Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

Kallman, Jeffrey S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Planar Total Internal Reflection Biofouling Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cladding Input Edge Diffraction Critical Point Core LaserCladding Core Input Edge Diffraction Surface Plasmon Resonance Metal Layer Prism-coupler (Sensor) Laser

Nam, Koo Hyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

North Atlantic Oscillation influence and weather types associated with winter total and extreme precipitation events in Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis of winter intensity and frequency of precipitation is presented, based on 102 daily precipitation stations over Spain and the Balearic Islands for the 1997–2006 decade. Precipitation stations have been merged in the eight different regions which compose the analyzed area by the use of an EOF analysis. NAO influence on the intensity and frequency of precipitation of each region is described in terms of mean precipitation, mean rain frequency, the number of extreme events, changes in the precipitation distribution and the prevalent synoptic configuration. Results indicate a non-stationary response; NAO signal being more evident in mid–late winter. Strong regional differences in the response to NAO are also found, which vary according to the specific character of the precipitation under analysis. Thus, NAO exerts a clear effect on the intensity of total and extreme precipitation rates in northern and westernmost Spanish regions, whereas the frequency of precipitation is clearly affected by NAO in central and southwestern areas. While the correlation between NAO and precipitation is negative for most of the analyzed area, two regions reveal positive responses to NAO in total precipitation occurrence and intensity for specific months. Further analyses reveal asymmetric responses to opposite phases of NAO in the precipitation distributions of some regions. The complex regional relationship between NAO and precipitation is also revealed through the modulation of the former in the preferred Circulation Weather Types associated to precipitation in each region. This spatially non-homogeneous NAO signal stresses the need of caution when employing Iberian precipitation as a proxy for NAO.

S. Queralt; E. Hernández; D. Barriopedro; D. Gallego; P. Ribera; C. Casanova

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

6

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

7

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

8

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

9

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

10

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

11

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

12

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

13

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

14

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

15

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

16

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

17

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

18

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

19

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

20

Temperature Control Framework Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Geostatistical Analysis for Total Spatial Awareness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) intelligent control, and (3) home automation [1]. Home automation is the use of products to link services presents a novel framework for intelligent temperature control in smart homes using Wireless Sensor Home; Intelligent Temperature Control; Wireless Sensor Network; WSN; Context Awareness; Geostatistical

Fan, Jeffrey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Flow-Through Fourier Transform Infrared Sensor for Total Hydrocarbons Determination in Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new flow-through Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) sensor for oil in water analysis based on solid-phase spectroscopy on octadecyl (C18) silica particles has been developed. The C18...

Pérez-Palacios, David; Armenta, Sergio; Lendl, Bernhard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 25, NO. 1, 2008, 1123 Total Deformation and its Role in Heavy Precipitation Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research and Forecasting (WRF) model output data. It is found that right before the occurrence of the terms shows that the pressure gradient plays a major role in determining the local change of total and wind velocity, only wind velocity is a vector. At the mesoscale, where the characteristic scale is less

Xue, Ming

23

Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) Global Gridded Products Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) Global Gridded Products Dataset Summary Description The SSM/I products are useful for evaluating the mean climate state, it's interannual and seasonal variations, and the detection of anomalies associated with ENSO and regional climatic variations. The Hydrology Team has assembled a time series of the entire SSM/I archive, now entering it's 16th year, which includes data from July 1987 to the present. Monthly average products are produced for precipitation, cloud liquid water, total precipitable water, snow cover, sea-ice cover, and oceanic surface wind speed.

24

CDIAC Precipitation Data Sets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Precipitation Precipitation CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Precipitation Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Stations data; monthly totals Varies by station; through 1990 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Station data; monthly totals Varies by station; some through most recent month A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (CDIAC DB-1003) R.S. Bradley et al. Monthly, seasonal, and annual anomaly maps of precipitation 1851 - 1989 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record

25

Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ polarization difference...

Manning, Norman Willis William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

Sensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in such a way that the total energy usage of the active sensor nodes in the tree is minimized. However whenSensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees Ling Shi , Agostino Capponi , Karl H. Johansson and Richard M. Murray Abstract

Johansson, Karl Henrik

27

precipitation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

precipitation precipitation Dataset Summary Description This dataset, made available by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), presents summer and winter precipitation for England and Wales, and the percent change from the baseline (1961 - 1990 average). The original source of the data is the Hadley Centre. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 12th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords climate change precipitation UK Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 1 Excel file: Precipitation, 1874 - 2009 (xls, 68.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment (Does not have "National Statistics" status) Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1874 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

28

A simulation model for the lifetime of wireless sensor networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present a model for the lifetime of wireless sensor networks. The model takes into consideration several parameters such as the total number of sensors, network size, percentage of sink nodes, location of sensors, the mobility of sensors, and power consumption. A definition of the life time of the network based on three different criteria is introduced; percentage of available power to total power, percentage of alive sensors to total sensors, and percentage of alive sink sensors to total sink sensors. A Matlab based simulator is developed for the introduced model. A number of wireless sensor networks scenarios are presented and discussed.

Elleithy, Abdelrahman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Heavy Daily Precipitation Frequency over the Contiguous United States: Sources of Climatic Variability and Seasonal Predictability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By matching large-scale patterns in climate fields with patterns in observed station precipitation, this work explores seasonal predictability of precipitation in the contiguous United States for all seasons. Although it is shown that total ...

Alexander Gershunov; Daniel R. Cayan

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Precipitation of petroleum sulfonates by magnesium ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precipitation of petroleum sulfonates was accomplished by the addition of magnesium ions. The magnesium tolerance, defined as the total magnesium concentration at which 5% of the total sulfonate was precipitated, was determined in aqueous solution for 20 commercial petroleum sulfonates. The magnesium tolerances ranged from essentially zero up to 2300 ppM of magnesium. The level of magnesium tolerated increases as the average equivalent weight of the sulfonate decreases. The precipitate formed during the reaction includes a high percentage of sodium sulfonate as well as magnesium sulfonate. All of the samples were prepared to contain 3% active sulfonate, and the reaction temperature was 30/sup 0/C. The precipitate was removed by centrifuging and filtering. The amount of unreacted sulfonate remaining in the filtrate was determined indirectly by measuring the magnesium and sodium remaining in the filtrate. The viscosities of the filtrates were found to change as the amount of magnesium added was increased. The viscosity goes through at least one maximum before rapid precipitation of sulfonate occurs. 5 figures, 2 tables.

French, T.R.; Collins, A.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Relationships among Lightning, Precipitation, and Hydrometeor Characteristics over the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lightning data from the Pacific Lightning Detection Network (PacNet) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite were compared with TRMM precipitation radar products and latent heating and ...

Antti T. Pessi; Steven Businger

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Global precipitation retrieval algorithm trained for SSMIS using a numerical weather prediction model: Design and evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents and evaluates a global precipitation retrieval algorithm for the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS). It is based on those developed earlier for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

Surussavadee, Chinnawat

33

ARM - Measurement - Precipitation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsPrecipitation govMeasurementsPrecipitation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Precipitation All liquid or solid phase aqueous particles that originate in the atmosphere and fall to the earth's surface. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer LDIS : Laser Disdrometer MWRHF : Microwave Radiometer - High Frequency

34

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

35

Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 1: precipitation scavenging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers are presented under the headings: cloud studies, precipitation chemistry, plume studies, gas scavenging, microphysics and models.

Pruppacher, H.R.; Semonin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

ARM - Evaluation Product - Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsQuantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) ProductsQuantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from the CSAPR Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from the CSAPR Site(s) SGP TWP General Description Precipitation rates from cloud systems can give a fundamental insight into the processes occurring in-cloud. While rain gauges and disdrometers can give information at a single point, remote sensors such as radars can provide rainfall information over a defined area. The QPE value-added product (VAP) takes the Corrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates VAP and maps the Rain_rate_A field onto a Cartesian grid at the surface. This field is the rain rate as determined using the specific attenuation (A, dBZ/km) due to two-way liquid attenuation after Ryzhkov et

37

Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and the global monsoon total precipitation (GMP) have increased during 1979­2008 [Hsu et al., 2011; Wang et alIncrease of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal? Pang of people around the world. The global monsoon precipitation had an increasing trend over the past three

Li, Tim

38

The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Precipitation affects many aspects of our everyday life. It is the primary source of freshwater and has significant socioeconomic impacts resulting from natural hazards such as hurricanes, floods, droughts, and landslides. Fundamentally, precipitation is ...

Arthur Y. Hou; Ramesh K. Kakar; Steven Neeck; Ardeshir A. Azarbarzin; Christian D. Kummerow; Masahiro Kojima; Riko Oki; Kenji Nakamura; Toshio Iguchi

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

40

Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

Crawford, Don L. (Moscow, ID); Pometto, III, Anthony L. (Moscow, ID)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sandia National Laboratories: Sensors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensors Sensors Sandia's Microsensor and Sensor Microsystem effort develops sensors and sensor arrays for chemical, physical, and biological detection Custom Solutions Microsensors...

42

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

43

Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design of Freiburg #12;OverviewOverview · Sensor networks · mobile sensor · mobile robot · Mote · sensor relocation #12;Sensor networks · A wirless network . · Set of sensors. · Static Mote #12;Mobile sensor networks

Schindelhauer, Christian

44

Investigation of Microphysical Parameters within Winter and Summer Type Precipitation Events over Mountainous [Complex] Terrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study we investigate complex terrain effects on precipitation with RAMS for both in winter and summer cases from a microphysical perspective. We consider a two dimensional east-west topographic cross section in New Mexico representative of the Jemez mountains on the west and the Sangre de Cristo mountains on the east. Located between these two ranges is the Rio Grande Valley. In these two dimensional experiments, variations in DSDs are considered to simulate total precipitation that closely duplicate observed precipitation.

Stalker, James R.; Bossert, James E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from such as cloud mask, atmos- pheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties vapor amount, aerosol particles, and the subsequently formed clouds [9]. Barnes et al. [2] provide

Sheridan, Jennifer

46

Inducing Mineral Precipitation in Groundwater by Addition of Phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Induced precipitation of phosphate minerals to scavenge trace metals and radionuclides from groundwater is a potential remediation approach for contaminated aquifers. Phosphate minerals can sequester trace elements by primary mineral formation, solid solution formation and/or adsorption, and they are poorly soluble under many environmental conditions, making them attractive for long-term sustainable remediation. The success of such engineered schemes will depend on the particular mineral phases generated, their rates of formation, and their long term stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals under conditions representative of a natural groundwater. Because microorganisms are present in groundwater, and because some proposed schemes for induced phosphate mineral precipitation rely on the stimulation of native groundwater populations, we also tested the effect of bacterial cells (initial densities of 105 and 107 ml-1) within the precipitation medium. We also tested the effect of a trace mixture of propionic, isovaleric, formic and butyric acids (total concentration 0.035 mM). The experiments showed that the general progression of mineral precipitation was similar under all of the conditions, with initial formation of amorphous calcium carbonate, and transformation to poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) by the end of the week-long experiments. The presence of the bacterial cells appeared to delay precipitation, although by the end of 7 days the overall extent of precipitation was similar for all of the treatments. The stoichiometry of the final precipitates as well as results of Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data indicated that the treatments including organic acids and bacterial cells resulted in increased distortion of the HAP crystal lattice, with the higher concentration of cells resulting in the greatest distortion. Uptake of Sr into the phosphate minerals was decreased in the treatments with cells and organic acids, compared to the control. The results of the experiments enable a greater understanding of the challenges associated with phosphate-based remediation schemes for contaminated environments.

Karen E. Wright; Yoshiko Fujita; Thomas Hartmann; Mark Conrad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 1. Precipitation scavenging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These two volumes contain papers prepared for and presented at the Fourth International Conference on Precipitation Scavenging, Dry Deposition, and Resuspension (the Chamberlain Meeting) held during 29 November to 3 December, 1982 in Santa Monica, California. Papers presented are abstracted separately.

Pruppacher, H.R.; Semonin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Interdecadal changes in summertime tropical cyclone precipitation over Southeast China during 1960–2009  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the changes in tropical cyclone (TC) precipitation and the associated contributing factors over Southeast China during 1960–2009. Climatologically, TC rainfall accounts for approximately 20–40% of the total rainfall over ...

Richard C. Y. Li; Wen Zhou

50

Precipitate stability in Zircaloy-2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a follow-up to previous work on Zircaloy-4, irradiated Zircaloy-2 was studied both with and without post-irradiation annealing. The Zircaloy-2 samples were taken from a BWR water-rod at locations with fluences of 2.9 {times} 10{sup 21}, 7.7 {times} 10{sup 21}, and 12.0 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV), all having irradiation temperatures of 288{degree}C. Material from these samples demonstrated irradiation induced phenomena quite similar to Zircaloy-4, including the gradual amorphization and dissolution of Zr(Cr, FE){sub 2} precipitates and the development of {bar c}-component dislocations. Zr{sub 2} (Fe,Ni) precipitates in the Zircaloy-2 did not show signs of amorphization, but show a small degree of Fe depletion with increasing fluence. The depletion of iron was reversed upon post-irradiation annealing at 575 to 750{degree}C in both types of precipitates. Post-irradiation annealing caused intergranular precipitates to form. At 575{degree}C, both intergranular Zr{sub 2} (Fe,Ni) and Zr(Cr,Fe){sub 2} were found, while at 625 and 6675{degree}C, only the latter appeared. This is probably a consequence of the faster ripening of Zr{sub 2} (Fe,Ni). No intergranular precipitates were found after 1 hour at 750{degree}C, which is probably due to their dissolution during ripening. 29 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

Kruger, R.M. (General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

52

Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals www.msm.cam.ac.uk/phase-trans #12 diffusion into austenite Carbon diffusion into austenite and carbide precipitation in ferrite Carbide precipitation from austenite CASE 2: elimination of carbides #12;#12;#12;0.110.090.070.050.03 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

Cambridge, University of

53

Modeling Asphaltene Precipitation in Reservoir Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The primary goal of this study was to simulate the effects of asphaltene precipitation on miscible-gas flooding. ... We simulated three different cases to investigate the effect of asphaltene precipitation on oil production for different rock fabrics. ... (7) The simplified algorithm for asphaltene precipitation gives simulation results in agreement with simulations using the pseudo-multiphase algorithm and saves significant computational time. ...

Xiangjun Qin; Peng Wang; Kamy Sepehrnoori; Gary A. Pope

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

Future credible precipitation occurrences in Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I have studied many factors thought to have influenced past climatic change. Because they might recur, they are possible suspects for future climatic alterations. Most of these factors are totally unpredictable; therefore, they cast a shadow on the validity of derived climatic predictions. Changes in atmospheric conditions and in continental surfaces, variations in solar radiation, and in the earth's orbit around the sun are among the influential mechanisms investigated. Even when models are set up that include the above parameters, their reliability will depend on unpredictable variables totally alien to the model (like volcanic eruptions). Based on climatic records, however, maximum precipitation amounts have been calculated for different probability levels. These seem to correspond well to past precipitation occurrences, derived from tree ring indices. The link between tree ring indices and local climate has been established through regression analysis.

Abeele, W.V.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Sink repositioning for enhanced performance in wireless sensor networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the energy aware routing approaches for unattended wireless sensor networks pursue multi-hop paths in order to minimize the total transmission power. Since almost in all sensor networks data are routed towards a single sink (gateway), hops close ... Keywords: Energy awareness, Real-time data delivery, Sink relocation, Timeliness, Wireless sensor networks

Kemal Akkaya; Mohamed Younis; Meenakshi Bangad

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

57

Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors TR-UTEDGE-2006-001 Sanem Kabadayi Adam Pridgen Christine Julien © Copyright 2006 The University of Texas at Austin #12;Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors Sanem Kabadayi, Adam Pridgen, and Christine Julien The Center

Julien, Christine

58

Category:Active Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Active Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Active Sensors page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Active Sensors Add.png Add a new Active Sensors Technique Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. R [×] Radar‎ 5 pages Pages in category "Active Sensors" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. L LiDAR R Radar Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Active_Sensors&oldid=689848"

59

Are we there yet?: feasibility of continuous stress assessment via wireless physiological sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stress can lead to headaches and fatigue, precipitate addictive behaviors (e.g., smoking, alcohol and drug use), and lead to cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Continuous assessment of stress from sensors can be used for timely delivery of a variety ... Keywords: mobile health, stress, wireless physiological sensor

Md. Mahbubur Rahman, Rummana Bari, Amin Ahsan Ali, Moushumi Sharmin, Andrew Raij, Karen Hovsepian, Syed Monowar Hossain, Emre Ertin, Ashley Kennedy, David H. Epstein, Kenzie L. Preston, Michelle Jobes, J. Gayle Beck, Satish Kedia, Kenneth D. Ward, Mustafa al'Absi, Santosh Kumar

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Lakes as sensors in the landscape: Optical metrics as scalable sentinel responses to climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lakes as sensors in the landscape: Optical metrics as scalable sentinel responses to climate change, Edgewater, Maryland Abstract As the lowest point in the surrounding landscape, lakes act as sensors to respond to changes in air temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation at timescales ranging from

Williamson, Craig E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

H. Douville D. Salas-Me lia S. Tyteca On the tropical origin of uncertainties in the global land precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2005). Global warming also leads to a systematic increase in total precipitable water, soH. Douville � D. Salas-Me´ lia � S. Tyteca On the tropical origin of uncertainties in the global land precipitation response to global warming Received: 17 August 2005 / Accepted: 25 October 2005

Ribes, Aurélien

62

Distributed detection and fusion in a large wireless sensor network of random size  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For a wireless sensor network (WSN) with a random number of sensors, we propose a decision fusion rule that uses the total number of detections reported by local sensors as a statistic for hypothesis testing. We assume that the signal power attenuates ... Keywords: decision fusion, deflection coefficient, distributed detection, wireless sensor networks

Ruixin Niu; Pramod K. Varshney

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 September 1933 research-article Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve...

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

65

Sensors Handbook, 2 edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Complete, State-of-the-Art Coverage of Sensor Technologies and Applications Fully revised with the latest breakthroughs in integrated sensors and control systems, Sensors Handbook, Second Edition provides all of the information needed ...

Sabrie Soloman

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Precipitation Forecasting with Gamma Distribution Models for Gridded Precipitation Events in Eastern Oklahoma and Northwest Arkansas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An elegant and easy to implement probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasting model that can be used to estimate the probability of exceedance (POE) is presented. The model was built using precipitation data collected across eastern ...

Steven A. Amburn; Andrew S.I.D. Lang; Michael A. Buonaiuto

67

On the Dependence of Winter Precipitation Types on Temperature, Precipitation Rate, and Associated Features  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phase of precipitation formed within the atmosphere is highly dependent on the vertical temperature profile through which it falls. In particular, several precipitation types can form in an environment with a melting layer aloft and a ...

Julie M. Thériault; Ronald E. Stewart; William Henson

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locating–dominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater [186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locating–total dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evaluation of a total energy sensor for glide path control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of optimization problems and boundary conditions. The performance index was defined in terms of altitude h (relative and absolute), or path inclination 7 (relative and absolute) to determine the optimal trajectory on take-off through a wind shear. Resulting... on relative path inclination), theta guidance (based on pitch attitude angle), and acceleration guidance (based on relative acceleration). In another presentation dealing with aircraft trajectories through wind shear, Bowles discussed 12 potential alert...

Oseguera, Rosa Maria

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

70

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

71

Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or sonication, has been shown to successfully remove or prevent the formation of 50–90% of the precipitates in biofuels. Precipitates can plug filters as biodiesel is transported from one location to another, and often cannot be detected by visual inspection....

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

72

Dissolution of ordered precipitates under ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability of the ordered {gamma}{prime} precipitates under 300-keV Ni{sup +} irradiation was investigated between room temperature and 623 K. The two competing mechanisms of destabilization by cascade producing irradiation, i.e. disordering and dissolution of the {gamma}{prime} precipitates in Nimonic PE16 alloy, has been studied separately by electron microscopy and field-ion microscopy with atom probe. At high temperatures, the precipitates are stable. At intermediate temperatures, the precipitates dissolve by ballistic mixing into the matrix, but the interface is restored by the radiation-enhanced atomic jumps. The order in the precipitates remains stable. At low temperatures, the precipitates are dissolved by atomic mixing. The dissolution proceeds in a diffusional manner with a diffusion coefficient normalized by the displacement rate D/K = 0.75 nm{sup 2}dpa{sup {minus}1}. The precipitates become disordered by a fluence of 0.1 dpa, whereas precipitate dissolution needs much higher fluences.

Camus, E.; Bourdeau, F.; Abromeit, C.; Wanderka, N.; Wollenberger, H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in Petroleum Mixtures C. Lira-Galeana and A, Berkeley, CIA 94720 A thermodynamic pamework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum only recently have attempts been made to develop a thermodynamic description. Published methods

Firoozabadi, Abbas

74

Inexpensive Near-IR Sun Photometer for Measuring Total Column Water Vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An inexpensive two-channel near-IR sun photometer for measuring total atmospheric column water vapor (precipitable water) has been developed for use by the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) environmental science ...

David R. Brooks; Forrest M. Mims III; Richard Roettger

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

76

Sensor response rate accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Remotely Deployed Virtual Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remotely Deployed Virtual Sensors TR-UTEDGE-2007-010 Sanem Kabadayi Christine Julien © Copyright 2007 The University of Texas at Austin #12;Remotely Deployed Virtual Sensors Sanem Kabadayi that run on mobile client devices connect to the sensors of a multihop sensor network. For emerging

Julien, Christine

78

Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation of nickel hydroxide films Title Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation of nickel hydroxide films Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1998 Authors Kong, Fanping, Robert Kostecki, Frank R. McLarnon, and Rolf H. Muller Journal Thin Solid Films Volume 313-314 Pagination 775-780 Keywords effective medium approximation, electrochemical precipitation, inhomogeneous films, nickel hydroxide, spectroscopic ellipsometry Abstract In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to investigate the electrochemical precipitation of nickel hydroxide films. By use of optical models for inhomogeneous films it was found that a specific precipitation current density produced the most compact and homogeneous film structures. The density of nickel hydroxide films was derived to be 1.25-1.50 g/cm3. The redox behavior of precipitated nickel hydroxide films was studied with an effective-medium optical model. Incomplete conversion to nickel oxyhydroxide and a reduction in film thickness were found during the oxidation cycle.

79

Atmospheric Rivers Induced Heavy Precipitation and Flooding in the Western U.S. Simulated by the WRF Regional Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty years of regional climate simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model for North America has been analyzed to study the influence of the atmospheric rivers and the role of the land surface on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S. Compared to observations, the simulation realistically captured the 95th percentile extreme precipitation, mean precipitation intensity, as well as the mean precipitation and temperature anomalies of all the atmospheric river events between 1980-1999. Contrasting the 1986 President Day and 1997 New Year Day atmospheric river events, differences in atmospheric stability are found to have an influence on the spatial distribution of precipitation in the Coastal Range of northern California. Although both cases yield similar amounts of heavy precipitation, the 1997 case was found to produce more runoff compared to the 1986 case. Antecedent soil moisture, the ratio of snowfall to total precipitation (which depends on temperature), and existing snowpack all seem to play a role, leading to a higher runoff to precipitation ratio simulated for the 1997 case. This study underscores the importance of characterizing or simulating atmospheric rivers and the land surface conditions for predicting floods, and for assessing the potential impacts of climate change on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S.

Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Precipitation Banding in Idealized Baroclinic Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Moist idealized baroclinic-wave simulations show the development of precipitation bands from a zonally uniform initial midlatitude jet. For a frictionless lower boundary, and with no latent-heat release or surface heat and moisture fluxes, warm ...

Jesse Norris; Geraint Vaughan; David M. Schultz

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Testing Competing High-Resolution Precipitation Forecasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing Competing High-Resolution Precipitation Forecasts Eric Gilleland Research Prediction Comparison Test D1 D2 D = D1 ­ D2 copyright NCAR 2013 Loss Differential Field #12;Spatial Prediction Comparison Test Introduced by Hering and Genton

Gilleland, Eric

82

The Environment of Precipitating Shallow Cumulus Convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitative estimates of precipitation in a typical undisturbed trade wind region are derived from 2 months of radar reflectivity data and compared to the meteorological environment determined from soundings, surface flux, and airborne-lidar ...

Louise Nuijens; Bjorn Stevens; A. Pier Siebesma

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Advanced Concepts on Remote Sensing of Precipitation at Multiple Scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of satellite-based global precipitation data in weather andvarious satellite series have provided valuable weathersatellite precipitation research community, instru- ment development teams, military weather

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

An analysis of winter precipitation in the northeast and a winter weather precipitation type forecasting tool for New York City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are produced. The hourly precipitation-type climatologist present the probabilities for particular precipitation types (frozen, freezing, rain, and mixed) for 2F? temperature intervals from 8F? to 44F?. The synoptic precipitation-type climatologist provide...

Gordon, Christopher James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

Water Vapor Transport and the Production of Precipitation in the Eastern Fertile Crescent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Persian Gulf, etc.) may have a relatively strong affect on the total precipitation falling in the Fertile is the Mediterranean, and to the south is the Persian Gulf. While it has been generally accepted that the area sensitivity to changes in the condition of the Persian Gulf relative to the Mediterranean Sea. This may have

Evans, Jason

87

Range dependent errors in the convective and stratiform partitioning of a radar precipitation estimation algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BZ was classified differently by the two radar data sets at the 1.5 km and 3.0 km analysis levels respectively. The percentage of total rainfall from all precipitation classified differently was 26% for the 1.5 km analysis level, and 28% for the 3.0 km level....

Wood, David Richard

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Localized Topology Control for Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performances. Hence it can efficiently conserve the transmission energy from soft aspects with low cost, and assuming that a message sent by a sensor node will be received by all sensors within its transmission(n) total messages, where each message has O(log n) bits. We also conduct extensive simulations to study

Li, Xiang-Yang

89

Compensating For Changes in MOS Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AirAdvice provided the following introduction: “AirAdvice uses metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensors for measuring total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) in air. These sensors are incorporated into AirAdvice’s indoor air quality (IAQ) monitors. The IAQ monitors are designed so that they require annual calibration to maintain acceptable accuracy. Since the MOS TVOC sensors used in the monitors change in sensitivity with time and exposure to gases, AirAdvice has developed an algorithm-based process that automatically compensates for changes in the sensors. The proposed project is to have PNNL analyze data provided by AirAdvice with these objectives: (1) assess how effective AirAdvice’s automatic drift correction process is, (2) identify any problems in the process, and (3) propose improvements to the process.”

Matzke, Brett D.

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

21 briefing pages total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

91

Building Adaptable Sensor Networks with Sensor Cubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of layers allows easy experiments, upgrades and extensions Small-scale sensor network Example sensor module- world network algorithm and power management behavior · Results from small scale tests can be compared (short packets and high bit rate reduce collision probability); Transmitter's MAC table logic: Small

Roussos, George

92

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

Homuth, Emil F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Giant magnetoresistive sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases, the known values are used to approximate the values for the rest of the temperature range. Although such treatment contributes to uncertainty in model outputs, the model validation test cases indicate that the model, with its associated uncertainty, is valid for its intended use. The intended use of this model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period.

P. Mariner

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

96

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

97

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

98

Sensor system scaling issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

Canavan, G.H.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Sensor readout detector circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

100

Sensor readout detector circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems.

Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Sensors for Environmental Observatories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop December 2004 #12 States of America. 2005. #12;Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF Sponsored Workshop sensor technology and the networks that collect data from them. Present work clearly demonstrates

Hamilton, Michael P.

102

LLNL scientists find precipitation, global warming link  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 11/11/2013 | NR-13-11-04 Lawrence Livermore scientists have found that observed changes in global precipitation are directly affected by human activities. LLNL scientists find precipitation, global warming link Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov LIVERMORE, Calif. -- The rain in Spain may lie mainly on the plain, but the location and intensity of that rain is changing not only in Spain but around the globe. A new study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists shows that observed changes in global (ocean and land) precipitation are directly affected by human activities and cannot be explained by natural variability alone. The research appears in the Nov. 11 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

103

High volume, multiple use, portable precipitator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable high air volume electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a collection electrode adapted to carry a variety of collecting media. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section with a transversely positioned ionization wire to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows over the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. Air flow is maintained at but below turbulent flow, Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the selected medium which can be removed for analysis.

Carlson, Duane C. (N. Augusta, SC)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

104

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cloud Properties and Precipitation Formation Processes Observed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of spring time precipitation that develops in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. · What are the cloud properties for developing cloud in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. Research Objective #12;#12;Quality is based on calibration conducted by Kelly bosch and Dennis Afseth at Weather Modification Inc. (WMI) on 22

Delene, David J.

106

Superconductor precursor mixtures made by precipitation method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for preparing highly pure homogeneous precursor powder mixtures for metal oxide superconductive ceramics. The mixes are prepared by instantaneous precipitation from stoichiometric solutions of metal salts such as nitrates at controlled pH's within the 9 to 12 range, by addition of solutions of non-complexing pyrolyzable cations, such as alkyammonium and carbonate ions.

Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lamppa, Diana L. (Albuquerque, NM); Voigt, James A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Diurnal Precipitation Regimes in the Global Tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diurnal variations of the global tropical precipitation are documented by using two complementary Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) datasets (3B42 and 3G68) for 1998–2006 in an attempt to provide a unified view of the diurnal cycle and a ...

Kazuyoshi Kikuchi; Bin Wang

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Annual Cycle of East African Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

East African precipitation is characterized by a dry annual mean climatology compared to other deep tropical land areas and a bimodal annual cycle with the major rainy season during March–May (MAM, often called the “long rains”) and the second ...

Wenchang Yang; Richard Seager; Mark A. Cane; Bradfield Lyon

109

DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

Kyser, E.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

110

Impacts of Microphysical Scheme on Convective and Stratiform Characteristics in Two High Precipitation Squall Line Events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates the impact of snow, graupel, and hail processes on the simulated squall lines over the Southern Great Plains in the United States. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to simulate two squall line events in May 2007, and the results are validated against radar and surface observations in Oklahoma. Several microphysics schemes are tested in this study, including WRF 5-Class Microphysics Scheme (WSM5), WRF 6-Class Microphysics Scheme (WSM6), Goddard Three Ice scheme (Goddard 3-ice) with graupel, Goddard Two Ice scheme (Goddard 2-ice), and Goddard 3-ice hail scheme. The simulated surface precipitation is sensitive to the microphysics scheme, and especially to whether graupel or hail category is included. All of the three ice (3-ice) schemes overestimated the total precipitation, within which WSM6 has the highest overestimation. Two ice (2-ice) schemes, missing a graupel/hail category, produced less total precipitation than 3-ice schemes. By applying a radar-based convective/stratiform partitioning algorithm, we find that by including the graupel/hail processes, there is an increase in areal coverage, precipitation intensity, updraft and downdraft intensity in convective region and a reduction of areal coverage and its precipitation intensity in stratiform region. For vertical structures, all the bulk schemes, especially 2-ice schemes, have the highest reflectivity located at upper levels (~8 km), which is unrealistic compared to observations. In addition, this study shows the radar-based convective/stratiform partitioning algorithm can reasonably identify WRF simulated precipitation, wind and microphysics fields in both convective and stratiform regions.

Wu, Di; Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Feng, Zhe; Kennedy, Aaron; Mullendore, Gretchen; Gilmore, Matthew; Tao, Wei-Kuo

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

111

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

112

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

113

Capacitive chemical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

114

Working Group Report: Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

Artuso, M.; et al.,

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

115

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

116

Contact stress sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

Kotovsky, Jack

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

117

MTDC Safety Sensor Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MTDC Safety Sensor Technology MTDC Safety Sensor Technology Background Beyond the standard duty cycle data collection system used in the Department of Energy's Medium Truck Duty Cycle program, additional sensors were installed on three test vehicles to collect several safety-related signals of interest to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. The real-time brake stroke, tire pressure, and weight information obtained from these sensors is expected to make possible a number of safety-related analyses such as determining the frequency and severity of braking events and tracking tire pressure changes over time. Because these signals are posted to the vehicle's databus, they also have the potential to be

118

Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Express Licensing Acoustic Concentration Of Particles In Fluid Flow Express Licensing Apparatus And Method For Hydrogen And Oxygen Mass Spectrometry Of The Terrestrial Magnetosphere Express Licensing Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors Express Licensing Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components Express Licensing Corrosion Test Cell For Bipolar Plates Express Licensing Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator Negotiable Licensing Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Express Licensing Foil electron multiplier Express Licensing Hydrogen Sensor

119

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

Homuth, E.F.

1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

120

Error Analysis of Satellite Precipitation Products in Mountainous Basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate quantitative precipitation estimation over mountainous basins is of great importance because of their susceptibility to hazards such as flash floods, shallow landslides, and debris flows, triggered by heavy precipitation events (HPEs). In ...

Yiwen Mei; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou; Efthymios I. Nikolopoulos; Marco Borga

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The precipitation sequence in Al-Mg-Si alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fine-scale precipitation that occurs during age hardening of Al alloy 6061 has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the precipitation sequence is: independent clusters of Mg and Si atoms {yields} co-clusters that contain Mg and Si atoms {yields} small precipitates of unknown structure {yields} {beta}{double_prime} needle-shaped precipitates {yields} B{prime} lath-shaped precipitates and {beta}{prime} rod-shaped precipitates. A new structure is proposed for the {beta}{double_prime} precipitate. It was found that the Mg:Si ratio in the intermediate precipitates and co-clusters was close to 1:1.

Edwards, G.A.; Dunlop, G.L. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)] [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Stiller, K. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Couper, M.J. [Comalco Research Centre, Thomastown, Victoria (Australia)] [Comalco Research Centre, Thomastown, Victoria (Australia)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Diurnal Precipitation Variations in South-Central New Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Orographic forcing of diurnal precipitation variations in south-central New Mexico is examined. Harmonic analysis reveals a strong diurnal cycle in precipitation frequency at all stations studied. In addition, relatively high amplitudes in the ...

Donna F. Tucker

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Diurnal Variations of Warm-Season Precipitation over Northern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the diurnal variations of the warm-season precipitation over northern China using the high-resolution precipitation products obtained from the Climate Prediction Center’s morphing technique (CMORPH) during May–August of 2003–...

Huizhong He; Fuqing Zhang

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Micro-Alloyed Ferritic Steel Strengthened by Nanoscale Precipitates...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the interior of grains. The dual precipitate structure of finely dispersive TiC precipitates in the matrix and coarse M23C6 at grain boundaries provides combined...

125

Diurnal variation of tropical precipitation using five years TRMM data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data are used in this study to reveal diurnal variations of precipitation over the Tropics (30?S ? 30?N) from January, 1998...

Wu, Qiaoyan

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

A critical analysis of bulk precipitation recycling models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precipitation recycling is the contribution of local land evaporation to the precipitation of a region. The significant local evaporative contribution to rainfall in many continental regions highlights the potential ...

Fitzmaurice, Jean Anne

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Reduction of tropical land region precipitation variability via transpiration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tropical rainforests are known to exhibit low intraseasonal precipitation variability compared with oceanic areas with similar mean precipitation in observations and models. In the present study, the potential role of ...

Lee, Jung-Eun

128

Performance of Quality Assurance Procedures on Daily Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The search for precipitation quality control (QC) methods has proven difficult. The high spatial and temporal variability associated with precipitation data causes high uncertainty and edge creep when regression-based approaches are applied. ...

Jinsheng You; Kenneth G. Hubbard; Saralees Nadarajah; Kenneth E. Kunkel

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Global estimation of precipitation using opaque microwave bands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the use of opaque microwave bands for global estimation of precipitation rate. An algorithm was developed for estimating instantaneous precipitation rate for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

Chen, Frederick Wey-Min, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Sensitivity of tropical precipitation extremes to climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precipitation extremes increase in intensity over many regions of the globe in simulations of a warming climate1, 2, 3. The rate of increase of precipitation extremes in the extratropics is consistent across global climate ...

O'Gorman, Paul Ambrose

131

Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at nano-crystalline ZrO2SiO2Si Interfaces . Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at...

132

Augmenting Satellite Precipitation Estimation with Lightning Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used lightning information to augment the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network - Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS). Co-located lightning data are used to segregate cloud patches, segmented from GOES-12 infrared data, into either electrified (EL) or non-electrified (NEL) patches. A set of features is extracted separately for the EL and NEL cloud patches. The features for the EL cloud patches include new features based on the lightning information. The cloud patches are classified and clustered using self-organizing maps (SOM). Then brightness temperature and rain rate (T-R) relationships are derived for the different clusters. Rain rates are estimated for the cloud patches based on their representative T-R relationship. The Equitable Threat Score (ETS) for daily precipitation estimates is improved by almost 12% for the winter season. In the summer, no significant improvements in ETS are noted.

Mahrooghy, Majid [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Younan, Nicolas H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Petersen, Walter A. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL; Hsu, Kuo-Lin [University of California, Irvine; Behrangi, Ali [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Aanstoos, James [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiphase'' atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

Hales, J.M.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

``Multiphase`` atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

Hales, J.M.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies and feedback of land surface and atmospheric processes over large space and time scales. Remote sensing-based variables including soil moisture (from AMSR-E), surface heat fluxes (from MODIS) and precipitation rates

Pan, Ming

136

Thermodynamic modeling for organic solid precipitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A generalized predictive model which is based on thermodynamic principle for solid-liquid phase equilibrium has been developed for organic solid precipitation. The model takes into account the effects of temperature, composition, and activity coefficient on the solubility of wax and asphaltenes in organic solutions. The solid-liquid equilibrium K-value is expressed as a function of the heat of melting, melting point temperature, solubility parameter, and the molar volume of each component in the solution. All these parameters have been correlated with molecular weight. Thus, the model can be applied to crude oil systems. The model has been tested with experimental data for wax formation and asphaltene precipitation. The predicted wax appearance temperature is very close to the measured temperature. The model not only can match the measured asphaltene solubility data but also can be used to predict the solubility of asphaltene in organic solvents or crude oils. The model assumes that asphaltenes are dissolved in oil in a true liquid state, not in colloidal suspension, and the precipitation-dissolution process is reversible by changing thermodynamic conditions. The model is thermodynamically consistent and has no ambiguous assumptions.

Chung, T.H.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

138

Energy Conservation in Sensor and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Energy Conservation in Sensor and Sensor-Actuator Networks Ivan Stojmenovic 4 wireless network, and must work unattended. The limited energy budget at the individual sensor level

Stojmenovic, Ivan

139

Winter Precipitation Microphysics Characterized by Polarimetric Radar and Video Disdrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are dependent on the type of precipitation that reaches the surface. Winter storms such as freezing rain precipitation not having the mixed phase. There are also some studies that focus on various winter precipitation types. Trapp et al (2001) used a polarimetric radar to observe a winter storm event with snow and mixed-phase

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

140

Kaolinite dissolution and precipitation kinetics at 22oC and pH 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissolution and precipitation rates of low defect Georgia kaolinite (KGa-1b) as a function of Gibbs free energy of reaction (or reaction affinity) were measured at 22 C and pH 4 in continuously stirred flowthrough reactors. Steady state dissolution experiments showed slightly incongruent dissolution, with a Si/Al ratio of about 1.12 that is attributed to the re-adsorption of Al on to the kaolinite surface. No inhibition of the kaolinite dissolution rate was apparent when dissolved aluminum was varied from 0 and 60 {micro}M. The relationship between dissolution rates and the reaction affinity can be described well by a Transition State Theory (TST) rate formulation with a Temkin coefficient of 2 R{sub diss} (mol/m{sup 2}s) = 1.15 x 10{sup -13} [1-exp(-{Delta}G/2RT)]. Stopping of flow in a close to equilibrium dissolution experiment yielded a solubility constant for kaolinite at 22 C of 10{sup 7.57}. Experiments on the precipitation kinetics of kaolinite showed a more complex behavior. One conducted using kaolinite seed that had previously undergone extensive dissolution under far from equilibrium conditions for 5 months showed a quasi-steady state precipitation rate for 105 hours that was compatible with the TST expression above. After this initial period, however, precipitation rates decreased by an order of magnitude, and like other precipitation experiments conducted at higher supersaturation and without kaolinite seed subjected to extensive prior dissolution, could not be described with the TST law. The initial quasi-steady state rate is interpreted as growth on activated sites created by the dissolution process, but this reversible growth mechanism could not be maintained once these sites were filled. Long-term precipitation rates showed a linear dependence on solution saturation state that is generally consistent with a two dimensional nucleation growth mechanism following the equation R{sub ppt}(mol/m{sup 2}s) = 3.38 x 10{sup -14} exp[- 181776/T{sup 2} 1n{Omega}]. Further analysis using Synchrotron Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) in Total Electron Yield (TEY) mode of the material from the precipitation experiments showed spectra for newly precipitated material compatible with kaolinite. An idealized set of reactive transport simulations of the chemical weathering of albite to kaolinite using rate laws from HELLMANN and TISSERAND (2006) and this study respectively indicate that while pore waters are likely to be close to equilibrium with respect to kaolinite at pH 4, significant kaolinite supersaturation may occur at higher pH if its precipitation rate is pH dependent.

Steefel, Carl; Yang, L.; Steefel, C.I.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

142

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

143

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

144

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

145

Sensors and actuators 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains the proceedings on sensors and actuators 1990. Topics covered include: Hot wire air flow meter for engine control systems, A technique for the real-time estimation of air-fuel ratio using molecular weight ratios, combustion knock sensing: Sensor selection and application issues, and An indirect sensing technique for closed-loop diesel fuel quantity control.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Sensors & Materials | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensors and Materials Argonne uses its materials and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical...

147

4 - Mobile Robot Sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of sensors is of paramount importance for closing the feedback control loops that secure efficient and automated/autonomous operation of mobile robots in real-life applications. Sensing methods provide higher level and intelligence capabilities that go far beyond the “preprogrammed” style of operation. This chapter provides a conceptual introduction to a number of important sensors for mobile robot operation and control. Specifically, the objectives of the chapter are (i) to provide a popular classification of sensors, along with their operational features, (ii) to discuss sonar, laser, and infrared sensors, (iii) to present an outline of robotic vision and its principal functions (including omnidirectional vision), (iv) to list the operation principles of gyroscope, compass, and force/tactile sensors, and (v) to give a brief introduction to the global positioning system.

Spyros G. Tzafestas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Embedded Piezoresistive Microcantilever Sensors Functionalized for the Detection of Methyl Salicylate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sensors designed to detect the presence of methyl salicylate (MeS) have been tested. These sensors use a sensor platform based on the embedded piezoresistive microcantilever (EPM) design. Sensing materials tested in this study included the polymer poly (ethylene vinyl acetate), or PEVA as well as a composite sensing material consisting of the enzyme SA-binding protein 2, or SABP-2. The SABP-2 was immobilized within a biocompatible Hypol gel matrix. The PEVA-based sensors exhibited slower but reversible responses to MeS vapors, recovering fully to their initial state after the analyte was removed. SABP-2 sensors exhibited faster overall response to the introduction of MeS, responding nearly instantly. These sensors, however, do not recover after exposures have ended. Sensors using the SABP-2 sensing materials act instead as integrating sensors, measuring irreversibly the total MeS dose obtained.

Porter, T. L. [UNLV; Venedam, R. J. [NSTec

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Risk-Based Sensor Placement Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A risk-based sensor placement methodology is proposed to solve the problem of optimal location of sensors or detectors to protect population against the exposure to and effects of known and/or postulated chemical, biological, and/or radiological threats. Risk is calculated as a quantitative value representing population at risk from exposure against standard exposure levels. Historical meteorological data are used to characterize weather conditions as the frequency of wind speed and direction pairs. The meteorological data drive atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling of the threats, the results of which are used to calculate risk values. Sensor locations are determined via an iterative dynamic programming algorithm whereby threats captured or detected by sensors placed in prior stages are removed from consideration in subsequent stages. In addition to the risk-based placement algorithm, the proposed methodology provides a quantification of the marginal utility of each additional sensor or detector. Thus, the criterion for halting the iterative process can be the number of detectors available, a threshold marginal utility value, or the cumulative detection of a minimum factor of the total risk value represented by all threats. The methodology quantifies the effect of threat reduction measures, such as reduced probability of one or more threats due to administrative and/or engineering controls.

Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Kulesz, James J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

A Risk-Based Sensor Placement Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sensor placement methodology is proposed to solve the problem of optimal location of sensors or detectors to protect population against the exposure to and effects of known and/or postulated chemical, biological, and/or radiological threats. Historical meteorological data are used to characterize weather conditions as wind speed and direction pairs with the percentage of occurrence of the pairs over the historical period. The meteorological data drive atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling of the threats, the results of which are used to calculate population at risk against standard exposure levels. Sensor locations are determined via a dynamic programming algorithm where threats captured or detected by sensors placed in prior stages are removed from consideration in subsequent stages. Moreover, the proposed methodology provides a quantification of the marginal utility of each additional sensor or detector. Thus, the criterion for halting the iterative process can be the number of detectors available, a threshold marginal utility value, or the cumulative detection of a minimum factor of the total risk value represented by all threats.

Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Kulesz, James J [ORNL

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

152

Neptunium_Oxide_Precipitation_Kinetics_AJohnsen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We evaluate the proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation system at elevated temperatures to obtain primary information on the effects of temperature, ionic strength, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Experiments conducted on unfiltered solutions at 10{sup -4} M NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq), neutral pH, and 200 C indicated that solution colloids strongly affect precipitation kinetics. Subsequent experiments on filtered solutions at 200, 212, and 225 C showed consistent and distinctive temperature-dependent behavior at reaction times {le} 800 hours. At longer times, the 200 C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but experiments at 212 C and 225 C demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of 3 x 10{sup -6} M and 6 x 10{sup -6} M, respectively. Solids from a representative experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were consistent with NpO{sub 2}(cr). A 200 C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a dramatic increase in the rate of neptunium loss. A 200 C experiment in an argon atmosphere resulted in nearly complete loss of aqueous neptunium. Previously proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation mechanisms in the literature specified a 1:1 ratio of neptunium loss and H{sup +} production in solution over time. However, all experiments demonstrated ratios of approximately 0.4 to 0.5. Carbonate equilibria can account for only about 40% of this discrepancy, leaving an unexpected deficit in H+ production that suggests that additional chemical processes are occurring.

Johnsen, A M; Roberts, K E; Prussin, S G

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

153

Methods for predicting wax precipitation and deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of wax from wells and flowlines can account for significant additional operating costs. To evaluate these potential costs, the operating conditions that allow waxes to precipitate in the wellbore must be identified, and deposition rates must be estimated to determine the costs associated with removal of wax deposits. Presented in this paper are laboratory and analytic methods that can be used to estimate both the critical operating conditions and the deposition rates. The laboratory tests and analysis presented may be used to characterize any type of oil.

Weingarten, J.S.; Euchner, J.A.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Electrochemical micro sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

Setter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

155

RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

RF current sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN); Sparks, Dennis O. (Maryville, TN)

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

Kaolinite dissolution and precipitation kinetics at 22oC and pH4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissolution and precipitation rates of low defect Georgia kaolinite (KGa-1b) as a function of Gibbs free energy of reaction (or reaction affinity) were measured at 22 C and pH 4 in continuously stirred flow through reactors. Steady state dissolution experiments showed slightly incongruent dissolution, with a Si/Al ratio of about 1.12 that is attributed to the re-adsorption of Al on to the kaolinite surface. No inhibition of the kaolinite dissolution rate was apparent when dissolved aluminum was varied from 0 and 60 {micro}M. The relationship between dissolution rates and the reaction affinity can be described well by a Transition State Theory (TST) rate formulation with a Temkin coefficient of 2 R{sub diss} (mol/m{sup 2}s) = 1.15 x 10{sup -13} [1-exp(-{Delta}G/2RT)]. Stopping of flow in a close to equilibrium dissolution experiment yielded at solubility constant for kaolinite at 22 C of 10{sup 7.57}. Experiments on the precipitation kinetics of kaolinite showed a more complex behavior. One conducted using kaolinite seed that had previously undergone extensive dissolution under far from equilibrium conditions for 5 months showed a quasi-steady state precipitation rate for 105 hours that was compatible with the TST expression above. After this initial period, however, precipitation rates decreased by an order of magnitude, and like other precipitation experiments conducted at higher supersaturation and without kaolinite seed subjected to extensive prior dissolution, could not be described with the TST law. The initial quasi-steady state rate is interpreted as growth on activated sites created by the dissolution process, but this reversible growth mechanism could not be maintained once these sites were filled. Long-term precipitation rates showed a linear dependence on solution saturation state that is generally consistent with a two dimensional nucleation growth mechanism following the equation R{sub ppt}(mol/m{sup 2}s) = 3.38 x 10{sup -14} exp[181776/T{sup 2}1n{Omega}]. Further analysis using Synchrotron Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) in Total Electron Yield (TEY) mode of the material from the precipitation experiments showed spectra for newly precipitated material compatible with kaolinite.

Yang, Li; Steefel, Carl I.

2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Future Directions for Magnetic Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future Directions for Magnetic Sensors: HYBRIDMATERIALS Our goal is to develop the scientific expertise needed to allow modeling and simulation to become the driving force in improving magnetic sensors effectiveness in developing new and improved magnetic sensors. By quantifying the improvement in sensor

159

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

NOx Sensor Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

needed to meet emission targets and enable widespread use of diesel vehicles with better fuel economies: We are developing a novel sensor with the potential to meet OEM cost and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-DistribuciĂłn del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

162

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

163

Carbide precipitation in gamma-TiAl alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbide precipitation in gamma-TiAl is observed and found to involve the formation of coherent, rod-shaped perovskite precipitates as a metastable transition phase. At temperatures above 750 deg C, the formation of plate-shaped H-phase particles on dislocations and grain boundaries is accompanied by dissolution of the perovskite precipitate dispersions. This temperature regime includes possible service temperatures for gamma-TiAl-based alloys. 10 refs.

Chen, S.; Beaven, P.A.; Wagner, R. (GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, (Germany))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

165

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

166

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

167

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

168

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

169

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

170

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

171

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

172

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

173

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

174

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

175

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

176

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

177

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

178

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

179

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

180

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

182

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

183

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

184

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

185

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

186

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

187

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

188

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

189

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

190

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

191

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

192

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

193

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

194

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

195

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

196

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

197

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

198

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

199

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

200

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

202

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

203

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

204

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

205

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

206

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

207

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

208

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

209

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

210

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

211

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

212

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

213

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

214

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

215

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

216

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

217

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

218

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

219

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

220

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

222

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

223

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

224

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

225

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

226

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

227

Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation in the sediments under alkaline and saline conditions . Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and...

228

ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of...

229

Changes in concurrent monthly precipitation and temperature extremes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

changes in daily climate extremes of temperature J. Geophys.Bayesian spatial modeling of extreme precipitation returnand Mearns L 2000 Climate extremes: observations, modeling,

Hao, Zengchao; AghaKouchak, Amir; Phillips, Thomas J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Joint probability analysis of precipitation and streamflow extremes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis focuses on evaluation of joint occurrence of extreme precipitation and streamflow events at several hydrologic structures in South Florida. An analysis of twelve… (more)

Lin, Chia-hung.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

232

Development of Self-Correcting Algorithms for Complete Failure of Supply Air Temperature Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has initiated research (Fernandez et al., 2009a) ? Passive and proactive tests ? Rule-based algorithms ? Tested using virtual sensors ? Self-correction approach for the total failure of supply air... temperature sensors 7 ESL-IC-13-10-47 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Montreal, Quebec, October 8-11, 2013 Self-correction of HVAC controls ? proposed approach 8 1. Fault Diagnostic ? Constant sensor...

Monfet, D.; Choiniere, D.; Padilla, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Passive Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Sensors Passive Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Remote Sensing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Mineral maps can be used to show the presence of hydrothermal minerals and mineral assemblages Stratigraphic/Structural: Map structures/faults and regional strain rates Hydrological: Map surface water features Thermal: Map surface temperatures Dictionary.png Passive Sensors: Sensors that measure energy which is naturally available in the environment. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

234

Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Active Control Strategies for Chemical Sensors and Sensor Arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

validated on metal-oxide (MOX) sensors. Our results show that the active sensing method obtains better classification performance than passive sensing methods, and also is more robust to additive Gaussian noise in sensor measurements. Second, we consider...

Gosangi, Rakesh

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

236

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

237

Energy-efficient geographic multicast routing for Sensor and Actuator Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

progress metric and it is specially designed to minimize the total energy used by the multicast tree. GMREEEnergy-efficient geographic multicast routing for Sensor and Actuator Networks Juan A. Sanchez a and Actuator Networks (SANET). Sensors have very limited resources in terms of energy, band- width

Stojmenovic, Ivan

238

Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals Speaker(s): Steven Lanzisera Date: February 8, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kevin Kircher Wireless sensor networks have been promising to provide easy data collection and control capability to applications ranging from scientific data collection, disaster recover, national security, and more. The user experience, however, has been filled with confusing terminology, complicated systems, and a lack of interoperability between vendors. Users with a background in the technology and fundamentals are better able to understand system capabilities, make decisions, and end up with a network that meets their needs. Although a sufficient coverage of this topic is at least a semester course, the goal of this talk is to give a brief

239

Chemiresistor urea sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Optical displacement sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

Carr, Dustin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fiber optic vibration sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Capacitive proximity sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Fiber optic vibration sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

244

CHEMICAL SENSORS School of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL SENSORS CHEM 6282 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Chemical sensors theory of chemical recognition, electrochemical, optical, mass sensors and data reduction. Text: J. Janata, "Principles of Chemical Sensors", 2010 Springer NOTE: GT Library purchased an e

Sherrill, David

245

An Improved Gridded Historical Daily Precipitation Analysis for Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A gauge-only precipitation data quality control and analysis system has been developed for monitoring precipitation at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center (CPC). Over the past 10 yr the system has been used to develop and deliver many different ...

Viviane B. S. Silva; Vernon E. Kousky; Wei Shi; R. Wayne Higgins

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity, and coarsening N. Fujita and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia The growth of niobium carbide in austenite involves for the overall transformation kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in austenite that takes into account

Cambridge, University of

247

Nano-precipitation in hot-pressed silicon carbide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat treatments at 1300 degrees C, 1400 degrees C, 1500 degrees C, and 1600 degrees C in Ar were found to produce nanoscale precipitates in hot-pressed silicon carbide containing aluminum, boron, and carbon sintering additives (ABC-SiC). The precipitates were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nano-probe energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (nEDS). The precipitates were plate-like in shape, with a thickness, length and separation of only a few nanometers, and their size coarsened with increasing annealing temperature, accompanied by reduced number density. The distribution of the precipitates was uniform inside the SiC grains, but depleted zones were observed in the vicinity of the SiC grain boundaries. A coherent orientation relationship between the precipitates and the SiC matrix was found. Combined high-resolution electron microscopy, computer simulation, and nEDS identified an Al4C3-based structure and composition for the nano-precipitates. Most Al ions in SiC lattice exsolved as precipitates during the annealing at 1400 to 1500 degrees C. Formation mechanism and possible influences of the nanoscale precipitates on mechanical properties are discussed.

Zhang, Xiao Feng; Sixta, Mark E.; Chen, Da; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

248

Methods for verifying satellite precipitation estimates Elizabeth E. Ebert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Methods for verifying satellite precipitation estimates Elizabeth E. Ebert Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Australia Introduction Satellite precipitation estimates are widely used to measure global rainfall on monthly timescales for climate studies (e.g., Huffman et al., 1997). Near real time satellite

Ebert, Beth

249

An analysis of radar estimated precipitation to rain gauge measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the surface. These levels included 1.0 1.5@ 2.0 @ 2.5 km, and 3.0 km. Radar precipitation estimates were calculated at each 1.4 2 level using Z = 30ORand Z = 25OR" . The precipitation amounts, as measured by both the gauges and the radar,were used...

Gleason, Byron Edward

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The NCE recovery boiler precipitator: Mill experience and design implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operating and design experiences are discussed. Topics covered include: test results of the flue gas parameters of volume, temperature losses, and inlet dust loadings; summary of main precipitator design data; operator experiences with various precipitator systems, such as wet bottom, dry bottom, and performance results; and findings of a corrosion study.

Henderson, J.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Seasonal Forecasting of Extreme Wind and Precipitation Frequencies in Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seasonal Forecasting of Extreme Wind and Precipitation Frequencies in Europe Matthew J. Swann;Abstract Flood and wind damage to property and livelihoods resulting from extreme precipitation events variability of these extreme events can be closely related to the large-scale atmospheric circulation

Feigon, Brooke

252

Magnetic differential torque sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new torque sensor structure is presented. The basic idea is a simple torque sensor with a variable magnetic circuit excited by an axially magnetized permanent magnet ring. The circuit is constituted by iron toothed rings, whose teeth relative position changes whenever an applied torque twists the rotating shaft. A Hall probe measures the induction in an airgap where the induction is uniform. The new structure is an association of two previous ones, thus creating a differential system with the related advantages: diminution of thermal drifts, zero mean value for the signal. The new magnetic circuit is studied by calculating equivalent reluctances through energy calculations and by using electrical analogies.

Lemarquand, V.; Lemarquand, G. [Univ. de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)] [Univ. de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fluorescent temperature sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

254

Sensors as Information Transducers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This chapter reviews the mechanisms by which sensors gather information from the physical world and transform it into the electronic signals that are used in today's information and control systems. It introduces a new methodology for describing sensing mechanisms based on the process of information flow and applies it to the broad spectrum of sensors, instruments and data input devices in current use. We identify four distinct elemental transduction processes: energy conversion, energy dispersion, energy modulation and modulation of a material property. We posit that these four mechanisms form a complete set for describing information transduction in sensing systems.

J. David zook; Norbert Schroeder

2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

255

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Newsletter  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) newsletter will be released periodically to inform program stakeholders about new developments and achievements in the area of sensors, instrumentation and related technologies across the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) R&D programs.

257

Controlled mobility in sensor networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K. Gupta. Optimizing energy-latency trade- o? in sensoras “Optimizing Energy-Latency Trade-o? in Sensor NetworksK. Gupta, “Optimizing Energy-Latency Trade-o? in Sensor

Sugihara, Ryo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Nanotechnology-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomonitoring...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomonitoring Chemical Exposures . Nanotechnology-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomonitoring Chemical Exposures . Abstract:...

259

Lighting Controls/Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lighting ControlsSensors Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLightingControlsSensors&oldid267...

260

Characterization of Vertical Velocity and Drop Size Distribution Parameters in Widespread Precipitation at ARM Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extended, high-resolution measurements of vertical air motion and median volume drop diameter D0 in widespread precipitation from three diverse Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) locations [Lamont, Oklahoma, Southern Great Plains site (SGP); Niamey, Niger; and Black Forest, Germany] are presented. The analysis indicates a weak (0-10 cm{sup -1}) downward air motion beneath the melting layer for all three regions, a magnitude that is to within the typical uncertainty of the retrieval methods. On average, the hourly estimated standard deviation of the vertical air motion is 0.25 m s{sup -1} with no pronounced vertical structure. Profiles of D0 vary according to region and rainfall rate. The standard deviation of 1-min-averaged D0 profiles for isolated rainfall rate intervals is 0.3-0.4 mm. Additional insights into the form of the raindrop size distribution are provided using available dual-frequency Doppler velocity observations at SGP. The analysis suggests that gamma functions better explain paired velocity observations and radar retrievals for the Oklahoma dataset. This study will be useful in assessing uncertainties introduced in the measurement of precipitation parameters from ground-based and spaceborne remote sensors that are due to small-scale variability.

Giangrande S. E.; Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ultrafast Graphene Oxide Humidity Sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultrafast Graphene Oxide Humidity Sensors ... Graphene oxide can be exploited in humidity and temperature sensors with a number of convenient features such as flexibility, transparency and suitability for large-scale manufacturing. ... Here we show that the two-dimensional nature of graphene oxide and its superpermeability to water combine to enable humidity sensors with unprecedented response speed (?30 ms response and recovery times). ...

Stefano Borini; Richard White; Di Wei; Michael Astley; Samiul Haque; Elisabetta Spigone; Nadine Harris; Jani Kivioja; Tapani Ryhänen

2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

262

Sensor network algorithms and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...range-based localization methods for wireless sensor networks. They review...compression techniques for wireless sensor networks. They pay...consuming hundreds of megawatts of electricity. Careful monitoring of large...of the state of the art in wireless sensor networks. The articles...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Shape memory alloy thaw sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Placement of network services in a sensor network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An important challenge in designing a wireless sensor network is to maximise the network's lifetime. In a hierarchical cluster-based network, a key design issue is the placement of cluster heads (data loggers) such that the total power consumed by the overall network is minimised. Another key design goal is the localisation of sensors. In this study, we consider the placement of beacons and data loggers in the Cosumnes River Preserve. We consider a hybrid network in which the wireless sensors are deployed randomly into an irregular terrain while the data loggers and beacons are placed in a planned manner to satisfy the following three objectives: provide complete area coverage; load balance each cluster; minimise the total power consumption for collecting the data. We formulated an optimisation problem to determine the location of data loggers and beacons â?? which is solved using an Integer Linear Program (ILP).

Jennifer Yick; Gregory Pasternack; Biswanath Mukherjee; Dipak Ghosal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Wireless sensor node localization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...need to be asymmetrical, with small, passive sensor nodes listening for signals from one or more larger transmitters. The fact...is dropping. For example, the $600 MEMS-based analogue device ADIS16360 unit has a tri-axis accelerometer and a tri-axis...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Precision liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Thick film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

269

Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion with distributed "MEMS Dust" Sensors Shijun Qiu*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion with distributed "MEMS Dust" Sensors (Abstract) Shijun Qiu, Berkeley aagogino@euler.berkeley.edu Key Words : sensor networks, sensor fusion, sensor validation, micro-electromechanical systems, MEMS MEMS sensors make a rich design space of networked sensors viable. They can be deeply

Agogino, Alice M.

270

Distributed Symmetric Function Computation in Noisy Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to cooperatively provide information to this fusion center so it can compute some function of the sensor. The network has a special node called the fusion center whose goal is to compute a symmetric function of these measurements. The problem studied is to minimize the total transmission energy used by the network when

Srikant, Rayadurgam

271

Saving Energy by Adjusting Transmission Power in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and communication areas. Energy-efficient communication is an important issue in WSNs because of the limited power distributed algorithms to reduce communication energy consumption in WSNs by minimizing the total transmissionSaving Energy by Adjusting Transmission Power in Wireless Sensor Networks Xiao Chen Department

Rowe, Neil C.

272

QUALITY-OF-SERVICE SPECIFICINFORMATION RETRIEVAL FOR DENSELYDEPLOYED SENSOR NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S). It jointly'minimizes system latency (the amount of time spentfor data co(lection)and total energy consumption in part by the Multidisciplinary University Research lniliative (MURI) under the Office of Naval Research in a remote area. Each sensor is pre- programmed to sense the radiation level at specific time instants

Islam, M. Saif

273

Intelligent Sensor Placement for Hot Server Detection in Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

center energy consumption in the US will grow to over 100 billion kWh at a cost of $7.4 billion by 2011, IEEE Abstract--Recent studies have shown that a significant portion of the total energy consumption temperature set points to overcool the entire room, resulting in excessive energy consumption. Sensor network

Xing, Guoliang

274

California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

Caldwell, P M

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

275

Active Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Active Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Sensors Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Active Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Remote Sensing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Detect fault and ground movement, delineate faults, create high-resolution DEMS, quantify fault kinemaics, develop lineament maps, Geophysical Monitoring Hydrological: Can give indications about subsurface geothermal fluid flow Thermal: Dictionary.png Active Sensors: Sensors that emit their own source of energy then measure the

276

Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

Kallenbach, Gene A. (Bosque Farms, NM); Noda, Frank T. (Albuquerque, NM); Mitchell, Dean J. (Tijeras, NM); Etzkin, Joshua L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

A unified approach to asphaltene precipitation: Laboratory measurement and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unified approach to evaluation of asphaltene precipitation based on laboratory measurement and modeling is presented. This approach uses an organic deposition cell (ODC) for measuring asphaltene-dropout onset conditions. Asphaltene precipitation was detected by changes in optical fluorescence, electrical conductance, and visual observation. A series of experiments measured the effects of changing pressure,m temperature, and composition on asphaltene precipitation. A fully compositional vapor/liquid/solid (V/L/S) mathematical model completed by analysis by matching the experimental results. The authors then used the model to forecast asphaltene precipitation under a variety of production scenarios, including response to gas-lift operations,and to evaluate the possible location of a tar mat.

MacMillan, D.J.; Tackett, J.E. Jr.; Jessee, M.A.; Monger-McClure, T.G. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Precipitation Recycling in the Indian Subcontinent during Summer Monsoon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Indian summer monsoon rainfall is dominated by oceanic sources of moisture. However, land surface processes also have a significant role in the generation of precipitation within the Indian subcontinent. Evapotranspiration over a region ...

Amey Pathak; Subimal Ghosh; Praveen Kumar

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Enhancement of satellite precipitation estimation via unsupervised dimensionality reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology to enhance Satellite Precipitation Estimation (SPE) using unsupervised dimensionality reduction (UDR) techniques is developed. This enhanced technique is an extension to the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network (PERSIANN) and Cloud Classification System (CCS) method (PERSIANN-CCS) enriched using wavelet features combined with dimensionality reduction. Cloud-top brightness temperature measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) are used for precipitation estimation at 4 km 4 km spatial resolutions every 30 min. The study area in the continental United States covers parts of Louisiana, Arkansas, Kansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama. Based on quantitative measures, root mean square error (RMSE) and Heidke skill score (HSS), the results show that the UDR techniques can improve the precipitation estimation accuracy. In addition, ICA is shown to have better performance than other UDR techniques; and in some cases, it achieves 10% improvement in the HSS.

Mahrooghy, Majid [Mississippi State University (MSU); Younan, Nicolas H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Aanstoos, James [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Variability of the Australian Monsoon and Precipitation Trends at Darwin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atmospheric classification for northwestern Australia is used to define periods of monsoon activity and investigate the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the Australian monsoon, as well as long-term precipitation trends at Darwin. ...

Stuart Evans; Roger Marchand; Thomas Ackerman

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Frequency Modes of Monsoon Precipitation in Arizona and New Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interannual and intraseasonal variability of the North American monsoon is of great interest because a large proportion of the annual precipitation for Arizona and New Mexico arrives during the summer monsoon. Forty-one years of daily monsoon ...

Anne W. Nolin; Eileen A. Hall-McKim

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Modifying cellulose fibers by adsorption/precipitation of xylan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Xylan was precipitated on bleached and unbleached softwood ... more detailed information of the distribution of adsorbed xylan on cellulosic surfaces. The adsorption step was carried out at ... the beating degree...

Albrecht Miletzky; Manuel Punz; Armin Zankel; Sandra Schlader…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Ensemble typhoon quantitative precipitation forecasts model in Taiwan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, an ensemble typhoon quantitative precipitation forecast (ETQPF) model was developed to provide typhoon rainfall forecasts for Taiwan. The ETQPF rainfall forecast is obtained by averaging the pick-out cases, which are screened at a ...

Jing-Shan Hong; Chin-Tzu Fong; Ling-Feng Hsiao; Yi-Chiang Yu; Chian-You Tzeng

285

Lagrangian investigation of the precipitation efficiency of convective clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The precipitation efficiency of cumulus-congestus clouds is investigated with a new Lagrangian particle framework for large-eddy simulations. The framework is designed to track particles representative of individual water molecules. A Monte-Carlo ...

Wolfgang Langhans; Kyongmin Yeo; David M. Romps

286

Copper gettering by aluminum precipitates in aluminum-implanted silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copper in Si is shown to be strongly gettered by Al-rich precipitates formed by implanting Al to supersaturation and followed by annealing. At temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C a layer containing Al precipitates is found to getter Cu from Cu silicide located on the opposite side of a 0.25-mm Si wafer, indicating a substantially lower chemical potential for the Cu in the molten-A1 phase. Cu gettering proceeds rapidly until an atomic ratio of approximately 2 Cu atoms to 1 Al atom is reached in the precipitated Al region, after which the gettering process slows. Redistribution of Cu from one Al-rich layer to another at low Cu concentrations demonstrates that a segregation-type gettering mechanism is operating. Cu gettering occurs primarily in the region containing the precipitated Al rather than the region where the Al is entirely substitutional.

PETERSEN,GARY A.; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

Merging Cloud and Precipitation Radar Data Provides a Better  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Merging Cloud and Precipitation Radar Data Provides a Better View of Tropical Rain Clouds For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

288

Aerosol-Cloud interactions : a new perspective in precipitation enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increased industrialization and human activity modified the atmospheric aerosol composition and size-distribution during the last several decades. This has affected the structure and evolution of clouds, and precipitation ...

Gunturu, Udaya Bhaskar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Precipitation processes in the Middle East , R. Smitha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the north, the Mediterranean in the west and the Red Sea and Persian Gulf in the south, experience a reduced upslope seasonal precipitation. The Red Sea and Persian Gulf, while acting as powerful sources of water

Evans, Jason

290

Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier."Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation 28(3):56-64. doi:10.1111j.1745-6592.2008.00203.x Authors:...

291

Stochastic Simulation Methods for Precipitation and Streamflow Time Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One major acknowledged challenge in daily precipitation is the inability to model extreme events in the spectrum of events. These extreme events are rare but may cause large losses. How to realistically simulate extreme behavior of daily...

Li, Chao

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Observed Global Precipitation Variability During the 20th Century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of warming and other regional-scale features, including changes in wind patterns, precipitation and some aspects of extremes and of ice. n The models used in AR4 were judged to have improved representation

Anisimov, Mikhail

293

An Inexpensive CO Sensor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 An Inexpensive CO Sensor A schematic of the prototype CO passive sensor. Carbon moNOxide is a colorless, odorless, toxic gas whose primary source indoor is the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. This gas can be a potential problem in any house that uses combustion appliances for space or water heating, cooking, or idling an automobile in an attached garage. Although most appliances work correctly, a problem can exist in houses when the appliance is unventilated or its ventilation system does not properly eliminate exhaust gases from the house. Since Americans spend 90% of their time indoors and 65 to 70% in their residences, understanding how and when CO builds up indoors could save lives. We have very little systematic data on how CO hazards are distrubuted in the indoor environment, but mortality

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects regional precipitation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of precipitation trends over the two regions, as they are also directly affected by the South Asian monsoon... Regional summer precipitation events in Asia and their...

295

Ultra-wideband impedance sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ultra-wideband impedance sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

297

PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

Hay, M.; King, W.

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

298

Extracellular iron-sulfur precipitates from growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have examined extracellular iron-bearing precipitates resulting from the growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in a basal medium with lactate as the carbon source and ferrous sulfate. Black precipitates were obtained when D. desulfuricans was grown with an excess of FeSO{sub 4}. When D. desulfuricans was grown under conditions with low amounts of FeSO{sub 4}, brown precipitates were obtained. The precipitates were characterized by iron K-edge XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure), {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer-effect spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction. Both were noncrystalline and nonmagnetic (at room temperature) solids containing high-spin Fe(III). The spectroscopic data for the black precipitates indicate the formation of an iron-sulfur phase with 6 nearest S neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 2.24(1) {angstrom}, whereas the brown precipitates are an iron-oxygen-sulfur phase with 6 nearest O neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 1.95(1) {angstrom}.

Antonio, M. R.; Tischler, M. L.; Witzcak, D.

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

299

Precipitation in 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu maraging steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two maraging steels with the compositions 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu-4Mo (wt%) and 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu and with small additions of Al and Ti were investigated using atom probe field ion microscopy. Tomographic atom probe investigations were performed to clarify the spatial distribution of elements in and close to the precipitates. Materials heat treated at 475 C for 5, 25 min, 1, 2, 4 and 400 h were analyzed. Precipitates in the Mo-rich material were observed already after 5 min of aging, while in the material without MO, precipitation started later. In both materials precipitation begins with the formation of Cu-rich particles which work as nucleation sites for a Ni-rich phase of type Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al). A Mo-rich phase was detected in the Mo-rich steel after 2 h of aging. The distribution of alloying elements in the precipitates, their role in the precipitation process, and the mechanism of hardening in the two materials are discussed.

Stiller, K.; Haettestrand, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Danoix, F. [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique] [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

300

Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to discuss the findings of the Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration carried out at TNX during December 1995. This demonstration consisted of two steps: oxalate precipitation and precipitate washing. The first step reacted Am/Cm stimulant solution with oxalic acid resulting in the formation of insoluble lanthanide oxalates and soluble metal oxalates. The second step consisted of washing the precipitate with equal volumes of a nitric acid/oxalic acid solution to remove unwanted cations (miscellaneous metals) from the slurry. Quantitative results consist of: the solubility of the metallic impurities and lanthanide oxalates under process conditions, the settling rate of the oxalates, the specific volume of the oxalate precipitate, and the minimum distance the solution transfer jet can be place from the oxalate solids to prevent entrainment. Finally, discussion of how to decrease lanthanide losses is presented in terms of transfer jet location, initial nitric acid concentration, and wash nitric acid concentration. Solubilizing the precipitate and adjusting the nitric acid concentration prior to vitrification were not performed in this demonstration.

Beck, S.B.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 29 figs.

Farah, J.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Sensor Fusion - Applying sensor fusion in a district heating substation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Many machines in these days have sensors to collect information from the world they inhabit. The correctness of this information is crucial for the correct… (more)

Kangerud, Jim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The acid precipitation provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and minorities' energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November 1990 Congress passed a comprehensive set of amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1977 with potentially very high compliance costs. The provisions pertaining to control of acid precipitation have been specified with sufficient detail to examine their cost impacts. These provisions will require investment in emissions control technology, mainly by electric utilities. Production costs will increase due to the required investment, resulting in higher electricity prices. This paper examines the possible magnitude of these effects and whether there might be differential impacts on racial/ethnic minority groups. Differential impacts were considered a possibility because of the differences in the percentage of total income spent on energy by various population subgroups. In 1989, the Majority group (defined as non-Black, non-Hispanic) spent about three percent of household income on energy, while Blacks spent double that, six percent, and Hispanics spent about four percent. (The differences in income underlying these figures are greater, however, than the differences in energy expenditures). To address these issues, we compare projected electricity consumption and expenditures and total energy expenditures for Black, Hispanic, and Majority households. The distribution of benefits from reducing acid precipitation is not addressed since the possible effects on ambient air quality in specific geographical areas that are directly attributable to reducing utilities' sulfur dioxide emissions are highly uncertain.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The acid precipitation provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and minorities` energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November 1990 Congress passed a comprehensive set of amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1977 with potentially very high compliance costs. The provisions pertaining to control of acid precipitation have been specified with sufficient detail to examine their cost impacts. These provisions will require investment in emissions control technology, mainly by electric utilities. Production costs will increase due to the required investment, resulting in higher electricity prices. This paper examines the possible magnitude of these effects and whether there might be differential impacts on racial/ethnic minority groups. Differential impacts were considered a possibility because of the differences in the percentage of total income spent on energy by various population subgroups. In 1989, the Majority group (defined as non-Black, non-Hispanic) spent about three percent of household income on energy, while Blacks spent double that, six percent, and Hispanics spent about four percent. (The differences in income underlying these figures are greater, however, than the differences in energy expenditures). To address these issues, we compare projected electricity consumption and expenditures and total energy expenditures for Black, Hispanic, and Majority households. The distribution of benefits from reducing acid precipitation is not addressed since the possible effects on ambient air quality in specific geographical areas that are directly attributable to reducing utilities` sulfur dioxide emissions are highly uncertain.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

A Sensor Web Middleware with Stateful Services for Heterogeneous Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and measurement. 3. Sensor Collection Service (SCS) [15] ­ Service to fetch observations, which conform to the O&M information model, from a single sensor or a collection of sensors. It is also used to describe the sensors

Buyya, Rajkumar

306

HOMOLOGICAL SENSOR Vin de Silva 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOMOLOGICAL SENSOR NETWORKS Vin de Silva 1 and Robert Ghrist 2 Sensors and sense-ability A sensor) as well as vast networks of local sensors (for touch). 1Department of Mathematics, Pomona College. 2 possibilities lie in the domain of the small. Swarms of local sensors at micro- or nano- scale have

Ghrist, Robert W.

307

a Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transmitters #12;Sample sensors: #12;Sample sensors: PAR: Photosynthetically Active (solar) Radiation sensora Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental Monitoring a Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental technology: a truly self configurable, low-cost, maintenance-free, ad-hoc sensor network (not based on Zig

Gburzynski, Pawel

308

Platforms: Where the sensors are mounted.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the Sahara On September 18, 1994. #12;14 The sensor detects solar radiation that has been absorbed1 Platforms: Where the sensors are mounted. Sensors: Instruments on the platforms. ETM+ AVIRIS GER 1500 #12;2 Passive Sensors · Aerial Cameras · Visible or Thermal Active Sensors · Microwave (Radar

Gilbes, Fernando

309

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

310

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

311

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

312

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

313

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

314

Directional Sensor Control: Heuristic Approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensors are fused to form global estimates of target locations. ... We assume that there is a notional fusion center, which ...... a string-submodular type property.

2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fluorescent sensor for mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

Wang, Zidong (Urbana, IL); Lee, Jung Heon (Evanston, IL); Lu, Yi (Champaign, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

316

Microfabricated AC impedance sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Becker, Frederick (Houston, TX); Boser, Bernhard E. (Berkeley, CA); Eldredge, Adam B. (Austin, TX); Fuller, Christopher K. (Livermore, CA); Gascoyne, Peter R. C. (Bellaire, TX); Hamilton, Julie K. (Tracy, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Wang, Xiao-Bo (San Diego, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Chemoresistive gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemoresistive gas sensor is provided which has improved sensitivity. A layer of organic semiconductor is disposed between two electrodes which, in turn, are connected to a voltage source. High conductivity material is dispersed within the layer of organic semiconductor in the form of very small particles, or islands. The average interisland spacing is selected so that the predominant mode of current flow is by way of electron funneling. Adsorption of gaseous contaminant onto the layer of organic semiconductor modulates the tunneling current in a quantitative manner. 2 figs.

Hirschfeld, T.B.

1987-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

318

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

319

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

Cheng, Yang-Tse (Rochester Hills, MI); Poli, Andrea A. (Livonia, MI); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

On the robustness of clustered sensor networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or fault tolerance capability of a sensor system. The redundancy degree of sensors plays two important roles pertaining to the robustness of a sensor network. First, the redundancy degree provides proper parameter values for robust estimator; second, we can...

Cho, Jung Jin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mutual information based tracking with mobile sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to utilize mobile sensor nodes in a sensing and estimation problem, one must carefully consider the optimal placement of those sensor nodes and simultaneously account for the cost incurred in moving the sensor ...

Russ, John A., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Prospects for Bandit Solutions in Sensor Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Applications of Sensor Management. Springer. [2...Solutions in Sensor Management 1383 [3] Robbins...allocation. Computing Science and Statistics, 23...Learning and Geometric Approaches. 36th ACM Symp. Theory...2002) Multi-sensor management for information fusion......

Nicos G. Pavlidis; Niall M. Adams; David Nicholson; David J. Hand

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

GENERATING TEXT DESCRIPTIONS FOR GEOGRAPHICALLY DISTRIBUTED SENSORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATING TEXT DESCRIPTIONS FOR GEOGRAPHICALLY DISTRIBUTED SENSORS Martin Molina and Javier generation of geographic descriptions in natural language for geographically distributed sensors. We describe generation of geographic descriptions in natural language for geographically distributed sensors. We describe

Molina, MartĂ­n

324

Hydrogen Sensor Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sensor Workshop Agenda Hydrogen Sensor Workshop Agenda Agenda for the Hydrogen Sensor Workshop held June 8, 2011, in Chicago, Illinois.The workshop was hosted by the U.S....

325

Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Annual grassland resource pools and fluxes: sensitivity to precipitation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual grassland resource pools and fluxes: sensitivity to precipitation Annual grassland resource pools and fluxes: sensitivity to precipitation and dry periods on two contrasting soils Title Annual grassland resource pools and fluxes: sensitivity to precipitation and dry periods on two contrasting soils Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Sudderth, Erika A., Samuel B. St. Clair, Sarah A. Placella, Stéphanie M. Swarbreck, Cristina Castanha, Donald J. Herman, Marc L. Fischer, Markus Kleber, Erik B. Sudderth, Margaret S. Torn, Mary K. Firestone, Gary L. Andersen, and David D. Ackerly Journal Ecosphere Volume 3 Issue 8 Keywords Avena barbata, Bayesian ANOVA, carbon, climate change, dry periods, Grassland, nitrogen, phenology, precipitation, soil type, water Abstract In ecosystems throughout the world climate models project increased variability in precipitation patterns that may strongly affect the above- and below-ground processes that control carbon, water, and nutrient cycles. Uncertainty about how plant and soil processes respond to wet and dry periods at different times in the growing season is a barrier to understanding how changing rainfall patterns will affect ecosystem function in annual grasslands. We used mesocosm systems to test the sensitivity to mid- and late-season dry periods of twenty response variables related to nitrogen, carbon, and water cycling in Avena barbata monocultures. We compared the responses of individual variables and of grassland systems under low and high cumulative rain treatments and between two contrasting soil types.

327

Investigation on precipitation in Zircaloy-2 fuel cladding tube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Morphology of the precipitates and kinetics of precipitation in ? quenched Zircaloy-2 has been investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering, wide-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Wide-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy investigations indicate the existence of two types of intermetallic precipitates, namely, tetragonal Zr2(Fe,Ni) and hexagonal Zr(Fe,Cr)2. Porod exponents estimated from small-angle X-ray scattering profiles have been found to be less than four. These observations have been explained in terms of the existence of precipitates with two different morphologies, spherical and non-spherical (plate-like), which was also confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The precipitate size distribution for the virgin specimen shifts towards the smaller radius side after ? quenching and starts growing gradually towards the higher radius side with increase in aging time due to nucleation and growth. Phase separation is accompanied by dynamical scaling behaviour for different aging time.

D Sen; S Mazumder; R Tewari; P.K De; H Amenitsch; S Bernstorff

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Surface-Induced Nickel Hydroxide Precipitation in the Presence of Citrate and Salicylate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). These identified the Ni hydroxide precipitates with diffuse reflectance spec- LDH phases consist of brucite

Sparks, Donald L.

329

Innovative Sensors and Controls to Support Efficient Operation of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sensors and Controls to Support Efficient Operation of Sensors and Controls to Support Efficient Operation of State-of-the-Art Power Plants Innovative Sensors and Controls to Support Efficient Operation of State-of-the-Art Power Plants August 9, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has selected three projects to develop novel sensing and control technologies aimed at the efficient operation of advanced, zero-emission power systems and the improvement of operations at existing fossil energy power plants. The total value of the projects is approximately $4.9 million, with $3.9 million of DOE funding and $1 million in recipients' cost-sharing. The projects will help FE's Advanced Research Program lead the effort to develop sensing and control technologies for seamless, integrated,

330

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

331

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

333

Fiber optic temperature sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

Rabold, D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Hydrogen Sensor Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sensor Workshop Agenda Participants Workshop participants included: Affiliated Engineers Air Products Apollo Sensor Technology Argonne National Laboratory CenturyLink CSA...

335

Flexible Pressure Sensors: Modeling and Experimental Characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flexible capacitive pressure sensors fabricated with nanocomposites were experimentally characterized and results compared with simulations from analytical modeling. Unlike traditional diaphragm silicon pressure sensors, ...

Viana, J.C.

336

Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

Compact Potentiometric NOx Sensor | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Potentiometric NOx Sensor Compact Potentiometric NOx Sensor 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

338

Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensors and Controls Sensors and Controls Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

339

Enabling Long-Lived Sensor Networks Through Solar Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long - Lived Sensor Networks through Solar Energy Harvestingsolar energy harvesting and storage device for sensor

Jason Hsu; Sadaf Zahedi; Jonathan Friedman; Aman Kansal; Vijay Raghunathan; Mani Srivastava

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cloud and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season P. T. May Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, 3001, Victoria, Australia Introduction An interesting, and very relevant question, for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is how cloud characteristics and their seasonal and diurnal variation changes across the tropics. In particular, how does he cloud field around the new SRCS site compare with nearby regions. Thus, the aim of this study is to look at the characteristics of clouds and precipitation in the area around Darwin and to compare the cloud statistics estimated from geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS) satellite data with other nearby regions. Towards this end, GMS satellite imagery and radar data from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A Comparison of Two Ground-Based Lightning Detection Networks against the Satellite-Based Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lightning stroke data from both the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) and the Earth Networks Total Lightning Network (ENTLN) were compared to lightning group data from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) from 1 January 2010 through 30 ...

Kelsey B. Thompson; Monte G. Bateman; Lawrence D. Carey

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

343

Field Test of High Temperature Corrosion Sensors in a Waste to Energy Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field trial of electrochemical corrosion rate sensors was conducted over a five month period to monitor fireside corrosion in a waste to energy (WTE) plant. The unique 3-electrode air-cooled corrosion sensors, each including a thermocouple to monitor sensor temperature, were installed in four different ports at approximately the same level of the WTE boiler. A total of twelve sensors were tested, six with electrodes using the carbon steel boiler tube material, and six using the nickel-chromium weld overlay alloy for the electrodes. Corrosion rates and temperatures of the sensors were monitored continuously through the trial. Measurements of sensor thickness loss were used to calibrate the electrochemical corrosion rates. Air cooling of the sensors was found to be necessary in order to bring the sensors to the temperature of the boiler tubes, to better match the corrosion rate of the tubes, and to increase survivability of the sensors and thermocouples. Varying the temperature of the sensors simulated corrosion rates of boiler tubes with steam temperatures above and below that in the actual WTE plant. Temperatures of two of the sensors were successfully held at various controlled temperatures close to the steam temperature for a three hour test period. Corrosion rates of the two materials tested were similar although of different magnitude. An expression relating the corrosion rate of the boiler tube material to the corrosion rate of weld overlay was determined for a 7 day period in the middle of the field trial. Results from the field trial suggest that corrosion rate sensors controlled to the outer waterwall temperature can successfully monitor fireside corrosion in WTE plants and be used as a process control variable by plant operators.

Matthes, S.A.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Williamson, K.M.

2008-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nano {gamma}'/{gamma}'' composite precipitates in Alloy 718  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoscale composite precipitates of Alloy 718 have been investigated with both high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and phase field modeling. Chemical analysis via energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy allowed for the differentiation of {gamma}' and {gamma}'' particles, which is not otherwise possible through traditional Z-contrast methods. Phase field modeling was applied to determine the stress distribution and elastic interaction around and between the particles, respectively, and it was determined that a composite particle (of both {gamma}' and {gamma}'') has an elastic energy that is significantly lower than, for example, single {gamma}' and {gamma}'' precipitates which are non-interacting.

Phillips, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); McAllister, D.; Gao, Y.; Lv, D.; Williams, R. E. A.; Wang, Y.; Mills, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Peterson, B. [Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona 85034 (United States)

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

345

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ion mobility sensor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

348

Model-Based Sensor Placement for Component Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis in Fossil Energy Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensor Placement for Sensor Placement for Component Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis in Fossil Energy Systems Background Fossil fuel power plants generate approximately two-thirds of the world's total electricity and are expected to continue this important role in the years ahead. Increasing global energy demands, aging and inefficient power plants, and increasingly stricter emission requirements will require high levels of performance, available capacity, efficiency, and

349

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

350

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

351

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

352

Daily Cycle of Precipitation over the Northern Coast of Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The daily cycle of precipitation (DCP) in the austral autumn on the northern coast of Brazil (NCB) is examined in detail. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 dataset was used to obtain the DCP, and the intradaily variability was measured ...

Sheila Santana de Barros Brito; Marcos Daisuke Oyama

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Spatial variability of summer precipitation related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the observed diurnal patterns of precipitation over the central U.S. #12;Shading ­ meridional wind speed (Shading denotes meridional wind speed) P winds #12; Air temperature (shading; K) and zonal temperature #12;Convective P frequency Vertical wind in the model Moisture convergence at 850 hPa Vertical

Yang, Zong-Liang

354

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

355

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Global Precipitation Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

credits: Marty Bahamonde/FEMA, Darin Leach/USDA, Jocelyn Augustino/FEMA, Matt and Kim Rudge This graphic and condenses to form clouds, and falls again to the surface as precipitation. About 75 percent of the energy condenses into clouds latent heat is released--warming the atmosphere. Conversely, when liquid water

Waliser, Duane E.

356

Land surface feedbacks on spring precipitation in the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to investigate the sensitivity of precipitation to soil moisture and urban areas in the Netherlands. We analyze the average output of a four day event from 10-13 May 1999 for ...

Emma E. Daniels; Ronald W.A. Hutjes; Geert Lenderink; Reinder J. Ronda; Albert A.M. Holtslag

357

Affinity Purification of Plasmid DNA by Temperature-Triggered Precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Affinity Purification of Plasmid DNA by Temperature-Triggered Precipitation Jan Kostal, Ashok purification method, which takes advantage of the DNA- binding affinity and specificity of the bacterial increasing the temper- ature, ELP undergoes a reversible phase transition from water-soluble forms

Chen, Wilfred

358

Evaporation Minus Precipitation and Density Fluxes for the North Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimates of evaporation (E) over the North Atlantic Ocean by Bunker have been combined with estimates of precipitation (P) by Dorman and Bourke to produce new annual and seasonal maps of E–P and surface density flux. Although uncertainties about ...

Raymond W. Schmitt; Philip S. Bogden; Clive E. Dorman

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Flood or Drought: How Do Aerosols Affect Precipitation?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmosphere occurs by release of latent heat...clouds (7). The fraction of radiation...smoke from forest fires was observed to suppress rainfall...precipitation particles that release the latent heat...The additional release of latent heat...the cloud droplets airborne when strong updrafts thrust them...

Daniel Rosenfeld; Ulrike Lohmann; Graciela B. Raga; Colin D. O'Dowd; Markku Kulmala; Sandro Fuzzi; Anni Reissell; Meinrat O. Andreae

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

360

Capacitance studies of cobalt oxide films formed via electrochemical precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prepared by electrochemically precipitating the hydroxide and heating it in air to form Co3O4 the need to identify more suitable materials. One promising route is the use of transi- tion metal oxides to batteries, are referred to as Faradaic or pseudocapacitors. However, the high cost of these materials has

Weidner, John W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid Daniel M. Dabbs, Usha as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous

Aksay, Ilhan A.

362

Joint probability of precipitation and discharge deficits in the Netherlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint probability of precipitation and discharge deficits in the Netherlands Jules J. Beersma and T. Adri Buishand Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt, The Netherlands Received 14 April] The Netherlands are situated at the downstream end of the Rhine River. A large part of the country can be supplied

Beersma, Jules

363

Spectroscopic Evidence for Uranium Bearing Precipitates in Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopic Evidence for Uranium Bearing Precipitates in Vadose Zone Sediments at the Hanford 300, Advanced Light Source, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, United States Geological Survey Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Uranium (U) solid-state speciation in vadose zone sediments

364

STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS Rick Katz Institute of the validity of this analysis." -- Emil Gumbel #12;3 Outline (1) Introduction (2) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Classical Approach (3) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Modern Approach (4) Extreme

Katz, Richard

365

A total energy sensor for glidepath and speed control of a tactical airlifter in wind shear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advanced aircraft technologtes the chance to mature past the conceptual stage and be developed. integrated and evaluated in a realistic flight environment. Extended Chord Rudder Extended Chord Aileron Spogers Dorsal Horsals 40" Fuselage Plug...

Anderson, Thomas Edward

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

UAV sensor and survivability issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the most significant tradeoffs between the operating altitude and the complexity and cost of UAVs and sensors. Low altitudes allow less complex, smaller sensors and platforms, but are vulnerable to ground fire. High altitudes require more numerous and capable sensors, but provide wider swaths for more rapid coverage and reduced vulnerability to ground fire. It is shown that for mission requirements and air defenses that higher is not necessarily better and that optimal flight altitudes exist that can be determined analytically.

Canavan, G.H.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Characterization of The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 Vortex Using Surface Entrained Sensor Fish Device: Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the pilot study to characterize The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 vortex using a surface entrained Sensor Fish device. It was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on April 13 and 14, 2006. The total spill was controlled at approximately 110 kcfs, the forebay elevation was 157.89 ft, and the discharge of Bay 6 at the tested gate opening of 14 ft was approximately 18 kcfs. The objectives of the full study are to (1) develop baseline conditions for the detailed analysis of Sensor Fish measurements by deploying Sensor Fish in different surface locations in the vortex periphery; (2) observe the entrainment pattern and extract hydraulic data of interest such as acceleration, rotation, pressure, and estimated velocity of Sensor Fish or drogues; (3) integrate the experimental results with companion computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and inertial particle tracking studies. A total of 12 Sensor Fish were released in the surface at upstream edge, left edge, downstream edge, and the core of the vortex at Bay 6. Because of the high discharge, the vortex patterns at the test condition were less consistent than the patterns observed at lower discharges. Compared with the Sensor Fish released at mid-bay at Bay 6, Sensor Fish released from the surface at the vortex experienced higher pressure fluctuations, a larger percentage of severe events, and much more rapid angular velocities.

Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

Sensors for Safety & Performance Stationary Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for PEM Fuel Cell Vehicles · Interfacial Stability of Thin Film H2 Sensors · Sensors for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems · Micro-Machined Thin Film H2 Gas Sensors · Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Fuel Cell Monitoring #12;Discussion Points Barriers ·Cost ·Application ·Lifetime ·Flexibility ·Public

369

Polar Precipitation Measurement Mission A Mission Concept for Earth Explorer 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from other missions, particularly those with passive microwave sensors. Science background the sensor data to be extrapolated to a larger area, it is planned to integrate the data with other sensors

370

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

371

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

MINIMIZATION OF SENSOR USAGE FOR TARGET TRACKING IN A NETWORK OF IRREGULARLY SPACED SENSORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINIMIZATION OF SENSOR USAGE FOR TARGET TRACKING IN A NETWORK OF IRREGULARLY SPACED SENSORS Thomas address the following scenario: a single target moves through a field of stationary sensors with known locations. At each time epoch, each sensor is either active or not; each active sensor outputs either target

Morrell, Darryl

373

IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 4, NO. 4, AUGUST 2004 395 Sensor Technologies for Monitoring Metabolic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 4, NO. 4, AUGUST 2004 395 Sensor Technologies for Monitoring Metabolic Michelle Wilson, Member, IEEE Abstract--A review of optical, chemical, and biological sensors to detect-on-a-chip research instrumentation. The sensors reviewed include optical sensors, at both research and commercial

Wilson, Denise

374

Multiple frequency method for operating electrochemical sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple frequency method for the operation of a sensor to measure a parameter of interest using calibration information including the steps of exciting the sensor at a first frequency providing a first sensor response, exciting the sensor at a second frequency providing a second sensor response, using the second sensor response at the second frequency and the calibration information to produce a calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, using the first sensor response at the first frequency, the calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, and the calibration information to measure the parameter of interest.

Martin, Louis P. (San Ramon, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors Title Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2004 Authors Gundel, Lara A., Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan Keywords carbon monoxide, ozone Abstract Identification of aircraft cabin environmental quality concerns for which sensors may be useful The highest priority environmental indicators identified are ozone and cabin air pressure, followed by carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with moderate priority, and then relative humidity, airborne particles, and organic contaminants, including engine oil byproducts and pesticides. This list is based on the Congressional requirements and recent scientific literature, starting with information from recent studies (NAS/NRC, ASHRAE/Battelle), and continuing by seeking input from a variety of stakeholders.

377

Nuclear magnetic resonance readable sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The monitoring of physiological biomarkers is fundamental to the diagnosis and treatment of disease. We describe here the development of molecular sensors which can be read by magnetic resonance (MR) relaxometry. MR is an ...

Ling, Yibo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Honeywell developing fuel cell sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the US, four development teams from Honeywell Sensing & Control are collaborating in a DOE project to develop sensors that provide better control in the demanding fuel cell environment.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

380

Downhole Sensor Holds Transformative Potential  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Long-term operation of electronics at high temperatures remains a challenge for the geothermal sector; many downhole sensors are prone to failure when deployed in high-temperature wells, which limits the availability and complexity of logging tools av

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

382

Space sensors for global change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Satellite measurements should contribute to a fuller understanding of the physical processes behind the radiation budget, exchange processes, and global change. Climate engineering requires global observation for early indications of predicted effects, which puts a premium on affordable, distributed constellations of satellites with effective, affordable sensors. Defense has a requirement for continuous global surveillance for warning of aggression, which could evolve from advanced sensors and satellites in development. Many climate engineering needs match those of defense technologies.

Canavan, G.H.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Battery system with temperature sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

384

Calorimetric gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustible gas sensor is described that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 {micro}m thick {times} 10{micro}m wide {times} 100, 250, 500, or 1000 {micro}m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 {micro}m-thick protective CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac){sub 2} onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 C; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300 C (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H{sub 2} concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used. 11 figs.

Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Smith, J.H.; Moreno, D.J.; Manginell, R.P.; Senturia, S.D.; Huber, R.J.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Calorimetric gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick.times.10 .mu.m wide.times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500.degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300.degree. C. (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H.sub.2 concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N.sub.2 /O.sub.2 mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used.

Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Senturia, Stephen D. (Brookline, MA); Huber, Robert J. (Bountiful, UT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

Buchanan, Bruce R. (1985 Willis, Batesburg, SC 29006); Prather, William S. (2419 Dickey Rd., Augusta, GA 30906)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Micromechanical potentiometric sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microcantilever potentiometric sensor utilized for detecting and measuring physical and chemical parameters in a sample of media is described. The microcantilevered spring element includes at least one chemical coating on a coated region, that accumulates a surface charge in response to hydrogen ions, redox potential, or ion concentrations in a sample of the media being monitored. The accumulation of surface charge on one surface of the microcantilever, with a differing surface charge on an opposing surface, creates a mechanical stress and a deflection of the spring element. One of a multitude of deflection detection methods may include the use of a laser light source focused on the microcantilever, with a photo-sensitive detector receiving reflected laser impulses. The microcantilevered spring element is approximately 1 to 100 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. An accuracy of detection of deflections of the cantilever is provided in the range of 0.01 nanometers of deflection. The microcantilever apparatus and a method of detection of parameters require only microliters of a sample to be placed on, or near the spring element surface. The method is extremely sensitive to the detection of the parameters to be measured.

Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are described for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer. 4 figs.

Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

390

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

391

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, Moyses (Elmhurst, IL); Mills, Frederick E. (Elburn, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies A virtual O2 sensor for...

393

Stochastic Model Output Statistics for Bias Correcting and Downscaling Precipitation Including Extremes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Precipitation is highly variable in space and time; hence, rain gauge time series generally exhibit additional random small-scale variability compared to area averages. Therefore, differences between daily precipitation statistics simulated by ...

Geraldine Wong; Douglas Maraun; Mathieu Vrac; Martin Widmann; Jonathan M. Eden; Thomas Kent

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Latent heating contribution from precipitation systems with different sizes, depths and intensities in the tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Latent Heating (LH) from precipitation systems with different sizes, depths and convective intensities are quantified with 15 years of LH retrievals from Version 7 Precipitation Radar (PR) products of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)...

Chuntao Liu; Shoichi Shige; Yukari N. Takayabu; Edward Zipser

395

BMA Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting over the Huaihe Basin Using TIGGE Multimodel Ensemble Forecasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bayesian model averaging (BMA) probability quantitative precipitation forecast (PQPF) models were established by calibrating their parameters using 1–7-day ensemble forecasts of 24-h accumulated precipitation, and observations from 43 ...

Jianguo Liu; Zhenghui Xie

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Intensification of precipitation extremes with warming in a cloud resolving model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A cloud-resolving model is used to investigate the effect of warming on high percentiles of precipitation (precipitation extremes) in the idealized setting of radiative-convective equilibrium. While this idealized setting ...

Muller, Caroline

397

Predictions of extreme precipitation and sea–level rise under climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...relevant to river and coastal flooding: changes in extreme precipitation...relevant to river and coastal flooding: changes in extreme precipitation...Altitude Climate Computer Simulation Disasters Ecosystem Environmental...ses-surface temperature (SST) simulation, while these are not needed...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Assessment of SCaMPR and NEXRAD Q2 Precipitation Estimates Using Oklahoma Mesonet Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although satellite precipitation estimates provide valuable information for weather and flood forecasts, infrared (IR) brightness temperature (BT)-based algorithms often produce large errors for precipitation detection and estimation during deep ...

Ronald Stenz; Xiquan Dong; Baike Xi; Robert J. Kuligowski

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A census of precipitation features in the tropics using TRMM: radar, ice scattering, and lightning observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observation of precipitation in the tropics has been greatly enhanced trough the launch of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite n 1997. TRMM'S ability to continuously and simultaneously observe precipitation processes...

Nesbitt, Stephen William

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Large-Scale Precipitation Variability over Northwest China Inferred from Tree Rings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A preliminary study of a point-by-point spatial precipitation reconstruction for northwestern (NW) China is explored, based on a tree-ring network of 132 chronologies. Precipitation variations during the past ~200–400 yr (the common reconstruction ...

Keyan Fang; Xiaohua Gou; Fahu Chen; Edward Cook; Jinbao Li; Brendan Buckley; Rosanne D’Arrigo

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of Precipitation from Numerical Weather Prediction Models and Satellites Using Values Retrieved from Radars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Precipitation is evaluated from two weather prediction models and satellites, taking radar-retrieved values as a reference. The domain is over the central and eastern United States, with hourly accumulated precipitation over 21 days for the ...

Slavko Vasi?; Charles A. Lin; Isztar Zawadzki; Olivier Bousquet; Diane Chaumont

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Diurnal Cycle of Precipitation in the Tropics Simulated in a Global Cloud-Resolving Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzes the diurnal cycle of precipitation simulated in a global cloud-resolving model (GCRM) named the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM). A 30-day integration of NICAM successfully simulates the precipitation ...

Tomonori Sato; Hiroaki Miura; Masaki Satoh; Yukari N. Takayabu; Yuqing Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High Temperature NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloy. Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High Temperature NiTiHf Shape...

404

Scaling of Precipitation Extremes over a Wide Range of Climates Simulated with an Idealized GCM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extremes of precipitation are examined in a wide range of climates simulated with an idealized aquaplanet GCM. The high percentiles of daily precipitation increase as the climate warms. Their fractional rate of increase ...

O'Gorman, Paul Ambrose

405

Permeability Reduction Due to Precipitation of Quartz under Nonisothermal Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many problems concerning the origin and exploitation of geothermal reservoirs demonstrate the need for models of reactive-solute transport. Of particular interest to us is the coupling between dissolution/precipitation reactions and transient-flow behavior. In an effort to account for observed flow-rate reductions during experiments on samples of granite held in a temperature gradient (summarized at this meeting in 1981 by Moore and others), we examine the effect of quartz precipitation on fluid flow. Our results confirm earlier inerences that reactions responsible for porosity reduction were affected by kinetic factors. Although our results show substantial flow-rate reductions, we are unable to reproduce measured silica concentrations of the outlet fluid by considering the behavior of silica phases without regard for that of the feldspars and micas.

Keith, Laura A.; Delaney, Paul T.; Moore, Diane E.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

On the Mechanism of Scrapie Prion Precipitation with Phosphotungstate Anions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To measure the efficacy of each component of PTA, increasing concentrations of PW11, WO4, and mixtures thereof were used to precipitate PrPSc from brain homogenates of scrapie prion-infected mice. ... Interaction of POMs and sarkosyl with brain homogenates promoted the formation of fibrillar PrPSc aggregates prior to centrifugation, likely through the separation of lipids like GM1 from PrPSc. ...

Dana J. Levine; Jan Stoehr; Lillian E. Falese; Julian Ollesch; Holger Wille; Stanley B. Prusiner; Jeffrey R. Long

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

407

Precipitation kinetics in ultra-high lime softening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The second model used the crystal growth rate as an alternate measure of supersaturation. The growth rate obtained from a settling procedure correlated well with values for silica removal rates for experiments grouped by pH and recycie conditions... of precipitation processes specific applications to lime soFtening and silica removal can be addressed. Mechanisms oF silica raawal. Many of the processes studied for specific removal of silica From industrial water have relied on adsorption...

Peacock, Edward Dale

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

409

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature11784 Divergent global precipitation changes induced by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the spatial distribution of precipitation is complex, our approach relies on millennial simulations with ECHO-G

411

Immobilization of metals using apatite minerals: Precipitation or sorption?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metals can be immobilized into stable phosphate phases (apatite minerals) in contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater. Most affected by this treatment are Pb, Zn, Cr, Cu, Cd, Ni, U, Ba, Cs, St, Pu, and all other lanthanides and actinides. The reaction can be nearly irreversible under subsurface conditions. Mine tailing soils from the Bunker Hill Mining District containing 0.4 wt% Pb, Zn and Cd, were treated using various apatites, and modelled using MINTEQA2. Under subsurface conditions, the metal-apatite phases were predicted to be the most stable for Pb, and only moderately stable for Zn and Cd. In column experiments on untreated and apatite-treated soils using vadose zone water, leachates from untreated Bunker Hill soils contained hundreds to thousands of mgkg{sup -1} (ppm) Pb, Zn and Cd, but leachates from apatite-treated Bunker Hill soils showed concentrations below the ICP/MS detection limits of 1 {mu}g kg{sup -1}. SEM and XRD indicated precipitation of Pb-hydropyromorphite that accounted for most of the Pb removal, but no Cd or Zn phosphate minerals appeared. A minor amount of otavite was precipitated, but most of the Cd and Zn were removed in such a way as to produce no XRD patterns. Either sorption dominated Cd and Zn removal or X-ray amorphous materials precipitated. pH had no effect on Pb removal, but significantly affected Cd and Zn.

Wright, J. [NESTT, Richland, WA (United States); Conca, J. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Moody, T. [Bechtel Hanford, Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Precipitation of boron in silicon on high-dose implantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precipitation of boron implanted in silicon with a dose of 1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} is studied in relation to the concentration of substitutional boron C{sub B{sub 0}} introduced before implantation and before subsequent annealing at 900 deg. C. It is shown that C{sub B{sub 0}} = 2.5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is the critical concentration, at which the formation of precipitates is independent of the concentration of point defects introduced by implantation (far from or close to the mean projected range R{sub p}) and constitutes the prevailing channel of deactivation of boron. At lower concentrations C{sub B{sub 0}} close to the equilibrium concentration, precipitation is observed only far from R{sub p}, in the regions of reduced concentrations of point defects. At the same time, in the region of R{sub p} with a high concentration of point defects, most boron atoms are drawn into clustering with intrinsic interstitial atoms with the formation of dislocation loops and, thus, become electrically inactive as well.

Feklistov, K. V., E-mail: kos@thermo.isp.nsc.ru; Fedina, L. I.; Cherkov, A. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Division (Russian Federation)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nickel Solubility and Precipitation in Soils: A Thermodynamic Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of mixed-metal-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) phases similar to hydrotalcite has been identified as a significant mechanism for immobilization of trace metals in some environmental systems. These precipitate phases become increasingly stable as they age, and their formation may therefore be an important pathway for sequestration of toxic metals in contaminated soils. However, the lack of thermodynamic data for LDH phases makes it difficult to model their behavior in natural systems. In this work, enthalpies of formation for Ni LDH phases with nitrate and sulfate interlayers were determined and compared to recently published data on carbonate interlayer LDHs. Differences in the identity of the anion interlayer resulted in substantial changes in the enthalpies of formation of the LDH phases, in the order of increasing enthalpy carbonateprecipitates. Both mechanical mixture and solid-solution models could be used to predict the thermodynamic properties of the LDH phases. Modeling results based on these thermodynamic data indicated that the formation of LDH phases on soil mineral substrates decreased Ni solubility compared to Ni(OH)2 over pH 5-9 when soluble Al is present in the soil substrate. Over time, both of these precipitate phases will transform to more stable Ni phyllosilicates.

Peltier,E.; Allada, R.; Navrotsky, A.; Sparks, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

ARM - Instrument - tps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govInstrumentstps govInstrumentstps Documentation TPS : Handbook TPS : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports TPS : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Total Precipitation Sensor (TPS) Instrument Categories Surface Meteorology Picture of the Total Precipitation Sensor (TPS) Picture of the Total Precipitation Sensor (TPS) General Overview The total precipitation sensor (TPS) measures atmospheric temperature, horizontal wind, and precipitation. It consists of a sensor head and electronics enclosure that are integrated as a single unit. Output Datastreams tps : Total Precipitation Sensor Primary Measurements The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant.

415

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

416

DOE/SC-ARM-14-024 ARM Climate Research Facility Data Management...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(ORNL) (Giri Palanisamy and Raymond McCord) * Provided collection support: Infrared Thermometer (IRT), total precipitation sensor (TPS), Infrared Sky Imager (IRSI), and C-Band ARM...

417

Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids Lamia Goual and Abbas different petroleum fluids. Various resins are added to three different petroleum fluids to measure of precipitation. However, addition of resins to a petroleum fluid increases the amount of precipitated asphaltenes

Firoozabadi, Abbas

418

7 Physical Model of Carbide Precipitation 2 7.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contents 7 Physical Model of Carbide Precipitation 2 7.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 1 #12;Chapter 7 Physical Model of Carbide Precipitation 7.1 Introduction If the austempering process is held for prolonged periods of time precipitation of carbides from retained austenite occurs

Cambridge, University of

419

Metal precipitation at grain boundaries in silicon: Dependence on grain boundary character and dislocation decoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are combined to determine the dependence of metal silicide precipitate formation on grain boundary character and microstructure in multicrystalline silicon mc-Si . Metal silicide precipitate decoration is observed to increase the local metal silicide precipitate concentrations at various types of grain boundaries, identifying clear

420

Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA NOAA/NESDIS Satellite for each precipitation type, as well as light, moderate and heavy snow and rain. The light the cloud microphysics in producing precipitation. For example, ice will only nucleate from the vapor phase

Schultz, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Winter Precipitation Microphysics Characterized by Polarimetric Radar and Video Disdrometer Observations in Central Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the microphysics of winter storms with different types of precipitation. In general, warm rain events are studied. (2007) used polarimetric radar observations for winter precipitation not having the mixed phaseWinter Precipitation Microphysics Characterized by Polarimetric Radar and Video Disdrometer

Xue, Ming

422

Evidence for Pacific-modulated precipitation variability during the late Holocene from the southwestern USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence for Pacific-modulated precipitation variability during the late Holocene from-term, high-resolution, absolutely dateable proxies for precipitation in continental interiors. Here we show that late Holocene precipitation variability in the southwestern United States has been caused by changes

Asmerom, Yemane

423

The robust dynamical contribution to precipitation extremes in idealized warming simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The robust dynamical contribution to precipitation extremes in idealized warming simulations across shift under climate warming on the distribution of precipitation extremes and the associated sensitivity in the frequency of the most extreme categories of the precipitation events at the poleward side of the midlatitude

Chen, Gang

424

Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Understanding the mechanisms that control the durability of nuclear waste glass is paramount if reliable models are to be constructed so that the glass dissolution rate in a given geological repository can be calculated. Presently, it is agreed that (boro)silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4) with higher [H4SiO4] leading to lower dissolution rates. Once the reaction has slowed as a result of the buildup of H4SiO4, another increase in the rate has been observed that corresponds to the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products. However, it has also been observed that the concentration of silica-bearing solution species does not significantly decrease, indicating saturation, while other glass tracer elements concentrations continue to increase, indicating that the glass is still dissolving. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a representative zeolitic silica-bearing alteration product, analcime [Na(AlSi2O6)?H2O]. To simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix for amorphous silica was substituted for the glass pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix because it has been shown that silicate glasses act as a silica-only solid with respect to kinetic considerations. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. From the simulations we conclude, firstly, that the rate of glass dissolution is dependent on the kinetics of formation of the zeolitic phase. Therefore, the kinetics of secondary phase formation is an important parameter that should be taken into account in future glass dissolution modeling efforts. Secondly, the results indicate that, in the absence of a gel layer, the glass dissolution rate controls the rate of analcime precipitation in the long term. The meaning of these results pertinent to long-term glass durability is discussed.

Denis M. Strachan; James J. Neeway

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

426

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

427

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

428

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

429

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

430

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

431

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

432

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

433

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

434

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

435

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

436

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

437

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

438

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

439

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

440

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

442

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

443

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

444

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

445

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

446

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

447

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

448

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

449

EUROBRISA products documentation This page (http://eurobrisa.cptec.inpe.br/) presents 1-month lead South America precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South America precipitation forecasts and verification products for three month seasons. For example surface temperatures as predictor variables for precipitation over South America. For example

450

EUROBRISA products documentation This page (http://eurobrisa.cptec.inpe.br/) presents 1-month lead South America precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South America precipitation forecasts and verification products for three month seasons. For example Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures as predictor variables for precipitation over South America

451

DOE Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Next-Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Next-Generation Power Plants DOE Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Next-Generation Power Plants August 25, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has selected seven projects to develop sensors and controls to support the full-scale implementation and operation of highly efficient power generation technologies with near-zero emissions. The total award value of the projects is nearly $7 million, which includes $1.4 million in cost-sharing from the recipients. The projects will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Future power generation facilities are expected to be very complex, requiring a high level of system integration for efficient operation. To

452

Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

Duran, I. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v. v. i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, 182 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Bolshakova, I.; Holyaka, R. [Magnetic Sensor Laboratory, Lviv Polytechnic National University, 790 31 Lviv (Ukraine); Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z. [Nuclear Research Institute plc., 250 68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic); Sentkerestiova, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Bem, P. [Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, v. v. i., 250 68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

NETL: Advanced Research - Sensors & Controls Innovations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensors & Controls Sensors & Controls Advanced Research Sensors & Controls Innovations OSU's O2 Sensor Ohio State University's reference-free potentiometric oxygen sensor capable of withstanding temperatures of 800 °C. Novel Sensors and Advanced Process Control Novel Sensors and Advanced Process Control are key enabling technologies for advanced near zero emission power systems. NETL's Advanced Research Program is leading the effort to develop sensing and control technologies and methods to achieve seamless, integrated, automated, optimized, and intelligent power systems. Today, the performance of advanced power systems is limited by the lack of sensors and controls capable of withstanding high temperature and pressure conditions. Harsh environments are inherent to new systems that aim to

454

Obtaining accurate measurement using redundant sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional wisdom suggests to accomplish accurate measurement, the sensors used must have high precision and excellent dynamic range. This generally results in sensor systems that are complex, costly, and often sensitive to environmental factors...

Burnett, Michael Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

455

Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Novel sensor design based on acoustics. Determine in real-timeand in a single sensor packagemultiple parameters: temperature, pressure, fluid flow; and fluid properties, such as density, viscosity, fluid composition.

456

Three sun sensors for stratospheric balloon payloads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe three sun sensors which have been developed for balloon borne experiments. The sensors have different resolutions and sky coverage and have been developed and used in the BOOMERanG project.

G. Romeo; P. de Bernardis; G. Di Stefano; S. Masi; F. Piacentini; F. Pongetti; S. Rao

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Design guidelines for optical resonator biochemical sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we propose a design tool for dielectric optical resonator-based biochemical refractometry sensors. Analogous to the widely accepted photodetector figure of merit, the detectivity D*, we introduce a new sensor ...

Kimerling, Lionel C.

458

Automatic Calibration of Multiple Coplanar Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes an algorithm for recovering the rigid 3-DOF transformation (offset and rotation) between pairs of sensors mounted rigidly in a common plane on a mobile robot. The algorithm requires only a set of sensor ...

Brookshire, Jonathan

459

Nanocomposite Flexible Pressure Sensor for Biomedical Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new approach for the fabrication of flexible pressure sensors based on aligned carbon nanotubes (A-CNTs) is described in this paper. The technology is suitable for blood pressure sensors that can be attached to a stent-graft ...

Fachin, F.

460

Utilizing Solar Power in Wireless Sensor Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sensor networks are designed especially for deploymentin adverse and non-accessible areas without a fixed infrastructure.Therefore, energy conservation plays a crucialrole for these networks. We propose to utilize solar powerin wireless sensor networks, ...

Thiemo Voigt; Hartmut Ritter; Jochen Schiller

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nanojunction Sensors for the Detection of chemical and Biological...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and biological sensors, magnetoresistive sensors and molecular electronic and optoelectronic devices. This invention can turn these applications into commercial...

462

Minimum energy decentralized estimation in a wireless sensor network with correlated sensor noises  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Consider the problem of estimating an unknown parameter by a sensor network with a fusion center (FC). Sensor observations are corrupted by additive noises with an arbitrary spatial correlation. Due to bandwidth and energy limitation, each sensor is ... Keywords: decentralized estimation, energy efficiency, power control, wireless sensor networks

Alexey Krasnopeev; Jin-Jun Xiao; Zhi-Quan Luo

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 13, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2013 3405 A Soft Strain Sensor Based on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 13, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2013 3405 A Soft Strain Sensor Based on Ionic and Vincent Duchaine Abstract--A novel soft strain sensor capable of withstand- ing strains of up to 100% is described. The sensor is made of a hyperelastic silicone elastomer that contains embedded microchannels

Park, Yong-Lae

464

Abstract--A low noise optical sensor and biocompatible microscale optical filters for integrated fluorescence sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--A low noise optical sensor and biocompatible microscale optical filters for integrated fluorescence sensors were developed and tested. The sensor was fabricated in a 0.5 µm CMOS process. The measured reset noise of the sensor is reduced by a factor of 10 compared to conventional active pixel

Maryland at College Park, University of

465

Sensors and Actuators A xxx (2004) xxxxxx Micromachined silicon force sensor based on diffractive optical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors and Actuators A xxx (2004) xxx­xxx Micromachined silicon force sensor based on diffractive-based force sensor integrated with a surface micromachined silicon-nitride probe for penetration and injection that is designed to only be sensitive to axial deflections of the probe. The optical-encoder force sensor exhibits

Quake, Stephen R.

466

CCEC Seminar Wireless Sensors for SemiconductorWireless Sensors for Semiconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCEC Seminar Wireless Sensors for SemiconductorWireless Sensors for Semiconductor Manufacturing perhaps. In this talk, we describe our efforts in developing a new class of wireless sensors for use in semiconductor manufacturing. These sensors are fully self-contained with on board power, communications

Akhmedov, Azer

467

High pressure fiber optic sensor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

468

Sensors 2002, 2, 244-257 ISSN 1424-8220  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors 2002, 2, 244-257 sensors ISSN 1424-8220 © 2002 by MDPI http://www.mdpi.net/sensors Invited Paper Communication Buses and Protocols for Sensor Networks Junwei Zhou and Andrew Mason* Department communication buses which are commonly used in sensor networks, discusses sensor network architectures

Mason, Andrew

469

Fiber-optic liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber-optic liquid level sensor measures the height of a column of liquid through the hydrostatic pressure it produces. The sensor employs a fiber-optic displacement sensor to detect the pressure-induced displacement of the center of a corrugated diaphragm.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

SIA: Secure information aggregation in sensor networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In sensor networks, data aggregation is a vital primitive enabling efficient data queries. An on-site aggregator device collects data from sensor nodes and produces a condensed summary which is forwarded to the off-site querier, thus reducing the communication ... Keywords: Sensor networks, approximate interactive proofs, information aggregation, security

Haowen Chan; Adrian Perrig; Bartosz Przydatek; Dawn Song

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Wireless sensor networks and environmental monitoring applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radio: 4kbps, 180m Sensors: Light and accelerometer Energy: Solar powered Golem and deputy dust 16mm3-aided medicine Data processing in wireless sensor networks Facilities: Cluster of 16 computers 30 ultra low power wireless sensors Lego robotics lab (10 Mindstorms kits) More to come... (mobile robot, Mindstorms NXT kits

Le Borgne, Yann-AĂ«l

472

Compressive Computation in Analog VLSI Motion Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compressive Computation in Analog VLSI Motion Sensors Rainer A. Deutschmann1 and Oliver G. Wenisch2 analog VLSI mo- tion sensors developed in the past. We show how their pixel-parallel architecture can is best suited to perform the algorithm even at high noise levels. 1 Analog VLSI Motion Sensors Inthe past

Deutschmann, Rainer

473

700:20131001.1211 Fine Sun Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

700:20131001.1211 Fine Sun Sensor The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado, Boulder is a world leader in space-based research including measurements of the Sun with respect to sun center. LASP has built sun position sensors for decades beginning with sensors for sub

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

474

Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined. 5 figures.

Murray, H. Jr.; Harris, I.D.; Ratka, J.O.; Spiegelberg, W.D.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

475

Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined.

Murray, Jr., Holt (Hopewell, NJ); Harris, Ian D. (Dublin, OH); Ratka, John O. (Cleveland Heights, OH); Spiegelberg, William D. (Parma, OH)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

477

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

478

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

479

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

480

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

482

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

483

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

484

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

485

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

486

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

487

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

488

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

489

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

490

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shadowband Spectroradiometer SPEC-TOTDN : Shortwave Total Downwelling Spectrometer UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett Value-Added Products VISST : Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst...

491

,"New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","12312014"...

492

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

493

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to...

494

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

495

Energy management in sensor networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sensor networks are based on solar cells, such as Heliomote...design a highly efficient solar-based harvesting system, these solar-based designs need to employ...achieves a maximum value. (b) Energy storage According to the type of...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Centdian computation for sensor networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the centdian problem in a cactus network where a cactus network is a connected undirected graph, and any two simple cycles in the graph have at most one node in common The cactus network has important applications for wireless ... Keywords: cactus graph, centdian node, distributed algorithm, sensor network

Boaz Ben-Moshe; Amit Dvir; Michael Segal; Arie Tamir

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Fiber optic coupled optical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Sensors, Controls, & Transactional Network Reports  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Reports from the sensors, controls, and transactional network program. The transactional network is between appliances, buildings, and utilities, and can enable Smart Buildings -- buildings with technologies and control systems that can not only optimize energy performance and comfort, but also support energy-related transactions outside the building envelope.

499

Pneumatic gap sensor and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment.

Bagdal, Karl T. (Middletown, OH); King, Edward L. (Trenton, OH); Follstaedt, Donald W. (Middletown, OH)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

SO.sub.2 sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a process for detecting low concentration levels of sulfur oxides (SO.sub.2) in a flowing gas stream (typically a combustion exhaust gas stream) and a catalytic SO.sub.2 sensor system which may be used in that process.

Dalla Betta, Ralph A. (Mountain View, CA); Sheridan, David R. (Menlo Park, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z