ORNL/CDIAC-111 Systems Science Center) (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/NARSTO/ ). Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Center) (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/NARSTO/ ). Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA

106

Quality Management 09/15/08 INMGT 325 001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Quality by Evans and Lindsay 6th edition ISO 9001 Requirements: 92 Requirements Checklist and Compliance to assure customer satisfaction of product and/or service. An introduction to the ISO 9000. · Be knowledgeable about ISO 9000:2000 to the extent that you can become a significant asset to a firm either

Wu, Mingshen

107

Quality management systems in tourism companies: the case of travel agencies in Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For best practices, a tourism company needs to establish its own quality management system to help in comparing (benchmarking) the tourism company to its competitors and, if necessary (in most cases), differentiate it from others. Quality Management Systems (QMSs) offer a unique and original experience to the visitor and ensure his satisfaction and loyalty. This paper tries to provide an overview of the importance of QMSs to the tourism business sector and examines the degree to which there is an approach for quality measurement in the Egyptian tourism companies/travel agencies. The data of the research has been collected through questionnaires distributed to tourism managers in the Egyptian tourism companies/travel agencies. Out of the 150 randomly selected tourism companies, 50 fully completed and returned the questionnaire forms yielding a relatively satisfied response rate of 33%. The paper findings explain that Egyptian tourism companies do not have any of Quality Management (QM) approach and they do not have a clear system for quality control and/or quality assurance.

Mohammed I. Eraqi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Association between Postdiagnosis Dietary Supplement Use and Total Mortality Differs by Diet Quality among Older Female Cancer Survivors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...730: A prototype device for quality control of cancer specimens...A Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based SPTAN1...platform dedicated to specimen quality control. This foundational...Vortmeyer. A prototype device for quality control of cancer specimens...

Maki Inoue-Choi; Heather Greenlee; Sarah J. Oppeneer; and Kim Robien

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A congestion sensitive approach to modelling road networks for air quality management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research establishes an approach to modelling a congested road network for air quality management, which enables the assessment of traffic management solutions that may create only subtle changes in the traffic flow regimes. Road network emissions have been calculated using standard factors taking into account details of vehicle fleet composition, average speeds and road type. Additionally, the use of microsimulation traffic modelling in conjunction with an instantaneous emissions model (IEM) has been adopted to allow comparison between methodologies and enable congestion sensitive analysis of the impact of air quality management measures on the network. Findings from microscale modelling have revealed that the use of an IEM to calculate emissions as an input for air quality dispersion modelling significantly improved the performance of the dispersion modelling when measured against monitored data. Moreover, this methodology has been successfully applied to assess the performance of a traffic scheme in Durham, UK.

James O'Brien; Anil Namdeo; Margaret Bell; Paul Goodman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Application of Specialized Optimization Techniques in Water Quantity and Quality Management with Respect to Planning for the Trinity River Basi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the disposal of wastes. Thus, there is a clear interaction between quantity and quality of water. However, largely due to the agency structure in state and federal government, water quality management and water development activities are usually separated...

Meier Jr., W. L.; Shih, C. S.

111

Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) Quality Assurance Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) is to provide technical and integration support to Fluor Hanford, Inc., including operable unit investigations at 300-FF-5 and other groundwater operable units, strategic integration, technical integration and assessments, remediation decision support, and science and technology. This Quality Assurance Management Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project).

Fix, N. J.

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

112

IS&JCH040325 Software Engineering. Chapter 24 Slide 0 of 54 Quality Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISO 9001 Management responsibility Quality system Control of non-conforming products Design control to service industries ISO 9001 applicable to organizations which design, develop and maintain products ISO Software Engineering. Chapter 24 Slide 10 of 54 Areas covered by ISO 9001 Statistical techniques

Huang, Jung-Chang

113

SEISMIC IMAGING TO HELP UNDERSTAND AND MANAGE WATER QUALITY IN COASTAL BENIN, WEST AFRICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC IMAGING TO HELP UNDERSTAND AND MANAGE WATER QUALITY IN COASTAL BENIN, WEST AFRICA WHERE: B of this lake city and the fact that the lake is heavily relied upon for fishing has resulted in severe manipulation of the lake for waste disposal, navigation and fish farming. The continuity of the aquifer

Barrash, Warren

114

Report of the Review of the Hanford Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement regarding Data Quality Control and Management Issues  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Review of the Hanford Review of the Hanford Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Data Quality, Control and Management Issues January 2006 Hanford Solid Waste Environment Impact Statement (EIS) Data Quality, Control and Management Issues Review Report ii Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................. IV 1.0 BACKGROUND ................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 REVIEW APPROACH....................................................................................................... 1 3.0 SUMMARY........................................................................................................................ 2 4.0 REVIEW RESULTS........................................................................................................... 4

115

Quality Managment Program (QMP) report: A review of quality management programs developed in response to Title 10, Section 35.32 of the Code of Federal Regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In July of 1991, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission published a Final Rule in the Federal Register amending regulations governing medical therapeutic administrations of byproduct material and certain uses of radioactive sodium iodide. These amendments required implementation of a Quality Management Program (QMP) to provide high confidence that the byproduct material -- or radiation from byproduct material -- will be administered as directed by an authorized user physician. Herein, this rule is referred to as the QM rule. The Final Rule was published after two proposed rules had been published in the Federal Register.

Witte, M.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

85Kr management trade-offs: a perspective to total radiation dose commitment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiological consequences arising from the trade-offs for /sup 85/Kr waste management from possible nuclear fuel resource recovery activities have been investigated. The reference management technique is to release all the waste gas to the atmosphere where it is diluted and dispersed. A potential alternative is to collect, concentrate, package and submit the gas to long-term storage. This study compares the radiation dose commitment to the public and to the occupationally exposed work force from these alternatives. The results indicate that it makes little difference to the magnitude of the world population dose whether /sup 85/Kr is captured and stored or chronically released to the environment. Further, comparisons of radiation exposures (for the purpose of estimating health effects) at very low dose rates to very large populations with exposures to a small number of occupationally exposed workers who each receive much higher dose rates may be misleading. Finally, cost studies (EPA 1976 and DOE 1979a) show that inordinate amounts of money will be required to lower this already extremely small 80-year cumulative world population dose of 0.05 mrem/person (<0.001% of natural background radiation for the same time period).

Mellinger, P.J.; Hoenes, G.R.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Greenborg, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 66 (2014) Total Color and Total Alkalinity Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equivalent to FDEP's, which were collected using stringent quality assurance (QA rule. (For more information on this study go to the LAKEWATCH website

Jawitz, James W.

118

A modeling approach to evaluate the impacts of water quality management plans implemented in a watershed in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

best management practices (BMPs) have been implemented through Water Quality Management Plans (WQMPs; Best management practices Software availability Name of the software: Soil and Water Assessment Tool. doi:10.1016/j.envsoft.2005.05.013 www.elsevier.com/locate/envsoft Environmental Modelling & Software

119

Ceramic fabricator quality revolution: A case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This case study discusses statistical process control and other quality tools in the application of continuous improvement and total quality management programs to a mature ceramic parts manufacturing operation that had been producing quality'' products for many years. By applying these tools, significant incremental improvements in process performance and product quality were achieved.

Martin, S.C. (Advanced Refractory Technologies, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

71.3 - Data Reporting ¬タモ Quality Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

71.3 (May 2011) 71.3 (May 2011) 1 Data Reporting - Quality Management References Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 4.6 - Contract Reporting Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) Guidance - Improving Acquisition Data Quality for FY 2009 and 2010 Policy Flash 2010-82 - Subaward Reporting for Federal Funding and Transparency Act of 2006 (FFATA) Acquisition Guide Chapter 19.0 - Small Business Programs - An Overview Acquisition Guide Chapter 42.15 - Contractor Past Performance Information Acquisition Guide Chapter 42.16 - Reporting Other Contractor Information into Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System U.S. DOE Data Quality Plan Guiding Principle Procurement Directors are responsible for ensuring that their contracting staff complete all

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations prescribe the management of hazardous waste facilities in New York State. They identify and list different types of hazardous wastes and describe standards for generators, transporters, as well as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. The regulations also define specific types

122

FMEA as Design Monitor-, Regulation- and Management Tool Parallel to Product Design Cycle for an Optimised Quality Assurance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contents of this paper is that after an exact comparison of qualitative quality management methods you come to the conclusion that FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis) according ... be utilised to show the po...

Karsten Pickard; Peter Müller…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Standard Review Plan for Environmental Restoration Program Quality Management Plans. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Manual Environmental Restoration Program Quality System Requirements (QSR) for the Hanford Site, defines all quality requirements governing Hanford Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities. The QSR requires that ER Program participants develop Quality Management Plans (QMPs) that describe how the QSR requirements will be implemented for their assigned scopes of work. This standard review plan (SRP) describes the ER program participant responsibilities for submittal of QMPs to the RL Environmental Restoration Division for review and the RL methodology for performing the reviews of participant QMPS. The SRP serves the following functions: acts as a guide in the development or revision of QMPs to assure that the content is complete and adequate; acts as a checklist to be used by the RL staff in their review of participant QMPs; acts as an index or matrix between the requirements of the QSR and implementing methodologies described in the QMPs; decreases the time and subjectivity of document reviews; and provides a formal, documented method for describing exceptions, modifications, or waivers to established ER Program quality requirements.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Quality Assurance Management System Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830.120 and DOE O 414.1  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

DOE Elements and DOE contractors should consult this Guide in order to develop and implement effective management systems that are consistent with the Department's quality expectations and that support the Safety Management System Policy, DOE P 450.4. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2A. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

125

Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new approach to environmental decision support for salinity management in the San Joaquin Basin of California that focuses on web-based data sharing using YSI Econet technology and continuous data quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Holm, L.

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

126

Two-stage fuzzy-stochastic robust programming: a hybrid model for regional air quality management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, a hybrid two-stage fuzzy-stochastic robust programming (TFSRP) model is developed and applied to the planning of an air-quality management system. As an extension of existing fuzzy-robust programming and two stage stochastic programming methods, the TFSRP can explicitly address complexities and uncertainties of the study system without unrealistic simplifications. Uncertain parameters can be expressed as probability density and/or fuzzy membership functions, such that robustness of the optimization efforts can be enhanced. Moreover, economic penalties as corrective measures against any infeasibilities arising from the uncertainties are taken into account. This method can, thus, provide a linkage to predefined policies determined by authorities that have to be respected when a modeling effort is undertaken. In its solution algorithm, the fuzzy decision space can be delimited through specification of the uncertainties using dimensional enlargement of the original fuzzy constraints. The developed model is applied to a case study of regional air quality management at two coal-fired power plants considered as major sulfur dioxide emission sources. The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been obtained. The solutions can be used for further generating pollution-mitigation alternatives with minimized system costs and for providing a more solid support for sound environmental decisions. 61 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Yongping Li; Guo H. Huang; Amornvadee Veawab; Xianghui Nie; Lei Liu [University of Regina, Regina, SK (Canada). Environmental Systems Engineering Program

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Temperature management for the quality assurance of a perishable food supply chain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Compared to most product supply chains, food supply chains are often more complex and more difficult to manage because the food product is perishable and has a short shelf life. A cold chain or temperature-controlled supply chain provides the essential facilities and methods required to maintain the quality and quantity of foods. Since foods can be time and temperature sensitive in nature, they need to be properly taken care of in terms of harvesting, preparation, packaging, transportation and handling – in other words, throughout the entire chain. Temperature is the most important factor in prolonging or maintaining the shelf life of perishables. Refrigeration is one of most widely used methods to date to slow the bacteria growth that leads to food deterioration. The proper control and management of temperature is crucial in delivering perishables to consumers and ensuring that those perishables are in good condition and safe to eat. This paper addresses the methods used to improve the ability to define an optimal target temperature for multi-commodity refrigerated storage. Simulation results support the fact that the presented methods provide more accurate results compared to the conventional method. In addition, an experiment with a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) was conducted. As a result, the sensor-based methods for real time quality monitoring and assessment that consider product metabolism and Euclidean distance cost depending on temperature changes are found to be superior to the traditional visual assessment method.

Myo Min Aung; Yoon Seok Chang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Frey, H.C., and B. Hubbell, "A Risk-based Assessment And Management Framework For Multipollutant Air Quality," Paper 2009-A-235-AWMA, Proceedings, 102nd Annual Conference and Exhibition, Air & Waste Management Association, Detroit,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Quality," Paper 2009-A-235-AWMA, Proceedings, 102nd Annual Conference and Exhibition, Air & Waste For Multipollutant Air Quality Paper 2009-A-235-AWMA H. Christopher Frey Department of Civil, Construction approach to air quality management. Specifically, management decisions should be based on minimizing

Frey, H. Christopher

129

Interplay effects between dose distribution quality and positioning accuracy in total marrow irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric consequences of inaccurate isocenter positioning during treatment of total marrow (lymph-node) irradiation (TMI-TMLI) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT).Methods: Four patients treated with TMI and TMLI were randomly selected from the internal database. Plans were optimized with VMAT technique. Planning target volume (PTV) included all the body bones; for TMLI, lymph nodes and spleen were considered into the target, too. Dose prescription to PTV was 12 Gy in six fractions, two times per day for TMI, and 2 Gy in single fraction for TMLI. Ten arcs on five isocenters (two arcs for isocenter) were used to cover the upper part of PTV (i.e., from cranium to middle femurs). For each plan, three series of random shifts with values between ?3 and +3 mm and three between ?5 and +5 mm were applied to the five isocenters simulating involuntary patient motion during treatment. The shifts were applied separately in the three directions: left–right (L-R), anterior–posterior (A-P), and cranial–caudal (C-C). The worst case scenario with simultaneous random shifts in all directions simultaneously was considered too. Doses were recalculated for the 96 shifted plans (24 for each patient).Results: For all shifts, differences <0.5% were found for mean doses to PTV, body, and organs at risk with volumes >100 cm{sup 3}. Maximum doses increased up to 15% for C-C shifted plans. PTV covered by the 95% isodose decreased of 2%–8% revealing target underdosage with the highest values in C-C direction.Conclusions: The correct isocenter repositioning of TMI-TMLI patients is fundamental, in particular in C-C direction, in order to avoid over- and underdosages especially in the overlap regions. For this reason, a dedicated immobilization system was developed in the authors' center to best immobilize the patient.

Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Reggiori, Giacomo; Tomatis, Stefano; Alongi, Filippo; Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiation Oncology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Milan 20089 (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Milan 20089 (Italy); Castagna, Luca; Sarina, Barbara [Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Milan 20089 (Italy)] [Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Milan 20089 (Italy); Nicolini, Giorgia; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona 6500 (Switzerland)] [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona 6500 (Switzerland)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Effects of Forest Management on Total Biomass Production and CO2 Emissions from use of Energy Biomass of Norway Spruce and Scots Pine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of forest management on the total biomass production (t ha-1a-1) and CO2 emissions (kg CO2 MWh-1) from use of energy biomass of Norway spruce and Scots pine grown ...

Johanna Routa; Seppo Kellomäki; Harri Strandman

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Non-adaptive and adaptive hybrid approaches for enhancing water quality management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Using optimization to help solve groundwater management problems cost-effectively is becoming increasingly important. Hybrid optimization approaches, that combine two or more optimization algorithms, will become valuable and common tools for addressing complex nonlinear hydrologic problems. Hybrid heuristic optimizers have capabilities far beyond those of a simple genetic algorithm (SGA), and are continuously improving. \\{SGAs\\} having only parent selection, crossover, and mutation are inefficient and rarely used for optimizing contaminant transport management. Even an advanced genetic algorithm (AGA) that includes elitism (to emphasize using the best strategies as parents) and healing (to help assure optimal strategy feasibility) is undesirably inefficient. Much more efficient than an AGA is the presented hybrid (AGCT), which adds comprehensive tabu search (TS) features to an AGA. TS mechanisms (TS probability, tabu list size, search coarseness and solution space size, and a TS threshold value) force the optimizer to search portions of the solution space that yield superior pumping strategies, and to avoid reproducing similar or inferior strategies. An AGCT characteristic is that TS control parameters are unchanging during optimization. However, TS parameter values that are ideal for optimization commencement can be undesirable when nearing assumed global optimality. The second presented hybrid, termed global converger (GC), is significantly better than the AGCT. GC includes AGCT plus feedback-driven auto-adaptive control that dynamically changes TS parameters during run-time. Before comparing AGCT and GC, we empirically derived scaled dimensionless TS control parameter guidelines by evaluating 50 sets of parameter values for a hypothetical optimization problem. For the hypothetical area, AGCT optimized both well locations and pumping rates. The parameters are useful starting values because using trial-and-error to identify an ideal combination of control parameter values for a new optimization problem can be time consuming. For comparison, AGA, AGCT, and GC are applied to optimize pumping rates for assumed well locations of a complex large-scale contaminant transport and remediation optimization problem at Blaine Naval Ammunition Depot (NAD). Both hybrid approaches converged more closely to the optimal solution than the non-hybrid AGA. GC averaged 18.79% better convergence than AGCT, and 31.9% than AGA, within the same computation time (12.5 days). AGCT averaged 13.1% better convergence than AGA. The GC can significantly reduce the burden of employing computationally intensive hydrologic simulation models within a limited time period and for real-world optimization problems. Although demonstrated for a groundwater quality problem, it is also applicable to other arenas, such as managing salt water intrusion and surface water contaminant loading.

Ineke M. Kalwij; Richard C. Peralta

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality management Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problems. 12;... Learn More: www.arl.noaa.gov 17 A Breath of Fresh Air: Improving Air Quality Predictions... hazards. For example, air quality forecasters rely on HySPLIT...

133

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and 5) consistency with the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act. In addition, the management plan Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have

134

Groundwater quality assessment plan for single-shell waste management area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a first determination groundwater quality assessment at the Hanford Site. This work was performed for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement during the time period 1996--1998. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if waste from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY had entered the groundwater at levels above the drinking water standards (DWS). The resulting assessment report documented evidence demonstrating that waste from the WMA has, most likely, impacted groundwater quality. Based on 40 CFR 265.93 [d] paragraph (7), the owner-operator must continue to make the minimum required determinations of contaminant level and of rate/extent of migrations on a quarterly basis until final facility closure. These continued determinations are required because the groundwater quality assessment was implemented prior to final closure of the facility.

SM Narbutovskih

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Data quality assurance controls through the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) In Situ Data Acquisition, Analysis, and Management System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assurance of data quality for the in situ tests fielded at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is of critical importance. These tests supply the information for development and verification of the technology required for construction of a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. The tests are some of the largest ever fielded in an underground facility. To assure that the extensive output generated by the tests is compatible with the high standards of quality required, a major project task was undertaken for the acquisition, control, and preservation of the all the associated in situ test databases, with the principal emphasis on the very large thermal/structural in situ tests. In order to accomplish this task the WIPP In Situ Data Acquisition, Analysis, and Management (WISDAAM) System was put into place. The system provides for quality control of the test databases and certified test data throughout the duration of the tests. 13 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Munson, D.E. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Ball, J.R. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Jones, R.L. (Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and empirical modeling. First, a simple conceptual model of land allocation and management is used to illustrate how bioenergy policies and GHG mitigation incentives could influence market prices, shift the land supply between alternative uses, alter management...

Baker, Justin Scott

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

137

Optimal water quality management in surface water systems and energy recovery in water distribution networks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Two of the most important environmental challenges in the 21st century are to protect the quality of fresh water resources and to utilize renewable energy… (more)

Telci, Ilker Tonguc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Screening Technique for Joint Chance-Constrained Programming for Air-Quality Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This technical note presents a screening technique for using chance-constrained programming to achieve overall system (i.e., joint) reliability when there is statistical dependence between constraints representing an ambient air-quality requirement at ... Keywords: air quality control, environment, joint chance constraint, programming

Hyunhee An; J. Wayland Eheart

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management quality assessment program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the soil inorganic analysis of the 45th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLV) that were received on or before December 2, 1996.

Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Demand Side Management using VOLTAGE / DISTRIBUTION OPTIMIZATION Quality improvement & Peak reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to improve the quality of the electrical energy delivered at consumer households a Voltage Optimization Device (VOD) is introduced in each household. This device controls the output voltage accurately at...

N. H. M. Hofmeester; C. J. van de Water

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 44th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIV) that were received on or before June 3, 1996. The QAP is designed to test the quality of environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by it`s contractors. Since 1976, samples have been prepared and analyzed by the Environmental measurements Laboratory.

Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Quality-functions for an uniform and comparable analysis of demand side management algorithms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to renewable energies, the feed-in to the power grid will fluctuate increasingly. As long as no highly efficient storage technology is found, the importance of demand side management (DSM) will grow. Differen...

Daniel Hölker; Daniel Brettschneider…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Water quantity and quality model for the evaluation of water-management strategies in the Netherlands: application to the province of Friesland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Netherlands have a rather complex water-management system consisting of a number of major rivers, canals, lakes and ditches. Water-quantity management on a regional scale is necessary for an effective water-quality policy. To support water management, a computer model was developed that includes both water quality and water quantity, based on three submodels: ABOPOL for the water movement, DELWAQ for the calculation of water quality variables and BLOOM-II for the phytoplankton growth. The northern province of Friesland was chosen as a test case for the integrated model to be developed, where water quality is highly related to the water distribution and the main trade-off is minimizing the intake of (eutrophicated) alien water in order to minimize external nutrient load and maximizing the intake in order to flush channels and lakes. The results of the application of these models to this and to a number of hypothetical future situations are described.

Brinkman, J.J.; Griffioen, P.S.; Groot, S.; Los, F.J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Quality Hardware and Machine Co - IL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quality Hardware and Machine Co - Quality Hardware and Machine Co - IL 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: QUALITY HARDWARE AND MACHINE CO. (IL.11) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Ravenswood Venture Marden Manufacturing Co. IL.11-1 IL.11-2 Location: 5823/5849 North Ravenswood Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.11-3 Evaluation Year: 1990 IL.11-4 IL.11-5 Site Operations: From 1944 to 1945, entered into subcontracts with the University of Chicago to furnish personnel, facilities, and equipment to produce special tools, dies, fixtures, etc., from materials furnished by the University; was involved in the Hanford slug canning process. IL.11-10 IL.11-6 IL.11-7 IL.11-8 IL.11-9 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria IL.11-11

145

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 43rd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIII) that were received on or before December 1, 1995. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 2 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 42st set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLII) that were received on or before June 1, 1995. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 2 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.; Pan, V.

1995-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

147

Multi-level feedback control for Quality of Service Management Tommaso Cucinotta, Giuseppe Lipari  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Palopoli and Luca Abeni are with Universit`a di Trento, Trento, Italy §Rodrigo Santos is with Universidad {t.cucinotta, g.lipari}@sssup.it Luigi Palopoli, Luca Abeni {l.palopoli, l.abeni}@unitn.it Rodrigo Santos§ ierms@criba.edu.ar Abstract We consider the problem of power-aware Quality of Ser- vice (Qo

Lipari, Giuseppe

148

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Quality Management System Guidelines  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

management system tools customized for residential construction management system tools customized for residential construction are ready for use by builders, trades, and designers to help eliminate mistakes that would require high-cost rework. Unlike many manufacturing industries, home construction is usually accomplished through the cooperation of several businesses, including the designer; the architect; the builder; site supervisors; HVAC, plumbing, electrical, framing, roofing, insulation and other contractors; manufacturers and suppliers of materials and components, code inspectors, Home Energy Rating System (HERS) raters, and mortgage lenders. Historically, relationships in the residential construction industry are adversarial, with multiple disconnects and conflicts among the builder, subcontractors, material and product suppliers, and manufacturers.

149

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Quality Management System Guidelines  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management System tools customized for residential construction Management System tools customized for residential construction are ready for use by builders, trades, and designers to help eliminate mistakes that would require high-cost rework. Unlike many manufacturing industries, home construction is usually accomplished through the cooperation of several businesses, including the designer; the architect; the builder; site supervisors; HVAC, plumbing, electrical, framing, roofing, insulation and other contractors; manufacturers and suppliers of materials and components, code inspectors, Home Energy Rating System (HERS) raters, and mortgage lenders. Historically, relationships in the residential construction industry are adversarial, with multiple disconnects and conflicts among the builder, subcontractors, material and product suppliers, and manufacturers.

150

From Chemical Risk Assessment to Environmental Quality Management: The Challenge for Soil Protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the 1960s there was considerable investment in wastewater treatment, and 1965 saw the first explicit national policy for water pollution prevention and control. ... Rothstein, H.; Irving, P.; Walden, T.; Yearsley, R. The risks of risk-based regulation: Insights from the environmental policy domain Environ. ... Risk assessment tools used in soil quality assessment include both political and scientific elements, which are often interwoven. ...

James Bone; Martin Head; David T. Jones; Declan Barraclough; Michael Archer; Catherine Scheib; Dee Flight; Paul Eggleton; Nikolaos Voulvoulis

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Energy-Navigator -A Web Based Platform for Quality Management in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design, Braunschweig University of Technology, Germany {fisch, plesser}@igs.bau.tu-bs.de http://www.igs.bau.tu-bs.de 2 Software Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Germany {pinkernell, kurpick, rumpe}@se-rwth.de http://www.se-rwth.de 3... synavision GmbH, Aachen, Germany {pinkernell, plesser}@synavision.de http://www.synavision.de ABSTRACT Energy efficient buildings require high quality standards for all their technical equipment to enable their efficient and successful operation...

Plesser, S. Pinkernell, C.; Fisch, N.; Rumpe, B.; Kurpick, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Quality Assurance Corporate Board | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Assurance Quality Assurance Corporate Board Quality Assurance Corporate Board The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance Corporate Board is an...

153

Integration of hydrogen management in refinery planning with rigorous process models and product quality specifications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New trends of increased heavy crude markets and clean-fuel legislation, to produce ultra low-sulphur (ULS) gasoline and diesel fuels, are forcing refineries to increase their consumption of hydrogen. This critical situation raises the need to have a tool for operating refineries with flexibility and profitability. This paper addresses the planning of refinery with consideration to hydrogen availability. A systematic method for integrating a hydrogen management strategy within a rigorous refinery planning model is undertaken. The presented model consists of two main building blocks: a set of non-linear processing units' models and a hydrogen balance framework. The two blocks are integrated to produce a refinery-wide planning model with hydrogen management. The hydrogen management alternatives were determined by economic analysis. The proposed model improves the hidden hydrogen unavailability that prevents refineries from achieving their maximum production and profit. The model is illustrated on representative case studies and the results are discussed. It was found that an additional annual profit equivalent to $7 million could be achieved with a one-time investment of $13 million in a new purification unit.

Ali Elkamel; Ibrahim Alhajri; A. Almansoori; Yousef Saif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A Precision Agriculture Approach to Managing Cotton Fiber Quality as a Function of Variable Soil Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. After ginning, the lint was weighed and the bulk samples of lint were sub-sampled for 0.15 kg of lint (according to testing facility requirements). These samples were tested at the International Textile Center (Lubbock, TX) in 2006 and at Cotton... Incorporated (Cary, NC) in 2007. These samples were High Volume Instrument (HVI) tested for lint quality. The boxmapped cotton samples were weighed and sub sampled to 0.005 kg (according to testing facility requirements). These samples were Advanced Fiber...

Stanislav, Scott

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

155

Quality Assurance: Quality Policy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Policy Policy It is the policy of the Department of Energy to establish quality requirements to ensure that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks posed by the facility or activity and its work. The Department implements this policy through the QA Order and the QA rule directives to ensure quality assurance requirements are clearly specified for the broad spectrum of work performed by DOE and its contractors. Objective The objective of the QA requirements are to establish an effective management system (i.e., quality assurance programs) using the performance requirements coupled technical standards where appropriate that ensure:

156

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

157

Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish an effective management system [i.e., quality assurance programs (QAPs)] using the performance requirements of this Order, coupled with technical standards where appropriate. Cancels DOE O 414.1.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

159

The University's approach to quality management The University of Bath has a reputation for excellence as a result of sustained success in learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

representatives, the outcomes of the University's routine quality management processes, and good practice for excellence as a result of sustained success in learning and teaching and research over a number of years to make the case for a particular approach to learning and teaching, or it can be about drawing upon

Burton, Geoffrey R.

160

texas water resources institute Water management is one of the most significant challenges facing Texas today. Major water quantity and water quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

texas water resources institute Water management is one of the most significant challenges facing Texas today. Major water quantity and water quality problems exist, affecting the environment and economy. Texas needs solutions. At the Texas Water Resources Institute, we help solve these pressing water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

162

Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

QUALITY ASSURANCE IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE has established Quality Policy, Principles and Value Added Requirement Attributes that apply to all work and are focused on performance, customer expectations, and improvement. When properly implemented, the principles and requirements form a management system to plan, perform, assess, and improve work. The requirements are performance oriented and offer unlimited implementation flexibility.

163

Quantifying And Predicting Wood Quality Of Loblolly And Slash Pine Under Intensive Forest Management Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The forest industry will increasingly rely on fast-growing intensively managed southern pine plantations to furnish wood and fiber. Intensive silvicultural practices, including competition control, stand density control, fertilization, and genetic improvement are yielding tremendous gains in the quantity of wood production from commercial forest land. How these technologies affect wood properties was heretofore unknown, although there is concern about the suitability of fast-grown wood for traditional forest products. A four year study was undertaken to examine the effects of these intensive practices on the properties of loblolly and slash pine wood by applying a common sampling method over 10 existing field experiments. Early weed control gets young pines off to a rapid start, often with dramatically increased growth rates. This response is all in juvenile wood however, which is low in density and strength. Similar results are found with early Nitrogen fertilization at the time of planting. These treatments increase the proportion of juvenile wood in the tree. Later, mid-rotation fertilization with Nitrogen and Phosphorus can have long term (4-8 year) growth gains. Slight reductions in wood density are short-lived (1-2 years) and occur while the tree is producing dense, stiff mature wood. Impacts of mid-rotation fertilization on wood properties for manufacturing are estimated to be minimal. Genetic differences are evident in wood density and other properties. Single family plantings showed somewhat more uniform properties than bulk improved or unimproved seedlots. Selection of genetic sources with optimal wood properties may counter some of the negative impacts of intensive weed control and fertilization. This work will allow forest managers to better predict the effects of their practices on the quality of their final product.

Richard F. Daniels; Alexander Clark III

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

164

Quality Assurance: Underlying Quality Principles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Underlying Quality Principles Underlying Quality Principles These principles are consistent with Integrated Safety Management Policy, P 450.4A and support ISM implementation. Define Policies and Objectives--Ensure they are Understood and Accepted. Management must set expectations for the organization as a whole before employees can do their jobs, satisfy their customers, and strive to improve the quality of their work. This is accomplished by developing and implementing specific policies and objectives that reflect the operating philosophy of the facility's management. Once these policies and objectives have been established, all managers must take the necessary actions to ensure that each employee shares their vision of the organization's purpose. Specify Roles and Responsibilities--Ensure they are Understood and Accepted.

165

21 briefing pages total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

166

management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5%2A en Management and Budget http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsmanagementandbudget

P...

167

Surface Water Quality Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURFACE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS AAs part of the ongoing program to manage Texaswater quality, the Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality (TCEQ) is currently review- ing the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards, including the standards... for contact recreation use. Preliminary public comment plus input from the Surface Water Quality Standards Advisory Work Group have provided guidance on options available for revising the standards, said Jim Davenport, leader of the TCEQ Water Quality...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

ARM - Data Quality Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quality Program Quality Program DQ Resources Data Quality Assessment and Control Report (PDF, 747KB) Data Quality Office Data Quality Problem Reporting (DQPR) Contact Us Submit Data Quality Findings Randy Peppler, Data Quality Manager Ken Kehoe, Data Quality Specialist Justin Monroe, Data Quality Specialist Adam Theisen, Data Quality Specialist Sean Moore, Data Quality Consultant Instrument and Site Contacts Instrument Mentors AAF Contacts AMF Contacts NSA Site Contacts SGP Site Contacts TWP Site Contacts Data Quality Program Introduction One of the goals of the ARM Climate Research Facility is to provide datastreams of quality suitable for scientific research. Maintaining data quality for an organization program of the size and complexity of the ARM Facility is a significant challenge; efforts toward this end have matured

169

Quality Policy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Quality Policy It is the policy of the Department of Energy to establish quality requirements to ensure that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks posed by the facility or activity and its work. The Department implements this policy through the QA Order and the QA rule directives to ensure quality assurance requirements are clearly specified for the broad spectrum of work performed by DOE and its contractors.

170

Quality management organisation, validation of standards, developments and inquiries for solid-recovered fuels—An overview on the QUOVADIS-Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waste-to-energy solid-recovered fuels (SRFs) are prepared from non-hazardous waste. Their use is regulated under European Union (EU) legislation and requires specifications for commercial or regulatory purposes. \\{SRFs\\} are seen as important contributors to a sustainable EU waste management. Directive 2001/77/EC includes in its scope the production of electricity from biomass, being defined as the biodegradable fraction of products, waste and residues from agriculture, forestry and related industries, as well as the biodegradable fraction of industrial and municipal waste. In this context, the European Commission (EC) gave a mandate to the European Committee for Standardisation (CEN) to develop and validate Technical Specification (TS) concerning SRF for energy recovery and to transform these TS into European Standards. To meet these requests, a holistic validation programme covering quality management and the validation exercises for the pre-standards of CEN's Technical Committee on Solid Recovered Fuels (CEN TC 343) was designed and carried out by various members of CEN TC 343, interested non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and the EC's Joint Research Centre (JRC). This paper gives an overview about the validation programme called QUOVADIS (from \\{QUality\\} Management Organisation, \\{VAlidation\\} of Standards, Developments and Inquiries for Solid-Recovered Fuels) and the partnership behind it, and highlights some particular aspects in performing the necessary validation work.

Bernd Manfred Gawlik; Elzbieta Sobiecka; Stefano Vaccaro; Giovanni Ciceri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

Quinn, N.W.T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quality plan describes the system used by Characterization Project management to achieve quality. This plan is comprised of eleven quality policies which, when taken together, form a management system deployed to achieve quality. This quality management system is based on the customer`s quality requirements known as the `RULE`, 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance.

Board, D.C.

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

173

Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quality plan describes the system used by Characterization Project management to achieve quality. This plan is comprised on eleven quality policies which, when taken together, form a management system deployed to achieve quality. This quality management system is based on the customer`s quality requirements known as the `RULE`, 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance.

Trible, T.C., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Engagement with Social Media Platforms via Mobile Apps for Improving Quality of Personal Health Management: A Healthcare Analytics Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Patient engagement in self health and wellness management has been identified as an important goal in improving health outcomes. As a result, the use of mobile and social media for health and wellness promotion is gathering considerable momentum. Several ... Keywords: Consumer Segmentation, Health Plan, Health and Wellness Management, Mobile Apps, Predictive Models, Social Media

Sinjini Mitra, Rema Padman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water QualityManagement for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration Program (SJRRP) has recognized the potential importance of real-time monitoring and management to the success of the San Joaquin River (SJR) restoration endeavor. The first step to realizing making real-time management a reality on the middle San Joaquin River between Friant Dam and the Merced River will be the installation and operation of a network of permanent telemetered gauging stations that will allow optimization of reservoir releases made specifically for fish water temperature management. Given the limited reservoir storage volume available to the SJJRP, this functionality will allow the development of an adaptive management program, similar in concept to the VAMP though with different objectives. The virtue of this approach is that as management of the middle SJR becomes more routine, additional sensors can be added to the sensor network, initially deployed, to continue to improve conditions for anadromous fish.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

Systems Approach for Safe Handling and Quality Assurance in Waste Management: Conditioning, Transport, Storage, Disposal and Safeguards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thus, waste product and canister quality assurance measures must be oriented towards criteria derived from their overall safety assessments. The most stringent requirements originate from long-term safety aspects...

E. R. Merz

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Proposal for a Guide for Quality Management Systems for PV Manufacturing: Supplemental Requirements to ISO 9001-2008 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical specification provides a guideline for photovoltaic module manufacturers to produce modules that, once the design has proven to meet the quality and reliability requirements, replicate such design in an industrial scale without compromising its consistency with the requirements.

Norum, P.; Sinicco, I.; Eguchi, Y.; Lokanath, S.; Zhou, W.; Brueggemann, G.; Mikonowicz, A.; Yamamichi, M.; Kurtz, S.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Do individual characteristics matter? The quality of work during the implementation of a workflow management system in a Dutch social insurance company  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Do individual characteristics influence how the quality of work is related to the use of a workflow management system (WFM) in a Dutch social insurance organisation? This key question is addressed in this paper. Building upon DeLone and McLean's model, we investigated the effects of gender, age, education, system experience and computer skills on the relationship between the level of user satisfaction with a WFM system and the perceived quality of work. The expected effects of individual characteristics were tested using survey data collected from 143 end users of a large Dutch social insurance organisation that recently deployed a WFM system. The results of the regression analysis show that: 1) user satisfaction has a positive relationship with quality of work; 2) age has a significant moderating influence on the perceived quality of work; 3) gender and system experience have no moderating effects; 4) education and system computer skills (as individual characteristics) had a degree of moderating effects. These results imply that it is valuable to focus on older employees when deploying information technology as WFM systems, i.e., by improving their computer skills in particular.

Benny M.E. De Waal; Paul Breman; Ronald Batenburg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Software Quality Assurance Plan for GoldSim Models Supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites Performance Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the development and maintenance of GoldSim models supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). Two PA models have been approved by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as of November 2006 for the PA maintenance work undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). NNSA/NSO asked NSTec to assume the custodianship of the models for future development and maintenance. The models were initially developed by Neptune and Company (N&C).

Gregory J. Shott, Vefa Yucel

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 36th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP 36) that were received on or before January 2, 1992. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are complied with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

Sanderson, C.G.; Scarpitta, S.C.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 36th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP 36) that were received on or before January 2, 1992. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are complied with EML's results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

Sanderson, C.G.; Scarpitta, S.C.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 38th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXXVIII) that were received on or before June 2, 1993.

Sanderson, C.G.; Klusek, C.S.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Lee Gilman, FULD Fellow Cohort II Efficacious Interventions for the Management of Delirium is a quality improvement (QI) project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and external to healthcare settings can affect quality of care. With rising costs of health care, an aging population, and health reform, we must design systems to minimize opportunities for causing patient harm a Family Nurse Practitioner engaged in clinical care, health education, and health promotion

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

185

Results of Phase I groundwater quality assessment for single-shell tank waste management areas T and TX-TY at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Phase I, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment for the Richland Field Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-RL) under the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (WMAs) T and TX-TY have impacted groundwater quality. Waste Management Areas T and TX-TY, located in the northern part of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, contain the 241-T, 241-TX, and 241-TY tank farms and ancillary waste systems. These two units are regulated under RCRA interim-status regulations (under 40 CFR 265.93) and were placed in assessment groundwater monitoring because of elevated specific conductance in downgradient wells. Anomalous concentrations of technetium-99, chromium, nitrate, iodine-129, and cobalt-60 also were observed in some downgradient wells. Phase I assessment, allowed under 40 CFR 265, provides the owner-operator of a facility with the opportunity to show that the observed contamination has a source other than the regulated unit. For this Phase I assessment, PNNL evaluated available information on groundwater chemistry and past waste management practices in the vicinity of WMAs T and TX-TY. Background contaminant concentrations in the vicinity of WMAs T and TX-TY are the result of several overlapping contaminant plumes resulting from past-practice waste disposal operations. This background has been used as baseline for determining potential WMA impacts on groundwater.

Hodges, F.N.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

187

Software Project Management and Quality Engineering Practices for Complex, Coupled Multiphysics, Massively Parallel Computational Simulations: Lessons Learned From ASCI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many institutions are now developing large-scale, complex, coupled multiphysics computational simulations for massively parallel platforms for the simulation of the performance of nuclear weapons and certification of the stockpile, and for research in ... Keywords: Software engineering, computational science, management, software project, validation, verification

D. E. Post; R. P. Kendall

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976. real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. This is the 42nd report of this program.

Sanderson, C.G.; Klusek, C.S.

1993-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976. real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. This is the 42nd report of this program.

Sanderson, C.G.; Klusek, C.S.

1993-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

190

Contacts for Information Collection Management | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Information Collection Management Contacts for Information Collection Management Information Collection Program, and Information Quality Guidelines Christina Rouleau, IM-23 Records...

191

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

192

NMMSS Software Quality Assurance Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NMMSS Software Quality Assurance Plan NMMSS Software Quality Assurance Plan The Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) for the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguard System...

193

Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish an effective management system [i.e., quality assurance programs(QAPs)] using the performance requirements of this Order, coupled with technical standards where appropriate. Change 1, dated 7/12/01, facilitates the Department's organizational transition necessitated by establishment of the NNSA. (Attachment 2 of this Order is canceled by DOE O 470.2B.) Cancels: DOE O 414.1

2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

194

Quality Assurance Checklist | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Quality Assurance Checklist Quality Assurance Checklist This checklist is intended to provide system owners, project managers and other information systems development and...

195

Line Management Perspective: Office of Environmental Management (EM)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Matthew Moury, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety, Security and Quality Programs, Office of Environmental Management. EFCOG Integrated Safety Management Work Planning and Control.

196

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

real-­?time  water  quality  management.     Environmental  real-­?time  water  quality  management.     Environmental  Management  of  Water  Quality  in  the  San   Joaquin  River.    California  Environmental  

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Characterization of contaminants in oil shale residuals and the potential for their management to meet environmental quality standards. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some general aspects of various oil shale processes developed for scale-up to commercial size modular units are described. The overall magnitude of an envisioned commercial shale oil operation and the magnitude of resulting potentially polluting residues in particular solid residues from retorting oil shale and associated operations and wastewater from retort streams and other sources are considered. The potential problems ensuing from self-oxidation of stockpiles of oil shale and from residual carbonaceous retorted oil shale disposed above ground and/or from in situ retorting operations are examined. Some methods for managing self-heating processes are suggested. The most plausible method of avoiding potential self-heating for retorted oil shale is to oxidize as much as possible of the organic carbon present by utilizing a process that will produce low carbon or carbon-free retorted oil shale residues. In the case of unretorted oil shale, the dimensions and shapes of the stockpiles should be designed such that heat build-up is eliminated or kept to a minimum.

Schmidt-Collerus, J.J.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Quality Assurance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assurance Assurance Quality Assurance QUALITY ASSURANCE IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE has established Quality Policy, Principles and Value Added Requirement Attributes that apply to all work and are focused on performance, customer expectations, and improvement. When properly implemented, the principles and requirements form a management system to plan, perform, assess, and improve work. The requirements are performance oriented and offer unlimited implementation flexibility. The DOE quality management system moves beyond the traditional quality assurance requirements that had become narrowly focused on safety systems, paper, compliance, and inspections. The management system is designed to link with an organization's strategic plan to support mission achievement and the

199

Science of the Total Environment 407: 1200-1205 (2009) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2008.07.029 1 Predicting soil quality indices with near infrared analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.07.029 1 Predicting soil quality indices with near infrared analysis in a wildfire chronosequence Lauric@cetiom.fr, Webpage: http://lauric.cecillon.free.fr/ Abstract We investigated the power of near infrared (NIR are involved, its implementation at the landscape scale remains too expensive and time consuming. Near infrared

Boyer, Edmond

200

NETL: Site Environmental Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Site Environmental Quality Site Environmental Quality About NETL Site Environmental Quality - Certified to ISO 14001:2004 Questions about NETL's Environment, Safety and Health Management System may be directed to Michael Monahan, 304-285-4408, michael.monahan@netl.doe.gov. NETL has implemented an Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Management System, based on DOE's Integrated Safety Management System, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14000 series, and the Occupational Health and Safety Assessment (OHSAS) 18000 series. While the original scope of the ES&H Management System included the Morgantown and Pittsburgh sites, in fiscal year 2010, the Albany site was incorporated into the existing ES&H Management System. In addition, all three sites underwent ISO 14001:2004 recertification audits and Morgantown and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ALLIANCE MANAGEMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last two decades, production and manufacturing management has rapidly adopted a range of new concepts: manufacturing strategy, focused factory, just-in-time manufacturing, concurrent engineering, total ...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Rangeland Resource Management for Texans: Total Resource Management (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

animales (ganado, fauna silvestre) ? recursos financieros ? recursos humanos ? recursos f?sicos (edificios, corrales, pozos de agua) Entonces prepare inventarios m?s espec?ficos de los recursos que apoyar?an a las empresas individuales. Paso 3. Escoja...

Hanselka, C. Wayne; Fox, William E.; White, Larry D.

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

203

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locating–dominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater [186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locating–total dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Quality management of ovarian cancer serum profiles using functionalizied magnetic beads, AnchorChipTM technology, MALDI-TOF MS and, MALDI-TOF/TOF MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...evidence about the many benefits to quality of life derived from weight control...the coherence of evidence relating energy balance to the prevention of cancer...interventions as a routine standard for quality clinical care in the population...

Sau-Mei Leung and Samuel C. Mok

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Office of Quality Assurance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quality Assurance Quality Assurance QUALITY ASSURANCE IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE has established Quality Policy, Principles and Value Added Requirement Attributes that apply to all work and are focused on performance, customer expectations, and improvement. When properly implemented, the principles and requirements form a management system to plan, perform, assess, and improve work. The requirements are performance oriented and offer unlimited implementation flexibility. The DOE quality management system moves beyond the traditional quality assurance requirements that had become narrowly focused on safety systems, paper, compliance, and inspections. The management system is designed to link with an organization's strategic plan to support mission achievement and the delivery of products and services. The Department's commitment to environment, safety, and health also relies, upon work being conducted within an effective management system. DOE line managers and contracting officers must understand these two fundamental purposes for the QA requirements and ensure the QA Order and rule are specified in each major contract (including those contracts using the Work Smart Standards process to satisfy DOE Acquisition regulation 48 CFR 970.5223-1).

206

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management Water conservation LBNL’s approach to sustainable environmentalWater Discharges) of Introduction Environmental Managementenvironmental compliance programs, such as air and water quality, as well as less traditional programs, such as wildland fire management,

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

208

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

209

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PUB-5352, Rev. 6 WM QA Plan Review and approval of changesand review of procedures, work plans, instructions, reports,Plans, Instructions and Reports9 4.1.2 Procedure Review and

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Irrigation Water Quality Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Na2SO4 Moderate to large Calcium chloride CaCl2 Moderate Calcium sulfate (gypsum) CaSO4 2H2O Moderate

211

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

212

Commissioning : The Total Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that rely on electronic control. Very frequently these systems and design features have not performed as expected. This can result in energy-efficiency losses. occupant complaints about comfort, indoor air quality problems. high operating costs...

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Wildland fire management and air quality in the southern Sierra Nevada: Using the Lion Fire as a case study with a multi-year perspective on PM2.5 impacts and fire policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Management of fire is an important and controversial policy issue. Active fire suppression has led to a backlog of fuels, limited the ecological benefits of fire, and reduced short-term smoke impacts likely delaying these emissions to future generations over a larger spatial extent. Smoke impacts can be expected to increase as fire size and intensity increase and the fuel backlog is consumed; whether through reintroduction of fire under desirable conditions or through stand replacing fire. Land Management Agencies would like to increase the use of naturally ignited fires to burn during favorable conditions as a way to reduce catastrophic fires. This study provides information about the levels of air quality impacts expected from these types of fires and discusses some of the policy controversies of managed fire that propagate inconsistencies between agencies and enter the public discourse. The Lion Fire, a primarily low intensity 8,370 ha fire that was extensively monitored for Particulate Matter less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5), is used to quantify impacts to air quality. PM2.5 monitoring sites are used to assess exposure, public health impacts, and subsequently quantify annual air quality during a year with a fire that is within the historic normal fire size and intensity for this area. Ground level PM2.5 impacts were found to be localized with 99% of the hourly Air Quality Index readings in the moderate or good category for the sites impacted by the fire. PM2.5 concentrations at sites nearest the fire were below annual federal air quality standards for PM2.5 with annual 98th percentile at the most impacted sites (Johnsondale, Kernville, and Camp Nelson) of 35.0, 34.0, and 28.0 ?g m–3 respectively. Smoke impacts to PM2.5 concentrations were not found to reach the populated Central Valley. The findings suggest that this type of fire can be implemented with minimal public health impacts thus allowing an opportunity for air and fire managers to alter policy to allow additional burning in an area with severe anthropogenic air pollution and where frequent widespread fire is both beneficial and inevitable. The more extensive air quality impacts documented with large high intensity fire may be averted by embracing the use of fire to prevent unwanted high intensity burns. A widespread increase in the use of fire for ecological benefit may provide the resiliency needed in Sierra Nevada forests as well as be the most beneficial to public health through the reduction of single dose exposure to smoke and limiting impacts spatially.

Don Schweizer; Ricardo Cisneros

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Underlying Quality Principles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These principles are consistent with Integrated Safety Management Policy, P 450.4A and support ISM implementation. 1. Define Policies and Objectives--Ensure they are Understood and Accepted. Management must set expectations for the organization as a whole before employees can do their jobs, satisfy their customers, and strive to improve the quality of their work. This is accomplished by developing and implementing specific policies and objectives that reflect the operating philosophy of the facility's management. Once these policies and objectives have been established, all managers must take the necessary actions to ensure that each employee shares their vision of the organization's purpose.

215

Project Level Factors Affecting Quality of Construction Projects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Quality management is an important topic in today s construction industry as it has become essential for construction companies to focus on increasing quality performance… (more)

Bansal, Ankit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Approved Module Information for BD1R1R, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Managing Quality Module Code: BD1R1R  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

codes, ISO 9001, ISO/TS 16949 (Learning Outcome: 03/05) Session 05 ? Quality Models e.g. EFQM, Baldrige

Neirotti, Juan Pablo

217

Towards Total Traffic Awareness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A combination of factors render the transportation sector a highly desirable area for data management research. The transportation sector receives substantial investments and is of high societal interest across the globe. Since there is limited room ...

Chenjuan Guo, Christian S. Jensen, Bin Yang

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Quality Assurance Requirements and Description  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

QjCivilianRadioactive QjCivilianRadioactive Was'fe Management QA: QA QVALITY ASSURANCE REQUIREMENTS AND DESCRIPTION DOEIRW-0333P Revisiol1 20 Effective Date: 10-01-2008 LarrY Newman, DlrectQr Office of Quality As,surance ~~--~-_._._- Edward F. Spr at III, Di or Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Date I/Jf/4t' , . - - - Date OCRWM Title: Quality Assurance Requirements and Description DOEIRW-0333P, Revision 20 Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Quality Assurance Policy Page: 2 of 160 Successful implementation of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Quality Assurance (QA) program is essential for the OCRWM to carry out its mission. Our mission is to manage and dispose ofbigh-Ievel radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a manner that protects health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits

219

EFCOG Integrated Safety Management Work Planning and Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Matthew Moury, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety, Security and Quality Programs, Office of Environmental Management

220

Quality Assurance: Library and Training  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quality Assurance Library/Training Quality Assurance Library/Training DOE Quality Assurance Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) Management Assessment Tools Software Quality Assurance CRAD QA Program Document Examples: These QA Programs are available to serve as examples from three different types of DOE organizations. Management System for Quality and Safety Management EM HQ DOE-ID DOE Nuclear Safety QA Regulation Enforcement Guide: DOE Enforcement Program Roles and Responsibilities Training, Qualification, and Orientation Materials: See also SQA Training U.S. Nuclear QA Principles, Practices and Requirements - Part I (August 2005) U.S. Nuclear QA Principles, Practices and Requirements - Part II-A Tutorial (August 2005) Suspect/Counterfeit Items Training Materials DOE-STD-1150-2002, Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Quality Assurance REFERENCE GUIDE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Assurance Quality Assurance Qualification Standard DOE-STD-1150-2002 July 2012 Reference Guide The Functional Area Qualification Standard References Guides are developed to assist operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff in the acquisition of technical competence and qualification within the Technical Qualification Program. Please direct your questions or comments related to this document to the Office of Leadership and Career Management, Technical Qualification Program (TQP) Manager, Albuquerque Complex. This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i FIGURES ....................................................................................................................................... ii TABLES ........................................................................................................................................ iii

222

PURPOSE: This product provides simulation capabilities to allow water resource managers to meet operational and water quality objectives in a basin wide approach under the System-Wide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the spring to conserve cooler water temperatures in the fall). Coupling ResSim and CE-QUAL-W2 (W2) provides- tives for in-pool and riverine locations for real-time water management and in planning studiesPURPOSE: This product provides simulation capabilities to allow water resource managers to meet

US Army Corps of Engineers

223

DOE Order on Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INITIATED BY: INITIATED BY: www.directives.doe.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy ORDER Washington, D.C. Approved: 4-25-2011 SUBJECT: QUALITY ASSURANCE 1. PURPOSE. a. To ensure that Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), products and services meet or exceed customers' requirements and expectations. b. To achieve quality for all work based upon the following principles: (1) All work, as defined in this Order, is conducted through an integrated and effective management system; (2) Management support for planning, organization, resources, direction, and control is essential to quality assurance (QA); (3) Performance and quality improvement require thorough, rigorous

224

Quality engineering as a discipline of study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current framework for quality scholarship in the United States ranges from the training and education of future quality engineers, managers, and professionals to focused and sustained research initiatives that, through academic institutions and other organizations, aim to improve the knowledge and application of quality across a variety of sectors. Numerous quality journals also provide a forum for professional dissemination of information.

Kolb, Rachel R.; Hoover, Marcey L.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

226

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

227

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - age care managers Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

quality improvement in nursing homes; organizational design. Kathryn Dansky... health care; quality management, telehealth. ... Source: Colby, Ralph H. - Department of...

229

Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into storm drains, or suspicious activi- ties that may cause environmental harm to the Storm Water Quality was created for the Storm Water Management Program http://cleanwater.ucsc.edu Contact us at: cleanwater Management Program and UCSC Storm Water Management Plan at cleanwater.ucsc.edu Storm Water Management: 1

California at Santa Cruz, University of

230

Signed Quality Assurance Hub Memo  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

:I I! DR. STEVEN L. KRAHN DEPUTY ASSISTANT SEC SAFETY AND SECCTRITY PROGRAM ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: Office of Environmental Management Quality Assurance Performance Assessment, Commitment, and Corrective Action Management Program Launch In a memorandum to the FieldlSite Managers dated July 10,2009, it was announced that the Office of Standards and Quality Assurance (EM-23) had deployed a pilot prototype web-based system (Hub) to facilitate providing real-time status of Quality Assurance (QA) performance assessments and associated corrective actions and commitments. The pilot phase of the system has been completed with exceptional cooperation from the various sites involved. The system has now been transferred to a secured Department of Energy Environmental Management (EM)

231

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Quality Policy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Policy Quality Policy Quality Policy It is the policy of the Department of Energy to establish quality requirements to ensure that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks posed by the facility or activity and its work. The Department implements this policy through the QA Order and the QA rule directives to ensure quality assurance requirements are clearly specified for the broad spectrum of work performed by DOE and its contractors. Objective The objective of the QA requirements are to establish an effective management system (i.e., quality assurance programs) using the performance requirements coupled technical standards where appropriate that ensure:

233

Quality Assurance Corporate Board | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Assurance » Quality Quality Assurance » Quality Assurance Corporate Board Quality Assurance Corporate Board The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance Corporate Board is an executive board that includes both senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor representatives who are involved with construction, operating, and decommissioning projects. The Board acts in an advisory capacity to the EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Safety and Security Program, who is the Chief Executive Officer and Chair of the Board. Decisions on the Corporate Board's recommendations are acted on by EM senior management. The Corporate Board provides the management structure to integrate the independently managed federal and contractor Quality Assurance Programs into a single corporate entity. The Board serves as a consensus-building

234

EM Quality Assurance Policy, Revision 0  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Environmental Management Corporate Quality Policy Office of Environmental Management Corporate Quality Policy The Office of Environmental Management recognizes that individuals performing work determine whether it is done correctly in accordance with all requirements and therefore achieves quality. Although "do work safely" is our first priority, we understand it is also essential to "do work correctly" or both safety and quality are jeopardized. While plans, procedures, and instructions are commonly understood elements of any quality program, people make quality happen and allow us to deliver on our commitments. As the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM), I am responsible to achieve quality within my organization. It is EM policy that doing work correctly is not

235

Safety and Occupational Health Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a Health and Safety, Compliance and Quality Assurance Manager providing program management, technical oversight, and expertise in the area of...

236

Managing Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 19 Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) project managers work together with scientists and educators as well as government funding agencies to address water quality and quantity issues in Texas. Each of TWRI?s five project... the funds.? Gregory began his role at TWRI in 2006 upon com- pletion of a master?s degree in water management and hydrological science at Texas A&M University. A former Mills Scholar, Gregory was familiar with TWRI. He saw that the institute...

Baker, Emily

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

COLLABORATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF WATER QUALITY POLLUTION PATTERNS: WORKING WITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Management Title of Research Project: Collaborative Investigations of Water Quality Pollution: Chair: Jennifer Silver Phd Candidate in Resource and Environmental Management (REM) ___________________________________________ Dr. Evelyn Pinkerton Senior Supervisor Professor of Resource and Environmental Management, SFU

238

Quality In-Plant Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Quality of In-plant Envi~onment. How can employees be expected to p~oduce Wo~ld-class quality pa~ts with a "di~ty" plant? Obviously, the wo~k environment has an effect on the attitude of the wo~k force. Quality of In-plant Environment con sists... reduced to .87 years. CONCLUSION The changing business climate can present opportunities for dramatic energy savings. Concepts such as Quality of Work LiEe and Quality In-Plant Environment may initially appear to have a very negative efE~ct on total...

Petzold, M. A.

239

Irrigation Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irrigation water quality is determined by the total amounts of salts and the types of salts the water contains. In this publication you'll learn why well water can be salty, what problems salty water can cause, what tests should be done...

McFarland, Mark L.; Lemon, Robert G.; Stichler, Charles

2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

240

Report: EM Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM QUALITY ASSURANCE EM QUALITY ASSURANCE September 25, 2008 Submitted by the EMAB Quality Assurance Subcommittee Background: In Fiscal Year (FY) 2008, the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) was tasked to dialogue with the Office of Quality Assurance (EM-60, QA) as it works to revitalize standards and institutionalize QA into Departmental and EM processes. In addition, EMAB was directed to dialogue with EM-60 on incorporating QA and engineering into the procurement process. Board members reviewed and discussed the topics of QA and EM-60's functions during their public meeting on May 7, 2008, in Washington D.C. The EMAB QA Subcommittee comprised of Dr. Lawrence Papay, Mr. G. Brian Estes, and Mr. Tom Winston, continued to explore the issues presented in May and engaged in follow-up

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Quality Assurance: Fundamentals of the DOE Quality System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fundamentals of the DOE Quality System Fundamentals of the DOE Quality System The quality assurance program is a management system involving all organizational components and should not be regarded as the sole domain of any single group. The Order and Rule reflects the concept that all work is a process that can be planned, performed, assessed, and improved. The basic requirements are broken into three categories: MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT This format permits managers, those performing the work, and those assessing the planning implementation, and results of the work to focus on their unique responsibilities in carrying out the provisions of the quality assurance program. The three categories capture the range of activities common to all work, from organizing and staffing to assessing results and

242

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

243

Office of Resource Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Management Resource Management Home Sub Offices › Business Operations › Information Management › Human Resources and Administration Mission and Functions HSS Standard Operating Practices (For Internal Users Only) HSS Subject Matter Experts and Functional Points of Contacts Contact Us HSS Logo Office of Resource Management Direct Report to the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer Mission and Functions Mission The Office of Resource Management supports the infrastructure of the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) by providing balanced, unbiased, technically competent, and customer focused services in the areas of: (1) Financial Management, including budget formulation and execution; (2) Procurement Management, including contract and credit card programs; (3) Information Management, including technology-based solutions and programs; (4) Quality Assurance; (5) Human Resources, including recruitment and retention programs; (6) Administrative Services, including property management, travel, and work space management; and; (7) Strategic and Program Planning including performance and efficiency measures.

244

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

245

IT Project Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Management IT Project Management Qualification, Engineering and Quality Assurance The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE) IT Project Management, Engineering, and Quality Assurance effort is to lead and provide guidance to information technology programs, and to support the successful development and maintenance of Departmental site-specific information systems. This is accomplished by fostering and mentoring continuous growth and maturity in the use of best practices for project management, software systems engineering, and quality assurance and soliciting DOE-wide participation and successes for sharing. IT Project Management, Engineering, and Quality Assurance is a component of the DOE Enterprise Architecture Program and Capital Planning and Investment

246

NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

Gianotto, David

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

248

Quality Assurance Program Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Assurance Program Plan Quality Assurance Program Plan Quality Assurance Program Plan The achievement of quality in LM activities and products requires implementation of a formal Quality Assurance (QA) Program. This program establishes principles, requirements, practices, and methods for integrating quality into the daily operations of our programs and projects. The QA Program functions as a management tool to ensure that quality objectives are achieved throughout LM's technical, administrative, and operational functions. Achieving quality is the responsibility of managers as well as those who perform the work. Each employee is expected to do the job in accordance with procedures and other requirements. The name LM must represent quality to us, our customers, our service providers, and our

249

SOPP-43, EM-23 Quality Assurance Oversight  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

. POLICY: The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance program . POLICY: The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance program requirements and expectations are documented in the EM Quality Assurance Program (QAP), EM-QA-001, dated October 2008. The QAP is the EM management system to ensure that all EM organizations "do work correctly." The QAP meets the requirements of DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830 Subpart A "Quality Assurance Requirements." The QAP demonstrates how QA and the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) are fully integrated in EM. The QAP also provides consistent QA implementation across EM while allowing both for grading based on importance to the EM mission and safety, and for site-specific requirements to be addressed (e.g., DOE/RW-0333P, Quality Assurance

250

ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Net broadband total irradiance The difference between upwelling and downwelling, covering longwave and shortwave radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

251

Quality Assurance Specialist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Alternate Title(s):Quality Control Technician; Quality Assurance Inspector; Quality Assurance Representative

252

FUEL CYCLE TECHNOLOGIES QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM DOCUMENT  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) is the top-level quality policy and requirements document for the Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program. The quality assurance (QA) requirements specified herein apply to Participants that manage and/or perform work within FCT Program.

253

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

254

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

256

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

257

Quality Cost Analysis: Benefits and Risks Copyright Cem Kaner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality Cost Analysis: Benefits and Risks Copyright © Cem Kaner January, 1996 All rights reserved quality-related costs as a means of communication between the quality staff departments and the company of quality-related costs since 1951. Feigenbaum made it one of the core ideas underlying the Total Quality

258

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

259

Final Report Implementing Office of Management and Budget Information...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Final Report Implementing Office of Management and Budget Information Dissemination Quality Guidelines (67 Fed Reg 62446) Final Report Implementing Office of Management and Budget...

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality information Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management District (BAAQMD). For more detailed information, see Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions... Air Quality: Reporting Requirements Department: Chemical and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyzing service quality Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ISO 9000 consists of three quality assurance models and a quality management model; ISO 9001, ISO... , production, installation, and servicing. ISO 9002 is a model for...

262

Measuring correlation of information quality dimensions using six sigma based product perspective.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research investigates the issues of information quality assessment and management. It takes information as a product, and examines how different information quality dimensions impact… (more)

Lee, Sang Hyun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Microsoft Word - info quality guidelines updated 3-7-11.docx...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Final Report Implementing Office of Management and Budget Information Dissemination Quality Guidelines (67 Fed Reg 62446) Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review...

264

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

265

Quality Assurance Exchange, June 2006  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

V V o lu m e 2 , I ssu e 2 J un e 2 0 0 6 I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : Secretary Bodman Emphasizes Quality Assurance 1 In the Spotlight: Interview with Ava Holland Quality Assurance Manager CBFO/WIPP 1 "How To" Series on Performing Assessments: Audit Meetings 1 DOE Contractor receives the 2005 Malcolm Baldrige Award for Performance Excellence 2 SQA Work Activity #3: Software Configuration Management 3 Safety Software Central Registry Activities 8 Activities, Updates, & Announcements 9 Upcoming Meetings, Conferences & Training Courses 10 Q U A L I T Y A S S U R A N C E E X C H A N G E Ava Holland is the Quality Assurance Manager for the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) at the Waste Isolation Plant (WIPP). Ms. Holland is responsible for

266

Total assessment audits (TAA) in Iowa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, energy, waste reduction and productivity audits are performed for a manufacturing facility independent of one another. Auditors generally deliver recommendations for improvement based on their specialized expertise (energy, waste reduction, productivity, etc.) without regard to how those recommendations may impact other, sometimes less obvious, subsystems or processes within the facility. The audits are typically performed in isolation from the plant upper management and commonly without adequate knowledge of how inherent interrelated operational constraints may directly or indirectly influence the success of audit recommendations. The Total Assessment Audit (TAA) concept originated from the belief that a manufacturing facility is better served using a holistic approach to problem solving rather than the more conventional isolated approach. The total assessment audit methodology partners the upper management team of a company with a multi-disciplined team of industry-specific specialists to collectively ascertain the core opportunities for improvement in the company and then to formulate a company oriented continuous improvement plan. Productivity, waste reduction, and energy efficiency objectives are seamlessly integrated into a single service delivery with the TAA approach. Nontraditional audit objectives that influence profitability and competitiveness such as business management practices, employee training, human resource issues, etc. are also subject to evaluation in a TAA. The underlying premise of this approach is that the objectives are interrelated and that simultaneous evaluation will province synergistic results. Ultimately, it is believed that the TAA approach can motivate a manufacturer to implement improvements it might not otherwise pursue if it were focused only on singular objectives.

Haman, W.G.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Innovation in higher education quality assurance: an empirical study of Sweden and Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose – The aim of this research is to innovate a new quality assessment and assurance techniques based on a holistic and multifunctional perspective, to examine the major factors affecting students' perception of cumulative satisfaction and to address the question whether students in Sweden and Egypt evaluate quality of higher education similarly or differently. Design/methodology/approach – From the literature review, a draft questionnaire was constructed and tested to ensure that the instrument solicit information that is appropriate to internal and external quality assurance. The final draft questionnaire containing five quality constructs (5Qs) was distributed among university students in Sweden and Egypt. The collected data was analysed. Findings – In this research, we describe a study involving a new instrument, i.e. the 5Qs model. We modelled the student satisfaction as a function of the 5Q dimensions based on total relationship management (TRM) philosophy. To the extent possible, we draw upon scales which had been used in management, sociological, medical and pedagogical literature. Practical implications – The TRM strategy and 5Qs tool should be implemented to inspire all employees at the university, faculty and department to understand its main philosophy and approach. Originality/value – This study presents an innovative quality evaluation and assurance model. The new 5Qs model, methodology, together with its implementation, has proved beneficial in terms of structure for designing a higher education quality measurement instrument and a framework for prioritising results and findings.

Mosad Zineldin; Valentina Vasicheva; Mohamed Belal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

EQUUS Total Return Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EQUUS Total Return Inc EQUUS Total Return Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EQUUS Total Return Inc Place Houston, Texas Product A business development company and VC investor that trades as a closed-end fund. EQUUS is managed by MCC Global NV, a Frankfurt stock exchange listed management and merchant banking group. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

269

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy that comes from some continuous range of directions, at wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, that is being emitted downwards. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component BSRN : Baseline Solar Radiation Network

270

Records Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Management Records Management The Department of Energy (DOE) Records Management Program ensures compliance with the Federal Records Act of 1950, as amended, by promoting the management of records throughout their life cycle in an economical, efficient and effective manner. Implementation of a sound Records Management Program facilitates decision-makers and others having the right information in support of mission accomplishment; and the creation and maintenance of records to protect the rights and interests of the Department and those we serve. The Records Management Program is also responsible for the Department's Information Collection Program, and the Information Quality Program. The Information Collection Program is responsible for implementing the

271

Records Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Management Records Management The Department of Energy (DOE) Records Management Program ensures compliance with the Federal Records Act of 1950, as amended, by promoting the management of records throughout their life cycle in an economical, efficient and effective manner. Implementation of a sound Records Management Program facilitates decision-makers and others having the right information in support of mission accomplishment; and the creation and maintenance of records to protect the rights and interests of the Department and those we serve. The Records Management Program is also responsible for the Department's Information Collection Program, and the Information Quality Program. The Information Collection Program is responsible for implementing the

272

Hospitality Management Hospitality Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the global hospitality industry. Academic Offerings HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR Students pursuing programs in other areas of study may choose a minor Lodging Management 3 HPM 309 Sports Arena Management 3 HPM 312* Cost Control in Food Services (Prereq

McConnell, Terry

273

A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) have caused water quality concerns in many rural watersheds, sometimes forcing the State of Texas to conduct Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessments of stream nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). One suggested Best Management... Practice (BMP) is the export of phosphorus (P) through turfgrass sod produced with composted dairy manure from an impaired rural watershed to an urban watershed. The manure-grown sod releases P slowly and would not require additional P fertilizer for up...

Richards, Chad Edward

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

275

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

276

Air Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What We Monitor & Why » What We Monitor & Why » Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data monitoring for particulate matter An air monitoring field team member tests one of LANL's tapered element oscillating microbalance samplers, which collects real-time particulate matter data. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL monitors air quality 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Why we monitor air LANL monitors many different pathways in order to assess their impact on workers, the public, animals, and plants. We monitor the air around the Laboratory to ensure our operations are not affecting the air of nearby

277

Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines roles and responsibilities for providing quality assurance for DOE products and services. Cancels DOE O 414.1C. Admin Chg 1, dated 5-8-13, cancels DOE O 414.1D.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order ensures that the quality of DOE/NNSA products and services meets or exceeds the customers' expectations. Cancels DOE O 414.1B and DOE N 411.1. Canceled by DOE O 414.1D.

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

Air Quality: Implementation Plan Department: Chemical and General Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Quality: Implementation Plan Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 The requirements of Chapter 30, "Air in place 1 SLAC Environment, Safety, and Health Manual (SLAC-I-720-0A29Z-001), Chapter 30, "Air Quality

Wechsler, Risa H.

280

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

283

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

284

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

285

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

286

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

287

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

288

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

289

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

290

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

291

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

292

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

293

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

294

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

295

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

296

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

297

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

298

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

299

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

300

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

302

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

303

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

304

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

305

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

306

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

307

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

308

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

309

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

310

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

311

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

312

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

313

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

314

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

315

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

316

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

317

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

318

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

319

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

320

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

322

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

323

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

324

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

325

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

326

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

327

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

328

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

329

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

330

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

331

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

332

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

333

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

334

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

335

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

336

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

337

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

338

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

339

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

340

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

342

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

343

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

344

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

345

Urban and Regional Air Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

equipment equipment Urban and Regional Air Quality Research in this area is concerned with regional air quality issues such as: Controlling nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds, to manage tropospheric ozone pollution. Hazardous air pollutants: using science to base standards on rigorously studied risks. Air quality and climate: how does climate influence air quality at a regional or local level? Current modeling practices often do not capture variations in pollutants such as ozone-they represent a limited sample of the diverse meteorology and human behavior that affect air pollution. Improved modeling of regional air quality will help understand variability, reveal patterns of behavior, and pollutant transport issues. Controlled experiments in lab and field can help validate improved models.

346

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

347

Montana 2012 Final Water Quality Integrated Report | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Provides an overview of sources of nonpoint source pollution in Montana and outlines management goals for a 5-year period. Author Montana Department of Environmental Quality...

348

Quality Assurance Exchange March 2011, Volume 7 Issue 1 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

management process. This information is very positive and highlights a Department of Energy (DOE) project that simultaneously improved quality, reduced project costs, and...

349

EM Quality Assurance Program (EM-QA-001 Revision 1)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this document is to describe the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance Program (QAP).

350

Underlying Quality Principles | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underlying Quality Principles Underlying Quality Principles Underlying Quality Principles These principles are consistent with Integrated Safety Management Policy, P 450.4A and support ISM implementation. Define Policies and Objectives--Ensure they are Understood and Accepted. Management must set expectations for the organization as a whole before employees can do their jobs, satisfy their customers, and strive to improve the quality of their work. This is accomplished by developing and implementing specific policies and objectives that reflect the operating philosophy of the facility's management. Once these policies and objectives have been established, all managers must take the necessary actions to ensure that each employee shares their vision of the organization's purpose. Specify Roles and Responsibilities--Ensure they are Understood and

351

to Protect Water Quality in Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forestry Best Management Practices to Protect Water Quality in Colorado 2010 #12;Contents Intr Crossings................................ 26 Wildfire Colorado's forest lands provide aesthetic value, clean wa- ter, abundant wildlife, minerals, recreation

Rutledge, Steven

352

Analytical laboratory quality audits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

Kelley, William D.

2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

353

Water Quality: 2007 Data, BPA-51; Preliminary Report, January 26, 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Print Out No.1 presents a listing of the initial data. The variables included were: SITE, REP, NH4, NO2{_}3, SRP, TDP, TN, TP, and JULIAN , representing site code, replication number, ammonia nitrogen, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen, soluble reactive phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and Julian date, respectively. All values for nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon variables are recorded as {micro}g/L. The 2007 water quality data received by SCS required considerable manipulation and data management prior to analysis. If it is anticipated that water quality data received by SCS in the future will be of the same format, the time to carry out the necessary reformatting of the data should be taken into consideration. The levels of SRP from water quality data of previous years were often below detection limits. The data from 2007 showed elevated levels for this and other responses. This pattern was seemingly unrelated to nutrient addition treatments, however, as they appeared consistently across the study area. The river fertilization program was begun in 2005. Because the procedures for detection of nutrients and metals are quite sensitive, SCS recommends that any future water quality samples taken on, or close to, the dates of fertilizer application be carried out with the utmost care to avoid contamination issues. Doing so will ensure consistency and reliability in the resulting data.

Holderman, Charles

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Office of Environmental Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

Environmental Management Environmental Management Search Search form Search Office of Environmental Management Office of Environmental Management Services Services Home Waste Management Waste Management Home Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste Disposition Packaging and Transportation Site & Facility Restoration Site & Facility Restoration Home Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Facility Engineering Soil & Groundwater Sustainability Program Management Program Management Home Safety Security Quality Assurance Budget & Performance Acquisition Compliance Project Management Communication & Engagement Communication & Engagement Home Intergovernmental Programs EMAB EM SSAB Tribal Programs International Programs Long-Term Stewardship Community Involvement Fund

355

EM Quality Assurance Program (EM-QA-001 Revision 0) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Program Management » Quality Assurance » EM Quality Services » Program Management » Quality Assurance » EM Quality Assurance Program (EM-QA-001 Revision 0) EM Quality Assurance Program (EM-QA-001 Revision 0) Previous revision of the Environmental Management Quality Assurance Program. The program is the EM management system to ensure we"do work correctly." This document has been superseded by Revision 1 of the program, but is still in use at some EM sites. EM Quality Assurance Program (EM-QA-001 Revision 0) More Documents & Publications Quality Assurance Program EM Quality Assurance Program (EM-QA-001 Revision 1) SOPP-43, EM-23 Quality Assurance Oversight Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste Disposition Packaging and Transportation Site & Facility Restoration

356

University College Dublin UCD Quality Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2 ORGANISATION AND MANAGEMENT Ref# RG Recommendation Cat. Action Taken/Action Planned/Reason for Not Implementing continue to work towards developing and fostering a quality culture in the University. Each unit under to the resources available, or unless it would be unreasonable or impractical to do so. Units prepare a Quality

357

RULES AND REGULATIONS ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on best management practices to protect and restore that important resource, and to meet PennsylvaniaRULES AND REGULATIONS ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY BOARD [25 PA. CODE CHS. 91 AND 92] Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations and Other Agricultural Operations [35 Pa.B. 5796] The Environmental Quality Board

Guiltinan, Mark

358

Business System Management Review  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

P-004 Business System Management Review Process 11_0304Page 1 of 7 P-004 Business System Management Review Process 11_0304Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Business System Management Review Process Document Number: P-004 Rev 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-009, Business System Management Review Template P-004 Business System Management Review Process 11_0304Page 2 of 7 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0414 Corrective Actions, Preventive Actions, and Improvement Opportunity 09_1124 Edited document for clarity and to better fit the process in use. Added requirement to provide management with

359

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Advanced Process Management and Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Process Management is a method to achieve optimum process performance during the life cycle of a plant through proper design, effective automation, and adequate operator decision support. Developing a quality process model is an effective...

Robinson, J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of total nitrate and ammonia were made during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study using a steam

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total upwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

upwelling irradiance upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband total upwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, passes through a horizontal unit area in an upward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFR : Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments RAD-AIR : Airborne Radiometers

363

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, passes through a horizontal unit area in a downward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NFOV : Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer

364

Integrating Environmental, Safety, and Quality Management System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utilizing Bacteria for Sustainable Manufacturing of Low-Cost Nanoparticles Performance Analysis of Air-Source Variable Speed Heat Pumps and Various Electric Water Heating Options...

365

An integrated view of data quality in Earth observation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to a Theme Issue e-Science-towards the cloud...While our data quality management approach is in the domain of...methodologies for data quality management can be applied to wider...observation (EO) is the science of measurement of all...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

LANL Data Profile 20122013 Total: 10,407  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Community Programs Office (505) 665% Environmental management 6% Safeguards and security 5% DOE Office of Science 4% Energy and related programs.......................$534,756,599 New Mexico total procurement..........$338,725,405 Los Alamos County

367

Procurement and Property Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Doing Business with... Doing Business with... Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Procurement and Property Management provides customers with timely, cost-effective procurement and property management services integrated with and supporting the Laboratory's science, technology and cleanup missions in accordance with the prime contract and customer expectations. Services Include: Procurement of high quality supplies and services that meet customer requirements, Identification and control of government property, Maintaining an efficient stores operation, Expeditious shipping, receiving and delivery services. PPM Has Moved! We are located at: 44 Ramsey Road Shirley, NY 11967 Directions Procurement Property Management Purchasing System Approval (pdf) Personal Property Approval (pdf)

368

Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalProjectCost TotalProjectCost Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/TotalProjectCost Property Type Number Description Total Project Cost Pages using the property "Geothermal/TotalProjectCost" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 6,135,381 + A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project + 1,629,670 +

369

Air Quality: Emissions Source Inspection Form Department: Chemical and General Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Quality: Emissions Source Inspection Form Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 This inspection form Quality", http://www-group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/environment/air_quality/policies.htm 29 Jul 2007 (updated

Wechsler, Risa H.

370

The Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QA Program, the applicable QA requirements, and the responsibility for the implementationQA capability as determined by evaluation of the facilities and implementation of the QA program.QA personnel and having line authority for the implementation of the QA program.

Albert editor, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Prediction of Total Dissolved Gas (TDG) at Hydropower Dams throughout the Columbia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. The entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin cause elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) saturation. Physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been characterized throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and at real-time water quality monitoring stations. These data have been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange which are site specific and account for the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant transport and exchange in route to the downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the findings from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow for the formulation of optimal water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases.

Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL] [ORNL; Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL] [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL] [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation] [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Data Driven Quality Assurance and Quality Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Data Driven Quality Assurance & Quality Control," Patrick Roche, Conservation Services Group. Provides an overview of data QA/QC system design.

373

Air Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hazard analysis AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control Standard NESHAPs National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants NOx oxides of nitrogen NPOC nonAir Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner

Wechsler, Risa H.

374

Manager's Desk Reference on Human Capital Management Flexibilities |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manager's Desk Reference on Human Capital Management Flexibilities Manager's Desk Reference on Human Capital Management Flexibilities Manager's Desk Reference on Human Capital Management Flexibilities The purpose of this document is to provide DOE managers and supervisors with information on available flexibilities that can be used in day-to-day human capital management activities, especially those bearing on the recruitment and retention of high-quality staff. Each section of the document includes a basic description of a particular tool as well as Frequently Asked Questions related to how to best use it in a given set of circumstances or in combination with other flexibilities, unless they are available elsewhere, in which the web link is listed under References for that section. At the end of each section are references with web links that

375

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

376

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

377

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

378

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

379

Quality Assurance Exchange, December 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 D e c e m be r 2 0 0 5 I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : In the Spotlight: Interview with Colette Broussard, Quality Assurance Administrator, Office of EM 1 "How To" Series on Performing Assessments: Preparing for Auditing Success 1 Lessons Learned: BNL conducts 3rd Consecutive Third- Party Evaluation of its Assessment Program 2 SQA Work Activity 2 Software Risk Management 3 Announcements, Updates, and Activities 7 Upcoming Meetings &Workshops 9 Q U A L I T Y A S S U R A N C E E X C H A N G E Colette Broussard has extensive back- ground in DOE as a Quality Assurance Engineer, along with experience in safety engineering and environmental management. Colette joined the DOE in 1983 as a QA Engineer at the Pinel- las Plant. She transferred to Headquar-

380

Verify your information with the data quality checker | ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

your information with the data quality checker your information with the data quality checker Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit Identify your property type Enter data into Portfolio Manager The data quality checker

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

E-Print Network 3.0 - archive management workshop Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Specifications, plus Data Validation Guidelines Quality Management Policy, Roles... Pollution Sponsors Strategic Planning Workshops Ozone and Particulate ... Source: Oak...

382

Quality Assurance Exchange, January 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 J a n u a r y 2 0 0 7 I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : Departmental Elements Respond to "Improving QA" 1 "How To" Series on Performing Assessments: Post Field Investigation Activities 1 Best Practices: Appropriate Metrics Facilitate Data-Driven IT Decisions 4 SQA Work Activity #4: Procurement and Supplier Management 6 Safety Software Central Registry Activities 7 Upcoming Conferences & Training (relating to DOE / Nuclear & General QA) 8 Q U A L I T Y A S S U R A N C E E X C H A N G E In his memorandum "Improving Quality As- surance," dated April 26, 2006, the Secretary of Energy stated the Department's priority of implementing an effective Quality Assurance program (QAP) and promulgating a quality culture throughout the DOE complex. The

383

Quality Assurance Exchange, April 2009  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 , I s s u e 1 M a r c h / A p r i l 2 0 0 9 I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : In the Spotlight: George Detsis, Program Manager, ASP 1 Special Feature: Blurred Vision: Do Our Business Leaders See What Quality is All About? 3 SQA Work Activity: Problem Reporting and Corrective Action 7 HSS QA Activity Corner 8 Quality Council 9 QA-Related Meetings & Conferences 10 Director's Note 10 Lessons Learned: Insufficient Training Causes Near Miss Events and Injuries 5 Q U A L I T Y A S S U R A N C E E X C H A N G E The Analytical Services Program (ASP) encompasses approximately 40 annual qualification audits of analytical laboratories and commercial waste operation vendors, semi-annual quality assurance (QA) proficiency testing of 120 domestic and international analytical laboratories, and the

384

Appropriateness Criteria and Elective Procedures — Total Joint Arthroplasty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the importance of such criteria and have already started developing them as guidelines for other orthopedic procedures. Second, accountable care organizations and other institutions pursuing similar health care delivery models are becoming influential, and as they move away from procedure-based payments... The implementation of appropriateness criteria that help to identify the patients likely to benefit most from a given procedure could help to combat increasing health care costs while enhancing access and quality. Total joint arthroplasty offers a prime example.

Ghomrawi H.M.K.Schackman B.R.Mushlin A.I.

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fuel cell gas management system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

386

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

387

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

388

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

389

Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Assurance for Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Q C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Quality A Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Assuranc view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) e (QA) e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

390

FAQS Qualification Card - Quality Assurance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Qualification Card - Quality Assurance Qualification Card - Quality Assurance FAQS Qualification Card - Quality Assurance A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-QualityAssurance.docx Description Quality Assurance Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Quality Assurance

391

Supplier Selection Management Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Vendor Selection and Management Process Document Number: ADMP-002 Rev. 11_0203 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): ADMF-009 Vendor Audit Plan, ADMF-010 Vendor Audit Checklist, ADMF-011 Vendor Audit Report, ADMF-015 Vendor Evaluation Record, ADMP-001 Procurement Process, ADMF-016 EOTA Vendor List, REG-003 Record Register ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 2 of 9 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_1110 Added verbiage and reference for ADMF-016, EOTA Vendor List to process.

392

Office of Standards and Quality Assurance Correspondence | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Program Management » Quality Assurance » Office of Services » Program Management » Quality Assurance » Office of Standards and Quality Assurance Correspondence Office of Standards and Quality Assurance Correspondence The Safety and Security Program (EM-20) and subsequently the Office of Standards and Quality Assurance (EM-23) place a large emphasis on the fact that the Environmental Management (EM) work of safely cleaning up the environmental legacy of the Cold War is performed in the Field. A primary role of our Headquarters (HQ) office is assisting the Field to achieve mission success and recognizing that we are accountable for the quality, timeliness, and efficiency of our efforts, products, and support to the Field. EM-23 also embraces the EM Business Model which emphasizes completing these support functions in a proactive manner, not simply identifying issues.

393

Safeguards management inspection procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this inspection module is to independently assess the contributions of licensee management to overall safeguards systems performance. The inspector accomplishes this objective by comparing the licensee's safeguards management to both the 10 CFR, parts 70 and 73, requirements and to generally accepted management practices. The vehicle by which this comparison is to be made consists of assessment questions and key issues which point the inspector to areas of primary concern to the NRC and which raise additional issues for the purpose of exposing management ineffectiveness. Further insight into management effectiveness is obtained through those assessment questions specifically directed toward the licensee's safeguards system performance. If the quality of the safeguards is poor, then the inspector should strongly suspect that management's role is ineffective and should attempt to determine management's influence (or lack thereof) on the underlying safeguards deficiencies. (The converse is not necessarily true, however.) The assessment questions in essence provide an opportunity for the inspector to identify, to single out, and to probe further, questionable management practices. Specific issues, circumstances, and concerns which point to questionable or inappropriate practices should be explicitly identified and referenced against the CFR and the assessment questions. The inspection report should also explain why the inspector feels certain management practices are poor, counter to the CFR, and/or point to ineffecive management. Concurrent with documenting the inspection results, the inspector should provide recommendations for alleviating observed management practices that are detrimental to effective safeguards. The recommendations could include: specific changes in the practices of the licensee, followup procedures on the part of NRC, and proposed license changes.

Barth, M.J.; Dunn, D.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

395

Software Quality Assurance: Directives and Guidance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Directives and Guidance Directives and Guidance DOE O 414.1D, Quality Assurance DOE G 414.1-4, Software Guide for use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance DOE Order O 414.1D, Quality Assurance, includes Attachment 4 addressing SQA requirements for nuclear safety applications at DOE nuclear facilities. The DOE O 414.1D was issued April 25, 2011. This Order and its associated Guide for safety software, DOE G 414.1-4, Safety Software Guide for use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements. The Order identifies 10 software quality work activities that are to be performed using the graded approach specified in the Order. These 10 work activities are: (1) software project management, (2) software risk management, (3) software configuration management, (4) procurement and vendor management, (5) software requirements identification and management, (6) software design and implementation, (7) software safety design, (8) verification and validation, (9) problem reporting and corrective action, and (10) training of personnel in the design, development, use and evaluation of safety software. These 10 work activities were consolidated from practices and activities identified in several well known consensus standards and federal requirements. Safety software must be acquired, developed and implemented using ASME NQA-1-2008 with the NQA-1a-2009 addenda (or later edition), Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Facility Applications, Part 1 and Subpart 2.7, or other national or international consensus standards that provide an equivalent level of quailty assurance requirements as NQA-1-2008.

396

Project Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Management Project Management Project Directors are responsible for the planning, programming, budgeting and acquisition of capital assets. One of the principal outcomes in exercising this responsibility is the delivery of projects on schedule, within budget, with the required performance capability, and compliant with quality, environmental, safety and health standards. These web pages identify the DOE requirements related to the acquisition of capital assets and present a common framework for implementing the requirements. Our intent is not to impose additional requirements, but rather place existing requirements in the proper context. The target audience for these pages includes Federal Project Directors, Program Managers, Acquisition Executives, and others involved in the DOE capital asset acquisition

397

An evaluation of total body electrical conductivity to estimate body composition of largemouth bass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information about body composition of fish is important for the assessment and management of fish stocks. Measurement of total body electrical conductivity (TOBEC) recently has been used to estimate the body composition of several fish species in a...

Barziza, Daniel Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

Quality Assurance Source Requirements Traceability Database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Yucca Mountain Project the Project Requirements Processing System assists in the management of relationships between regulatory and national/industry standards source criteria, and Quality Assurance Requirements and Description document (DOE/R W-0333P) requirements to create compliance matrices representing respective relationships. The matrices are submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assist in the commission's review, interpretation, and concurrence with the Yucca Mountain Project QA program document. The tool is highly customized to meet the needs of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Office of Quality Assurance.

MURTHY, R., NAYDENOVA, A., DEKLEVER, R., BOONE, A.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Software Configuration Management (SCM) A Practical Guide | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Software Configuration Management (SCM) A Practical Guide Software Configuration Management (SCM) A Practical Guide Software Configuration Management (SCM) A Practical Guide This document provides a practical guide for integrating software configuration management disciplines into the management of software engineering projects. Software configuration management is the process of identifying and defining the software configuration items in a system, controlling the release and change of these items throughout the system lifecycle, recording and reporting the status of configuration items and change requests, and verifying the completeness and correctness of configuration items Software Configuration Management (SCM) A Practical Guide More Documents & Publications NMMSS Software Quality Assurance Plan SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration

400

Program Managers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Managers Program Managers Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

NTC Launches New eLearning Management System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Training Center is committed to producing high quality eLearning courses available to students for free on our Learning Management System (LMS).

403

TCEQ - Management Program for Nonpoint Source Water Pollution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract This is the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality's webpage for their Management Program for Nonpoint Source Water Pollution. Author Texas Commission on...

404

Policy 3508 Information Technology Project Management 1 OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Standardization (ISO) ­ Quality Management Principals (ISO 9000:2000) ­ ISO 9001:2000 specifies and Validation, International Standards Organization (ISO) 90002000 series, and Software Engineering

405

Microsoft Word - OccMed Recompete Contract Management Plan APM...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PNSO Pacific Northwest Site Office PWS Performance Work Statement QA Quality Assurance RCW Revised Code of Washington RIMS RL Integrated Management System RL Richland...

406

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

407

Integrated storage and querying of spatially varying data quality information in a relational spatial database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated storage and querying of spatially varying data quality information in a relational Variation in Quality Keywords Spatial data quality; spatial database; relational database management system for storing and retrieving spatially varying data quality information in a relational spatial database. Rather

Duckham, Matt

408

Office of Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Quality Assurance establishes and maintains the quality assurance (QA) policies, requirements and guidance for the Department and serves as DOE's corporate resource to ensure that products and services meet or exceed the Department’s quality objectives.

409

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

410

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

411

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

412

SAPHIRE 8 Software Quality Assurance Oversight  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The software quality assurance oversight consists of updating and maintaining revision control of the SAPHIRE 8 quality assurance program documentation and of monitoring revision control of the SAPHIRE 8 source code. This report summarizes the oversight efforts through description of the revision control system (RCS) setup, operation and contents. Documents maintained under revision control include the Acceptance Test Plan (ATP), Configuration Management Plan, Quality Assurance Plan, Software Project Plan, Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM), System Test Plan, SDP Interface Training Manual, and the SAPHIRE 8, 'New Features and Capabilities Overview'.

Kurt G. Vedros

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Adaptive Management Strategies May be Answer to Water Disputes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Management Strategies May be Answer to Water Disputes LINCOLN, Neb. -- Adaptive management leader in water- management and water-quality research. It has the largest underground aquifer in 1971 spurred new water management districts. Later developments have sought to undo environmental

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

414

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

415

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Environmental Quality: Air (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Environmental Quality regulates air quality in Louisiana. The Department has an established a fee system for funding the monitoring, investigation and other activities required...

417

Quality Assurance Specialist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The selectee will serve as a Quality Assurance (QA) Specialist within the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID). The Quality Assurance Specialist (QAS) provides specialized...

418

Total Dissolved Gas Monitoring in Chum Salmon Spawning Gravels Below Bonneville Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted research to determine whether total dissolved gas concentrations are elevated in chum salmon redds during spring spill operations at Bonneville Dam. The study involved monitoring the total dissolved gas levels at egg pocket depth and in the river at two chum salmon spawning locations downstream from Bonneville Dam. Dissolved atmospheric gas supersaturation generated by spill from Bonneville Dam may diminish survival of chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon when sac fry are still present in the gravel downstream from Bonneville Dam. However, no previous work has been conducted to determine whether total dissolved gas (TDG) levels are elevated during spring spill operations within incubation habitats. The guidance used by hydropower system managers to provide protection for pre-emergent chum salmon fry has been to limit TDG to 105% after allowing for depth compensation. A previous literature review completed in early 2006 shows that TDG levels as low as 103% have been documented to cause mortality in sac fry. Our study measured TDG in the incubation environment to evaluate whether these levels were exceeded during spring spill operations. Total dissolved gas levels were measured within chum salmon spawning areas near Ives Island and Multnomah Falls on the Columbia River. Water quality sensors screened at egg pocket depth and to the river were installed at both sites. At each location, we also measured dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, and water depth to assist with the interpretation of TDG results. Total dissolved gas was depth-compensated to determine when levels were high enough to potentially affect sac fry. This report provides detailed descriptions of the two study sites downstream of Bonneville Dam, as well as the equipment and procedures employed to monitor the TDG levels at the study sites. Results of the monitoring at both sites are then presented in both text and graphics. The findings and recommendations for further research are discussed, followed by a listing of the references cited in the report.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Panther, Jennifer L.; Dawley, Earl

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

Conference Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Areas (Texas) Management Areas (Texas) Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of groundwater and groundwater

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments S. Bottone and S. Moore Mission Research Corporation Santa Barbara, California Introduction Quality Measurement Experiments (QME) are a special class of Value-Added Products (VAP). QMEs add value to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program datastreams by providing for continuous assessment of the quality of incoming data based on internal consistency checks, comparisons between independent similar measurements, or comparisons between measurements and modeled results. Like any datastream, QME datastreams need to be checked for data quality. For each QME, we analyze a representative sample of files from the ARM data archive to determine 'typical' values of the QME variables. We then design outlier tests, specific to each variable, to be applied to

423

Contract/Project Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

First Quarter First Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 84% Construction 83% Cleanup 85% 77% Pre-CAP 86% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 1st Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 94% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

424

Contract/Project Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Second Quarter Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 88% Construction 87% Cleanup 89% 77% Pre-CAP 92% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 2nd Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 96% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

425

Contract/Project Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fourth Quarter Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Final FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Final Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 86% Construction 87% Cleanup 84% 77% Pre-CAP 89% Post-CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 4th Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 100% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

426

Contract/Project Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Third Quarter Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 87% Construction 87% Cleanup 87% 77% Pre-CAP 90% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 3rd Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 98% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - attendance improves quality Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skills... by the University's Said Business School); Career Planning; Quality Management (ISO 9001) and Environmental... , Tokyo & Milan and the 2009 tour is to China). All EPSRC...

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality non-attainment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arellano, University of Arizona AQ management contact: Jerry Dilley (Regional Air Quality Council), Ralph... Implementation Plan (SIP) Photochemical Modeling for the Denver...

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality existing Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 7 Air Quality Management CE 403503 Spring 2011 Summary: problem exists; 2) Modeling the impact of...

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieve air quality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Texas A&M University Collection: Engineering ; Renewable Energy 3 The Air Quality Management Resource Centre is part of the Institute for Sustainability, Health and...

431

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment air quality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the published version available August 2005. Improving Emission Inventories for Summary: Air Quality Management Across North America -- A NARSTO Assessment -- Table of Contents...

432

NS&T Managment Observations - 1st Quarter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

David Gianotto

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

434

VoIP Quality Evaluation in Mobile Wireless Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Managing voice service quality over both IP-based wired and wireless networks has become a challenge, especially in a heterogeneous network environment. This paper discusses the issues that affect voice qualit...

1; 2Pei-Jeng Kuo; Koji Omae; Ichiro Okajima…

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Integrated Safety Management Policy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Program Management » Quality Assurance » Integrated Services » Program Management » Quality Assurance » Integrated Safety Management Policy Integrated Safety Management Policy This Integrated Safety Management (ISM) System Description (ISMSD) defines how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) integrates environment, safety, and health requirements and controls into Federal work activities, and oversees implementation of ISM within EM federal and contractor activities. It explains our safety values, objectives and approach for ensuring protection to the public, worker and the environment, consistent with DOE Policy 450.4, Safety Management System Policy. The ISMSD describes how EM conducts work following the seven ISM Guiding Principles, the five ISM core functions, and also incorporates the

436

EM Quality Assurance Program (EM-QA-001 Revision 0)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I ~ r h b 1tv2om m ~ e e of Environments1M a ~ f p ~ ~ ! n n t (EM) Snbjeet: E M Quality Asamnee Program (QBP) Policies, Procedures, APPROVED: and Plans Principal Deputy Secretary for Environmental Management 1.0 PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVE The purpose of this document is to describe the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance Program (QAP). The QAP is the EM management system to ensure we "do work correctly." The QAP meets the requirements of DOE 0 414. IC, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830 Subpart A "Quality Assurance Requirements." It is intended that the requirements of DOE 0 414.1C and 10 CFR 830 Subpart A are met by implementing this QAP. The QAP provides EM expectations for implementing quality assurance (QA) across the EM complex. The QAP

437

Regulatory software configuration management system design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gap between nuclear safety-related regulations and the commercial software configuration management causes software quality concerns for Digital Control and Information System (DCIS) of a nuclear power plant. The main reason is that the DCIS of a ...

I-Hsin Chou; Chin-Feng Fan

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Account Executive Account Manager of Sales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerospace Engineer Air Quality Engineer Analyst Analyst/Consultant Applications Engineer ASIC VerificationAccount Executive Account Manager of Sales Administrative Assistant Advanced Systems Engineer Engineer Assistant Administrator Assistant Analyst Assistant Development Engineer Assistant Director

439

Adapting California's water management to climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage, water transfers, conservation, recycling, and desalination to meet changing demands. These same of agricultural water districts manage water supplies for California's farmers. Nearly 600 local wastewater utilities must meet water quality standards for municipal wastewater discharge. Most county governments

Pasternack, Gregory B.

440

Soil bioassays as tools for sludge compost quality assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Composting is a waste management technology that is becoming more widespread as a response to the increasing production of sewage sludge and the pressure for its reuse in soil. In this study, different bioassays (plant germination, earthworm survival, biomass and reproduction, and collembolan survival and reproduction) were assessed for their usefulness in the compost quality assessment. Compost samples, from two different composting plants, were taken along the composting process, which were characterized and submitted to bioassays (plant germination and collembolan and earthworm performance). Results from our study indicate that the noxious effects of some of the compost samples observed in bioassays are related to the low organic matter stability of composts and the enhanced release of decomposition endproducts, with the exception of earthworms, which are favored. Plant germination and collembolan reproduction inhibition was generally associated with uncomposted sludge, while earthworm total biomass and reproduction were enhanced by these materials. On the other hand, earthworm and collembolan survival were unaffected by the degree of composting of the wastes. However, this pattern was clear in one of the composting procedures assessed, but less in the other, where the release of decomposition endproducts was lower due to its higher stability, indicating the sensitivity and usefulness of bioassays for the quality assessment of composts.

Domene, Xavier, E-mail: x.domene@creaf.uab.es [Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), Facultat de Ciencies i Biociencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Valles, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Sola, Laura; Ramirez, Wilson; Alcaniz, Josep M.; Andres, Pilar [Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), Facultat de Ciencies i Biociencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Valles, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Wood Quality: The Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Quality: The Effects of Planting Density and Thinning Eini C. Lowell PNW Research Station wood quality? By volume, characteristic, product? #12;http://jilldenton.files.wordpress.com/2007, faster #12;What is it that defines wood quality?What is it that defines wood quality? Density: earlywood

442

Track 9: Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 9: Quality Assurance

443

The Heart Failure Bridge Clinic Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Heart Failure Bridge Clinic Quality Improvement Project My project involved working with my mentor, Tasha Beck Freitag, CRNP, MPH, CHFN, and loosely with Deirdre Flowers, MSN-MPH, who is the heart failure case manager. The heart failure bridge clinic (HFBC), is a standalone clinic that was created

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

444

2015 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Project Plan is jointly developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG), to provide execution support to the EM Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board. The Board serves a vital and critical role in ensuring that the EM mission is completed safely, correctly, and efficiently.

445

2014 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Project Plan is jointly developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG), to provide execution support to the EM Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board. The Board serves a vital and critical role in ensuring that the EM mission is completed safely, correctly, and efficiently.

446

Quality Assurance Lessons Learned 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quality Council Lessons Learned Quality Council Lessons Learned Vendor Supplier Deficiencies: Myers Drum Concerns at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) The Office of Packaging and Transportation, in the DOE Office of Environmental Management, issued a Safety Alert in January 12, 2010, (Issue Number: DOE/OPT/SA-01) alerting the DOE packaging and transportation community about potential failure associated with 55 and 30-gallon carbon steel drum closure rings. On January 13, 2010, HSS issued a Data Collection Sheet (DCS) to all DOE sites citing the concerns as well. Those concerns arose while contractors were performing receipt inspections on several lots of drums and drum rings received at the Hanford site and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It was determined that the drum

447

Nuclear Safety Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

[6450-01-P] [6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 830 Nuclear Safety Management AGENCY: Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Final Rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing a final rule regarding Nuclear Safety Management. This Part establishes requirements for the safe management of DOE contractor and subcontractor work at the Department's nuclear facilities. Today's rule adopts the sections that will make up the generally applicable provisions for Part 830. It also adopts the specific section on provisions for developing and implementing a formalized quality assurance program. EFFECTIVE DATE: This regulation becomes effective [insert 30 days after publication in the Federal Register.] FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Frank Hawkins, U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Safety

448

FAQS Qualification Card - Weapon Quality Assurance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Weapon Quality Assurance Weapon Quality Assurance FAQS Qualification Card - Weapon Quality Assurance A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-WeaponQualityAssurance.docx Description Weapon Quality Assurance Qualification Card More Documents & Publications DOE-STD-1025-2008

449

FAQS Qualification Card - Safety Software Quality Assurance | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety Software Quality Assurance Safety Software Quality Assurance FAQS Qualification Card - Safety Software Quality Assurance A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-SafetySoftwareQualityAssurance.docx Description Safety Software Quality Assurance Qualification Card More Documents & Publications

450

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality manages solid waste for the state of Louisiana under the authority of the Solid Waste Management and Resource Recover Law. The Department makes rules and regulations that establish standards governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery and reuse, and disposal of solid waste; implement a management program that

451

Quality Assurance Policy and Directives | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Assurance Policy and Directives Quality Assurance Policy and Directives Quality Assurance Policy and Directives The Office of Quality Assurance is responsible for DOE's quality assurance (QA) policy and requirements, and for providing assistance with QA implementation. DOE's QA requirements are found in a regulation for nuclear facilities/activities 10 CFR 830, Subpart A and DOE O 414.1D, Quality Assurance, for all other applications. Guidance for implementing the requirements is found in: DOE G 414.1-1B, G 414.1-2B, G 414.1-3, G 414.1-4 and portions of G 450.4-1. The Office also represents DOE's interests on international and national quality standards committees and conformity assessment bodies (third-party quality/environmental management system accreditation) and participates in DOE and contractor QA organizations.

452

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

453

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

455

Power management system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

456

Studies of urban air quality using electrochemical based sensor instruments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Poor air quality has been projected to be the world’s top cause of environmental premature mortality by 2050 surpassing poor sanitation and dirty water (IGBP / IGAC press release, 2012 ). One of the major challenges of air quality management is how...

Popoola, Olalekan Abdul Muiz

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

457

Management Responsibilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Responsibilities Management Responsibilities Depleted UF6 Management Responsibilities DOE has responsibility for safe and efficient management of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6. Organizational Responsibilities In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing all the depleted uranium that has been generated by the government and has been declared surplus to national defense needs. In addition, as a result of two memoranda of agreement that have been signed between the DOE and USEC, the DOE has assumed management responsibility for approximately 145,000 metric tons of depleted UF6 that has been or will be generated by USEC. Any additional depleted UF6 that USEC generates will be USEC's responsibility to manage. DOE Management Responsibility

458

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Management Energy Management Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation Notices & Rules Guidance Facility Reporting Fleet Reporting Energy Management Guidance The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance on Federal

459

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Full Document and Summary Versions...

460

S-PRIME Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System Quality Assurance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP)describes how the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System Design and Technology Demonstration Project addresses the Quality Assurance requirements delineated in DOE Order 5700.6C and the Thermionic Program Management Plan 214PMP000001. The Quality Assurance Program is based on the following fundamental principles, which Rocketdyne endorses and the QA Project Manager and Program Manager shall enforce: Quality Achievement is a continuing responsibility of line organization at all levels; the Quality Assurance organization through the effective overview of work, gives additional assurance that specified requirements are met; risk is the fundamental consideration in determining to what extent the Quality Assurance Plan should be applied to items and processes; action is based on facts and analysis, customer driven quality, strong quality leadership and continuous improvement.

Jones, C.M.

1992-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

462

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

463

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

464

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

465

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

466

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

467

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

468

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

469

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

470

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

471

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

472

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

473

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

474

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

475

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

476

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

477

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

478

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

479

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

480

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total quality management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

482

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

483

Nursing Home Administrators' Personality And Nursing Home Quality: Correlations Between The Predictive Index And Cms Ratings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The approximately two million residents in nursing homes are nearly totally dependent on the care they receive from the nursing homes' staff. The quality of… (more)

Osbaldiston, Kelly Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Improvement of the Protein Quality of Corn With Soybean Protein  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In most Central American countries, lime-treated corn provides 31% of the total protein and 45% of the energy intake, and beans 24% of the ... quality and quantity, as well as in energy. To overcome these deficie...

Ricardo Bressani; Luiz G. Elías…

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

ELLIS, TIMOTHY ALAN. Assessing Nursery Quality for Southern Flounder, Paralichthys lethostigma, through Fish Energy Content and Habitat Abiotic Conditions. (Under the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitat quality were compared: fish energy content and habitat abiotic conditions. The hypothesis habitat quality. When measured on appropriate temporal and spatial scales, total fish energy contentABSTRACT ELLIS, TIMOTHY ALAN. Assessing Nursery Quality for Southern Flounder, Paralichthys

Buckel, Jeffrey A.

486

Investigative Tools and Techniques for Indoor Air Quality Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATIVE TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR INDOOR AIR QUALITY STUDIES Steven R. Kennedy, C.E.P., REM, project Manager I C. Brandon ~uinn, P.E., C.P.G., Project Manager James E. Henderson, Ph. D., Director of ~nalytical services ' Robert G. ~ickery...

Kennedy, S. R.; Quinn, C. B.; Henderson, J. E.; Vickery, R. G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Social Perceptions of Drinking Water Quality in South Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality in the Lower Rio Grande Valley were examined, notably trying to assess the gap in social perceptions between key water managers and the colonia residents. A semi-structured interview methodology was used upon the key water managers in order...

Garcia, Victor

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

488

Quality Manual Faculty of Law, Economics and Finance (FDEF)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compliance of the Faculty's administration with the quality management system based on ISO standard 9001. We and management activities. It excludes sections 7.3, 7.5.4, 7.5.5 et 7.6 of ISO standard 9001, which relate

van der Torre, Leon

489

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

490

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

491

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT OFFICE MANAGEMENT OFFICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT OFFICE INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT OFFICE THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH University of Utah | Investment Management Office Quarterly Summary The Endowment Pool had a positive first quarter (ending March gain from investments of $7.8 million. The Endowment Pool unit value of $100 has grown to $175 in 10

492

Energy Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12 months) Identify and prioritize activities and projects that reduce energy use Connect energy efficiency to other business objectives (i.e. safety, quality, etc.) Develop...

493

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

494

OLYMPIC AIR QUALITY QUESTIONABLE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

OLYMPIC AIR QUALITY QUESTIONABLE ... Athletes GOING FOR GOLD worry about Beijing’s air ... Atmospheric chemists say the air quality during the Beijing Games literally rests on which direction the winds blow. ...

RACHEL PETKEWICH

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

495

Quality Assurance Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Formal EM policy on the use of the corporate Quality Assurance Program (EM-QA-001 Rev. 1) to ensure all EM projects utilize a consistent quality assurance approach.

496

Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 2 BACTERIA MANAGING tx H2O | pg. 3 IN TEXAS WATERS POLLUTION Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters tx H2O | pg. 4 W ith 310 water bodies in Texas failing to meetwater quality standards because... of bacteria,managing bacteria pollution is commanding the attention of water agencies, researchers and stake- holders across Texas. These water bodies are listed in the 2006 Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet the standards...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose was to: (1) define reservoir problems related to water quality conditions; (2) identify the probable causes of these problems; and (3) recommend procedures for achieving needed reservoir water quality improvements. This report presents the project findings to date and suggests steps for upgrading the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section II presents background information on the characteristics of the basin, the reservoir, and the beneficial uses of the reservoir. Section III identifies the impacts of existing reservoir water quality on uses of the reservoir for water supply, fishery resources, recreation, and waste assimilation. Section IV presents an assessment of cause-effect relationships. The factors affecting water quality addressed in Section IV are: (1) reservoir thermal stratification and hydrodynamics; (2) dissolved oxygen depletion; (3) eutrophication; (4) toxic substances; and (5) reservoir fisheries. Section V presents a preliminary evaluation of alternatives for improving the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section VI presents preliminary conclusions and recommendations for developing and implementing a reservoir water quality management plan. 7 references, 22 figures, 21 tables.

Iwanski, M.L.; Higgins, J.M.; Kim, B.R.; Young, R.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

2011 Project Management Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Management Workshop Project Management Workshop 2011 Project Management Workshop 2011 DOE Project Management Workshop Paul Bosco, The New DOE O 413.3B Jeff Baker, EERE's Research Support Facility Patrick Ferraro, Contract Management/ Project Management Summit Outbrief Anirban Basu, Construction Economic Forecast John Curran, LED Lighting Michael Deane, Construction and Demolition Debris Recycle Mark Fallon, Leadership & Safety Cost Estimating Panel, The Science and Art of Cost Estimating Tom Fox, Leading in Tough Times Bob Raines, Project Management Update Tony Cannon, Nuclear Quality Assurance Issues Peer Review Panel, Peer Reviews 101 Terry Cooke-Davies, Project Complexity Rod Rimando, EM Project Management Framework PMCDP Panel, PMCDP CRB CRB Panel Questions & Answers Chad Henderson, FPD's Perspective

499

Software Quality Models: Purposes, Usage Scenarios and Requirements Florian Deissenboeck, Elmar Juergens, Klaus Lochmann, and Stefan Wagner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research on software quality is as old as software re- search itself. As in other engineering and scienceSoftware Quality Models: Purposes, Usage Scenarios and Requirements Florian Deissenboeck, Elmar Software quality models are a well-accepted means to support quality management of software systems. Over

500

Software Quality Models: Purposes, Usage Scenarios and Requirements Florian Deissenboeck, Elmar Juergens, Klaus Lochmann, and Stefan Wagner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research on software quality is as old as software re- search itself. As in other engineering and sciencesSoftware Quality Models: Purposes, Usage Scenarios and Requirements Florian Deissenboeck, Elmar Software quality models are a well-accepted means to support quality management of software systems. Over

Deissenboeck, Florian