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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Hydrocarbon/Total Combustibles Sensor  

the invention is an electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor that is more reliable and reproducible than any other hydrocarbon sensor on the market today. The patented method for producing the sensor ensures reproducibility and reduces the need for ...

2

Trends in Total Precipitation and Frequency of Daily Precipitation Extremes over China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on a newly developed daily precipitation dataset of 740 stations in China and more robust trend detection techniques, trends in annual and seasonal total precipitation and in extreme daily precipitation, defined as those larger than its ...

Panmao Zhai; Xuebin Zhang; Hui Wan; Xiaohua Pan

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Performance of the Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System as a Precipitation Gauge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System (POSS) is a small X-band Doppler radar originally developed by the Meteorological Service of Canada for reporting the occurrence, type, and intensity of precipitation from Automated Weather Observing ...

B. E. Sheppard; P. I. Joe

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

A Blended Satellite Total Precipitable Water Product for Operational Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total precipitable water (TPW), the amount of water vapor in a column from the surface of the earth to space, is used by forecasters to predict heavy precipitation. In this paper, a process for blending TPW values retrieved from two satellite ...

Stanley Q. Kidder; Andrew S. Jones

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

On the Study of a Probability Distribution for Precipitation Totals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the probability distribution models for precipitation totals and their applications are briefly reviewed. The general properties of a probability distribution model which is a mixture of gamma and Poisson distributions are discussed. A ...

Aydin Öztürk

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

A Comparison of Total Precipitable Water between Reanalyses and NVAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares monthly total precipitable water (TPW) from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Water Vapor Project (NVAP) and reanalyses of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) (R-1), NCEP–Department ...

Arief Sudradjat; Ralph R. Ferraro; Michael Fiorino

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Total Precipitable Water Measurements from GOES Sounder Derived Product Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistics are compiled comparing calculations of total precipitable water (TPW) as given by GOES sounder derived product imagery (DPI) to that computed from radiosonde data for the 12-month period March 1998–February 1999. In order to ...

John F. Dostalek; Timothy J. Schmit

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Sampling Errors in the Measurement of Rainfall Parameters Using the Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System (POSS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System (POSS) is a small Doppler radar originally designed by the Meteorological Service of Canada (MSC) to report the occurrence, type, and intensity of precipitation in automated observing stations. It is ...

B. E. Sheppard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

How Total Precipitable Water Vapor Anomalies Relate to Cloud Vertical Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NOAA operational total precipitable water (TPW) anomaly product is available to forecasters to display percentage of normal TPW in real time for applications like heavy precipitation forecasts. In this work, the TPW anomaly is compared to ...

John M. Forsythe; Jason B. Dodson; Philip T. Partain; Stanley Q. Kidder; Thomas H. Vonder Haar

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A Probabilistic Forecast Approach for Daily Precipitation Totals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commonly, postprocessing techniques are employed to calibrate a model forecast. Here, a probabilistic postprocessor is presented that provides calibrated probability and quantile forecasts of precipitation on the local scale. The forecasts are ...

Petra Friederichs; Andreas Hense

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Variability and Trends of Total Precipitation and Snowfall over the United States and Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biases and large-scale inhomogeneities in the time series of measured precipitation and snowfall over the United States and Canada are discussed and analyzed. The spatial statistical characteristics of monthly and annual snowfall and total ...

Pavel Ya Groisman; David R. Easterling

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A Study of the Characteristics and Assimilation of Retrieved MODIS Total Precipitable Water Data in Severe Weather Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study determined the accuracy and biases associated with retrieved Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) total precipitable water (TPW) data, and it investigated the impact of these data on severe weather simulations using ...

Shu-Hua Chen; Zhan Zhao; Jennifer S. Haase; Aidong Chen; Francois Vandenberghe

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA): Quasi-Global, Multiyear, Combined-Sensor Precipitation Estimates at Fine Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) provides a calibration-based sequential scheme for combining precipitation estimates from multiple satellites, as well as gauge analyses where feasible, ...

George J. Huffman; David T. Bolvin; Eric J. Nelkin; David B. Wolff; Robert F. Adler; Guojun Gu; Yang Hong; Kenneth P. Bowman; Erich F. Stocker

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Detecting Precipitating Clouds over Snow and Ice Using a Multiple Sensors Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work discusses a snowfall detection approach for high-latitude regions that is based on a combination of passive sensors to discriminate between snowing and nonsnowing areas. Two different techniques have been developed to compute the ...

G. Todini; R. Rizzi; E. Todini

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Derived Distributions of Storm Depth and Frequency Conditioned on Monthly Total Precipitation: Adding Value to Historical and Satellite-Derived Estimates of Monthly Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stochastic precipitation model in which storms arrive as a Poisson process and have gamma-distributed depths previously has been shown to display useful aggregation properties. Here the disaggregation properties of this model are explored. ...

Guido D. Salvucci; Conghe Song

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

17

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

18

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

19

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

20

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

22

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

23

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

24

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

25

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

26

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

27

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

28

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

29

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

30

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

31

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

32

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

33

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

34

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

35

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

36

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

37

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

38

Investigation of PR and TMI Version 6 and Version 7 Rainfall Algorithms in Landfalling Tropical Cyclones Relative to the NEXRAD Stage-IV Multi-sensor Precipitation Estimate Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall estimates from Version 6 and Version 7 of the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) 2A25 and Microwave Imager (TMI) 2A12 algorithms are compared relative to the NEXRAD Multi-sensor Precipitation Estimate Stage IV hourly rainfall product. The ...

Joseph P. Zagrodnik; Haiyan Jiang

39

The impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on orographic clouds and precipitation: a multi-sensor case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study is presented from the 2012 AgI Seeding Cloud Impact Investigation, an experiment conducted over the Sierra Madre in southern Wyoming to study the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on precipitation. In this case, on 21 ...

Binod Pokharel; Bart Geerts; Xiaoqin Jing

40

Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) Global Gridded Products Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) Global Gridded Products Dataset Summary Description The SSM/I products are useful for evaluating the mean climate state, it's interannual and seasonal variations, and the detection of anomalies associated with ENSO and regional climatic variations. The Hydrology Team has assembled a time series of the entire SSM/I archive, now entering it's 16th year, which includes data from July 1987 to the present. Monthly average products are produced for precipitation, cloud liquid water, total precipitable water, snow cover, sea-ice cover, and oceanic surface wind speed.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Environmental Influence on Tropical Cyclone Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensity, spatial, and temporal changes in precipitation were examined in three North Atlantic hurricanes during 1989 (Dean, Gabrielle, and Hugo) using precipitation estimates made from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) measurements. ...

Edward B. Rodgers; Jong-Jin Baik; Harold F. Pierce

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Lightning Frequency and Microphysical Properties of Precipitating Clouds over the Western North Pacific during Winter as Derived from TRMM Multisensor Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission observations from multiple sensors including precipitation radar, microwave and infrared radiometers, and a lightning sensor were used to describe precipitation, lightning frequency, and microphysical ...

Yasu-Masa Kodama; Haruna Okabe; Yukie Tomisaka; Katsuya Kotono; Yoshimi Kondo; Hideyuki Kasuya

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

CDIAC Precipitation Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precipitation Precipitation CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Precipitation Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Stations data; monthly totals Varies by station; through 1990 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Station data; monthly totals Varies by station; some through most recent month A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (CDIAC DB-1003) R.S. Bradley et al. Monthly, seasonal, and annual anomaly maps of precipitation 1851 - 1989 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record

44

Precipitating clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or virga An multiple sensor based approach to provide water phase as well as ice phase properties Measurements - MWR - MPL or Raman lidar - MMCR The approach Water...

45

Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ polarization difference is used to restrict the application of the geophysical retrieval algorithms which are developed to handle specific atmospheric absorptive situations. An improved semi-empirical sea surface emissivity model is integrated into this refined D-matrix procedure that is being developed for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Radiometer (AMSR). The purpose of this work is to test the refined geophysical parameter retrieval methods using data from the Special Sensor Microwave / Imager (SSM/I). When comparing the statistical performance of the TIWV, WS, and CLW retrieval methods presented to the statistical performance of published retrieval methods for each geophysical parameter, the retrieval methods developed for this study perform only slightly better. However, it is demonstrated that the new retrieval methods are more physically valid than the comparison retrieval methods. The utilization of the polarization difference of the 85 GHZ channels to restrict the application of specifically-derived retrieval algorithms proves to be a valuable and reliable geophysical parameter retrieval tool.

Manning, Norman Willis William

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Automated Precipitation Detection and Typing in Winter: A Two-Year Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation detection and typing estimates from four sensors are evaluated using standard operational meteorological observations as a reference. All are active remote sensors radiating into a measurement volume near the sensor, and measuring ...

B. E. Sheppard; P. I. Joe

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Precipitation Patterns in West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional precipitation analysis from a total of 813 recording stations in 11 West African countries for the drought period 1968–75 is presented. Results illustrate the severity and extent of meteorological drought which prevailed throughout the ...

Raymond P. Motha; Sharon K. Leduc; Louis T. Steyaert; Clarence M. Sakamoto; Norton D. Strommen

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Estimation of Continental Precipitation Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. ...

Kaye L. Brubaker; Dara Entekhabi; P. S. Eagleson

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Hotplate Precipitation Gauge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new instrument designed to measure precipitation, the “hotplate precipitation gauge,” is described. The instrument consists of a heated thin disk that provides a reliable, low-maintenance method to measure precipitation rate every minute ...

Roy M. Rasmussen; John Hallett; Rick Purcell; Scott D. Landolt; Jeff Cole

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Changes in Intense Precipitation over the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In examining intense precipitation over the central United States, the authors consider only days with precipitation when the daily total is above 12.7 mm and focus only on these days and multiday events constructed from such consecutive ...

Pavel Ya. Groisman; Richard W. Knight; Thomas R. Karl

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Heavy Precipitation Events over Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial and temporal characteristics of heavy precipitation events over Canada (excluding the high Arctic) are examined for the period 1900–98. In southern Canada, about 71% of total precipitation comes from rainfall events. In northern Canada, ...

Xuebin Zhang; W. D. Hogg; Éva Mekis

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

1961-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Climatology-Calibrated Precipitation Analysis at Fine Scales: Statistical Adjustment of Stage IV towards CPC Gauge Based Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two widely used precipitation analyses are the CPC Unified Global Daily Gauge Analysis and Stage IV analysis based on quantitative precipitation estimate with multi-sensor observations. The Former is based on gauge records with a uniform quality ...

Dingchen Hou; Mike Charles; Yan Luo; Zoltan Toth; Yuejian Zhu; Roman Krzysztofowicz; Ying Lin; Pingping Xie; Dong-Jun Seo; Malaquias Pena; Bo Cui

54

Precipitation over Concave Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many topographic barriers are comprised of a series of concave or convex ridges that modulate the intensity and distribution of precipitation over mountainous areas. In this model-based idealized study, stratiform precipitation associated with ...

Qingfang Jiang

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A TEST OF THE PRECIPITATION AMOUNT AND INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH THE OTT PLUVIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A TEST OF THE PRECIPITATION AMOUNT AND INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH THE OTT PLUVIO Wiel M.F. Wauben precipitation sensor of Ott has been tested at KNMI in order to find out whether it is a suitable candidate for replacing the current operational KNMI precipitation gauge. Tests performed at the calibration facilities

Wauben, Wiel

56

Planar Total Internal Reflection Biofouling Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind- driven reverse osmosis desalination system withfeedback control," Desalination, vol. 150, pp. 277-287,a filtration process," Desalination, vol. 206, pp. 36-41,

Nam, Koo Hyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Gibbsite Precipitation Inhibitors  

Gibbsite Precipitation Inhibitors 3 Mission Drivers There are high concentrations of aluminum as gibbsite or boehmite in Hanford High Level Waste

58

Precipitator Performance Estimation Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased availability of data to use with an existing computer model makes it possible for utilities to calculate electrostatic precipitator performance without access to industry databases. This report examines the accuracy of the model and develops procedures to make it a more useful tool for troubleshooting precipitator performance and for selecting the size of a new unit.

1986-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

precipitation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

precipitation precipitation Dataset Summary Description This dataset, made available by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), presents summer and winter precipitation for England and Wales, and the percent change from the baseline (1961 - 1990 average). The original source of the data is the Hadley Centre. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 12th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords climate change precipitation UK Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 1 Excel file: Precipitation, 1874 - 2009 (xls, 68.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment (Does not have "National Statistics" status) Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1874 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

60

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Satellite Observational Study of Precipitation Characteristics in Western North Pacific Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) observations were used to examine spatial and temporal changes in the precipitation characteristics for western North Pacific tropical cyclones that reached storm stage or greater during 1987-92. The second ...

Edward B. Rodgers; Harold F. Pierce

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Comparing tropical precipitation simulated by the Met Office NWP and climate models with satellite observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasts of precipitation and water vapor made by the UK Met Office global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model are evaluated using products from satellite observations of Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) and Tropical Rainfall ...

Chunlei Liu; Richard P. Allan; Malcolm Brooks; Sean Milton

63

Relationships among Lightning, Precipitation, and Hydrometeor Characteristics over the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lightning data from the Pacific Lightning Detection Network (PacNet) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite were compared with TRMM precipitation radar products and latent heating and ...

Antti T. Pessi; Steven Businger

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A Cloud and Precipitation Feature Database from Nine Years of TRMM Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An event-based method of analyzing the measurements from multiple satellite sensors is presented by using observations of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR), Microwave Imager (TMI), Visible and Infrared ...

Chuntao Liu; Edward J. Zipser; Daniel J. Cecil; Stephen W. Nesbitt; Steven Sherwood

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A Satellite Observational and Numerical Study of Precipitation Characteristics in Western North Atlantic Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) observations were used to examine the spatial and temporal changes of the precipitation characteristics of tropical cyclones. SSM/I observations were also combined with the results of a tropical cyclone ...

Edward B. Rodgers; Simon W. Chang; Harold F. Pierce

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Effect of Spatial Aggregation on the Skill of Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skillful forecasts of 3-month total precipitation would be useful for decision making in hydrology, agriculture, public health, and other sectors of society. However, with some exceptions, the skill of seasonal precipitation outlooks is modest, ...

Xiaofeng Gong; Anthony G. Barnston; M. Neil Ward

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Occurrence of Extreme Precipitation Events in California and Relationships with the Madden–Julian Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

California receives most of the annual precipitation during the boreal winter season. Additionally, large spatial and temporal variations in the total rainfall amounts are observed. This study investigates the occurrence of extreme precipitation ...

Charles Jones

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Small-Scale Spatial Gradients in Climatological Precipitation on the Olympic Peninsula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persistent, 10-km-scale gradients in climatological precipitation tied to topography are documented with a finescale rain and snow gauge network in the Matheny Ridge area of the Olympic Mountains of Washington State. Precipitation totals are 50% ...

Alison M. Anders; Gerard H. Roe; Dale R. Durran; Justin R. Minder

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Impact of the Madden–Julian Oscillation on Wintertime Precipitation in Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the adjusted daily total precipitation data at Canadian stations and the Climate Prediction Center Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) data during the most recent 30 Northern Hemisphere winters, the connection between the tropical ...

Hai Lin; Gilbert Brunet; Ruping Mo

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Variational Data Assimilation in the Tropics Using Precipitation Data. Part III: Assimilation of SSM/I Precipitation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-VAR) in the Tropics is examined by assimilating radiosonde and pibal data over the globe and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) precipitation rates over the tropical ...

Tadashi Tsuyuki

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

72

ARM - Measurement - Precipitation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsPrecipitation govMeasurementsPrecipitation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Precipitation All liquid or solid phase aqueous particles that originate in the atmosphere and fall to the earth's surface. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer LDIS : Laser Disdrometer MWRHF : Microwave Radiometer - High Frequency

73

URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Solid State Gas Sensors - Energy Innovation Portal  

The total cost of ownership (TCO) for gas sensors today is a limiting factor in improving safety, air quality, and energy efficiency.

75

Cloud Type and Macrophysical Property Retrieval Using Multiple Remote Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cloud detection algorithm based on ground-based remote sensors has been developed that can differentiate among various atmospheric targets such as ice and water clouds, virga, precipitation, and aerosol layers. Standard cloud type and ...

Zhien Wang; Kenneth Sassen

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

An Improved Modeling Scheme for Freezing Precipitation Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve forecasts of various weather elements (snow, rain, and freezing precipitation) in numerical weather prediction models, a new mixed-phase cloud scheme has been developed. The scheme is based on a single prognostic equation for total ...

André Tremblay; Anna Glazer

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A Climatological Model for 1-min Precipitation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for estimating mean monthly total time occurrence for 1-min precipitation rates from monthly climatological variables has been developed. The model has two components: an estimation algorithm for the mean monthly percentage of time in ...

Paul Tattelman; Kevin P. Larson; Andrew J. Mazzella Jr.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Electrostatic Precipitator Reference Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual reviews the history of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and the theory on which they are based. The chemical and physical properties of fly ash are detailed, and practical guidelines for the selection of ESP design and size are presented. Special attention is given to operating and performance problem diagnostics, and trends in the design and application of ESPs are discussed.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Precipitator Layup Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI members faced with the need to lay up (temporarily shut down) coal-fired units for extended periods of time because of the current economic downturn have requested guidance on the methods and techniques necessary for protecting electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and their associated auxiliaries from corrosion damage and other degradation, both mechanical and electrical, during such layups.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Hydrogen Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sensor for detectingquantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ARM - Evaluation Product - Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsQuantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) ProductsQuantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from the CSAPR Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from the CSAPR Site(s) SGP TWP General Description Precipitation rates from cloud systems can give a fundamental insight into the processes occurring in-cloud. While rain gauges and disdrometers can give information at a single point, remote sensors such as radars can provide rainfall information over a defined area. The QPE value-added product (VAP) takes the Corrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates VAP and maps the Rain_rate_A field onto a Cartesian grid at the surface. This field is the rain rate as determined using the specific attenuation (A, dBZ/km) due to two-way liquid attenuation after Ryzhkov et

82

Illinois Precipitation Research: A Focus on Cloud and Precipitation Modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the heart of the 40-year atmospheric research endeavors of the Illinois State Water Survey have been studies to understand precipitation processes in order to learn how precipitation is modified purposefully and accidentally, and to measure ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Robert R. Czys; Robert W. Scott; Nancy E. Westcott

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

Crawford, Don L. (Moscow, ID); Pometto, III, Anthony L. (Moscow, ID)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NOx Sensor Development  

SciTech Connect

NO{sub x} compounds, specifically NO and NO{sub 2}, are pollutants and potent greenhouse gases. Compact and inexpensive NO{sub x} sensors are necessary in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles to meet government emission requirements and enable the more rapid introduction of more efficient, higher fuel economy CIDI vehicles. Because the need for a NO{sub x} sensor is recent and the performance requirements are extremely challenging, most are still in the development phase. Currently, there is only one type of NO{sub x} sensor that is sold commercially, and it seems unlikely to meet more stringent future emission requirements. Automotive exhaust sensor development has focused on solid-state electrochemical technology, which has proven to be robust for in-situ operation in harsh, high-temperature environments (e.g., the oxygen stoichiometric sensor). Solid-state sensors typically rely on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the oxygen-ion conducting electrolyte and then target different types of metal or metal-oxide electrodes to optimize the response. Electrochemical sensors can be operated in different modes, including amperometric (a current is measured) and potentiometric (a voltage is measured), both of which employ direct current (dc) measurements. Amperometric operation is costly due to the electronics necessary to measure the small sensor signal (nanoampere current at ppm NO{sub x} levels), and cannot be easily improved to meet the future technical performance requirements. Potentiometric operation has not demonstrated enough promise in meeting long-term stability requirements, where the voltage signal drift is thought to be due to aging effects associated with electrically driven changes, both morphological and compositional, in the sensor. Our approach involves impedancemetric operation, which uses alternating current (ac) measurements at a specified frequency. The approach is described in detail in previous reports and several publications. Briefly, impedancemetric operation has shown the potential to overcome the drawbacks of other approaches, including higher sensitivity towards NO{sub x}, better long-term stability, potential for subtracting out background interferences, total NO{sub x} measurement, and lower cost materials and operation. Past LLNL research and development efforts have focused on characterizing different sensor materials and understanding complex sensing mechanisms. Continued effort has led to improved prototypes with better performance, including increased sensitivity (to less than 5 ppm) and long-term stability, with more appropriate designs for mass fabrication, including incorporation of an alumina substrate with an imbedded heater. Efforts in the last year to further improve sensor robustness have led to successful engine dynamometer testing with prototypes mounted directly in the engine manifold. Previous attempts had required exhaust gases to be routed into a separate furnace for testing due to mechanical failure of the sensor from engine vibrations. A more extensive cross-sensitivity study was also undertaken this last year to examine major noise factors including fluctuations in water, oxygen, and temperature. The quantitative data were then used to develop a strategy using numerical algorithms to improve sensor accuracy. The ultimate goal is the transfer of this technology to a supplier for commercialization. Due to the recent economic downturn, suppliers are demanding more comprehensive data and increased performance analysis before committing their resources to take the technology to market. Therefore, our NO{sub x} sensor work requires a level of technology development more thorough and extensive than ever before. The objectives are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements and designs and manufacturing metho

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

Fries, B.A.

1959-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Energy efficient sensor network implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss a low power embedded sensor node architecture we are developing for distributed sensor network systems deployed in a natural environment. In particular, we examine the sensor node for energy efficient processing-at-the-sensor. We analyze the following modes of operation; event detection, sleep(wake-up), data acquisition, data processing modes using low power, high performance embedded technology such as specialized embedded DSP processors and a low power FPGAs at the sensing node. We use compute intensive sensor node applications: an acoustic vehicle classifier (frequency domain analysis) and a video license plate identification application (learning algorithm) as a case study. We report performance and total energy usage for our system implementations and discuss the system architecture design trade offs.

Frigo, Janette R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Raby, Eric Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brennan, Sean M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kulathumani, Vinod [WEST VIRGINIA UNIV.; Rosten, Ed [CAMBRIDGE UNIV.; Wolinski, Christophe [IRISA; Wagner, Charles [IRISA; Charot, Francois [IRISA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Trends in precipitation, runoff, and evapotranspiration for rivers draining to the Gulf of Maine in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate warming is projected to result in increases in total annual precipitation in northeastern North America. The response of runoff to increases in precipitation is likely to be more complex (even the direction of change is uncertain) because ...

T. G. Huntington; M. Billmire

89

A Comparison between Raw Ensemble Output, (Modified) Bayesian Model Averaging, and Extended Logistic Regression Using ECMWF Ensemble Precipitation Reforecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a 20-yr ECMWF ensemble reforecast dataset of total precipitation and a 20-yr dataset of a dense precipitation observation network in the Netherlands, a comparison is made between the raw ensemble output, Bayesian model averaging (BMA), and ...

Maurice J. Schmeits; Kees J. Kok

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Challenges to Satellite Sensors of Ocean Winds: Addressing Precipitation Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of global ocean surface winds made by orbiting satellite radars have provided valuable information to the oceanographic and meteorological communities since the launch of the Seasat in 1978, by the National Aeronautics and Space ...

D. E. Weissman; B. W. Stiles; S. M. Hristova-Veleva; D. G. Long; D. K. Smith; K. A. Hilburn; W. L. Jones

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

92

Hydrate Precipitation, Calcination and Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Kinetics of Boehmite Precipitation from Supersaturated Sodium Aluminates Solutions with Ethanol-Water Solvent: Wang Zhi1; Xu Rongguang1; ...

93

Sensors, Instrumentation Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors, Instrumentation Systems science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Sensors, Instrumentation Systems National security depends on science and technology. The...

94

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

Lowell, Jr., James R. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Rayfield, George W. (Bend, OR)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Sensor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, further, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

Origin of Precipitation and Dynamic Organization in Wavelike Precipitation Bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wavelike parallel precipitation bands, embedded in a layer of cirrus clouds, were studied with a vertically pointing millimetric Doppler radar. Their mean dimensions were 17 km between bands, a 50 km band length and a 6 km band width. Their ...

Richard Auria; Bernard Campistron

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

1992-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

98

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

Lowell, Jr., James R. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Rayfield, George W. (Eugene, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Humidity Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 21   Applications for humidity sensors...parts 5 to 40 0 to 50 Magnetic heads, LSIs, ICs Agriculture, forestry stockbreeding Greenhouse air conditioning 5 to 40 0 to 100 Air conditioning Dew prevention in tealeaf growing -10 to 60 50 to 100 Dew prevention Broiler farming 20 to 25 40 to 70 Health control Measurement Thermostatic bath -5 to 100 0 to...

100

A Precipitation Climatology of 5-Day Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A precipitation climatology has been developed for the relative frequencies of zero, one, or two or more days with measurable precipitation within 5-day periods. In addition, the distribution of precipitation amounts is given for the one wet day ...

E. S. Epstein; A. G. Barnston

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High-Strength Alloys; Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011 ... Precipitation Hardenable Mg-Ca-Al Alloys: J. Jayaraj1; C.L. Mendis1; T. Ohkubo1 ; K. Oh-ishi1; K. Hono1; 1National Institute for Materials ...

102

Some Statistics of Instantaneous Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Known sources of data from arrays of instantaneous precipitation intensity recorders in southern Germany, east-central Illinois, northeastern Illinois, central Florida, and Hilo, Hawaii are obtained. These data are analyzed for line averages of ...

Douglas M. A. Jones; Wayne M. Wendland

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tropical Influences on California Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric circulation anomalies and hydrologic processes associated with California wet and dry events were examined during Northern Hemisphere winter. The precipitation anomaly over the west coast of North America shows a north–south three-...

Kingtse C. Mo; R. Wayne Higgins

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Teleconnections with Tropical Precipitation Surges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation surges in the equatorial Pacific “dry zone” (as delineated in a study by Doberitz) reveal statistically significant teleconnections with midlatitude tropospheric flow patterns during all seasons. These connections are strongest, ...

Elmar R. Reiter

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ) System: Description, Results, and Future Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Mosaic and Multi-sensor QPE (Quantitative Precipitation Estimation), or “NMQ”, system was initially developed from a joint initiative between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Severe Storms Laboratory, the Federal ...

Jian Zhang; Kenneth Howard; Carrie Langston; Steve Vasiloff; Brian Kaney; Ami Arthur; Suzanne Van Cooten; Kevin Kelleher; David Kitzmiller; Feng Ding; Dong-Jun Seo; Ernie Wells; Chuck Dempsey

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Placement of network services in a sensor network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important challenge in designing a wireless sensor network is to maximise the network's lifetime. In a hierarchical cluster-based network, a key design issue is the placement of cluster heads (data loggers) such that the total power ... Keywords: beacons, cluster heads, clustering, data loggers, energy conservation, sensor localisation, service placement, wireless networks, wireless sensor networks

Jennifer Yick; Gregory Pasternack; Biswanath Mukherjee; Dipak Ghosal

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Charge Induced on a Conducting Cylinder by a Point Charge and Its Application to the Measurement of Charge on Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solution of the electrostatic boundary value problem for a point charge inside an infinite cylinder is applied to sensors employed in the measurement of charge on precipitation. With these devices the charge induced on a cylindrical segment ...

Andrew J. Weinheimer

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Wireless sensor network survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wireless sensor network (WSN) has important applications such as remote environmental monitoring and target tracking. This has been enabled by the availability, particularly in recent years, of sensors that are smaller, cheaper, and intelligent. These ... Keywords: Protocols, Sensor network deployment, Sensor network services, Survey, Wireless sensor network

Jennifer Yick; Biswanath Mukherjee; Dipak Ghosal

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Category:Active Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Active Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Active Sensors page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Active Sensors Add.png Add a new Active Sensors Technique Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. R [×] Radar‎ 5 pages Pages in category "Active Sensors" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. L LiDAR R Radar Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Active_Sensors&oldid=689848"

110

Hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

Effect of Cooling Rate From Solution Treatment on Precipitation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

of practical large size forging, such as furnace cooling, air cooling, oil quench and water quench. .... of y (3 y 'I and y '- y ” co-precipitates is agreed well with the TTH diagram. The “on .... groups, because of either the increase of total amount of.

112

Inducing Mineral Precipitation in Groundwater by Addition of Phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Induced precipitation of phosphate minerals to scavenge trace metals and radionuclides from groundwater is a potential remediation approach for contaminated aquifers. Phosphate minerals can sequester trace elements by primary mineral formation, solid solution formation and/or adsorption, and they are poorly soluble under many environmental conditions, making them attractive for long-term sustainable remediation. The success of such engineered schemes will depend on the particular mineral phases generated, their rates of formation, and their long term stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals under conditions representative of a natural groundwater. Because microorganisms are present in groundwater, and because some proposed schemes for induced phosphate mineral precipitation rely on the stimulation of native groundwater populations, we also tested the effect of bacterial cells (initial densities of 105 and 107 ml-1) within the precipitation medium. We also tested the effect of a trace mixture of propionic, isovaleric, formic and butyric acids (total concentration 0.035 mM). The experiments showed that the general progression of mineral precipitation was similar under all of the conditions, with initial formation of amorphous calcium carbonate, and transformation to poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) by the end of the week-long experiments. The presence of the bacterial cells appeared to delay precipitation, although by the end of 7 days the overall extent of precipitation was similar for all of the treatments. The stoichiometry of the final precipitates as well as results of Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data indicated that the treatments including organic acids and bacterial cells resulted in increased distortion of the HAP crystal lattice, with the higher concentration of cells resulting in the greatest distortion. Uptake of Sr into the phosphate minerals was decreased in the treatments with cells and organic acids, compared to the control. The results of the experiments enable a greater understanding of the challenges associated with phosphate-based remediation schemes for contaminated environments.

Karen E. Wright; Yoshiko Fujita; Thomas Hartmann; Mark Conrad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Increase in Number of Days with Heavy Precipitation in Tokyo Urban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of daily precipitation in August from 1954 to 1976 shows a recent trend for urban areas of Tokyo to have heavier precipitation than the suburbs, although one would not expect such a situation when it is dry and the total monthly ...

Tsuneharu Yonetani

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Stratiform Rain in the Tropics as Seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Across the Tropics (20°N–20°S), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) indicates that for reflectivities ?17 dBZ, stratiform precipitation accounts for 73% of the area covered by rain and 40% of the total rain ...

Courtney Schumacher; Robert A. Houze Jr.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Trends in global monsoon area and precipitation over the past Pangchi Hsu,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in global monsoon area and precipitation over the past 30 years Pangchi Hsu,1 Tim Li,1­2008) indicates that there are consistent increasing trends in both the global monsoon area (GMA) and the global monsoon total precipitation (GMP). This positive monsoon rainfall trend differs from previous studies

Li, Tim

116

Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensor networks are becoming increasingly pervasive. Existing methods of aggregation in sensor networks offer mostly standard mathematical operators over homogeneous data types. In this paper, we instead focus on supporting emerging scenarios in which ...

Sanem Kabadayi; Adam Pridgen; Christine Julien

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Plug & Play Sensors Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Documents. Plug & Play Sensors Sites. ... Plug & Play Sensors Sites. By selecting some of the links below, you will be leaving NIST webspace. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

118

Dynamic sensor tasking in heterogeneous, mobile sensor networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern sensor environments often attempt to combine several sensors into a single sensor network. The nodes of this network are generally heterogeneous and may vary with respect to sensor complexity, sensor operational ...

Jones, Peter B. (Peter B.), S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station  

SciTech Connect

A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Long-Lead Forecasts of Seasonal Precipitation in Africa Using CCA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A potentially operational forecast system for 3-month total precipitation for three sections of the African continent has been developed at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center using the statistical method of canonical correlation analysis (CCA). The ...

Anthony G. Barnston; Wassila Thiao; Vadlamani Kumar

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Long-Lead Forecasts of Seasonal Precipitation in the Tropical Pacific Islands Using CCA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A potentially operational system for 3-month total precipitation forecasts for island stations in the tropical Pacific has been developed at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center using the statistical method of canonical correlation analysis (CCA). ...

Yuxiang He; Anthony G. Barnston

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Precipitable Water Estimation from High-Resolution Split Window Radiance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique that uses the spatial variance of image brightness temperature to derive total column Precipitable water is applied to high-resolution multispectral aircraft scanner data for the 19 June 1986 COHMEX day. The technique has several ...

Gary J. Jedlovec

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Observed and Modeled Growing-Season Diurnal Precipitable Water Vapor in South-Central Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temporal-resolution total-column precipitable water vapor (PWV) was measured using a Radiometrics Corporation WVR-1100 Atmospheric Microwave Radiometer (AMR). The AMR was deployed at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, during the ...

John Hanesiak; Mark Melsness; Richard Raddatz

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Cool- and Warm-Season Precipitation Reconstructions over Western New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation over the southwestern United States exhibits distinctive seasonality, and contrasting ocean–atmospheric dynamics are involved in the interannual variability of cool- and warm-season totals. Tree-ring chronologies based on annual-...

D. W. Stahle; M. K. Cleaveland; H. D. Grissino-Mayer; R. D. Griffin; F. K. Fye; M. D. Therrell; D. J. Burnette; D. M. Meko; J. Villanueva Diaz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

NVAP and Reanalysis-2 Global Precipitable Water Products : Intercomparison and Variability Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study similarities and differences between NASA's Water Vapor Project (NVAP) and NCEP–NCAR's reanalysis-2 total precipitable water (TPW) datasets are investigated, along with an assessment of its space–time variability, using simple ...

Geremew G. Amenu; Praveen Kumar

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Moored Observations of Precipitation Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct observations of precipitation temperature were made from a surface buoy deployed for four months in the western Pacific warm pool. The observed rain droplet temperatures are equal to the wet-bulb temperature to within the measured wet-bulb ...

Steven P. Anderson; Alan Hinton; Robert A. Weller

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Predicting Hurricane Landfall Precipitation: Optimistic and Pessimistic Views from the Symposium on Precipitation Extremes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Symposium on Precipitation Extremes was one of two special symposia organized for the American Meteorological Society national meeting. This symposium was organized into sessions on winter precipitation, summer precipitation, and hurricane-...

Russell L. Elsberry

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Version-2 Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Monthly Precipitation Analysis (1979–Present)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Version-2 Monthly Precipitation Analysis is described. This globally complete, monthly analysis of surface precipitation at 2.5° latitude × 2.5° longitude resolution is available from January ...

Robert F. Adler; George J. Huffman; Alfred Chang; Ralph Ferraro; Ping-Ping Xie; John Janowiak; Bruno Rudolf; Udo Schneider; Scott Curtis; David Bolvin; Arnold Gruber; Joel Susskind; Philip Arkin; Eric Nelkin

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING AN IODATE PRECIPITATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for separating plutonium from lanthanum in a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation process for the recovery of plutonium values from an aqueous solution. The carrier precipitation process includes the steps of forming a lanthanum fluoride precipi- . tate, thereby carrying plutonium out of solution, metathesizing the fluoride precipitate to a hydroxide precipitate, and then dissolving the hydroxide precipitate in nitric acid. In accordance with the invention, the nitric acid solution, which contains plutonium and lanthanum, is made 0.05 to 0.15 molar in potassium iodate. thereby precipitating plutonium as plutonous iodate and the plutonous iodate is separated from the lanthanum- containing supernatant solution.

Fries, B.A.

1960-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

130

Seasonal Cycles of Precipitation and Precipitable Water and Their Use in Monsoon Onset and Retreat .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Precipitation (P) and precipitable water (W) are important components of the hydrological cycles in the earth system, and their seasonal cycles are closely related to… (more)

Lu, Er

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Evaluation of LFM-2 Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a near real time experiment designed to assess the state of the art of quantitative precipitation forecasting skill of the operational NMC LFM-2 are described. All available LFM-2 quantitative precipitation forecasts were verified ...

Lance F. Bosart

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Accuracy of United States Precipitation Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation measurements in the United States (as well as all other countries) are adversely affected by the gauge undercatch bias of point precipitation measurements. When these measurements are used to obtain areas averages, particularly in ...

Pavel Ya Groisman; David R. Legates

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Predictability of Precipitation Patterns: An Operational Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictability, defined as the ability to forecast precipitation over an area by Lagrangian persistence, is studied for 11 radar precipitation patterns. After a time ranging between 40 and 112 min, depending on individual cases, all forecast ...

I. Zawadzki; J. Morneau; R. Laprise

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Precipitable Water Measurements with Sun Photometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a brief history of spectroscopic and radiometric methods of remotely sensing precipitable water. We demonstrate a new method of calibrating sun photometers with microwave radiometer data to obtain precipitable water, and a new ...

R. E. Bird; R. L. Hulstrom

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Response of Tropical Precipitation to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using high-resolution cloud-resolving simulations with different CO2 concentrations, local precipitation fluxes are found to obey Clausius–Clapeyron (CC) scaling. Previous studies of the effect of CO2 concentration on precipitation extremes have ...

David M. Romps

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Precipitation Trends on the Canadian Prairies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canadian prairies are a major producer of grain, much of which is produced under rain-fed agriculture. The amount and timing of precipitation are critical to grain production. Information on the precipitation trend is therefore vital to this ...

O. O. Akinremi; S. M. McGinn; H. W. Cutforth

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Survey of Wet Electrostatic Precipitators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) have found application since they were first installed for sulfuric acid collection on a smelter and patented by Dr. Frederick Cottrell in 1907–1908. Power generation applications typically use dry ESPs for collection of coal fly ash in nonsaturated flue gas streams. This report summarizes the physical installations, specifications, operating environments, and operational experience of wet ESPs currently operating in the United States on power generation ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Precipitation Behavior in AEREX(TM) 350  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The precipitates are examined in the scanning electron microscope. In addition, the relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties are ...

139

Electrostatic Precipitator Guidelines, Volumes 1-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In summarizing the latest information on electrostatic precipitator technologies, these three volumes make up a central utility reference source. Plant engineers and operators will find in it detailed guidelines for preparing precipitator design specifications, for planning and conducting operations and maintenance programs, and for troubleshooting problem precipitators.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Guidelines for Upgrading Electrostatic Precipitator Performance: Electrostatic Precipitator Upgrade Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide, the second volume of a two-volume set, presents an analytical procedure to evaluate cost-effective options for enhancing the performance of an existing electrostatic precipitator (ESP) when the performance of the ESP, even after optimization, is not satisfactory. The guide focuses on ESPs that require significant improvements (more than $20/kW) to achieve their emissions goals. The first volume of this report, published in September 1999, treated low-cost options that could be used to optimiz...

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for ACEQ sensors than for chem-bio sensors 1 Under groundlocations In contrast to chem-bio sensors, false positives (or Implementation, Part 1: Chem. -Bio-Sensors, ACER Report,

Gundel, Lara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Giant magnetoresistive sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Digital Sensor Technology  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

145

Sensor readout detector circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

146

Sensor readout detector circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems.

Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

High temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Online distributed sensor selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key problem in sensor networks is to decide which sensors to query when, in order to obtain the most useful information (e.g., for performing accurate prediction), subject to constraints (e.g., on power and bandwidth). In many applications the utility ... Keywords: approximation algorithms, distributed multiarmed bandit algorithms, sensor networks, submodular optimization

Daniel Golovin; Matthew Faulkner; Andreas Krause

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Precipitation Retrieval over Land and Ocean with the SSM/I: Identification and Characteristics of the Scattering Signal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of this study is the identification of precipitation in warm and cold land and ocean environments from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP) Special Sensor Micmwave/Imager (SSM/I). The high sensitivity of the SSM/I ...

Roy W. Spencer; H. Michael Goodman; Robbie E. Hood

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

METATHESIS OF PLUTONIUM CARRIER LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATE WITH AN ALKALI  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plutonium fluoride precipitate is converted to plutonium hydroxide by digesting the precipitate with an aqueous alkali metal hydroxide solution.

Duffield, R.B.

1960-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

Miller, David H. (Redondo Beach, CA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development and application of new methods to retrieve vertical structure of precipitation above the ARM CART sites from MMCR measurementsĂ?Âť  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project was to develop, validate and apply remote sensing methods to retrieve vertical profiles of precipitation over the DOE ARM CART sites using currently available remote sensors. While the ARM Program invested very heavily into developments of remote sensing methods and instruments for water vapor and non-precipitating cloud parameter retrievals, precipitation retrievals and studies lagged behind. Precipitation, however, is a crucial part of the water cycle, and without detailed information on rainfall and snowfall, significant improvements in the atmospheric models of different scales (i.e., one of the ARM Program's main goals) is difficult to achieve. Characterization of the vertical atmospheric column above the CART sites is also incomplete without detailed precipitation information, so developments of remote sensing methods for retrievals of parameters in precipitating cloud condition was essential. Providing modelers with retrieval results was also one of the key objectives of this research project.

Dr. Sergey Matrosov

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

154

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

155

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

156

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

157

METHOD FOR REMOVING CONTAMINATION FROM PRECIPITATES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation process is presented for the recovery and purification of plutonium. When plutonium, in the tetravalent state, is carried on a bismuth phosphate precipitate, amounts of centain of the fission products are carried along with the plutonium. The improvement consists in washing such fission product contaminated preeipitates with an aqueous solution of ammonium hydrogen fluoride. since this solution has been found to be uniquely effective in washing fission production contamination from the bismuth phosphate precipitate.

Stahl, G.W.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Investigation of Solution Combustion Synthesis and Precipitation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Investigation of Solution Combustion Synthesis and Precipitation Synthesis Conditions on TiO2 and ZnO Nanopowder Characteristics

159

Carbon Nano Tubes (CNT) / Aragonite Precipitated Calcium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Carbon Nano Tubes (CNT) / Aragonite Precipitated Calcium ... Porous Rare-Earth Containing NbTiAl-Based High-entropy Materials Used for ...

160

Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel  

ORNL 2010-G00619/jcn UT-B ID 200902314 Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel Technology Summary At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Kinetics of Boehmite Precipitation from Supersaturated Sodium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents the effects of mass ratio of ethanol and temperature on the precipitation rate and phase compositions of alumina hydrate. The ratio of AlOOH  ...

162

Creep resistant, precipitation-dispersion-strengthened ...  

An iron-based, corrosion-resistant, precipitation strengthened, martensitic steel essentially free of delta ferrite for use at high temperatures has a ...

163

Influence of GPS Precipitable Water Vapor Retrievals on Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting in Southern California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of precipitable water vapor (PWV) retrievals from the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) on quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF) skill are examined over two flood-prone regions of Southern California: Santa ...

Steven Marcus; Jinwon Kim; Toshio Chin; David Danielson; Jayme Laber

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Comparison of precipitation derived from the ECMWF operational forecast model and satellite precipitation data sets.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation is an important component of the climate system and the accurate representation of the diurnal rainfall cycle is a key test of model performance. Although the modelling of precipitation in the cooler mid-latitudes has improved, in ...

Chris Kidd; Erin Dawkins; George Huffman

165

Extension of the Climate Prediction Center Long-Lead Temperature and Precipitation Outlooks to General Weather Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-lead monthly and seasonal forecasts issued by the Climate Prediction Center literally pertain only to average temperature and total precipitation outcomes, but implicitly contain information regarding other quantities that are correlated ...

W. M. Briggs; D. S. Wilks

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Estimating Monthly and Seasonal Distributions of Temperature and Precipitation Using the New CPC Long-Range Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for transforming underlying climatological distributions for monthly and seasonal mean temperature and monthly and seasonal total precipitation, in a manner consistent with long-range forecasts by the U.S. Climate Prediction Center, is ...

William M. Briggs; Daniel S. Wilks

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

An Examination of El Nińo–La Nińa-Related Precipitation and Temperature Anomalies across the Northern Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly total precipitation and mean temperature data records extending from the late nineteenth century to 1990 were collected for 147 stations in South Dakota, North Dakota, and portions of adjacent states and provinces. This region, defined as ...

Matthew J. Bunkers; James R. Miller Jr.; Arthur T. DeGaetano

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Embedded Sensor Technology Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber Sensors are poised to be used in future LEPs. The three primary vehicles for fiber sensors are Department 1, Joint Test Assembly (JTA), and Shelf Life (SL). The National Security Enterprise (NSE) community plans to incorporate optical sensors or systems into these vehicles. Additionally, hermetic sealing of optical systems is required if optical technology is to be integrated into LEP and future weapons applications. Hermetic seals will reduce the long-term risk of contamination which can degrade or incapacitate optical components. This study was funded through the Kansas City Plant's (KCP) ESC work package between 2007 and 2009 to develop optical sensors, identify commercial fiber sensors and hermetic connectors, and qualify these sensors against likely weapon lifetime environments.

Kennedy, Chris

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

169

Remote electrochemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

High-temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Not Available

1981-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

171

Inexpensive Near-IR Sun Photometer for Measuring Total Column Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive two-channel near-IR sun photometer for measuring total atmospheric column water vapor (precipitable water) has been developed for use by the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) environmental science ...

David R. Brooks; Forrest M. Mims III; Richard Roettger

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Energy efficient sensor node implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss a low power embedded sensor node architecture we are developing for distributed sensor network systems deployed in a natural environment. In particular, we examine the sensor node for energy efficient processing-at-the-sensor. ... Keywords: acoustic, distributed sensor network (dsn), dsp, fpga, seismic, vehicle classification, video

Jan R. Frigo; Eric Y. Raby; Sean M. Brennan; Christophe Wolinski; Charles Wagner; Francois Charot; Edward Rosten; Vinod K. Kulathumani

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

MTDC Safety Sensor Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MTDC Safety Sensor Technology MTDC Safety Sensor Technology Background Beyond the standard duty cycle data collection system used in the Department of Energy's Medium Truck Duty Cycle program, additional sensors were installed on three test vehicles to collect several safety-related signals of interest to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. The real-time brake stroke, tire pressure, and weight information obtained from these sensors is expected to make possible a number of safety-related analyses such as determining the frequency and severity of braking events and tracking tire pressure changes over time. Because these signals are posted to the vehicle's databus, they also have the potential to be

174

Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Express Licensing Acoustic Concentration Of Particles In Fluid Flow Express Licensing Apparatus And Method For Hydrogen And Oxygen Mass Spectrometry Of The Terrestrial Magnetosphere Express Licensing Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors Express Licensing Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components Express Licensing Corrosion Test Cell For Bipolar Plates Express Licensing Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator Negotiable Licensing Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Express Licensing Foil electron multiplier Express Licensing Hydrogen Sensor

175

PNNL: Available Technologies: Sensors  

Non-Contact Sensor for Measuring the Density and Speed of Sound of a Liquid Contained in a Pipeline or Vessel; Real-Time Fluid Viscometer in Contact ...

176

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

179

A Decentralized Dynamic Sensor Activation Protocol for Chemical Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the significant amount of energy consumed by chemical sensors for sensing, reducing sensing activity is critical for improving the lifespan of chemical sensor networks. In this paper, we consider a simple decentralized dynamic sensor activation ...

Shanika Karunasekera; Champake Mendis; Alex Skvortsov; Ajith Gunatilaka

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Aluminosilicate Precipitation Impact on Uranium  

SciTech Connect

Experiments have been conducted to examine the fate of uranium during the formation of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) when wastes containing high aluminate concentrations are mixed with wastes of high silicate concentration. Testing was conducted at varying degrees of uranium saturation. Testing examined typical tank conditions, e.g., stagnant, slightly elevated temperature (50 C). The results showed that under sub-saturated conditions uranium is not removed from solution to any large extent in both simulant testing and actual tank waste testing. This aspect was not thoroughly understood prior to this work and was necessary to avoid criticality issues when actual tank wastes were aggregated. There are data supporting a small removal due to sorption of uranium on sites in the NAS. Above the solubility limit the data are clear that a reduction in uranium concentration occurs concomitant with the formation of aluminosilicate. This uranium precipitation is fairly rapid and ceases when uranium reaches its solubility limit. At the solubility limit, it appears that uranium is not affected, but further testing might be warranted.

WILMARTH, WILLIAM

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

182

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

183

Diurnal variation of tropical precipitation using five years TRMM data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data are used in this study to reveal diurnal variations of precipitation over the Tropics (30?S ? 30?N) from January, 1998, to December 2002. The TMI data were used for the regions over oceans and islands and the PR data was used over continents. The observations are sorted regionally to examine the difference in diurnal cycle of rainfall over ocean, island, and continental regions. The rain rate is averaged over individual two hour intervals of local time in each region to include more observations in order to reduce the sampling error. F-test is used to determine those regions whose diurnal cycle is detected at the 95% confidence level. In most oceanic regions there is a maximum at 0400 LST - 0700 LST. The amplitude of diurnal variation over ocean regions with small total rain is a little higher than that of the ocean regions with heavy total rain. The diurnal cycle peaks at 0700 LST - 0800 LST over islands with rainfall variation similar to surrounding oceanic regions. A maximum at 1400 LST - 1500 LST was found in areas over continents with heavy total rain, while the maximum occured at 1900 LST - 2100 LST over continents with lesser total rain. The amplitudes of variation over continents with heavy total rain and with small total rain do not show significant differences. The diurnal cycle in in JJA (June, July, August) and DJF (December, January, February) varies with latitude over continents. A seasonal cycle of diurnal cycle can also be found in some oceanic regions. The diurnal cycle annual change is not evident over continents, while the diurnal cycle annual change over oceans exists in some regions. Island regions in this paper exhibit no evident seasonal and annual diurnal change.

Wu, Qiaoyan

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation of nickel hydroxide films Title Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation of nickel hydroxide films Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1998 Authors Kong, Fanping, Robert Kostecki, Frank R. McLarnon, and Rolf H. Muller Journal Thin Solid Films Volume 313-314 Pagination 775-780 Keywords effective medium approximation, electrochemical precipitation, inhomogeneous films, nickel hydroxide, spectroscopic ellipsometry Abstract In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to investigate the electrochemical precipitation of nickel hydroxide films. By use of optical models for inhomogeneous films it was found that a specific precipitation current density produced the most compact and homogeneous film structures. The density of nickel hydroxide films was derived to be 1.25-1.50 g/cm3. The redox behavior of precipitated nickel hydroxide films was studied with an effective-medium optical model. Incomplete conversion to nickel oxyhydroxide and a reduction in film thickness were found during the oxidation cycle.

185

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

186

Froth height level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single sensor, comprised of a tube located near the foaming liquid, and another well away from the first, are used to determine the existence of foam in the vicinity of the probe. Two sensors a known distance apart can be used to locate the froth assuming a uniform froth density. The present invention utilizes the pressure differential existing between process chamber ambient pressure and the froth pressure to determine the existence of a froth and its location. Where froth density is not constant, multiple sensors at differing heights with respect to each other, or a single movable sensor, are used. Information derived using the multiple or movable sensor yields unambiguous froth density and height data.

Glaser, J.W.; Holmes, L.; Upadhye, R.S.; Wilder, J.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Determination of total ozone from DMSP multichannel filter radiometer measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multichannel filter radiometer (MFR) infrared sensor was first flown in 1977 on a Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Block 5D series satellite operated by the US Air Force. The first four satellites in this series carried MFR sensors from which total atmospheric column ozone amounts may be derived. The last MFR sensor ceased operating on February 16, 1980. The series of four sensors spans a data period of nearly three years. The MFR sensor measures infrared radiances for 16 channels. Total ozone amounts are determined from sets of radiance measurements using an empirical relationship that is developed using linear regression analysis. Total ozone is modeled as a linear combination of terms involving functions of the MFR radiances for four channels (1, 3, 7 and 16) and the secant of the zenith angle. The ozone retrieval methodology is described schematically. The ozone retrieval model is developed through regression analysis using sets of simulated MFR radiances derived from detailed radiative transfer calculations. The MFR total ozone data are compared with independent ground-based Dobson measurements in order to evaluate the ozone retrieval methodology. Many Dobson observatories have been providing their daily measurements of total ozone which are taken close in time to DMSP overpass times. MFR total ozone data are compared with Dobson measurements taken between January 1 and February 15, 1979, and the results are summarized. Comparisons were made where the MFR and Dobson measurements are within 300 km and 300 minutes of each other. Percentages are computed with respect to the Dobson values. The MFR data were processed using a preliminary methodology, and the data will be reprocessed in the near future.

Luther, F.M.; Weichel, R.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Energy harvesting Wheel Speed Sensor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a prototype energy harvesting autonomous sensor, called the Autonomous Wheel Speed Sensor (AWSS), that is targeted for operation in the Electronic Braking… (more)

Parthasarathy, Dhasarathy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

190

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

191

Skill, Correction, and Downscaling of GCM-Simulated Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of general circulation models (GCMs) to correctly simulate precipitation is usually assessed by comparing simulated mean precipitation with observed climatologies. However, to what extent the skill in simulating average precipitation ...

Jonathan M. Eden; Martin Widmann; David Grawe; Sebastian Rast

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Diurnal Variation of Precipitation in California and Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal variation of precipitation across California and Nevada has been studied by means of a harmonic analysis of 35 years of hourly precipitation data for 347 stations, and a regional probability of precipitation analysis for grouped ...

Michael G. Landin; Lance F. Bosart

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A Bias-Corrected Precipitation Climatology for China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of bias corrections of Chinese standard precipitation gauge (CSPG) measurements for wind-induced undercatch, a trace amount of precipitation, and wetting loss. Long-term daily data of precipitation, temperature, ...

Baisheng Ye; Daqing Yang; Yongjian Ding; Tianding Han; Toshio Koike

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Effects of Precipitation on Cloud Droplet Measurement Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft in situ observations of precipitation during the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) field project are used to study and parameterize the effects of precipitation on cloud probes. Specifically, the effects of precipitation on the ...

Brad Baker; Qixu Mo; R. Paul Lawson; Darren O’Connor; Alexei Korolev

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Evaluation of Precipitation Products for Global Hydrological Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate precipitation data are critical for hydrologic prediction, yet outside the developed world in situ networks are so sparse as to make alternative methods of precipitation estimation essential. Several such alternative precipitation ...

Nathalie Voisin; Andrew W. Wood; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Statistical Relationships between Topography and Precipitation Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical relationships between topography and the spatial distribution of mean annual precipitation are developed for ten distinct mountainous regions. These relationships are derived through linear bivariate and multivariate analyses, using ...

Alan Basist; Gerald D. Bell; Vernon Meentemeyer

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Environment of Precipitating Shallow Cumulus Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative estimates of precipitation in a typical undisturbed trade wind region are derived from 2 months of radar reflectivity data and compared to the meteorological environment determined from soundings, surface flux, and airborne-lidar ...

Louise Nuijens; Bjorn Stevens; A. Pier Siebesma

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Specification of United States Summer Season Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The specification of summer season precipitation in the contiguous United States from summer season fields of 700 mb height, sea level pressure (SLP) and Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) was carried out using stepwise multiple linear ...

John R. Lanzante; Robert P. Harnack

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Causes of Robust Seasonal Land Precipitation Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) archive are used to calculate the zonal mean change in seasonal land precipitation for the second half of the twentieth century in response to a range of ...

Debbie Polson; Gabriele C. Hegerl; Xuebin Zhang; Timothy J. Osborn

200

Quantifying Precipitation Suppression Due to Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban air pollution and industrial air pollution have been shown qualitatively to suppress rain and snow. Here, precipitation losses over topographical barriers downwind of major coastal urban areas in California and in the land of Israel that ...

Amir Givati; Daniel Rosenfeld

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Interannual Variations of Tropical Precipitation Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal and annual precipitation anomalies, normalized with respect to the standard deviations, are computed for stations between 30°S and 30°N. It is established that the annual anomalies are normally distributed. Spatially averaged anomalies ...

Till Stoeckenius

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Precipitation from Space: Advancing Earth System Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances to space-based observing systems and data processing techniques have made precipitation datasets quickly and easily available via various data portals and widely used in Earth sciences. The increasingly lengthy time span of space-based ...

Paul A. Kucera; Elizabeth E. Ebert; F. Joseph Turk; Vincenzo Levizzani; Dalia Kirschbaum; Francisco J. Tapiador; Alexander Loew; M. Borsche

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Wakasa Bay: An AMSR Precipitation Validation Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The “Wakasa Bay Experiment” was conducted in order to refine error models for oceanic precipitation from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) measurements and to develop algorithms for snowfall. The NASA P-3 ...

Elena S. Lobl; Kazumasa Aonashi; Masataka Murakami; Brian Griffith; Christian Kummerow; Guosheng Liu; Thomas Wilheit

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Radar Backscattering by Inhomogeneous Precipitation Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations of radar backscattering by inhomogeneous precipitation particles require values of the dielectric function of two-component mixtures. Four such dielectric functions are critically examined and their relative merits are weighed. ...

Craig F. Bohren; Louis J. Battan

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Initial Precipitation Formation in Warm Florida Cumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microphysical processes that lead to the development of precipitation in small, warm cumulus are examined using data from the Small Cumulus Microphysics Study near Cape Canaveral, Florida. Aircraft measurements are used to determine the ...

Neil F. Laird; Harry T. Ochs III; Robert M. Rauber; L. Jay Miller

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hypothesis Tests for Evaluating Numerical Precipitation Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When evaluating differences between competing precipitation forecasts, formal hypothesis testing is rarely performed. This may be due to the difficulty in applying common tests given the spatial correlation of and non-normality of errors. ...

Thomas M. Hamill

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Precipitation at Ocean Weather Station “P"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the 27-yr record of precipitation measurements at Ocean Weather Station “P” (50°N, 145°W). The credibility of the rainfall observations is assessed, and the testing of certain extraordinary features of the fall and winter ...

M. A. Jenkins; W. C. Wong; K. Higuchi; J. L. Knox

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Determination of Precipitable Water from Solar Transmission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of determining precipitable water to within 10% from solar radiometer data has been developed. The method uses a modified Langley technique to obtain the water vapor optical depth, and a model developed at the University of Arizona is ...

K. J. Thome; B. M. Herman; J. A. Reagan

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Precipitation Growth Trajectories in a CCOPE Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth trajectories of precipitation particles that attain diameters from 0.5 to 2.0 cm are modeled within the wind field of a small, relatively steady-state, southeastern Montana thunderstorm. The trajectories are calculated backwards, from ...

Charles A. Knight; Kevin R. Knupp

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Estimates of Characteristic Times for Precipitation Scavenging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of using climatological data to estimate residence times in the atmosphere of particles subjected to precipitation scavenging. Basic parameters are the scavenging coefficient ?, the rainfall intensity R and the length of ...

Henning Rodhe; Jan Grandell

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Predictability of Seasonal Precipitation Using Joint Probabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper tests whether seasonal mean precipitation is predictable using a new method that estimates and analyzes joint probabilities. The new estimation method is to partition the globe into boxes, pool all data within the box to estimate a ...

M. Tugrul Yilmaz; Timothy DelSole

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During May–July 2000, the Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS) occurred in the High Plains, near the Colorado–Kansas border. STEPS aimed to achieve a better understanding of the interactions between kinematics, ...

Timothy J. Lang; L. Jay Miller; Morris Weisman; Steven A. Rutledge; Llyle J. Barker III; V. N. Bringi; V. Chandrasekar; Andrew Detwiler; Nolan Doesken; John Helsdon; Charles Knight; Paul Krehbiel; Walter A. Lyons; Don Macgorman; Erik Rasmussen; William Rison; W. David Rust; Ronald J. Thomas

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Environmental Influence on Typhoon Bobbie's Precipitation Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution and intensity of tropical cyclone precipitation has been known to have a large influence on the intensification and maintenance of the system. Therefore, monitoring the tropical cyclone convective rainband cycle and the large-...

Edward B. Rodgers; Harold F. Pierce

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Tropical Precipitation Response to Orbital Precession  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orbital precession changes the seasonal distribution of insolation at a given latitude but not the annual mean. Hence, the correlation of paleoclimate proxies of annual-mean precipitation with orbital precession implies a nonlinear rectification ...

Timothy M. Merlis; Tapio Schneider; Simona Bordoni; Ian Eisenman

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Calibration of Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From 1 August 1990 to 31 July 1995, the Weather Service Forecast Office in Pittsburgh prepared 6159 probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasts. Forecasts were made twice a day for 24-h periods beginning at 0000 and 1200 UTC for two river ...

Roman Krzysztofowicz; Ashley A. Sigrest

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts for River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology has been formulated to aid a field forecaster in preparing probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) for river basins. The format of probabilistic QPF is designed to meet three requirements: (i) it is compatible with ...

Roman Krzysztofowicz; William J. Drzal; Theresa Rossi Drake; James C. Weyman; Louis A. Giordano

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Bayesian Quantitative Precipitation Nowcast Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very short-period quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF) or nowcast schemes provide deterministic output that fails to convey explicit measures of the uncertainty in the forecast. Presented here is a forecast methodology based upon a Bayesian ...

Neil I. Fox; Christopher K. Wikle

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Improved Reconstruction of Global Precipitation since 1900  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved land–ocean global monthly precipitation anomaly reconstruction is developed for the period beginning in 1900. Reconstructions use the available historical data and statistics developed from the modern satellite-sampled period to ...

Thomas M. Smith; Phillip A. Arkin; Li Ren; Samuel S. P. Shen

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Quantifying Southern Oscillation-Precipitation Relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of earlier studies has identified regions of the world in which precipitation appears to have a consistent relationship with the Southern Oscillation (SO). In this paper, the authors attempt to quantify this relationship based on shifts ...

Chester F. Ropelewski; Michael S. Halpert

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Optimization of Heat Recovery from the Precipitation Circuit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For this reason, plate heat exchangers are used both at inlet to Precipitation and in between precipitation stages at Vedanta Aluminium's Lanjigarh alumina ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan...

222

Remote electrochemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

223

Integrated optical tamper sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of an monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

RF current sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN); Sparks, Dennis O. (Maryville, TN)

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

Electrochemical micro sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

Setter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

226

Precipitation in a lead calcium tin anode  

SciTech Connect

Samples from a hot rolled sheet of a tin and calcium bearing lead alloy were solution heat treated at 300 Degree-Sign C and cooled down to room temperature at different rates; these samples were left at room temperature to study natural precipitation of CaSn{sub 3} particles. The samples were aged for 45 days before analysing their microstructure, which was carried out in a scanning electron microscope using secondary and backscattered electron detectors. Selected X-ray spectra analyses were conducted to verify the nature of the precipitates. Images were taken at different magnifications in both modes of observation to locate the precipitates and record their position within the images and calculate the distance between them. Differential scanning calorimeter analyses were conducted on selected samples. It was found that the mechanical properties of the material correlate with the minimum average distance between precipitates, which is related to the average cooling rate from solution heat treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distance between precipitates in a lead alloy is recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relationship between the distance and the cooling rate is established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that the strengthening of the alloy depends on the distance between precipitates.

Perez-Gonzalez, Francisco A., E-mail: fco.aurelio@inbox.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Camurri, Carlos G., E-mail: ccamurri@udec.cl [Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Carrasco, Claudia A., E-mail: ccarrascoc@udec.cl [Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Colas, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.colas@uanl.edu.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Risk-Based Sensor Placement Methodology  

SciTech Connect

A sensor placement methodology is proposed to solve the problem of optimal location of sensors or detectors to protect population against the exposure to and effects of known and/or postulated chemical, biological, and/or radiological threats. Historical meteorological data are used to characterize weather conditions as wind speed and direction pairs with the percentage of occurrence of the pairs over the historical period. The meteorological data drive atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling of the threats, the results of which are used to calculate population at risk against standard exposure levels. Sensor locations are determined via a dynamic programming algorithm where threats captured or detected by sensors placed in prior stages are removed from consideration in subsequent stages. Moreover, the proposed methodology provides a quantification of the marginal utility of each additional sensor or detector. Thus, the criterion for halting the iterative process can be the number of detectors available, a threshold marginal utility value, or the cumulative detection of a minimum factor of the total risk value represented by all threats.

Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Kulesz, James J [ORNL

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies (< 1 Hz) as the sensing signal and attribute the measured response to interfacial phenomena. Work by our group has also investigated using phase angle as the sensing signal at somewhat higher frequencies (10 Hz). The higher frequency measurements would potentially allow for reduced sampling times during sensor operation. Another potential advantage of impedance-metric NO{sub x} sensing is the similarity in response to NO and NO{sub 2} (i.e., total-NO{sub x} sensing). Potentiometric NO{sub x} sensors typically show higher sensitivity to NO2 than NO, and responses that are opposite in sign. However, NO is more stable than NO{sub 2} at temperatures > 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90% NO, balance NO{sub 2}. Since automotive exhaust sensors will probably be required to operate at temperatures > 600 C, NO is the dominant component in thermodynamic equilibrium and the target NOx species. Also, the use of upstream catalysts could further promote the conversion of NO{sub x} species to NO. Therefore, the focus of current work is to investigate the response to NO. Nevertheless, minimizing the sensitivity to a variety of competing species is important in order to obtain the accuracy necessary for achieving the emission limits. Mitigating the effect of interfering gases (e.g., O{sub 2}, water vapor, HCs, etc.) is an area of current study. For impedance metric NO{sub x} sensors, our previous work has demonstrated that the cross-sensitivity to O{sub 2} may be accounted for by comparing measurements at multiple frequencies. Other strategies for compensation are also being explored, including calibration using data from existing sensors located nearby. Our current work has made significant advances in terms of developing prototype sensors more suitable for commercialization. Also, dynamometer testing has provided real-world sensor performance data that will be useful in approaching potential suppliers to whom we can transfer the technology for commercialization. The advances are a direct result of understanding the sensing mechanisms responsible for impedance-based NO{sub x} sensing and the effect of materials choice and sensor design/geometry.

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

229

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

Integrated optical sensor  

SciTech Connect

An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Integrated optical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

232

Capacitance pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

An Improved Humidity Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common feature of all capacitance humidity sensors is their undesirable hysteresis effect due to the unequal adsorption and desorption of water vapor on the surfaces of their dielectric porous materials. To eliminate this error, an improved ...

Shixuan Pang; Hartmut Graßl; Horst Jäger

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Changes in the Proportion of Precipitation Occurring as Snow in New England (1949–2000)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of snow to total precipitation (S/P) is a hydrologic indicator that is sensitive to climate variability and can be used to detect and monitor hydrologic responses to climatic change. Changes in S/P ratio over time could influence the ...

Thomas G. Huntington; Glenn A. Hodgkins; Barry D. Keim; Robert W. Dudley

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

An Airborne Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer for Cloud, Precipitation, and Atmospheric Water Vapor Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-channel airborne total-power Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) was recently built to provide measurements of atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and precipitation. The instrument is a cross-track scanner that has a 3-dB beamwidth of 3.5°...

P. Racette; R. F. Adler; J. R. Wang; A. J. Gasiewski; D. M. Jakson; D. S. Zacharias

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Results of Sun Photometer–Derived Precipitable Water Content over a Tropical Indian Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact, hand-held multiband sun photometer (ozone monitor) has been used to measure total precipitable water content (PWC) at the low-latitude tropical station in Pune, India (18°32?N, 73°51?E). Data collected in the daytime (0730–1800 LT) ...

P. Ernest Raj; P. C. S. Devara; R. S. Maheskumar; G. Pandithurai; K. K. Dani; S. K. Saha; S. M. Sonbawne; Y. K. Tiwari

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

238

Homogeneous Precipitation of Nickel Hydroxide Powders  

SciTech Connect

Precipitation and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders were investigated. A comprehensive precipitation model incorporating the metal ion hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions was developed for the production of the powders with urea precipitation method. Model predictions on Ni{sup 2+} precipitation rate were confirmed with precipitation experiments carried out at 90 C. Experimental data and model predictions were in remarkable agreement. Uncertainty in the solubility product data of nickel hydroxides was found to be the large contributor to the error. There were demonstrable compositional variations across the particle cross-sections and the growth mechanism was determined to be the aggregation of primary crystallites. This implied that there is a change in the intercalate chemistry of the primary crystallites with digestion time. Predicted changes in the concentrations of simple and complex ions in the solution support the proposed mechanism. The comprehensive set of hydrolysis reactions used in the model described above allows the investigation of other systems provided that accurate reaction constants are available. the fact that transition metal ions like Ni{sup 2+} form strong complexes with ammonia presents a challenge in the full recovery of the Ni{sup 2+}. On the other hand, presence of Al{sup 3+} facilitates the complete precipitation of Ni{sup 2+} in about 3 hours of digestion. A challenge in their predictive modeling studies had been the fact that simultaneous incorporation of more than one metal ion necessitates a different approach than just using the equilibrium constants of hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions. Another limitation of using equilibrium constants is that the nucleation stage of digestion, which is controlled mainly by kinetics, is not fully justified. A new program released by IBM Almaden Research Center (Chemical Kinetics Simulator{trademark}, Version 1.01) lets the user change the order of kinetic components of a reaction which was set to stoichiometric constant with which the species appear in the reaction in KINSIM by default. For instance, in the case of LDH precipitation, the new program allows to change the order of species in the reactions associated with Al{sup 3+} and let the Ni{sup 2+} reactions take over. This could be carried on iteratively until a good fit between the experimental data and the predictions were observed. However for such studies availability of accurate equilibrium constants (especially for the solubility products for the solid phase) is a prerequisite.

Bora Mavis

2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

239

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

240

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions.      ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

LLNL scientists find precipitation, global warming link  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 11/11/2013 | NR-13-11-04 Lawrence Livermore scientists have found that observed changes in global precipitation are directly affected by human activities. LLNL scientists find precipitation, global warming link Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov LIVERMORE, Calif. -- The rain in Spain may lie mainly on the plain, but the location and intensity of that rain is changing not only in Spain but around the globe. A new study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists shows that observed changes in global (ocean and land) precipitation are directly affected by human activities and cannot be explained by natural variability alone. The research appears in the Nov. 11 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

242

Biological Microsensors - Microsensors and Sensor Microsystems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

science to deliver prototype solutions in applications ranging from biodetection to photovoltaics. Sensor development includes discrete sensors and sensor arrays based on...

243

Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

245

Passive Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Sensors Passive Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Remote Sensing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Mineral maps can be used to show the presence of hydrothermal minerals and mineral assemblages Stratigraphic/Structural: Map structures/faults and regional strain rates Hydrological: Map surface water features Thermal: Map surface temperatures Dictionary.png Passive Sensors: Sensors that measure energy which is naturally available in the environment. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

246

Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals Speaker(s): Steven Lanzisera Date: February 8, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kevin Kircher Wireless sensor networks have been promising to provide easy data collection and control capability to applications ranging from scientific data collection, disaster recover, national security, and more. The user experience, however, has been filled with confusing terminology, complicated systems, and a lack of interoperability between vendors. Users with a background in the technology and fundamentals are better able to understand system capabilities, make decisions, and end up with a network that meets their needs. Although a sufficient coverage of this topic is at least a semester course, the goal of this talk is to give a brief

247

Capacitive proximity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

249

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

250

Research on the Morphology of Precipitation and Runoff in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project has consisted of two distinct phases: (1) equipment modification and installation with associated collection and (2) analyses of data plus development of hydrologic techniques. Errors inherent in the utilization of radar as a hydrologic sensor are discussed. It is shown that errors in the measurement of in-cloud liquid water content can be as much as 100 per cent. Similar results will be obtained in the measurement of rainfall rates by weather radar. It is demonstrated that radar can be used quite effectively in the synthesis of hydrographs. In particular, the feasibility of using radar in streamflow forecasting has been tested for the Little Washita River in Oklahoma. The results were very encouraging. Techniques for hydrograph synthesis are discussed. These have been combined with a stochastic model (which incorporates a sixth-order Markov chain) for rainfall-runoff simulation. The proposed model has been tested thoroughly and appears to hold promise as a forecasting tool. A study was made of Hurricane Beulah which produced extremely heavy precipitation in south Texas and fostered an unprecedented number of tornadoes. The injection of dry air into the area northeast of the parent cyclone was apparently responsible for the extreme instability and development of a large number of tornadoes in that region.

Clark, R.A.

1969-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A Comparison of NEXRAD WSR-88D Radar Estimates of Rain Accumulation with Gauge Measurements for High- and Low-Reflectivity Horizontal Gradient Precipitation Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radar-estimated rainfall amounts from the NEXRAD Weather Surveillance Radar precipitation accumulation algorithm were compared with measurements from numerous rain gauges (1639 radar versus gauge comparisons). Storm total rain accumulations from ...

Gerard E. Klazura; Jessica M. Thomale; D. Scott Kelly; Paul Jendrowski

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Interannual Variability of the Cyclonic Activity along the U.S. Pacific Coast: Influences on the Characteristics of Winter Precipitation in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the observed interannual variability of the cyclonic activity along the U.S. Pacific coast and quantifies its impact on the characteristics of both the winter total and extreme precipitation in the western United States. A ...

Boksoon Myoung; Yi Deng

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Implantable medical sensor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Chemical sensor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fluorescent temperature sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Nonhomogeneous Hidden Markov Model for Precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

patterns called weather states". The weather states are assumed to follow a Markov chain in which-level pressure. Precipitation is assumed to be conditionally temporally independent given the weather state. In developing hydrologic models re- searchers use information on temperature, solar radiation and other climatic

Washington at Seattle, University of

258

RECOVERY OF PLUTONIUM BY CARRIER PRECIPITATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of plutonium from an aqueous nitric acid Zr-containing solution of 0.2 to 1N acidity is accomplished by adding fluoride anions (1.5 to 5 mg/l), and precipitating the Pu with an excess of H/sub 2/0/sub 2/ at 53 to 65 deg C. (AEC)

Goeckermann, R.H.

1961-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Method to Determine Precipitation Types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to diagnose surface precipitation types is suggested. Most cases of freezing rain and ice pellets occur with a layer warmer than 0°C extending above a surface-based layer of air colder than 0°C. The procedure uses predictors proportional ...

Pierre Bourgouin

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Soft computing techniques in ensemble precipitation nowcast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presented various soft computing techniques for forecasting the hourly precipitations during tropical cyclones. The purpose of the current study is to present a concise and synthesized documentation of the current level of skill of various ... Keywords: Forecast, Machine learning, Rainfall, Skill score

Chih-Chiang Wei

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Weekly Precipitation Cycles along the Northeast Corridor?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twenty years of precipitation data from seven cities along or near the east coast of the United States from the northern mid-Atlantic region to northern New England have been analyzed to determine if there are any weekly cycles in either daily ...

Mark P. DeLisi; Alan M. Cope; Jason K. Franklin

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The Isotopic Composition of Cyclonic Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deuterium/hydrogen ratios ?D of sequential samples of precipitation at Palisades, New York were measured during four separate storms during January 1978. The values ranged from a low of ?177‰ to a high of ?30‰. For each of the storms there ...

Stanley David Gedzelman; James R. Lawrence

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Causes of Robust Seasonal Land Precipitation Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) archive are used to calculate the zonal-mean change in seasonal land precipitation for the second half of the twentieth century in response to a range of ...

Debbie Polson; Gabriele C. Hegerl; Xuebin Zhang; Timothy J. Osborn

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Superconductor precursor mixtures made by precipitation method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for preparing highly pure homogeneous precursor powder mixtures for metal oxide superconductive ceramics. The mixes are prepared by instantaneous precipitation from stoichiometric solutions of metal salts such as nitrates at controlled pH's within the 9 to 12 range, by addition of solutions of non-complexing pyrolyzable cations, such as alkyammonium and carbonate ions.

Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lamppa, Diana L. (Albuquerque, NM); Voigt, James A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Investigation of Neptunium Precipitator Cleanout Options  

SciTech Connect

Oxalate precipitation followed by filtration is used to prepare plutonium oxalate. Historically, plutonium oxalate has tended to accumulate in the precipitation tanks. These solids are periodically removed by flushing with concentrated (64 percent) nitric acid. The same precipitation tanks will now be used in the processing of neptunium. Literature values indicate that neptunium oxalate may not be as soluble as plutonium oxalate in nitric acid. Although a wide variety of options is available to improve neptunium oxalate solubility for precipitator flushing, most of these options are not practical for use. Many of these options require the use of incompatible or difficult to handle chemicals. Other options would require expensive equipment modifications or are likely to lead to product contamination. Based on review of literature and experimental results, the two best options for flushing the precipitator are (1) 64 percent nitric acid and (2) addition of sodium permanganate follow ed by sodium nitrite. Nitric acid is the easiest option to implement. It is already used in the facility and will not lead to product contamination. Experimental results indicate that neptunium oxalate can be dissolved in concentrated nitric acid (64 percent) at 60 degree C to a concentration of 2.6 to 5.6 grams of Np/liter after at least three hours of heating. A lower concentration (1.1 grams of Np/liter) was measured at 60 degree C after less than two hours of heating. These concentrations are acceptable for flushing if precipitator holdup is low (approximately 100-250 grams), but a second method is required for effective flushing if precipitator holdup is high (approximately 2 kilograms). The most effective method for obtaining higher neptunium concentrations is the use of sodium permanganate followed by the addition of sodium nitrite. There is concern that residual manganese from these flushes could impact product purity. Gas generation during permanganate addition is also a concern. Experimental results indicate that a solubility of at least 40 grams of Np/liter can be obtained using permanganate at ambient temperature, although it is expected that even higher neptunium concentrations can be achieved.

Hill, B.C.

2003-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

267

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at a well (which can lead to clogging). A final particularly attractive characteristic of this approach is its long-term sustainability; the remediation scheme is geared toward environments that are already saturated with respect to calcite, and in such systems the bulk of any newly precipitated calcite will remain stable once engineered manipulations cease. This means that the co-precipitated contaminants will be effectively sequestered over the long term. We are currently conducting integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate a) the relationships between urea hydrolysis rate, calcite precipitation rate, and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions; and b) the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and calcite precipitate distribution and metal uptake. We are also assessing the application of geophysical and molecular biological tools to monitor the relevant chemical and physical processes. The primary emphasis is on field-scale processes, with the laboratory and modeling activities designed specifically to support the field studies. Field experiments are being conducted in perched water (vadose zone) at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) at the Idaho National Laboratory; the VZRP provides an uncontaminated setting that is an analog of the 90Sr-contaminated vadose zone at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. A summary of results to date will be presented.

Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

270

Tactile sensing using elastomeric sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GelSight, namely, elastomeric sensor, is a novel tactile sensor to get the 3D information of contacting surfaces. Using GelSight, some tactile properties, such as softness and roughness, could be gained through image ...

Jia, Xiaodan (Xiaodan Stella)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Advanced Sensors for Multifunctional Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more precision, most of the examples are related to multifunctional gas ... Still , those systems do not have the information capacity of natural biologic ... shape- memory devices, temperature sensors, and liquid-viscosity sensors as well.

272

DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

Kyser, E.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

273

Range dependent errors in the convective and stratiform partitioning of a radar precipitation estimation algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), designed to assist climate and atmospheric circulation modeling efforts by providing accurate information on tropical precipitation and latent-heat release, will require ground based validation of satellite derived rainfall totals and type classification. A key element in ground validation is the precipitation classification method authored by Steiner and Houze. The method partitions precipitation by type using a radar reflectivity threshold technique. Steiner and Houze report a lack of any significant range dependency, despite the normal problems associated with beam spreading and increasing altitude with range. This study will examine the Steiner and Houze classification method to quantify the effect of range dependent problems in discerning precipitation type. Radar data for this study were collected on January 10 and 18, 1993 during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE), by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) N42RF WP-3D Orion aircraft's tail Doppler radar as well as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Doppler radar deployed on board the United States research vessel Vickers. The data were chosen so the PW-3D tail radar data set maintained low ranges to precipitation of interest while the MIT radar data set possessed a wide variation of range. Possible error sources such as position error, radar calibration error, and temporal data collection differences, were minimized so that range dependency could be focused on. Range dependent beam spreading influenced precipitation classification over the largest span of ranges, and the greatest portion of the data. Also, beam spreading was found to increase the horizontal extent of precipitation areas in a direction perpendicular to the central axis of the radar beam. Overall, using the Steiner and Houze classification method, 24.0% and 21.6% of the precipitation with reflectivity greater than 15 dBZ was classified differently by the two radar data sets at the 1.5 km and 3.0 km analysis levels respectively. The percentage of total rainfall from all precipitation classified differently was 26% for the 1.5 km analysis level, and 28% for the 3.0 km level.

Wood, David Richard

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Sensors for Underground Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of different sensors are needed for underground distribution applications. These include sensors for temperature monitoring to track possible overload issues and other issues that can cause heating in underground systems (for example, arcing), sensors for fault detection and characterization, and sensors for voltage and current monitoring to support a wide range of applications (for example, SCADA, volt/var control, and load flow management). In 2008, EPRI evaluated the present state of medium-...

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Future Directions for Magnetic Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sensor applications. They have the advantages of high sensitivity, small size, low cost, and low power consumption. However ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

276

Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Carriers. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2009,Vapor Sensors. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2008,Absorption. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2009,

Sarkar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Carbon Monoxide Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; ... the sensor ensures reproducibility and reduces the need for calibration of every sensor coming off the ...

278

Thick film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Composite sensor membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA); Satyanarayana, Srinath (Berkeley, CA); Yue, Min (Albany, CA)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

280

Lean blowoff detection sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Carbon dioxide sensor  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Miniaturized wireless sensor network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses an overview of the wireless sensor networks. It is shown that MEMS/NEMS technologies and SIP concept are well suited for advanced architectures. It is also shown analog architectures have to be compatible with digital signal techniques to develop smart network of microsystem.

Lecointre, Aubin; Dubuc, David; Katia, Grenier; Patrick, Pons; Aubert, Hervé; Muller, A; Berthou, Pascal; Gayraud, Thierry; Plana, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Shape memory alloy thaw sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Sensor system for web inspection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for electrically measuring variations over a flexible web has a capacitive sensor including spaced electrically conductive, transmit and receive electrodes mounted on a flexible substrate. The sensor is held against a flexible web with sufficient force to deflect the path of the web, which moves relative to the sensor.

Sleefe, Gerard E. (1 Snowcap Ct., Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rudnick, Thomas J. (626 E. Jackson Rd., St. Louis, MO 63119); Novak, James L. (11048 Malaguena La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Navigation protocols in sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop distributed algorithms for adaptive sensor networks that respond to directing a target through a region of space. We model this problem as an online distributed motion planning problem. Each sensor node senses values in its perception space ... Keywords: Sensor networks, motes, navigation, potential field, robotics

Qun Li; Daniela Rus

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Estimating the Spatial Distribution of Precipitation in Iceland Using a Linear Model of Orographic Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear model of orographic precipitation that includes airflow dynamics, condensed water advection, and downslope evaporation is adapted for Iceland. The model is driven using coarse-resolution 40-yr reanalysis data from the European Centre for ...

Philippe Crochet; Tómas Jóhannesson; Trausti Jónsson; Oddur Sigurđsson; Helgi Björnsson; Finnur Pálsson; Idar Barstad

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Open Standards for Sensor Information Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document explores sensor standards, sensor data models, and computer sensor software in order to determine the specifications and data representation best suited for analyzing and monitoring computer system health using embedded sensor data. We review IEEE 1451, OGC Sensor Model Language and Transducer Model Language (TML), lm-sensors and Intelligent Platform Management Inititative (IPMI).

Pouchard, Line Catherine [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL; Lothian, Josh [ORNL

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Species and community response to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought in the northern Mojave Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Little information is available on how desert plant communities that are dominated by perennial species respond to normal and above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. Intuitively, one would expect total canopy cover to increase. Whether a concomitant increase in the density of perennial species also occurs is unknown. Even less is known about how individual species respond to above normal precipitation following drought. From 1987 through 1991 a prolonged drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the northern Mojave Desert. In March 1991 the northern Mojave Desert received well above normal precipitation. The following two winters (December--March) also had above normal precipitation (150 to 200 % of normal, unpublished data). Ongoing vegetation characterization studies by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG&G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both vegetation associations and individual species respond to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. This paper reports the preliminary results.

Schultz, B.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Evaluation of Sampling Errors of Precipitation from Spaceborne and Ground Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial and temporal characteristics of rainfall over Oklahoma and Kansas are analyzed in this paper using the raingage data collected during the Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central (PRESTORM). The autocorrelation function and ...

Charles E. Graves; Juan B. Valdés; Samuel S. P. Shen; Gerald R. North

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Improved Daytime Column-Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate water vapor profiles from radiosondes are essential for long-term climate prediction, weather prediction, validation of remote sensing retrievals, and other applications. The Vaisala RS80, RS90, and RS92 radiosondes are among the more ...

K. E. Cady-Pereira; M. W. Shephard; D. D. Turner; E. J. Mlawer; S. A. Clough; T. J. Wagner

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Active Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Active Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Sensors Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Active Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Remote Sensing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Detect fault and ground movement, delineate faults, create high-resolution DEMS, quantify fault kinemaics, develop lineament maps, Geophysical Monitoring Hydrological: Can give indications about subsurface geothermal fluid flow Thermal: Dictionary.png Active Sensors: Sensors that emit their own source of energy then measure the

292

Alarm sensor apparatus for closures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or framework and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

Carlson, J.A.; Stoddard, L.M.

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Alarm sensor apparatus for closures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or frame work and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

Carlson, James A. (Thornton, CO); Stoddard, Lawrence M. (Arvada, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A Framework for Moving Sensor Data Query and Retrieval of Dynamic Atmospheric Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. One challenge in Earth science research is the accurate and efficient ad-hoc query and retrieval of Earth science satellite sensor data based on user-defined criteria to study and analyze atmospheric events such as tropical cyclones. The problem can be formulated as a spatiotemporal join query to identify the spatio-temporal location where moving sensor objects and dynamic atmospheric event objects intersect, either precisely or within a user-defined proximity. In this paper, we describe an efficient query and retrieval framework to handle the problem of identifying the spatio-temporal intersecting positions for satellite sensor data retrieval. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed framework using sensor measurements from QuikSCAT (wind field measurement) and TRMM (precipitation vertical profile measurements) satellites, and the trajectories of the tropical cyclones occurring in the North Atlantic Ocean in 2009. Key words: data retrieval, satellite data, atmospheric events, spatiotemporal

Shen-shyang Ho; Wenqing Tang; W. Timothy Liu; Markus Schneider

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Automatic control and management of electrostatic precipitator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficient operation of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in practice depends upon many variables, such as charging method, particle size, gas flow, temperature, dust resistivity, etc. With the air pollution control requirements becoming increasingly stringent, it is essential to closely monitor and accurately control the key parameters of an ESP control system. The efficient functioning of an ESP normally means minimizing power consumption and maximizing dust collection. Several control strategies can be adopted to meet this broad requirement. In this paper, a distributed control technique of an ESP, which uses the actual dust emission and boiler load as feedback inputs has been explained. The Electrostatic Precipitator Management System, which is a system designed by Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd., Hyderabad, India, to meet the above control strategies using the distributed architecture to achieve efficient ESP operation is also described.

Durga Prasad, N.V.P.R.; Lakshminarayana, T.; Narasimham, J.R.K.; Verman, T.M.; Krishnam Raju, C.S.R. [Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd., Hyderabad (India). Programmable Control Systems Lab.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Combinatorial aspects of total positivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I study combinatorial aspects of an emerging field known as total positivity. The classical theory of total positivity concerns matrices in which all minors are nonnegative. While this theory was pioneered ...

Williams, Lauren Kiyomi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Determination of Rainfall with the ESOC Precipitation Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A validation of the ESOC (European Space 0Perations Centre) Precipitation Index (EPI) is carried out by comparing satellite data with observed rainfall in five African countries to determine the ability of estimating accumulated precipitation ...

Olli M. Turpeinen; Azzouz Abidi; Wahid Belhouane

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Understanding Prediction Skill of Seasonal Mean Precipitation over the Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The connection between the local SST and precipitation (SST–P) correlation and the prediction skill of precipitation on a seasonal time scale is investigated based on seasonal hindcasts from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) ...

Arun Kumar; Mingyue Chen; Wanqiu Wang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Tropical Convection and Precipitation Regimes in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have documented the relationship between tropical convection and precipitation regimes in the western United States. Circulation patterns associated with precipitation regimes are described and physical mechanisms are proposed. ...

Kingtse C. Mo; R. W. Higgins

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Modulation of Caribbean Precipitation by the Madden–Julian Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on 12 years of daily satellite precipitation data and reanalysis winds, intraseasonal (30–90 days) variability in Caribbean precipitation is linked to phases of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO). Intraseasonal variability is largest ...

Elinor R. Martin; Courtney Schumacher

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

On the Conditional Distribution of Daily Precipitation Amounts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Possible conditional dependence of the distribution of daily precipitation amounts on the occurrence of precipitation on the preceding day is examined. Test results based on 25 years of data at 30 stations in the conterminous United States show ...

Edwin H. Chin; John F. Miller

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Regional Precipitation Trends: Distinguishing Natural Variability from Anthropogenic Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the nature and causes for observed regional precipitation trends during 1977–2006 are diagnosed. It is found that major features of regional trends in annual precipitation during 1977–2006 are consistent with an atmospheric ...

Martin Hoerling; Jon Eischeid; Judith Perlwitz

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Observed Trends in Summertime Precipitation over the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors evaluate the significance of multidecadal trends in seasonal-mean summertime precipitation and precipitation characteristics over the southwestern United States using stochastic, chain-dependent daily rainfall models. ...

Bruce T. Anderson; Jingyun Wang; Guido Salvucci; Suchi Gopal; Shafiqul Islam

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Exploratory Analysis of Precipitation Events with Implications for Stochastic Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a concept called a precipitation “event” to obtain information regarding certain statistical properties of precipitation time series at a particular location and for a specific application (e.g., for modeling erosion) is described. ...

Barbara G. Brown; Richard W. Katz; Allan H. Murphy

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Central-West Argentina Summer Precipitation Variability and Atmospheric Teleconnections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interannual-to-multidecadal variability of central-west Argentina (CWA) summer (October–March) precipitation and associated tropospheric circulation are studied in the period 1900–2010. Precipitation shows significant quasi cycles with periods ...

Eduardo A. Agosta; Rosa H. Compagnucci

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Evaluation of Passive Microwave Precipitation Algorithms in Wintertime Midlatitude Situations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second intercomparison project of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project examined the estimation of midlatitude, cool-season precipitation. As part of that effort, the authors report here on the results of two microwave techniques the ...

Andrew J. Negri; Eric J. Nelkin; Robert F. Adler; George J. Huffman; Christian Kummerow

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Correction of Global Precipitation Products for Orographic Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underestimation of precipitation in topographically complex regions plagues most gauge-based gridded precipitation datasets. Gauge locations are usually in or near population centers, which tend to lie at low elevations relative to the ...

Jennifer C. Adam; Elizabeth A. Clark; Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Eric F. Wood

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Orographic Precipitation and Water Vapor Fractionation over the Southern Andes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climatological nature of orographic precipitation in the southern Andes between 40° and 48°S is investigated primarily using stable isotope data from streamwater. In addition, four precipitation events are examined using balloon soundings and ...

Ronald B. Smith; Jason P. Evans

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Canadian Precipitation Patterns Associated with the Southern Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation responses over Canada associated with the two extreme phases of the Southern Oscillation (SO), namely El Nińo and La Nińa, are identified. Using the best available precipitation data from 1911 to 1994, both the spatial and temporal ...

Amir Shabbar; Barrie Bonsal; Madhav Khandekar

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Adjusting Satellite Precipitation Data to Facilitate Hydrologic Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant concern has been expressed regarding the ability of satellite-based precipitation products such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation ...

Kenneth J. Tobin; Marvin E. Bennett

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Short-Range Ensemble Forecasts of Precipitation Type  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short-range ensemble forecasting is extended to a critical winter weather problem: forecasting precipitation type. Forecast soundings from the operational NCEP Short-Range Ensemble Forecast system are combined with five precipitation-type ...

Matthew S. Wandishin; Michael E. Baldwin; Steven L. Mullen; John V. Cortinas Jr.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Mechanisms for Global Warming Impacts on Precipitation Frequency and Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming mechanisms that cause changes in frequency and intensity of precipitation in the tropics are examined in climate model simulations. Under global warming, tropical precipitation tends to be more frequent and intense for heavy ...

Chia Chou; Chao-An Chen; Pei-Hua Tan; Kuan Ting Chen

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Influence of Land Surface Moisture Retention on Precipitation Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The retention of precipitation water in land surface reservoirs damps higher frequencies of evaporation variability and can thereby influence the feedback of evaporation on precipitation. The extent of this influence is examined in a series of ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Estimates of Thunderstorm Precipitation Efficiency from Field Measurements in CCOPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The precipitation efficiency (the ratio of surface rainfall to water vapor inflow) of a small sample of thunderstorms observed in the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment is calculated using surface and cloud-base airflow and moisture ...

J. C. Fankhauser

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Storm Morphology and Rainfall Characteristics of TRMM Precipitation Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR), TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), and Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) observations within the Precipitation Feature (PF) database have been analyzed to examine regional ...

Stephen W. Nesbitt; Robert Cifelli; Steven A. Rutledge

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Stochastic versus Dynamical Downscaling of Ensemble Precipitation Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of hydrometeorological risk in small basins requires the availability of skillful, high-resolution quantitative precipitation forecasts to predict the probability of occurrence of severe, localized precipitation events. Large-scale ...

Elisa Brussolo; Jost von Hardenberg; Nicola Rebora

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Sensitivity of Monthly Convective Precipitation to Environmental Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identifying dynamical and physical mechanisms controlling variability of convective precipitation is critical for predicting intraseasonal and longer-term changes in warm-season precipitation and convectively driven large-scale circulations. On a ...

Boksoon Myoung; John W. Nielsen-Gammon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Precipitation Recycling: Moisture Sources over Europe using ERA-40 Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric moisture within a region is supplied by both local evaporation and advected from external sources. The contribution of local evaporation in a region to the precipitation in the same region is defined as “precipitation recycling.” ...

B. Bisselink; A. J. Dolman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

An Improved Operational System for Forecasting Precipitation Type  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Model Output Statistics system for forecasting the conditional probability of precipitation type (PoPT) became operational within the National Weather Service in September 1978. Forecasts are provided for three precipitation type categories: ...

Joseph R. Bocchieri; George J. Maglaras

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

An Automated Radar Technique for the Identification of Tropical Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radar-based automated technique for the identification of tropical precipitation was developed to improve quantitative precipitation estimation during extreme rainfall events. The technique uses vertical profiles of reflectivity to identify the ...

Xiaoyong Xu; Kenneth Howard; Jian Zhang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Estimating Monthly Precipitation Reconstruction Uncertainty Beginning in 1900  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainty estimates are computed for a statistical reconstruction of global monthly precipitation that was developed in an earlier publication. The reconstruction combined the use of spatial correlations with gauge precipitation and correlations ...

Thomas M. Smith; Samuel S. P. Shen; Li Ren; Phillip A. Arkin

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Inferences of Predictability Associated with Warm Season Precipitation Episodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Herein preliminary findings are reported from a radar-based climatology of warm season precipitation “episodes.” Episodes are defined as time–space clusters of heavy precipitation that often result from sequences of organized convection such as ...

R. E. Carbone; J. D. Tuttle; D. A. Ahijevych; S. B. Trier

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Quantitative Precipitation Forecast Techniques for Use in Hydrologic Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative hydrologic forecasting usually requires knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. First, it is important to accurately measure the precipitation falling over a particular watershed of interest. Second, ...

Konstantine P. Georgakakos; Michael D. Hudlow

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Diurnal Variability of Precipitation in the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal and semidiurnal variations of precipitation over the northeastern United States (New England, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania) are investigated using 25 years of hourly precipitation data for 271 stations. The hourly data were ...

Michael G. Landin; Lance F. Bosart

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Ground Validation Network for the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype Validation Network (VN) is currently operating as part of the Ground Validation System for NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. The VN supports precipitation retrieval algorithm development in the GPM prelaunch era. ...

Mathew R. Schwaller; K. Robert Morris

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

PRECIPITATION METHOD FOR THE SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM AND RARE EARTHS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of purifying plutonium is given. Tetravalent plutonium is precipitated with thorium pyrophosphate, the plutonium is oxidized to the tetravalent state, and then impurities are precipitated with thorium pyrophosphate.

Thompson, S.G.

1960-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

Decadal Variability of Precipitation over Western North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decadal (>7- yr period) variations of precipitation over western North America account for 20%–50% of the variance of annual precipitation. Spatially, the decadal variability is broken into several regional [O(1000 km)] components. These decadal ...

Daniel R. Cayan; Michael D. Dettinger; Henry F. Diaz; Nicholas E. Graham

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Deep Convection and “First Echoes” within Anvil Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of convective cells within anvil precipitation, in a region of moderate convective activity that might be called a small mesoscale convective system, is described and discussed. The presence of precipitation-sized hydrometeors in ...

Charles A. Knight; L. Jay Miller; William D. Hall

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Orographic Precipitation and Oregon’s Climate Transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oregon’s sharp east–west climate transition was investigated using a linear model of orographic precipitation and four datasets: (a) interpolated annual rain gauge data, (b) satellite-derived precipitation proxies (vegetation and brightness ...

Ronald B. Smith; Idar Barstad; Laurent Bonneau

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Stochastic Precipitation Generation Based on a Multivariate Autoregression Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of stochastic precipitation generation has long been of interest. A good generator should produce time series with statistical properties to match those of the real precipitation. Here, a multivariate autoregression model designed to ...

Oleg V. Makhnin; Devon L. McAllister

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Partially Coherent Backscatter in Radar Observations of Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classical radar theory only considers incoherent backscatter from precipitation. Can precipitation generate coherent scatter as well? Until now, the accepted answer has been no, because hydrometeors are distributed sparsely in space (relative to ...

A. R. Jameson; A. B. Kostinski

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Optimally Merging Precipitation to Minimize Land Surface Modeling Errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new method to improve land surface model skill by merging different available precipitation datasets, given that an accurate land surface parameter ground truth is available. Precipitation datasets are merged with the ...

M. Tugrul Yilmaz; Paul Houser; Roshan Shrestha; Valentine G. Anantharaj

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Diurnal Variations of Warm-Season Precipitation over Northern China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the diurnal variations of the warm-season precipitation over northern China using the high-resolution precipitation products obtained from the Climate Prediction Center’s morphing technique (CMORPH) during May–August of 2003–...

Huizhong He; Fuqing Zhang

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A Screening Methodology for Passive Microwave Precipitation Retrieval Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of any passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithm relies on the proper identification of rain areas and the elimination of surface areas that produce a signature similar to that of precipitation. A discussion on the impact of ...

Ralph R. Ferraro; Eric A. Smith; Wesley Berg; George J. Huffman

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Global Precipitation Climatology Project: First Algorithm Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) was established by the World Climate Research Programme to produce global analyses of area- and time-averaged precipitation for use in climate research. To achieve the required spatial coverage, ...

Phillip A. Arkin; Pingping Xie

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Diurnal Precipitation Variations in South-Central New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orographic forcing of diurnal precipitation variations in south-central New Mexico is examined. Harmonic analysis reveals a strong diurnal cycle in precipitation frequency at all stations studied. In addition, relatively high amplitudes in the ...

Donna F. Tucker

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Spatial and Temporal Variability of Monthly Precipitation in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly precipitation at 46 stations located throughout the state of Texas was examined over a continuous 62-year period from 1923 to 1984. Precipitation data were subjected to spectral, empirical orthogonal function (EOF) and correlation ...

Steven W. Lyons

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Global estimation of precipitation using opaque microwave bands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the use of opaque microwave bands for global estimation of precipitation rate. An algorithm was developed for estimating instantaneous precipitation rate for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

Chen, Frederick Wey-Min, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Two terminal micropower radar sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Two terminal micropower radar sensor  

SciTech Connect

A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Advanced Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) Power Supplies Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manufacturers of new, high-frequency power supplies for electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) have continued to push the development of this technology steadily forward since the last EPRI report on the subject was published. The capacity of these new power supplies continues to grow and the reliability issues identified in the early applications are being steadily resolved. This report contains a description of the technology behind the new power supplies and an update on recent applications and future pla...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

342

Total correlations and mutual information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In quantum information theory it is generally accepted that quantum mutual information is an information-theoretic measure of total correlations of a bipartite quantum state. We argue that there exist quantum states for which quantum mutual information cannot be considered as a measure of total correlations. Moreover, for these states we propose a different way of quantifying total correlations.

Zbigniew Walczak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Thermodynamic modeling for organic solid precipitation  

SciTech Connect

A generalized predictive model which is based on thermodynamic principle for solid-liquid phase equilibrium has been developed for organic solid precipitation. The model takes into account the effects of temperature, composition, and activity coefficient on the solubility of wax and asphaltenes in organic solutions. The solid-liquid equilibrium K-value is expressed as a function of the heat of melting, melting point temperature, solubility parameter, and the molar volume of each component in the solution. All these parameters have been correlated with molecular weight. Thus, the model can be applied to crude oil systems. The model has been tested with experimental data for wax formation and asphaltene precipitation. The predicted wax appearance temperature is very close to the measured temperature. The model not only can match the measured asphaltene solubility data but also can be used to predict the solubility of asphaltene in organic solvents or crude oils. The model assumes that asphaltenes are dissolved in oil in a true liquid state, not in colloidal suspension, and the precipitation-dissolution process is reversible by changing thermodynamic conditions. The model is thermodynamically consistent and has no ambiguous assumptions.

Chung, T.H.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Precipitate Phases in Several High Temperature Shape Memory ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Shape Memory Alloys. Presentation Title, Precipitate Phases in Several High ...

345

A Modeling Tool for the Precipitation Simulations of Superalloys ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

simulate the complicated precipitations and microstructure .... The kinetic simulation employs three models to treat three ..... Thermochemistry 26, 175 (

346

An Inexpensive CO Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 An Inexpensive CO Sensor A schematic of the prototype CO passive sensor. Carbon moNOxide is a colorless, odorless, toxic gas whose primary source indoor is the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. This gas can be a potential problem in any house that uses combustion appliances for space or water heating, cooking, or idling an automobile in an attached garage. Although most appliances work correctly, a problem can exist in houses when the appliance is unventilated or its ventilation system does not properly eliminate exhaust gases from the house. Since Americans spend 90% of their time indoors and 65 to 70% in their residences, understanding how and when CO builds up indoors could save lives. We have very little systematic data on how CO hazards are distrubuted in the indoor environment, but mortality

347

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Rigid particulate matter sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

Theory for growth of spherical precipitates with capillarity effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precipitation in power plant steels,1,2 there is no analytical solution for the growth of a sphereTheory for growth of spherical precipitates with capillarity effects P. E. J. Rivera-Dõ�az-del-Castillo and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia Analytical solutions are presented for the growth of spherical precipitates

Cambridge, University of

350

NOx Sensor Development  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

351

Underground Distribution Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising costs of new infrastructure, increasing demand, and a declining number of available workers will drive utilities to operate as efficiently as possible. The practice of overbuilding infrastructure to improve or maintain reliability will be viewed as cost-inefficient. Utilities will be forced to operate distribution systems more dynamically and efficiently. Distribution sensors will help provide the needed information to utilities to achieve the goal of dynamic efficiency. The Underground Distributi...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Orographic Enhancement of Precipitation over Low Mountain Ranges. Part II: Simulations of Heavy Precipitation Events over Southwest Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic precipitation model that combines linear theory of hydrostatic flow with parameterized microphysics is applied to several stratiform heavy precipitation events over the low mountain ranges of southwestern Germany. Model-simulated ...

Michael Kunz; Christoph Kottmeier

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The Precipitation Anomaly Classification: A Method for Monitoring Regional Precipitation Deficiency and Excess on a Global Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective method to identify and track significant global precipitation anomalies on time scales of a month or longer is presented. The technique requires current observations of monthly precipitation amounts for each station and long term (20 ...

J. E. Janowiak; C. F. Ropelewski; M. S. Halpert

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Modeling overall energy consumption in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing the energy consumption of a wireless sensor network application is crucial for effective realization of the intended application in terms of cost, lifetime, and functionality. However, the minimizing task is hardly possible as no overall energy cost function is available for optimization. Optimizing a specific component of the total energy cost does not help in reducing the total energy cost as this reduction may be negated by an increase in the energy consumption of other components of the application. Recently we proposed Hierarchy Energy Driven Architecture as a robust architecture that takes into account all principal energy constituents of wireless sensor network applications. Based on the proposed architecture, this paper presents a single overall model and proposes a feasible formulation to express the overall energy consumption of a generic wireless sensor network application in terms of its energy constituents. The formulation offers a concrete expression for evaluating the performance of ...

Kamyabpour, Najmeh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Hydrogen Optical Fiber Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optically-based hydrogen sensors promise to deliver an added level of safety as hydrogen and fuel cell technologies enter the mainstream. More importantly, they offer reduced power consumption and lower cost, which are desirable for mass production applications such as automobiles and consumer appliances. This program addressed two of the major challenges previously identified in porous optrode-based optical hydrogen sensors: sensitivity to moisture (ambient humidity), and interference from the oxygen in air. Polymer coatings to inhibit moisture and oxygen were developed in conjunction with newer and novel hydrogen sensing chemistries. The results showed that it is possible to achieve sensitive hydrogen detection and rapid response with minimal interference from oxygen and humidity. As a result of this work, a new and more exciting avenue of investigation was developed: the elimination of the porous optrode and deposition of the sensor chemistry directly into the polymer film. Initial results have been promising, and open up a wider range of potential applications from extended optical fiber sensing networks, to simple plastic "stickers" for use around the home and office.

Lieberman, Robert A.; Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

357

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

358

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

359

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

360

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

362

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

363

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

364

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

365

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

366

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

367

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

368

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

369

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

370

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

371

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

372

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

373

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

374

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

375

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

376

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

377

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

378

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

379

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

380

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

382

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

383

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

384

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

385

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

386

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

387

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

388

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

389

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

390

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

391

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q 0.5 Q Q Monitor is Turned Off... 0.5 N Q Q Q Q N Q Use of Internet Have Access to Internet Yes... 66.9...

392

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

m... 3.2 0.2 Q 0.1 Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 14.9 11.1 3.9 Cordless...

393

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

m... 3.2 0.9 0.7 Q Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 19.3 13.2 6.1 Cordless...

394

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Four Most Populated States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four...

395

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

396

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

397

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,000 to 79,999 80,000 or More Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

398

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators U.S. Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Energy Information...

399

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.7...

400

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC4.7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC8.7...

402

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East North Central West North Central Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

403

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

404

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

405

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

406

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump... 53.5...

407

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

408

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

409

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.1 0.5 Q 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

410

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.3 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.7 0.5 Q Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

411

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.8 0.3 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

412

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.1 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.4 Q 0.2 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

413

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.4 0.4 0.4 0.7 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

414

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer......

415

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 25.8 2.8 5.8 5.5 3.8 7.9 1.4 5.1 Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan Used All Summer... 18.7 4.2 4.9 4.1 2.1 3.4 2.4 6.3...

416

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Characteristics Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC5.4 Space Heating...

417

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

418

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 34.3 1.2 0.9 2.2 2.9 5.4 7.0 8.2 6.6 Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated... 29.5 1.5 0.9 2.3 2.7 4.1...

419

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

420

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

422

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

423

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

424

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

425

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

426

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

427

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

428

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

429

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

430

Ultra-wideband impedance sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Ultra-wideband impedance sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

432

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

433

Neptunium_Oxide_Precipitation_Kinetics_AJohnsen  

SciTech Connect

We evaluate the proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation system at elevated temperatures to obtain primary information on the effects of temperature, ionic strength, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Experiments conducted on unfiltered solutions at 10{sup -4} M NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq), neutral pH, and 200 C indicated that solution colloids strongly affect precipitation kinetics. Subsequent experiments on filtered solutions at 200, 212, and 225 C showed consistent and distinctive temperature-dependent behavior at reaction times {le} 800 hours. At longer times, the 200 C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but experiments at 212 C and 225 C demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of 3 x 10{sup -6} M and 6 x 10{sup -6} M, respectively. Solids from a representative experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were consistent with NpO{sub 2}(cr). A 200 C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a dramatic increase in the rate of neptunium loss. A 200 C experiment in an argon atmosphere resulted in nearly complete loss of aqueous neptunium. Previously proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation mechanisms in the literature specified a 1:1 ratio of neptunium loss and H{sup +} production in solution over time. However, all experiments demonstrated ratios of approximately 0.4 to 0.5. Carbonate equilibria can account for only about 40% of this discrepancy, leaving an unexpected deficit in H+ production that suggests that additional chemical processes are occurring.

Johnsen, A M; Roberts, K E; Prussin, S G

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

434

Modeling of asphaltene and wax precipitation  

SciTech Connect

This research project was designed to focus on the development of a predictive technique for organic deposition during gas injection for petroleum EOR. A thermodynamic model has been developed to describe the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on asphaltene precipitation. The proposed model combines regular solution theory with Flory-Huggins polymer solutions theory to predict maximum volume fractions of asphaltene dissolved in oil. The model requires evaluation of vapor-liquid equilibria, first using an equation of state followed by calculations of asphaltene solubility in the liquid-phase. A state-of-the-art technique for C{sub 7+} fraction characterization was employed in developing this model. The preliminary model developed in this work was able to predict qualitatively the trends of the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition. Since the mechanism of paraffinic wax deposition is different from that of asphaltene deposition, another thermodynamic model based on the solid-liquid solution theory was developed to predict the wax formation. This model is simple and can predict the wax appearance temperature with reasonable accuracy. Accompanying the modeling work, experimental studies were conducted to investigate the solubility of asphaltene in oil land solvents and to examine the effects of oil composition, CO{sub 2}, and solvent on asphaltene precipitation and its properties. This research focused on the solubility reversibility of asphaltene in oil and the precipitation caused by CO{sub 2} injection at simulated reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. These experiments have provided many observations about the properties of asphaltenes for further improvement of the model, but more detailed information about the properties of asphaltenes in solution is needed for the development of more reliable asphaltene characterization techniques. 50 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

Chung, F.; Sarathi, P.; Jones, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

China Total Cloud Amount Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Total Cloud Amount Over China DOI: 10.3334CDIACcli.008 data Data image Graphics Investigator Dale P. Kaiser Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental...

436

Shape memory alloy thaw sensors  

SciTech Connect

A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

437

Stochastic binary sensor networks for noisy environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a stochastic framework for detecting anomalies or gathering events of interest in a noisy environment using a network consisting of binary sensors. A binary sensor is an extremely coarse sensor, capable of measuring data to only 1-bit ... Keywords: energy consumption, energy efficiency, noisy environments, sensor networks, simulation, stochastic binary sensors, wireless networks

T. Nguyen; Dong Nguyen; Huaping Liu; Duc A. Tran

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Sensors & Materials | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical and biological agents and explosives. Argonne...

439

Available Technologies: Plasmonic Nanocube Sensor  

Berkeley Lab researchers Hung-Jen Wu and John T. Groves have developed a plasmonic nanocube sensor – a low cost, label free optical detection tool ...

440

PC Board Mountable Corrosion Sensors  

Sandia National Laboratories has created sensors to identify and assess the pervasive and expensive problem of corrosion in applications ranging from ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Portable Chemical Sensors for Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Sensors for Environmental and State of Health Monitoring Emerging nano technologies are transforming microsensor research and development, a key enabler of Sandia's...

442

Mobility in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the 802.15.4 radio (for wireless operation) as well as thewireless sensor network protocol, significant power can be saved during network operations.

Mehta, Ankur Mukesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Fluorescent sensor for mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

Wang, Zidong (Urbana, IL); Lee, Jung Heon (Evanston, IL); Lu, Yi (Champaign, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

444

Expendable oceanographic sensor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expendable oceanographic sensor apparatus is deployed from an airplane or a ship to make oceanographic observations in a profile of the surface-to-ocean floor, while deployed on the floor, and then a second profile when returning to the ocean surface. The device then records surface conditions until on-board batteries fail. All data collected is stored and then transmitted from the surface to either a satellite or other receiving station. The apparatus is provided with an anchor that causes descent to the ocean floor and then permits ascent when the anchor is released. Anchor release is predetermined by the occurrence of a pre-programmed event.

McCoy, Kim O. (Carmel, CA); Downing, Jr., John P. (Port Townsand, WA); DeRoos, Bradley G. (Worthington, OH); Riches, Michael R. (Silver Spring, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

Cheng, Yang-Tse (Rochester Hills, MI); Poli, Andrea A. (Livonia, MI); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Optical humidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

Tarvin, J.A.

1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

447

Optical humidity sensor  

SciTech Connect

An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

Tarvin, Jeffrey A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Recent Variations of Snow Cover and Snowfall in North America and Their Relation to Precipitation and Temperature Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contemporary large-scale changes in solid and total precipitation and satellite-derived snow cover were examined over the North American continent. Annual snow cover extent over the last 19 years decreased up to 6×105 km2 relative to a 0.93°C (...

Thomas R. Karl; Pavel Ya Groisman; Richard W. Knight; Richard R. Heim Jr.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

450

Parametric testing of coal electrostatic precipitator performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of internal geometry, electrode type, and operating conditions on the performance of a coal electrostatic precipitator (ESP) has been analyzed by means of an extensive parametric testing program. Tests under different conditions of plate spacing, discharge electrodes, gas velocity, and energization wave form have been performed using two extreme coal types, with very high and low resistivity ashes, respectively. The study was made by means of a pilot installation operating with a flue gas slipstream drawn upstream of a power plant ESP. The experimental plant includes a specifically designed pilot ESP, able to admit an internal modification of plate spacing and electrode type. The ESP is equipped with a microprocessor controlled power supply which can generate both continuous and intermittent rectified current. The measured sensitivity of the precipitation process to the dust properties, filter configuration, electrode type, and energization method is presented, covering both the ESP efficiency evolution and the associated power consumption. The results of this work allow to extract practical conclusions about specification of ESP design and size for a given application, and assess the conditions in which use of wide plate spacing, new electrode geometries, or intermittent current are actually advantageous. 11 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Canadas, L.; Navarrete, B.; Ollero, P.; Salvador, L. [Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Heterogeneous wireless sensor network deployment and topology control based on irregular sensor model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterogeneous wireless sensor network (heterogeneous WSN) consists of sensor nodes with different ability, such as different computing power and sensing range. Compared with homogeneous WSN, deployment and topology control are more complex in heterogeneous ... Keywords: heterogeneous sensor deployment, irregular sensor model, sensor coverage, topology control, wireless sensor network

Chun-Hsien Wu; Yeh-Ching Chung

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Measuring Total Column Water Vapor by Pointing an Infrared Thermometer at the Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2-yr study affirms that the temperature indicated by an inexpensive ($20–$60) IR thermometer pointed at the cloud-free zenith sky (Tz) is a proxy for total column water vapor [precipitable water (PW)]. From 8 September 2008 to 18 October 2010 Tz was ...

Forrest M. Mims III; Lin Hartung Chambers; David R. Brooks

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fiber optic temperature sensor  

SciTech Connect

Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

Rabold, D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Passive blast pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Disens: scalable distributed sensor network simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation is widely used for developing, evaluating and analyzing sensor network applications, especially when deploying a large scale sensor network remains expensive and labor intensive. However, due to its computation intensive nature, existent simulation ... Keywords: distributed simulation, sensor network, simulation

Ye Wen; Rich Wolski; Gregory Moore

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Security for wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter identifies the vulnerabilities associated with the operational paradigms currently employed by Wireless Sensor Networks. A survey of current WSN security research is presented. The security issues of Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks and infrastructure ... Keywords: WSN, security, sensor networks, wireless

Sasikanth Avancha; Jeffrey Undercoffer; Anupam Joshi; John Pinkston

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Substation Sensor Database Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Substation Sensor database provides utilities with a searchable list of sensors available to be applied in substation applications. The Substation Sensor Database provides a searchable database of sensors available to substation engineers, categorized by Area, Component, Sub-Component, Parameter, and Technology. By specifying each category, the list can be filtered to a sub-set of sensors. By clicking on a sensorname, details can be viewed including a description, sensor maturity, and a link to the m...

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

459

Uranium and Aluminosilicate Surface Precipitation Tests  

SciTech Connect

The 2H evaporator at the Savannah River Site has been used to treat an aluminum-rich waste stream from canyon operations and a silicon-rich waste stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The formation of aluminosilicate scale in the evaporator has caused significant operational problems. Because uranium has been found to accumulate in the aluminosilicate solids, the scale deposition has introduced criticality concerns as well. The objective of the tests described in this report is to determine possible causes of the uranium incorporation in the evaporator scale materials. The scope of this task is to perform laboratory experiments with simulant solutions to determine if (1) uranium can be deposited on the surfaces of various sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) forms and (2) aluminosilicates can form on the surfaces of uranium-containing solids. Batch experiments with simulant solutions of three types were conducted: (1) contact of uranium solutions/sols with NAS coatings on stainless steel surfaces, (2) contact of uranium solutions with NAS particles, and (3) contact of precipitated uranium-containing particles with solutions containing aluminum and silicon. The results show that uranium can be incorporated in NAS solids through encapsulation in bulk agglomerated NAS particles of different phases (amorphous, zeolite A, sodalite, and cancrinite) as well as through heterogeneous deposition on the surfaces of NAS coatings (amorphous and cancrinite) grown on stainless steel. The results also indicate that NAS particles can grow on the surfaces of precipitated uranium solids. Particularly notable for evaporator operations is the finding that uranium solids can form on existing NAS scale, including cancrinite solids. If NAS scale is present, and uranium is in sufficient concentration in solution to precipitate, a portion of the uranium can be expected to become associated with the scale. The data obtained to date on uranium-NAS affinity are qualitative. A necessary next step is to quantitatively determine the amounts of uranium that may be incorporated into NAS scale solids under differing conditions e.g., varying silicon/aluminum ratio, uranium concentration, temperature, and deposition time.

Hu, M.Z.

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

460

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Novel Zigzag Shape Gives Sensors Magnetic Appeal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have designed tiny magnetic sensors in a "zigzag" shape that are ... Zigzag-shaped magnetic sensors. ...

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

462

Category:Passive Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging P Passive Sensors S Stereo Satellite Imagery SWIR Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:PassiveSensors&oldid594073" Category: Remote Sensing...

463

Energy Harvesting Support for Sensor Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Energy Harvesting Support for SensorLifetime or Per formance Energy Harvesting System life andProposed Solution: Energy Harvesting Support for sensor

Jason Hsu; Aman Kansal; Mani Srivastava

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Wireless Temperature Sensors for Improved HVAC Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reliable, and affordable and affordable Wireless Temperature Sensors for Improved HVAC Control An assessment of wireless sensor technology Executive Summary This Technology...

465

HVAC Sensors, Controls, and Human Feedback Interfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC Sensors, HVAC Sensors, Controls, and Human Controls, and Human Feedback Interfaces Feedback Interfaces April 26, 2010 Dr. Amr Gado Emerson Climate Technologies Heating And...

466

Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

467

Smart Grid Applications Using Sensor Web Services .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sensor network web services have recently emerged as promising tools to provide remote management, data collection and querying capabilities for sensor networks. They can be… (more)

Asad, Omar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors and Controls Sensors and Controls Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

469

State-of-the-Art Electrostatic Precipitator Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New electrostatic precipitator (ESP) power supply controls are available that can significantly enhance the performance of precipitators. These controls are capable of intermittent energization and bad corona detection, as well as ESP data archiving and performance troubleshooting. Furthermore, a new generation of power supplies for electrostatic precipitators is now on the market. These new high frequency supplies are smaller and lighter than the 60 hertz transformer – rectifier power supplies the...

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

470

Factors Affecting the Resistivity of Recovery Boiler Precipitator Ash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) are commonly used to control particulate emissions from recovery boilers in the kraft pulping process. The electrical resistivity of entrained particulates is… (more)

Sretenovic, Ivan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Summer and Winter Precipitation in England and Wales: 1874 -...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Wales: 1874 - 2009 This dataset, made available by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), presents summer and winter precipitation for England and Wales, and...

472

ATOMIC STRUCTURE OF PRECIPITATES IN A Mg-Re SYSTEM ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 20, 2012 ... ATOMIC STRUCTURE OF PRECIPITATES IN A Mg-Re SYSTEM ... Though the age hardening response in Mg-Nd is established for a long time ...

473

Daily Temperature and Precipitation Data for 518 Russian Meteorologica...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and precipitation values are contained in 518 station files in the Russiastations directory with names of the form "XXXXX.txt", with "XXXXX" representing World...

474

Deformation Mechanisms and Precipitate Structure in Ni-Base ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential Characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron Sandstone Deposit · Direct Precipitation of Sr-doped LaP3O9 Thin Film Electrolytes for ...

475

An Integrated CALPHAD Tool for Modeling Precipitation Kinetics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, An Integrated CALPHAD Tool for Modeling Precipitation Kinetics and Accelerating Materials Design. Author(s), Qing Chen, Herng-Jeng Jou, ...

476

Evolution of Size and Morphology of gamma' Precipitates in UDIMET ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

nucleation bursts during continuous cooling from the solution annealed state .... ( EELS) and X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) are used for the precipitate ...

477

Precipitates in Long Term Aging Al 5083 Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Precipitates in Long Term Aging Al 5083 Alloy. Author(s), Gaosong Yi. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Gaosong Yi. Abstract Scope, Al 5083 alloy ...

478

Innovative Sensors and Controls to Support Efficient Operation of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sensors and Controls to Support Efficient Operation of Sensors and Controls to Support Efficient Operation of State-of-the-Art Power Plants Innovative Sensors and Controls to Support Efficient Operation of State-of-the-Art Power Plants August 9, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has selected three projects to develop novel sensing and control technologies aimed at the efficient operation of advanced, zero-emission power systems and the improvement of operations at existing fossil energy power plants. The total value of the projects is approximately $4.9 million, with $3.9 million of DOE funding and $1 million in recipients' cost-sharing. The projects will help FE's Advanced Research Program lead the effort to develop sensing and control technologies for seamless, integrated,

479

Infrasound Sensor Models and Evaluations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has continued to evaluate the performance of infrasound sensors that are candidates for use by the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. The performance criteria against which these sensors are assessed are specified in ``Operational Manual for Infra-sound Monitoring and the International Exchange of Infrasound Data''. This presentation includes the results of efforts concerning two of these sensors: (1) Chaparral Physics Model 5; and (2) CEA MB2000. Sandia is working with Chaparral Physics in order to improve the capability of the Model 5 (a prototype sensor) to be calibrated and evaluated. With the assistance of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Sandia is also conducting tests to evaluate the performance of the CEA MB2000. Sensor models based on theoretical transfer functions and manufacturer specifications for these two devices have been developed. This presentation will feature the results of coherence-based data analysis of signals from a huddle test, utilizing several sensors of both types, in order to verify the sensor performance.

KROMER,RICHARD P.; MCDONALD,TIMOTHY S.

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Guidelines for Upgrading Electrostatic Precipitator Performance: Volume 1: Optimizing an Existing Electrostatic Precipitator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first of a two-volume set, this guide presents a systematic procedure to optimize a chronically under-performing electrostatic precipitator (ESP) without conducting a major upgrade. The guide focuses on ESPs that require only moderate improvements (less than $10-$20/kW) to achieve their emissions goals. The second volume of this report, which will appear at the end of 1999, will cover more extensive upgrades, as well as flue gas conditioning.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total precipitation sensor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Co-precipitation synthesis and sintering of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) powders: the eect of precipitant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vacuum sintering was performed in a furnace heated by a tungsten-mesh heater (Model M60-3X8-WW-23, Nemus co-precipitated from a mixed solution of aluminum and yttrium nitrates using ammonia water of ammonia water produced a hydroxide pre- cursor with an approximate composition of Al(OH)3 .0.3[Y2(OH)5(NO3

Lee, Jong-Heun

482

Special Issue "Underwater Sensor Nodes and Underwater Sensor Networks" A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Special Issue "Underwater Sensor Nodes and Underwater Sensor Networks" A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220) Website: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/sensors/special_issues/underwater_sens Journal prediction, oil monitoring and so on. This special issue tries to collect the recent advances on underwater

Chen, Min

483

On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Deformation of an Ultra-Fine Precipitate Strengthened Advanced Austenitic Alloy  

SciTech Connect

An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. The low-cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 °C and a 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of -1 and hold times at peak tensile strain as long as 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in fatigue and creep-fatigue of both alloys at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present for hold times of 60 min and longer, and substantially more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ significantly; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas in HT-UPS the microstructure takes the form of widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep-fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as it evolves with continued cycling.

M.C. Carroll; L.J. Carroll

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

for distributed wireless sensor networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEMS technology is enabling the development of inexpensive, autonomous wireless sensor nodes with volumes ranging from cubic mm to several cubic cm. These tiny sensor nodes can form rapidly deployed, massive distributed networks to allow unobtrusive, spatially dense, sensing and communication. MEMS enable these devices by reducing both the volume and energy consumption of various components. This paper will review some of the wireless sensor nodes under development and applicable MEMS devices for small and efficient optical communication, micropower generation, and sensing. In addition, CMOS post-process micromachining will be discussed as a method of achieving low cost and high integration. 1.

Brett A. Warneke; Kristofer S. J. Pister

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Analysis  

SciTech Connect

As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), an analysis of the effects of salts and precipitates on the repository chemical environment is to be developed and documented in an Analyses/Model Report (AMR). The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The purpose of this ICN is to qualify and document qualification of the AMR's technical products. The scope of this document is to develop a model of the processes that govern salt precipitation and dissolution and resulting water composition in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS). This model is developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical modeling work performed by PAO and is to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. However, the concepts may also apply to some near and far field geochemical processes and can have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone and saturated zone transport modeling efforts. The intended use of the model developed in this report is to estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the pH, chloride concentration, and ionic strength of water on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the post-closure period. These estimates are based on evaporative processes that are subject to a broad range of potential environmental conditions and are independent of the presence or absence of backfill. An additional intended use is to estimate the environmental conditions required for complete vaporization of water. The presence and composition of liquid water in the drift (i.e., pH, chloride concentration, and ionic strength) are potentially important to corrosion and radionuclide transport calculations performed by PAO.

P. Mariner

2001-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

487

Modification of Precipitation from Warm Clouds—A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review is begun with a brief summary of the current status of our understanding of the physics of precipitation in warm clouds. The impact of warm-cloud precipitation processes on the evolution of the ice phase in supercooled clouds also is ...

William R. Cotton

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

An Improved Gridded Historical Daily Precipitation Analysis for Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gauge-only precipitation data quality control and analysis system has been developed for monitoring precipitation at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center (CPC). Over the past 10 yr the system has been used to develop and deliver many different ...

Viviane B. S. Silva; Vernon E. Kousky; Wei Shi; R. Wayne Higgins

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The Measurement of Precipitation with Synthetic Aperture Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radar equation for the measurement of precipitation by SAR is identical to that for a conventional radar. The achievable synthetic beamwidth, ?s, is proportional to ?v/U, the ratio of the spread of the precipitation Doppler spectrum to the ...

David Atlas; Richard K. Moore

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Electrostatic precipitators vs. fabric filters: A symposium and debate  

SciTech Connect

Nine papers were presented at the Electrostatic Precipitators vs. Fabric Filters: A Symposium and Debate held March 22, 1994 at the Sheraton Crystal City Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. The Symposium was intended to take a frank look at the comparative advantages of electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

A Model to Predict the Probability of Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model to predict the probability of a specific amount of accumulated precipitation at a point in an area of extended convective precipitation has been developed. The model has been used in conjunction with a large-scale numerical forecast model ...

Ulla Hammarstrand

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

SEPARATION OF FISSION PRODUCTS FROM PLUTONIUM BY PRECIPITATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fission product separation from hexavalent plutonium by bismuth phosphate precipitation of the fission products is described. The precipitation, according to this invention, is improved by coprecipitating ceric and zirconium phosphates (0.05 to 2.5 grams/liter) with the bismuth phosphate.

Seaborg, G.T.; Thompson, S.G.; Davidson, N.R.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Are Precipitation Levels Getting Higher? Statistical Evidence for the Netherlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the possible consequences of global warming is that there will be more days with precipitation throughout the year, and also that the level of precipitation will be higher. In this paper a detailed statistical analysis of a century of ...

Alex J. Koning; Philip Hans Franses

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717) Authors: E. Peltier* - Univ in contaminated soils plays a crucial role in determining the long term fate of toxic metal pollutants speciation in laboratory contaminated soils with thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of precipitate stability

Sparks, Donald L.

495

13 - Aging Effects on the ?´ and ?" Precipitates of Inconel 718 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finally a double-aging at 720 şC, 8 h/FC at 57 şC/h down to 620 şC, 8 h/AC to precipitate both ?´ and ?"? phases. The precipitation of both ?´ and ?" phases were ...

496

DISTRIBUTED SENSOR FUSION USING DYNAMIC CONSENSUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISTRIBUTED SENSOR FUSION USING DYNAMIC CONSENSUS Demetri P. Spanos Richard M. Murray California in the underlying network topology and performance, making it an interesting candidate for sensor fusion, Decentralized systems, Graph theoretic models, Sensor Fusion 1. INTRODUCTION Sensor networks are a prominent

Murray, Richard M.

497

Wireless sensor networks for habitat monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We provide an in-depth study of applying wireless sensor networks to real-world habitat monitoring. A set of system design requirements are developed that cover the hardware design of the nodes, the design of the sensor network, and the capabilities ... Keywords: environmental monitoring, habitat monitoring, low power systems, sensor network architecture, wireless sensor networks

Alan Mainwaring; David Culler; Joseph Polastre; Robert Szewczyk; John Anderson

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Multiple sensors with single HVAC system control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sensor; HVAC; control system; optimization; multi channeloptimization method is designed to be independent of the HVAC

Lin, Craig; Federspiel, Clifford; Auslander, David

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Effects of Pressure on Oxygen Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To measure the effects of pressure on the output of a membrane oxygen sensor and a nonmembrane oxygen sensor, the authors pressure cycled a CTD sensor package in a laboratory pressure facility. The CTD sensor package was cycled from 30 to 6800 db ...

M. J. Atkinson; F. I. M. Thomas; N. Larson

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Secure multidimensional range queries in sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most future large-scale sensor networks are expected to follow a two-tier architecture which consists of resource-rich master nodes at the upper tier and resource-poor sensor nodes at the lower tier. Sensor nodes submit data to nearby master nodes which ... Keywords: multidimensional range query, security, sensor networks,

Rui Zhang; Jing Shi; Yanchao Zhang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z