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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Derived Data, Global Earth Coverage (GEC) from NASA's Earth Probe Satellite  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This is data from an external datastream processed through the ARM External Data Center (XDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The XDC identifies sources and acquires data, called "external data", to augment the data being generated within the ARM program. The external data acquired are usually converted from native format to either netCDF or HDF formats. The GEC collection contains global data derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the Earth Probe satellite, consisting of daily values of aerosol index, ozone and reflectivity remapped into a regular 1x1.25 deg grid. Data are available from July 25, 1996 - December 31, 2005, but have been updated or replaced as of September 2007. See the explanation on the ARM web site at http://www.arm.gov/xds/static/toms.stm and the information at the NASA/TOMS web site: http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov/ (Registration required)

2

Annual and Seasonal Global Variation in Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Ozone » Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone Atmospheric Trace Gases » Ozone » Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone Annual and Seasonal Global Variation in Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone, 1958-1987 (1991) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp023 data Data Investigators J. K. Angell, J. Korshover, and W. G. Planet Description For 1958 through 1987, this data base presents total ozone variations and layer mean ozone variations expressed as percent deviations from the 1958 to 1977 mean. The total ozone variations were derived from mean monthly ozone values published in Ozone Data for the World by the Atmospheric Environment Service in cooperation with the World Meteorological Organization. The layer mean ozone variations are derived from ozonesonde and Umkehr observations. The data records include year, seasonal and annual

3

6, 39133943, 2006 Svalbard total ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Farman et al., 1985) and25 global ozone layer reduction, the chemical and dynamical processes causing

Boyer, Edmond

4

Influence of Long-Period Variations of Total Ozone Content on Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Influence of Long-Period Variations of Total Ozone Content on Climate Influence of Long-Period Variations of Total Ozone Content on Climate Change in Twentieth Century Zuev, V Institute of Atmospheric Optics Zueva, N. Institute of Atmospheric Optics Bondarenko, S Institute of Atmospheric Optics Category: Atmospheric State and Surface It is shown that during long-term total ozone decrease everywhere at middle and high latitudes there takes place the destruction of balance in global carbon cycle first of all due to reduction of photosynthetical СО2 sink in consequence of UV-B radiation stress of vegetable biota. As a result, СО2 concentrations in the atmosphere considerably increase, enhancing the "greenhouse effect." Based on reconstruction of behavior of stratospheric ozone between 1600 and 2000 from dendrochronologic data, it is shown that

5

Interannual Variations of Total Ozone at Northern Midlatitudes Correlated with Stratospheric EP Flux and Potential Vorticity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At northern midlatitudes over the 19792002 time period, column ozone trends are observed to have maximum negative amplitudes in February and March. Here, the portion of the observed ozone interannual variability and trends during these months ...

L. L. Hood; B. E. Soukharev

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

NASA maps volcano's 4000-mile-long SO2 cloud  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NASA maps volcano's 4000-mile-long SO2 cloud ... The S02 was mapped on June 18 by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, an instrument aboard NASA's NIMBUS-7 satellite that has been measuring ozone levels and monitoring S02 since 1978. ...

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; MAGNETIC SURVEYS; MAPS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; AERIAL SURVEYING; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; IDAHO; KGRA; FEDERAL REGION X; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; SURVEYS; USA Author(s): Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA) Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/1/1981 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5456508 Source: View Original Report Aeromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Raft River Geothermal Area

8

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

9

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

10

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

11

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

12

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

13

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

14

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

15

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

16

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

17

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

18

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

19

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

20

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

22

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

23

Ozone removal by HVAC filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded with particles during operation in the field can remove ozone from intake or recirculated air. However, knowledge of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial buildings is incomplete. We measured the ozone removal efficiencies of clean (unused) fiberglass, clean synthetic filters, and field-loaded residential and commercial filters in a controlled laboratory setting. For most filters, the ozone removal efficiency declined rapidly but converged to a non-zero (steady-state) value. This steady-state ozone removal efficiency varied from 0% to 9% for clean filters. The mean steady-state ozone removal efficiencies for loaded residential and commercial filters were 10% and 41%, respectively. Repeated exposure of filters to ozone following a 24-h period of no exposure led to a regeneration of ozone removal efficiency. Based on a theoretical scaling analysis of mechanisms that are involved in the ozone removal process, we speculate that the steady-state ozone removal efficiency is limited by reactant diffusion out of particles, and that regeneration is due to internal diffusion of reactive species to sites available to ozone for reaction. Finally, by applying our results to a screening model for typical residential and commercial buildings, HVAC filters were estimated to contribute 22% and 95%, respectively, of total ozone removal in HVAC systems.

P. Zhao; J.A. Siegel; R.L. Corsi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

A study on the temporal and spatial variability of absorbing aerosols using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, individual events, such as the Kuwait oil fire and Australian smoke plum, are isolated in individual higher cycle in the two data sets shows that the cycles agree very well both globally and regionally dust and biomass burning source regions, as well as dust transport. Finally, we find that large

25

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 95, NO. D10, PAGES 16,529-16,543, SEPTEMBER 20, 1990 Evolution of the Total Ozone Field During the Breakdown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactions occurring on the surface of ice crystalsin polar stratosphericclouds(PSCs) [Farman et al., 1985 before the appearance of the ozone hole [Dobson, 1966;Farman et al., 1985];but beginningin about 1975,the

26

SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.  

SciTech Connect

This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

map | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

map map Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A map depicting model estimates of monthly average daily total radiation using inputs derived from satellite and surface observations of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, albedo, atmospheric pressure and ozone sampled at a 40km resolution. (Purpose): A visual depiction of solar energy resource for photovoltaic power systems. Source NREL Date Released December 11th, 2003 (11 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords Cuba GEF GHI map NREL solar SWERA UNEP Data application/pdf icon Download Maps (pdf, 1.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License Comment Please cite NREL and UNEP SWERA.

28

Maps depicting nonattainment areas pursuant to Section 107 of the Clean Air Act - 1985  

SciTech Connect

The report is a detailed mapping of the United States depicting those areas nonattaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, and total suspended particulates. It includes nonattainment area maps and supporting lists from Federal Register publications for final actions through September 1, 1985.

Yarn, J.; Beal, W.; Tate, C.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Maps depicting nonattainment areas pursuant to Section 107 of the Clean Air Act - 1982  

SciTech Connect

This report is a detailed mapping of the United States depicting those areas not attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide and total suspended particulates. It includes nonattainment area maps and supporting lists from Federal Register publications for final actions through February 1, 1982.

Pearson, J.; Beal, W.; Duggan, G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Maps depicting nonattainment areas pursuant to Section 107 of the Clean Air Act - 1983  

SciTech Connect

This report is a detailed mapping of the United States Depicting those areas not attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide and total suspended particulates. It includes nonattainment area maps and supporting lists from Federal Register publications for final actions through February 1, 1983.

Duggan, G.; Pearson, J.; Beal, W.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Maps depicting nonattainment areas pursuant to Section 107 of the Clean Air Act - 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report is a detailed mapping of the United States depicting those areas not attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide and total suspended particulates. It includes non-attainment area maps and supporting lists from Federal Register publications for final actions through July 1, 1984.

Yarn, J.; Beal, W.; Tate, C.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Mapping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mapping is a creative method that invites participants to visually represent or depict the aspect of their lives that is under investigation. The underlying aim of a mapping exercise is to elicit a full, holis...

Valerie A. Futch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maps Maps Maps Los Alamos is located in Northern New Mexico about 35 miles (about 40 minutes drive) northwest of Santa Fe and 1 hour and 45 minutes drive from Albuquerque. Contact LANL Directory 667-5061 Badge Office (505) 667-6901 Email Institutional Visits and Events (505) 667-2222 Location and directions How to get to LANL Los Alamos is located in Northern New Mexico about 35 miles (about 40 minutes drive) northwest of Santa Fe and 1 hour and 45 minutes drive from Albuquerque. Laboratory facilities can be found in 50 different work areas that are spread across 36 square miles. Below is the general location of the Otowi Building, Badge Office, cafeteria, and Research Library. V Screen reader users: click here for plain HTML Go to Google Maps Home Casa Grande Drive, Los Alamos, NM

34

BOOMERANG: A Balloon-borne Millimeter Wave Telescope and Total Power Receiver for Mapping Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe BOOMERANG; a balloon-borne microwave telescope designed to map the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at a resolution of 10' from the Long Duration Balloon (LDB) platform. The millimeter-wave receiver employs new technology in bolometers, readout electronics, cold re-imaging optics, millimeter-wave filters, and cryogenics to obtain high sensitivity to CMB anisotropy. Sixteen detectors observe in 4 spectral bands centered at 90, 150, 240 and 410 GHz. The wide frequency coverage, the long duration flight, the optical design and the observing strategy provide strong rejection of systematic effects. We report the flight performance of the instrument during a 10.5 day stratospheric balloon flight launched from McMurdo Station, Antarctica that mapped ~2000 square degrees of the sky.

B. P. Crill; P. A. R. Ade; D. R. Artusa; R. S. Bhatia; J. J. Bock; A. Boscaleri; P. Cardoni; S. E. Church; K. Coble; P. deBernardis; G. deTroia; P. Farese; K. M. Ganga; M. Giacometti; C. V. Haynes; E. Hivon; V. V. Hristov; A. Iacoangeli; W. C. Jones; A. E. Lange; L. Martinis; S. Masi; P. V. Mason; P. D. Mauskopf; L. Miglio; T. Montroy; C. B. Netterfield; C. G. Paine; E. Pascale; F. Piacentini; G. Polenta; F. Pongetti; G. Romeo; J. E. Ruhl; F. Scaramuzzi; D. Sforna; A. D. Turner

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

Ensemble forecasting with machine learning algorithms for ozone, nitrogen dioxide and PM10 on the Prev'Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ensemble forecasting with machine learning algorithms for ozone, nitrogen dioxide and PM10'Air operational platform. This platform aims at forecasting maps, on a daily basis, for ozone, nitrogen dioxide models, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter, threshold exceedance 1. Introduction1 Operational

Mallet, Vivien

36

Intercomparison of ozone measurements over Antarctica  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the abundances of ozone over Antarctic in August and September 1987 obtained during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment are intercompared. These measurements of ozone concentrations and total column abundance were obtained by three satellite instruments, two IR and one UV column-measuring instruments aboard the DC-8, one in situ DC-8, and two in situ ER-2 instruments, an upward looking lidar aboard the DC-8, and ozonesondes from four sites in Antarctica. Given the natural variability of ozone in the Antarctic and the fact that the data were not truly coincident spatially and temporally, this intercomparison is suitable only for identifying gross disparities among the techniques, rather than confirming the accuracies as rigorously as is normally done in an intercomparison. This paper presents a summary of the ozone data, using the data and accuracies given by the individual investigators in the individual papers in this issue, without any attempt to critically review or evaluate the data. In general, very good agreement (within about 10-20%, limited by natural variability) among the various techniques was found, with no systematic biases detected. These observations confirm the low ozone amounts reported in the Antarctic stratosphere.

Margitan, J.J.; Farmer, C.B.; Toon, G.C. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (United States)); Brothers, G.A. (Chemal, Inc., Wallops Island, VA (United States)); Browell, E.V.; Gregory, G.L.; Hypes, W.; Larsen, J.C.; McCormick, M.P. (NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)); Cariolle, D. (Centre National de la Recherches Meteorologiques, Toulouse (France)); Coffey, M.T.; Mankin, W. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)); Farman, J.C. (British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Harder, J.W.; Mount, G.H.; Ravishankara, A.R.; Schemeltekopf, A.L.; Tuck, A.F. (NOAA Aeronomy Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)); Hofmann, D.J. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie (United States)); Ismail, S.; Kooi, S. (ST Systems, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States)); Jakoubek, R.O.; Proffitt, M.H.; Wahner, A.; Watterson, I. (NOAA Aeronomy Lab., Boulder, CO (United States) Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States)); Komhyr, W. (NOAA Air Resources La

1989-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Ozone in Michigan's Environment 18761880  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric ozone was monitored in Michigan during the late 1880's using Schoenbein's test paper. A conversion chart was constructed to relate the Schoenbein ozone scale at various relative humidifies to ozone levels indicated by a Dasibi ozone ...

Dale E. Linvill; W. J. Hooker; Brian Olson

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The evolution of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and the ozone layer during the last three decades.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 1985 Joseph Farman and his colleagues of the British Antarctic Survey published a paper [Farman et al. 1985] showing that the total ozone content (more)

Oss Castilln, Albert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

7, 97959828, 2007 Tropospheric ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 9795­9828, 2007 Tropospheric ozone climatology over Beijing A. J. Ding et al. Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tropospheric ozone climatology over Beijing: analysis of aircraft data;ACPD 7, 9795­9828, 2007 Tropospheric ozone climatology over Beijing A. J. Ding et al. Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

40

8, 1106311101, 2008 Tropospheric Ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 8, 11063­11101, 2008 Tropospheric Ozone climatology in the southern subtropics G. Clain et al.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tropospheric ozone climatology at two southern Tropospheric Ozone climatology in the southern subtropics G. Clain et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wastewater Ozonation Catalyzed by Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Another attempt to improve ozonation removal efficiency is the use of metals or their oxides to catalyze ozonation. ... The waveforms were generated by a potentiostat BAS model Epsilon-2. ... Sreethawong, T.; Chavadej, S.Color removal of distillery wastewater by ozonation in the absence and presence of immobilized iron oxide catalyst J. Hazard. ...

Anaid Cano Quiroz; Carlos Barrera-Di?az; Gabriela Roa-Morales; Patricia Balderas Herna?ndez; Rubi? Romero; Reyna Natividad

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

Solar: annual average direct normal (DNI) map at 40km resolution for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

map at 40km resolution for map at 40km resolution for Central America from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A map depicting model estimates of monthly average daily total radiation using inputs derived from satellite and surface observations of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, albedo, atmospheric pressure and ozone sampled at a 40km resolution. (Purpose): A visual depiction of solar energy resource for concentrating solar power systems. Source NREL Date Released December 11th, 2003 (11 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords Central America direct normal DNI map NREL solar SWERA UNEP Data application/pdf icon Download Map (pdf, 67.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency

43

Removal of phenol and chlorophenols from water by new ozone generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Presence of phenol in river water occasionally disturbs the production of drinking water. Phenol often originated from coal power plants or pesticides. New ozone generator [Kuraica et al., Vacuum, 73 (2004) 705] was used for removal of phenol and chlorophenols from water. The ozone generator was based on coaxial dielectricbarrier-discharge and operated in the air at an atmospheric pressure. Flowing water was one of dielectric layers. Ozone and ozonized water were generated in the same volume of the discharge. This type of ozone generator has considerable advantages in comparison with the classical ones. In this paper five experiments were described, three with bidistilled water and two with different water samples from river Danube. In all cases, 5L of water containing 6mg/L of corresponding phenol was passed once through the ozonizer. The concentration of dissolved ozone in water was 740mg/L. The ozonization lasted 1 h, but the total contact time was up to 94 h. In all cases, before and after the treatment of water with ozone, the concentration of corresponding phenol [Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater, method 510 B, Chloroform Extraction Method, American Public Health Association, Washington, 1985, p. 558], dissolved and residual ozone [Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater, Methods 2-41, 2-42 (dissolved ozone) Iodometric Method; method 4-104 (ozone residual) Indigo Colorimetric Method, American Public Health Association, Washington, 1995] were determined by standard methods. In experiments with distilled water most of the phenol was removed during ozonization (89.5%). After 24 and 96 h the percentage of removed phenol increased to 93.3 and 98.9%, respectively. With 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol, 99.8 and 98.9% of corresponding phenols were removed. In experiments with two different water samples from Danube, the phenol was also mostly removed during ozonization, 76.7 and 80.0%, respectively.

D. Manojlovic; D.R. Ostojic; B.M. Obradovic; M.M. Kuraica; V.D. Krsmanovic; J. Puric

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Response: Stratospheric Ozone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Stratospheric Ozone The Upper Atmosphere Research Pro-gram...not coincide with true atmospheric change. A major review...report "Spacelab-2 plasma depletion experiments...correct figure 5 is printed below. N 2.5 OMS...360 MHz0 o 1.704 MHz'(a O, 2.108 MHz...

KENNETH P. BOWMAN

1988-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

Stratospheric ozone depletion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmospheric lifetimes. The water solubility of the CFCs is very...surface back into the gas phase, where they...sufficient additional water molecules can accumulate...stratospheric ozone by nitrogen oxide catalysts from...Gille, J.C1986The water vapor budget of the...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Ozone decomposing filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

Simandl, Ronald F. (Farragut, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN); Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L. (Dublin, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Ozone and ethylene stress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR"In a recent News and Views article1 "Adding ethylene to injury", M. Unsworth discussed the results of Mehlhorn and Wellburn2, who reported ... M. Unsworth discussed the results of Mehlhorn and Wellburn2, who reported that both endogenous ethylene (a stress-hormone) and exogenous ozone are cooperating prerequisites for injury to pea plants ...

E. F. ELSTNER

1987-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates be inferred for important trace gases such as ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Chemical transport models.11 to 3.79. Total nitrogen dioxide columns can be retrieved from space in the 405­465 nm window

Haak, Hein

49

Ozone Depletion and Global Warming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract This thesis examines global warming and the possible contribution that ozone depletion provides to this warming. An examination is performed to determine the extent (more)

Fow, Alista John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Analysis, anaerobic treatment and ozonation of wool scouring wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Wool scouring effluents (WSE) were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS), and then exposed to anaerobic biological treatment using laboratory scale fixed-bed filters. This resulted in a nearly 50% reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD). Ozonation of the effluent from the biological step led to an even further decrease in total organic carbon (TOC). The fatty acid content of the WSE was affected by both biological treatment and ozonation. Finally, steroids in the WSE underwent reduction reactions when exposed to the anaerobic biological treatment.

Monteverdi, A.; Rindone, B.; Sorlini, C. (Univ. di Milano (Italy)); Andreoni, V. (Univ. di Torino (Italy)); Rozzi, A. (Inst. di Ingegneria Sanitaria del Politechnico di Milano (Italy))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hole in the ozone layer?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hole in the ozone layer? Hole in the ozone layer? Name: Kelley Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is there really a hole in the ozone layer? Replies: That depends on what one means by a "hole". There is a thinning of the layer that is particularly severe during certain seasons at the poles. But the ozone layer is thinning most everywhere. The thinning around the south pole of earth is particularly stunning, and has been referred to as a hole even though some ozone still exists there, it is much less concentrated. As you may know, this ozone destruction is probably due to human release of pollutants such as clorofluorocarbons (CFCs) an due to natural sources such as chemicals from volcanic eruptions. CFCs are used is cooling systems such as refrigerators and air conditioning. There is an international agreement to phase out the use of these destructive chemicals but they won't be banned entirely for years for fears of losing money. Meanwhile the ozone layer thins and we are exposed to increasingly higher doses of cancer causing radiation

52

Pulsed ozone generation in oxygen  

SciTech Connect

Ozone is a powerful oxidant and bactericide which is increasingly replacing chlorine in applications such as potable water treatment, swimming pool water sterilisation and bleaching. Ozone can be produced in a number of ways but the conventional method (1) is by producing an AC barrier discharge in a uniform-field arrangement containing a thin dielectric barrier. The process is highly inefficient with most of the energy supplied being converted to unwanted heat. Thus ozone treatment, although environmentally {open_quotes}friendly{close_quotes}, tends to be more costly and so there is a compelling argument for investigating ways of increasing the efficiency.

Chalmers, I.D.; Zanella, L.; MacGregor, S.J. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (Germany)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutants ozone Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Global Ozone Project Ozone Formation in Summary: , power plants and industry all emit air pollution that forms ground-level ozone. Ozone is a primary... Stratospheric and...

54

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

55

Technological Implementation of Renewable Energy in Rural?Isolated Areas and Small?Medium Islands in Indonesia: Problem Mapping And Preliminary Surveys of Total People Participation in a Local Wind Pump Water Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article discusses a formulation of problem mapping and preliminary surveys of total people participation in a local wind pump (LWP) water supply in term of technological implementation of renewable energy (RE) in rural?isolated areas and small?medium islands in Indonesia. The formulation was constructed in order to enhance and to promote the local product of RE across Indonesia. It was also addressed to accommodate local potencies barriers and opportunities into a priority map. Moreover it was designed into five aspects such as (1) local technology of the RE: a case of pilot project of the LWP; (2) environmental?cultural aspects related to global issues of energy?renewable energy; (3) potencies and barriers corresponding to local national regional and international contents; (4) education and training and (5) gender participation. To focus the formulation serial preliminary surveys were conducted in five major areas namely: (1) survey on support and barrier factors of the aspects; (2) strategic planning model a concept A?B?G which stands for Academician?Business people?Government; (3) survey on background based knowledge on energy conservation; (4) survey on gender participation in energy conservation and (5) survey on local stakeholder involvement. Throughout the surveys it has been notified that the concept needs to be developed to any level of its component since its elements were identified in tolerance values such as high potency value of the LWP development (95%); a strong potency of rural area application (88%); a medium background of energy energy conservation (EC) identified in a range of 56%?72% sufficient support from local stakeholders and gender participation.

Ahmad Taufik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

57

Isotope Evidence for Ozone Formation on Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remarkably, the gas-phase recombination or association reaction of ozone has an unusually large (?10%) isotope effect and shows almost equal enrichments of the ozone molecules containing two different oxygen isotopes. ... For a better understanding of the pressure and temperature dependence of ozone isotopic composition in oxygen discharges, we developed a relatively simple isotope kinetic model that accounts for the processes of (i) heterogeneous ozone formation at the reactor walls, (ii) isotope exchange of oxygen atoms with O2 molecules, and (iii) ozone formation in the gas phase. ...

Christof Janssen; Bla Tuzson

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes  

SciTech Connect

Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Ozone decomposition in water solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hewes, III; B. S. , Texas ASH University Directed by Dr. R. R. Davison The rate of the decomposition of ozone in water solutions at various pH's and temperatures were ob- tained by an iodometrical method. The orders of the reactions and the reaction...

Hewes, Cecil Grayson

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

6, 74277469, 2006 Linear ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from biases in the schemes' climatology coefficients. Cariolle v2.1 analyses showed biases of up to 20 and Kelder (1998) ozone climatology into the scheme. Chem2D-OPP v2.1 analyses showed biases up to 20 analysed temperatures and the temperature climatology supplied with the scheme. Future developments should

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Impact of ozonation and biological treatment on disinfection by-products  

SciTech Connect

The paper summarizes several recent studies on the impact of ozonation and biological treatment on DBP formation. Ozonation was characterized by the formation of ozonation DBPs such as aldehydes, assimilable organic carbon (AOC), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and the oxidation of bromide to bromate. The oxidation of the DBP precursor compounds and the effectiveness of biotreatent for the control of DBPs were monitored by the formation potential (FP) for total organic halogen (TOX), total THMs (TTHMs) and total measured haloacetic acid (THAAs). Special attention was also given to the impact of bromide concentration on the speciation of the DBPs. A specific objective of the paper was to compare DBP control by batch biological treatment at the bench-scale to that by a continuous flow sand filter at the pilot-scale.

Shukairy, H.M.; Summers, R.S.; Miltner, R.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Discharge cell for ozone generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A discharge cell for use in an ozone generator is provided which can suppress a time-related reduction in ozone concentration without adding a catalytic gas such as nitrogen gas to oxygen gas as a raw material gas. The discharge cell includes a pair of electrodes disposed in an opposed spaced relation with a discharge space therebetween, and a dielectric layer of a three-layer structure consisting of three ceramic dielectric layers successively stacked on at least one of the electrodes, wherein a first dielectric layer of the dielectric layer contacting the one electrode contains no titanium dioxide, wherein a second dielectric layer of the dielectric layer exposed to the discharge space contains titanium dioxide in a metal element ratio of not lower than 10 wt %.

Nakatsuka, Suguru (Amagasaki, JP)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ozone bleaching of recycled paper  

SciTech Connect

Chlorinated bleaching chemicals, notably chlorine and hypochlorite, are still being used to bleach deinked, woodfree pulps. Increasing environmental concern about the use of these chemicals--coupled with the industry's efforts to increase the use of recycled fibers--highlight the need to develop better techniques for producing high-quality deinked pulp. Results presented in this report suggest that deinked fibers can be treated with ozone followed by a peroxide bleaching stage to produce a high-quality pulp.

Muguet, M.; Kogan, J. (American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Y-12 Plant Stratospheric Ozone Protection plan  

SciTech Connect

The Y-12 Plant staff is required by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) (formerly Martin Marietta Energy Systems) standard ESS-EP-129 to develop and implement a Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program which will minimize emissions of ozone-depleting substances to the environment and maximize the use of ozone-safe alternatives in order to comply with Title VI of the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments and the implementing regulations promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This plan describes the requirements, initiatives, and accomplishments of the Y-12 Plant Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

DOE's Studies of Weekday/Weekend Ozone Pollution in Southern...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California 2002 DEER Conference Presentation:...

66

Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ambient Ozone Formation as a Function of NOx Reductions Summary and Implications for Air Quality Impacts DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern...

67

The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications WeekendWeekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California...

68

Extension maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define extension maps as maps that extend a system (through adding ancillary systems) without changing the state in the original system. We show, using extension maps, why a completely positive operation on an initially entangled system results in a non positive mapping of a subsystem. We also show that any trace preserving map, either positive or negative, can be decomposed in terms of an extension map and a completely positive map.

Aik-meng Kuah; E. C. G. Sudarshan

2005-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ozone and life on the Archaean Earth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...John Raven Ozone and life on the Archaean Earth Charles S Cockell 1 * John A Raven 2...cockell@open.ac.uk ) 1 Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research...column abundance. On the anoxic Archaean Earth, such an ozone screen would not have existed...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Location Map  

SciTech Connect

Map file package containing shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, major roads, railroads, and rivers. The inset map shows regional Paleozoic structural elements.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

71

Location Map  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Map file package containing shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, major roads, railroads, and rivers. The inset map shows regional Paleozoic structural elements.

Lane, Michael

72

A study of the effect of ozone and antioxidants on ozone-sensitive loblolly pine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to prevent injury from other pollutants (Manning, 1992). It has been widely reported that ethylenediurea protects plants from ozone foliar injury (Bennett et al. , 1978; Lee et al. , 198 la; Clarke et al. , 1990', Whitaker et al. , 1990; Kostka-Rick... & Manning, 1991; 1992) as well as early senescence due to ozone damage (Temple & Bisessar, 1979; Lee et al. , 1981a; Kostka-Rick et al. , 1991). Ozone pretnaturely ages the leaf, and EDU counteracts these effects by enhancing cellular carbohydrates...

Posey, Karen Lashea

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Geophysics: Ancient Air, Ozone, and Faults  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...col-leagues at he Jet Propulsion Laboratory showing that the postulated reactions do occur under Antarctic stratospheric di-iions. Whether similar reactions accelerate ozone destruion under conditions more typial of the rest of the stratosphere re-mains...

RICHARD A. KERR

1988-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ozone treatment of biomass to enhance digestibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is very resistant to enzymatic degradation. Lignocellulosic materials require pretreatment to enhance their digestibility. The main objective of this research was to further enhance the digestibility of biomass (bagasse) with ozonation as a follow...

Almendarez, Maria Elena

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Biomass Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Maps Biomass Maps These maps illustrate the biomass resources available in the United States by county. Biomass feedstock data are analyzed both statistically and graphically using a geographic information system (GIS). The following feedstock categories are evaluated: crop residues, forest residues, primary and secondary mill residues, urban wood waste, and methane emissions from manure management, landfills, and domestic wastewater treatment. Biomass Resources in the United States Map of Total Biomass Resources in the United States Total Resources by County Total Biomass per Square Kilometer These maps estimate the biomass resources currently available in the United States by county. They include the following feedstock categories: crop residues (5 year average: 2003-2007) forest and primary mill residues

76

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

77

Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982000 tropical ozone climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ozone record from Paramaribo, Surinam (6°N, 55°W) (also in SHADOZ) shows a marked contrast to southern tropical ozone because Surinam is often north of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). A more

Thompson, Anne

78

Concentration of ozone in surface air over greater Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface ozone concentrations were measured in the Greater Boston area from November, 1964 to December, 1965. Ozone was monitored continuosly using a Mast microcoulombmetric sensor. A chromium trioxide filter was fitted to ...

Widen, Donald Allen

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Open-path ozone detection by quantum-cascade laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Open-path ozone measurements performed by mid-IR differential absorption spectroscopy are reported. Ozone spectrum was taken by fast repetitive sweeping of a quantum-cascade laser wavelength over a spectral featu...

M. Taslakov; V. Simeonov; M. Froidevaux; H. van den Bergh

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Chemistry climate model simulations of1 spring Antarctic ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

013577. 1. Introduction [2] Since its discovery [Farman et al., 1985], the Antarctic ozone hole has been

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Attribution of the Arctic ozone column deficit in March 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toronto, Ont. , Canada. Farman, J. C. , B. G. Gardiner, andthe Antarctic ozone hole [Farman et al. , 1985]. [ 13

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Ozone treatment in a closed culture system for Macrobrachium rosenbergii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constant flow of air. The Orthotoridine-Manganese Method (OTM) wss employed to measure ozone in solution (APHA, 1976) . Because of the rapid rate of decomposition of ozone in water, it was determined that the production of ozone could not be measured... by introducing into water and then sampling that water for analysis with OTM. Therefore, ozone was introduced directly into a solution of OTM reagent with subsequent changes in color of the reagent, measured on a "B & L Spectronic 70" spectrophotometer, being...

Yamaguchi, Ryoji

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Title Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5889E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., and Max H. Sherman Journal Building and Environment Volume 59 Start Page 456 Pagination 456-465 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, filtration, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, ozone, simulation Abstract Elevated outdoor ozone levels are associated with adverse health effects. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone of outdoor origin would lower population exposures and might also lead to a reduction in ozone---associated adverse health effects. In most buildings, indoor ozone levels are diminished with respect to outdoor levels to an extent that depends on surface reactions and on the degree to which ozone penetrates the building envelope. Ozone enters buildings from outdoors together with the airflows that are driven by natural and mechanical means, including deliberate ventilation used to reduce concentrations of indoor---generated pollutants. When assessing the effect of deliberate ventilation on occupant health one should consider not only the positive effects on removing pollutants of indoor origin but also the possibility that enhanced ventilation might increase indoor levels of pollutants originating outdoors. This study considers how changes in residential ventilation that are designed to comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.2 might influence indoor levels of ozone. Simulation results show that the building envelope can contribute significantly to filtration of ozone. Consequently, the use of exhaust ventilation systems is predicted to produce lower indoor ozone concentrations than would occur with balanced ventilation systems operating at the same air---exchange rate. We also investigated a strategy for reducing exposure to ozone that would deliberately reduce ventilation rates during times of high outdoor ozone concentration while still meeting daily average ventilation requirements.

84

Effects of pulp consistency and mixing intensity on ozone bleaching  

SciTech Connect

Conventional wisdom holds that ozone bleaching is feasible only at low or high pulp consistencies. However, recent research suggests that ozone bleaching at medium consistency is possible under conditions of high-intensity mixing. This article presents experimental results for softwood and hardwood pulps that were ozone-bleached over a range of consistencies (3-40%) and mixing conditions. Ozone was pressurized and delivered by a proprietary automated system. Results indicate that ozone bleaching at medium consistency can be as effective as bleaching at high consistency. Medium-consistency bleaching has the advantage of greater selectivity, resulting in higher pulp viscosity.

Hurst, M.M. (Quantum Technologies, Inc., Twinsburg, OH (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NASA reports drop in stratospheric ozone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NASA reports drop in stratospheric ozone ... "I believe I have that evidence," asserts NASA's Heath, adding: "It's not the proofthat will take much more work. ... Public release of the NASA data analysis is somewhat premature, he says, because the paper has not yet been published. ...

1981-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

86

Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary o Regional nuclear war could cause global which traps pollutants o Nuclear weapons cause explosions, which then causes things around the vicinity to start burning, which in turn releases black carbon; it is not the nuclear material or fallout causing

Toohey, Darin W.

87

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind Resource Potential Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind Resource Potential The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative provides 90-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the total offshore wind potential that would be possible from developing the available offshore areas. The offshore wind resource maps can be used as a guide to identify regions for commercial wind development. A map of the United States showing offshore wind resource. Washington offshore wind map. Oregon offshore wind map. California offshore wind map. Texas offshore wind map. Minnesota offshore wind map. Lousiana offshore wind map. Wisconsin offshore wind map. Michigan offshore wind map. Michigan offshore wind map. Illinois offshore wind map. Indiana offshore wind map. Ohio offshore wind map. Georgia offshore wind map. South Carolina offshore wind map. North Carolina offshore wind map. Virginia offshore wind map. Maryland offshore wind map. Pennsylvania offshore wind map. Delaware offshore wind map. New Jersey offshore wind map. New York offshore wind map. Maine offshore wind map. Massachusetts offshore wind map. Rhode Island offshore wind map. Connecticut offshore wind map. Hawaii offshore wind map. Delaware offshore wind map. New Hampshire offshore wind map.

88

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas extinction. We retrieve ozone and nitrogen dioxide number densities and aerosol extinction from transmission), Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III

89

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates #12 Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission es- timates / by Bas Subject headings: satellite retrieval / nitrogen dioxide / ozone / air pollution / emis- sion estimates

Haak, Hein

90

Laboratory measurement of secondary pollutant yields from ozone reaction with HVAC filters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ozone Reaction with HVAC Filters Hugo Destaillats, WenhaoOzone Reaction with HVAC Filters Hugo Destaillats 1,3,* ,Ozone Reaction with HVAC Filters Hugo Destaillats 1,3,* ,

Destaillats, Hugo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

International aspects of restrictions of ozone-depleting substances  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes international efforts to protect stratospheric ozone. Also included in this report is a discussion of activities in other countries to meet restrictions in the production and use of ozone-depleting substances. Finally, there is a brief presentation of trade and international competitiveness issues relating to the transition to alternatives for the regulated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons. The stratosphere knows no international borders. Just as the impact of reduced stratospheric ozone will be felt internationally, so protection of the ozone layer is properly an international effort. Unilateral action, even by a country that produces and used large quantities of ozone-depleting substances, will not remedy the problem of ozone depletion if other countries do not follow suit. 32 refs., 7 tabs.

McDonald, S.C.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ozone chemistry in the smoke from the Kuwait oil fires  

SciTech Connect

Ozone depletion occurred in the core of the plume of smoke from the Kuwait oil fires within 100 km of the fires, primarily in regions where NO{sub x} concentrations were high and ultraviolet flux was near zero. Rapid conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} can explain almost all of the ozone loss. Ozone was produced in diffuse regions of the plume, where the ultraviolet flux was higher than in the core. However, due to the relatively high ratio of nonmethane hydrocarbons to NO{sub x}, ozone production was slow. Since ozone was produced in a much larger volume than it was depleted, the plume as a whole was a source of ozone on a regional scale. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Herring, J.A.; Hobbs, P.V. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Maps and Mapping Page 1 of 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maps and Mapping Page 1 of 7 OBJECTIVES This exercise covers map projection, the systematic rendering of the earth's round, three-dimensional surface onto a flat map. Any map projection inherently, and orientation of the earth's surface features. You will use Flex Projector to evaluate various map projections

Clarke, Keith

95

Maps and Mapping Page 1 of 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maps and Mapping Page 1 of 11 OBJECTIVES Online mapping is redefining the concept of maps in our culture. Cartographic mash-ups, mapping applications that combine content from multiple sources. The relative ease with which anyone can add location based information to a map has inspired a mash

Clarke, Keith

96

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locatingdominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater[186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locatingtotal dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ozone heating and the destabilization of traveling waves during summer  

SciTech Connect

The effects of ozone heating on the linear stability of lower stratospheric traveling waves of the summertime, extratropical circulation are examined. Based on coupled equations for the quasigeostrophic potential vorticity and ozone volume mixing ratio, it is shown that the diabatic heating arising from ozone advection can offset the damping due to Newtonian cooling, leading to wave amplification and significant changes in the structure and zonally rectified fluxes of the wave fields in both the lower stratosphere and troposphere. The vertical profile of the zonal mean wind plays a crucial role in determining whether the ozone heating destabilizes eastward and/or westward traveling disturbances.

Nathan, T.R.; Cordero, E.C.; Li, L. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provided by HVAC system filters, it was assumed filtration from the HVAC system filters brings down HVAC system air leakage and ozone deposition on HAVC system filters.

Walker, Iain S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ozone depletion Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Introduction Stratospheric ozone depletion has been one... (Chubachi, 1984; Farman et al., 1985), winter ozone ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic ozone experiment Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the 1980s of anomalously low ozone column abundances over the Antarctic by Farman et al. (1985... ), ozone abundances in the Antarctic ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne antarctic ozone Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the 1980s of anomalously low ozone column abundances over the Antarctic by Farman et al. (1985... ), ozone abundances in the Antarctic ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient ozone levels Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

level ozone. Lesson 2: Ozone Formation... , power plants and industry all emit air pollution that forms ... Source: Royer, Dana - Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences,...

104

Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home » Site Map Home » Site Map Site Map Home About Overview NERSC Mission Contact us Staff Center Leadership Sudip Dosanjh Select Publications Jeff Broughton Katie Antypas John Shalf Francesca Verdier Center Administration James Craw Norma Early Jeff Grounds Betsy MacGowan Zaida McCunney Lynn Rippe Suzanne Stevenson David Tooker Center Communications Jon Bashor Linda Vu Margie Wylie Kathy Kincade Advanced Technologies Group Nicholas Wright Brian Austin Research Projects Matthew Cordery Christopher Daley Analytics Group Peter Nugent David Camp Hank Childs Harinarayan Krishnan Burlen Loring Joerg Meyer Prabhat Oliver Ruebel Daniela Ushizima Gunther Weber Yushu Yao Computational Systems Group Jay Srinivasan James Botts Scott Burrow Tina Butler Nick Cardo Tina Declerck Ilya Malinov David Paul Larry Pezzaglia Iwona Sakrejda

105

A demonstration and evaluation of trajectory mapping  

SciTech Connect

Problem of creating synoptic maps from asynoptically gathered data has prompted the development of a number schemes, the most notable being the Kalman filter, Salby-Fourier technique, and constituent reconstruction. This thesis presents a new technique, called trajectory mapping, which employs a simple model of air parcel motion to create synoptic maps from asynoptically gathered data. Four sources of trajectory mapping errors were analyzed; results showed that (1) the computational error is negligible; (2) measurement uncertainties can result in errors which grow with time scales of a week; (3) isentropic approximations lead to errors characterized by time scales of a week; and (4) wind field inaccuracies can cause significant errors in individual parcel trajectories in a matter of hours. All the studies, however, indicated that while individual trajectory errors can grow rapidly, constituent distributions, such as on trajectory maps, are much more robust, maintaining a high level of accuracy for periods on the order of several weeks. This technique was successfully applied to a variety of problems:(1) dynamical wave- breaking events; (2) satellite data validation for both instrument accuracy and precision; and (3) accuracy of meteorological wind fields. Such demonstrations imply that trajectory mapping will become an important tool in answering questions of global change, particularly the issue of ozone depletion.

Morris, G.A. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Space Physics and Astronomy

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL MAPPING OF TOTAL AND PHOSPHORYLATED EUKARYOTIC INITIATION FACTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reperfusion in the rat. In cornu ammonis (Am- mon's horn; CA) 1 at 90 min and 4 h reperfusion, eIF4G staining in selec- tively vulnerable populations of hippocampal neurons. Cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) pyramidal neurons

DeGracia, Donald J.

107

Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDAHO; KGRA; FEDERAL REGION X; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; SURVEYS; USA Authors Geological Survey, Denver and CO (USA) Published DOE Information Bridge, 11...

108

Manhattan Project: Maps  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

MAPS MAPS Resources Scroll down to view thumbnails of each map. Leslie Groves looks at a map of Japan. Manhattan Project: General Manhattan Project Facilities Places map "Signature Facilities of the MED" map Hanford Hanford map Hanford (black and white) map Hanford Site Diagram Hanford Site Location Map Hanford: Native Peoples map Hanford: Town map Los Alamos Map of Los Alamos, New Mexico Los Alamos: "Tech Area" map Oak Ridge Map of Clinton Engineer Works, Oak Ridge Clinton Engineer Works, Oak Ridge (black and white) map Oak Ridge: Projected Site for Atomic Production Plants, 1942, map Other Flight paths for Hiroshima and Nagasaki missions map Map of the Trinity Test Site Post-War U.S. Nuclear Tests map Manhattan Project Facilities Manhattan Project Facilities

109

Category:Map Files | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

image files, and where available, links to KMZ image files, and where available, links to KMZ sources used to generate the image files. Add.png Add a new Map File Subcategories This category has the following 4 subcategories, out of 4 total. M [×] Map Image Files‎ [×] Map PDF Files‎ N [×] NREL Map Files‎ 1 pages S [×] SWERA Map Files‎ Media in category "Map Files" The following 200 files are in this category, out of 1,687 total. (previous 200) (next 200) Australia-Solar-Map.png Australia-Solar-Map.png 55 KB Banglmetst 221.pdf Banglmetst 221.pdf 5.42 MB Black.Warrior.Basin usgs.map.pdf Black.Warrior.Basin us... 148 KB BOEMRE atlantic.OCS.multiple.use.map.2003.pdf BOEMRE atlantic.OCS.mu... 3.06 MB BOEMRE lease.platforms.santa.barb.map.5.2010.pdf BOEMRE lease.platforms... 1.41 MB BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf

110

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

111

Quantifying Denitrification and Its Effect on Ozone Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Effect on Ozone Recovery 10.1126...USA. 3 Atmospheric and Environmental...effects on ozone recovery in a colder and possibly...below the condensation point of...37) [or water vapor (38...5 ppm for water vapor. The atmospheric concentrations...

A. Tabazadeh; M. L. Santee; M. Y. Danilin; H. C. Pumphrey; P. A. Newman; P. J. Hamill; J. L. Mergenthaler

2000-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

Massive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...particles, which in turn heat the ambient air, causing...Heterogeneous reaction of ozone with hydrocarbon flame soot . Phys Chem Chem Phys...and nonreactive uptake on hydrocarbon soot: HNO 3 , O 3 , and N 2...the reaction of ozone with combustion soot: Implications for reactivity...

Michael J. Mills; Owen B. Toon; Richard P. Turco; Douglas E. Kinnison; Rolando R. Garcia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 31513160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 3151­3160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters P. Zhao, J.A. Siegel?, R May 2006; accepted 14 June 2006 Abstract Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial

Siegel, Jeffrey

114

URBAN OZONE CONCENTRATION FORECASTING WITH ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK IN CORSICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perceptron; Ozone concentration. 1. Introduction Tropospheric ozone is a major air pollution problem, both, Ajaccio, France, e-mail: balu@univ-corse.fr Abstract: Atmospheric pollutants concentration forecasting is an important issue in air quality monitoring. Qualitair Corse, the organization responsible for monitoring air

Boyer, Edmond

115

WINDExchange: Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind Resource Potential  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind Resource Potential The U.S. Department of Energy provides 90-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the total offshore...

116

Site Map | DOEpatents  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Site Map Site Map Home Basic Search Advanced Search DOEpatents FAQ About DOEpatents Site Map Contact Us Website PoliciesImportant Links...

117

Effects of 20002050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy-relevant background surface ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) project major changes in anthro- pogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone precur- sors over the 2Effects of 2000­2050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy; published 27 September 2008. [1] We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) driven by a general

Mickley, Loretta J.

118

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 REACTIONS BETWEEN OZONE AND BUILDING PRODUCTS: IMPACT ON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2118 REACTIONS BETWEEN OZONE AND BUILDING PRODUCTS: IMPACT ON PRIMARY of reactions of ozone on building products and on their emissions in indoor air. For this purpose, 12 building products were exposed to ozone in a dedicated experimental setup. The measured ozone removal rate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

119

ARM - Instrument - toms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Instrument Categories Satellite Observations General Overview Global data derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the...

120

Fermilab Map Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This Fermilab interactive map is actually a series of maps. The first map in the series--the map that you just clicked on to get this window--is an overview of the entire Fermilab...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Laboratory Measurement of Secondary Pollutant Yields from Ozone Reaction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Measurement of Secondary Pollutant Yields from Ozone Reaction Laboratory Measurement of Secondary Pollutant Yields from Ozone Reaction with HVAC Filters Title Laboratory Measurement of Secondary Pollutant Yields from Ozone Reaction with HVAC Filters Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2009 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Wenhao Chen, Michael G. Apte, Nuan Li, Michael Spears, Jérémie Almosni, Jianshun Zheng, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference Conference Location Syracuse, NY Keywords building-related symptoms, hvac filter, ozone, ptr-ms, secondary pollutants Abstract We used Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and conventional sampling methods to monitor and identify trace level organic pollutants formed in heterogeneous reactions between ozone and HVAC filters in real time. Experiments were carried out using a bench-scale flow tube reactor operating with dry air and humidified air (50% RH), at realistically high ozone concentrations (150 ppbv). We explored different filter media (i.e., fiberglass and cotton/polyester blends) and different particle loadings (i.e., clean filter and filters loaded with particles for 3 months at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Port of Oakland, CA). Detailed emission dynamics of very low levels of certain organic pollutants from filter media upon ozone exposure in the presence of moisture have been obtained and analyzed.

122

Sensitivity Analysis of Ozone Formation and Transport for a Central  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity Analysis of Ozone Formation and Transport for a Central Sensitivity Analysis of Ozone Formation and Transport for a Central California Air Pollution Episode Title Sensitivity Analysis of Ozone Formation and Transport for a Central California Air Pollution Episode Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Jin, Ling, Shaheen R. Tonse, Daniel S. Cohan, Xianglei Mao, Robert A. Harley, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Environmental Science & Technology Volume 42 Start Page 3683 Issue 10 Pagination 3683-3689 Date Published 05/2008 Abstract We developed a first- and second-order sensitivity analysis approach with the decoupled direct method to examine spatial and temporal variations of ozone-limiting reagents and the importance of local vs upwind emission sources in the San Joaquin Valley of central California for a 5 day ozone episode (Jul 29th to Aug 3rd, 2000). Despite considerable spatial variations, nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission reductions are overall more effective than volatile organic compound (VOC) control for attaining the 8 h ozone standard in this region for this episode, in contrast to the VOC control that works better for attaining the prior 1 h ozone standard. Interbasin source contributions of NOx emissions are limited to the northern part of the SJV, while anthropogenic VOC (AVOC) emissions, especially those emitted at night, influence ozone formation in the SJV further downwind. Among model input parameters studied here, uncertainties in emissions of NOx and AVOC, and the rate coefficient of the OH + NO2 termination reaction, have the greatest effect on first-order ozone responses to changes in NOx emissions. Uncertainties in biogenic VOC emissions only have a modest effect because they are generally not collocated with anthropogenic sources in this region.

123

Maps and Mapping Lab 6: Terrain Representation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maps and Mapping Lab 6: Terrain Representation OBJECTIVES Representing the earth's relief on a two. In this exercise, we will examine some ways that terrain can be represented on a map and in digital form. You exaggeration using Google Earth. MATERIALS USGS Quadrangle map, Ruler, Pencil, Calculator, Google Earth (4

Clarke, Keith

124

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

125

The Solubility of Oxygen and Ozone in Liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review covers the solubility of oxygen and ozone in liquids as a function of temperature and pressure. Solubility data for individual systems were critically evaluated and recommended or tentative values presented in many cases. The trend of solubilities in homologous series or related solvents is discussed. Liquids include water;seawater; aqueous salt solutions; mixed solvents; hydrocarbons; organic compounds containing oxygen halogen sulfur nitrogen or silicon; olive oil; and human blood. For ozone only its solubility in water is presented. Key words: aqueous solutions; biological fluids; gas solubility; hydrocarbons; mixed solvents; organic solvents; oxygen; ozone;seawater;water.

Rubin Battino; Timothy R. Rettich; Toshihiro Tominaga

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ozone generation by rock fracture: Earthquake early warning?  

SciTech Connect

We report the production of up to 10 ppm ozone during crushing and grinding of typical terrestrial crust rocks in air, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at atmospheric pressure, but not in helium or nitrogen. Ozone is formed by exoelectrons emitted by high electric fields, resulting from charge separation during fracture. The results suggest that ground level ozone produced by rock fracture, besides its potential health hazard, can be used for early warning in earthquakes and other catastrophes, such as landslides or land shifts in excavation tunnels and underground mines.

Baragiola, Raul A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Hedges, Dawn [Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

127

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

128

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

129

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

130

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

132

Ozone concentrations in El Paso, Texas  

SciTech Connect

El Paso, Texas may have a problem in meeting ambient air standards due to influx of pollutants from foreign sources. Cd. Juarez, Chihuahua, and Fort Bliss abut the city and are areas over which the Texas Air Control Board (TACB) has little or no jurisdiction. The Board maintains two Continuous Air Monitoring Stations (CAM) in El Paso. Ozone, nitric oxide, and nitrogen dioxide data were obtained from these stations. If the EPA Empirical Kinetic Model is used for El Paso, reducing NMHC concentrations may increase rather than decrease O/sub 3/ concentrations. The Texas State Implementation Plan, while not based on Empirical Kinetic Modeling, calls for a reduction of 18% in NMHC. However, 31% of all NMHC in El Paso arise from sources over which Texas had little (a federal military reservation) or no (Cd. Juarez) jurisdiction. It appears the TACB is correct in believing the SIP for O/sub 3/ may not bring El Paso into compliance. (JMT)

Crocker, J.E. (Texas Air Control Board, Austin); Applegate, H.G.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Tips for Key Maps / Inset Maps How Do I Add a Key Maps or Inset Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tips for Key Maps / Inset Maps How Do I Add a Key Maps or Inset Maps You need a new data frame o the properties/look of the extent rectangle Tips Index Map o Should be a simplified version of the map o Should cover at least 5X the area of the main map o Should have its own scale/coordinates/title o Main coverage

Brownstone, Rob

134

The Ozone Dilemma: a reference handbook (Contemporary World Issues Series)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilemma: a reference handbook By David E. Newton Reviewed byDilemma: a reference handbook (Contemporary World IssuesThe Ozone Dilemma: a reference handbook is targeted at both

Li, Haipeng

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The role of ozone in tracheal cell transformation  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential role of ozone as a respiratory carcinogen by characterizing its ability to induce or modulate the preneoplastic transformation of rat tracheal epithelial cells. The chemical reactivity of ozone and the types of damage it can cause suggest that it may have a role in environmental carcinogenesis. Few other studies have examined the direct cytotoxic or transforming effects of ozone after in vivo or in vitro exposure of cells, and no studies have been reported on the comparative effects of ozone on respiratory cells exposed in vivo or in vitro. The induction of early preneoplastic changes in populations of rat tracheal epithelial cells by carcinogens can be detected and quantified in vitro after exposures in vivo or in vitro of tracheal epithelial cells. This cell culture and transformation system was used to characterize the transforming potency of ozone. Tracheal epithelial cells were isolated from Fischer-344/N rats that had been exposed for six hours per day, five days per week for one, two, or four weeks to 0, 0.12, 0.5, or 1.0 parts per million (ppm)* ozone (sea-level equivalents). Cell populations were examined in culture for increases in the frequency of preneoplastic variants. Rats exposed to ozone did not exhibit an increase in the frequency of preneoplastic tracheal cells, although exposed tracheas did exhibit dose-dependent morphological changes. Rat tracheal epithelial cells were given single, 40-minute in vitro exposures to concentrations of ozone that did not result in any detectable decrease in colony-forming efficiency.

Thomassen, D.G.; Harkema, J.R.; Sun, J.D.; Stephens, N.D.; Griffith, W.C. (Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Study to determine the nature and extent of ozone and ozone precursor transport in selected areas of California. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The project was designed to assess the contribution of transported pollutants to violations of the state ozone standard within the air basins covered by the report using existing data and advanced data analysis techniques. The objectives of the project were to determine the characteristics of ozone and ozone precursor transport within the California air basins covered by the report and to identify whether the contribution of transported pollutants to ozone violations in each downwind area was inconsequential, significant, or overwhelming, relative to locally-emitted pollutants. The precursor pollutants of interest were nitrogen oxides and reactive organic gases. The project evaluated transport to the following areas: The Broader Sacramento Area and the Upper Sacramento Valley; The North Central Coast Air Basin; The Southeast Desert Air Basin (SEDAB); and the Imperial County portion of the SEDAB.

Roberts, P.T.; Musarra, S.; Smith, T.B.; Lurmann, F.W.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evidential cognitive maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to handle uncertain information, this paper proposes evidential cognitive maps (ECMs), similar to the fuzzy cognitive maps (FCMs). ECMs are uncertain-graph structures for representing causal reasoning through the combination of cognitive maps ... Keywords: Data fusion, Decision making, Evidence theory, Evidential cognitive maps, Fuzzy cognitive maps

Bingyi Kang; Yong Deng; Rehan Sadiq; Sankaran Mahadevan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

SolarTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarTotal SolarTotal Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarTotal Place Bemmel, Netherlands Zip 6681 LN Sector Solar Product The company sells and installs PV solar instalations Coordinates 51.894112°, 5.89881° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.894112,"lon":5.89881,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

140

Catalytic ozonation of phenol in water with natural brucite and magnesia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural brucite and magnesia were applied as catalysts in catalytic ozonation of phenol in this work. It was found that both brucite and magnesia had remarkable accelerations on degradation of phenol and removal of COD in water. On this basis, effective and feasible routes for catalytic ozonation of phenol in water were proposed. The influence of initial pH value, radical scavengers and reaction temperature were investigated. The results revealed that there were different ozonation mechanisms in two systems: molecular ozone direct oxidation mechanism was proved in catalytic ozonation with brucite, and hydroxyl radical mechanism was demonstrated to play a main role in catalytic ozonation with magnesia.

Kun He; Yu Ming Dong; Zhen Li; Lin Yin; Ai Min Zhang; Yi Chun Zheng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

High-resolution maps of solar collector performance using a climatological solar radiation model  

SciTech Connect

This paper will present a new methodology for producing estimates of the monthly and annual average performance of different types of flat-plate and concentrating solar collectors. The estimates are made on a uniform spatial grid with 40 km resolution. These estimates should be highly useful both to create maps to facilitate visualization of the solar resource, and as the basic data behind analytical studies of solar resources, deployment scenarios, CO{sub 2} mitigation strategies, and economic assessments. Their initial use of this methodology will be in the continental United States, where supporting data is available to evaluate the model outputs. In future years the authors hope to utilize this technique world-wide, especially in areas where the surface data are lacking. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL, Golden, CO) has developed the Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) model to estimate climatological averages of daily-total solar radiation at a 40 km spatial resolution. The CSR model is operational and has been usefully applied to the US as well as several international areas. The model uses, as input, monthly climatological mean values of cloud cover, precipitable water vapor, aerosol optical depth, surface albedo, and total column ozone. These input parameters are available from various sources such as NASA and NCDC (National Climatic Data Center). The outputs from the original version of CSR are monthly mean daily total values of Global Horizontal, Direct Normal, and Diffuse radiation. Their latest revision of the model allows them to calculate the monthly mean output for the various collector types such as tilted flat-plate surfaces, one- and two-axis flat-plate collectors, and concentrating collectors.

George, R.L.; Maxwell, E.L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removal of Indoor Ozone with Reactive Materials: Preliminary Results and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removal of Indoor Ozone with Reactive Materials air quality. #12;Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removing ozone from indoor

Siegel, Jeffrey

143

Maps and Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shrouded door to box seats. Rose / Maps and Plans Re-Placing Places 20.1 Rose / Maps and Plans Re-Placing PlacesMaps and Plans Thomas Rose Architectural plans create the

Rose, Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Holomorphic segre preserving maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for holomorphic Segre maps. Math. Ann. 337, 457-478, (2007).There are no holomorphic maps satisfying criteria (1.37). (j ? C\\{0}, the family of maps given by H = c 1 z 1 , . . . ,

Angle, Robert Blair

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Site Map | ScienceCinema  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Site Map Site Map Home Audio Search Fielded Search About Help Site Map Contact Us Website PoliciesImportant Links...

146

Historical Network Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors ESnet Live Blog Home Engineering Services The Network Network Maps Historical Network Maps Engineering...

147

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

148

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

149

Deep Maps: A Brief for Digital Palimpsest Mapping Projects (DPMPs, or Deep Maps)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEEP MAPS: A Brief for Digital Palimpsest DPMPs, or Deep Maps) SHELLEY FISHER FISHKIN paintings, drawings, maps, photos, books,

Fishkin, Shelley Fisher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric ozone depletion Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H. U., The ozone distributionin the atmosphere,Can. J. Chem., 52, 1491-1504, 1974. Farman, J. C... , Quasi-biennial modulation of the Antarctic ozone ... Source: Bowman,...

151

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ozone hole Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The discovery of the ozone hole in the Southern Hemi- sphere... (Chubachi, 1984; Farman et al., 1985), winter ozone losses over the Arctic (e.g. Brune et al., 1991... .,...

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic ozone depletion Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-B and Biosphere." Oecologia 128(1-2): 1-296. (1997). Ozone depletion FAQ Part IV: UV radiation and its effects... -B radiation due to stratospheric ozone depletion on global...

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute ozone-induced change Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract Predicting ozone-induced reduction of carbon... a leaf-level model to the whole tree, it is possible to investigate whether the ozone-induced ... Source: Michigan...

154

Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Yuan Ma-scale reactors were operated at the LaPrairie Wastewater Treatment plant (one control and one ozonated

Barthelat, Francois

155

Weekend/Weekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend...

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid regulates ozone-induced Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ozone-induced Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acid regulates ozone-induced Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Plant Molecular Biology 51:...

157

A delayed effect of ozone fumigation on photosynthesis of Norway spruce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A delayed effect of ozone fumigation on photosynthesis of Norway spruce D. Eamus1 A.W. Davis J into the long-lastincl effects of ozone fumiga- tion upon photosynthesis of Norway spruce. Measurements were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

158

Allinea MAP at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAP MAP MAP MAP from Allinea Software is a parallel profiler with a simple graphical user interface. It is installed on Hopper, Edison and Carver. Note that the performance of the X Windows-based MAP Graphical User Interface can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with the free NX software. Introduction Allinea MAP is a parallel profiler with simple Graphical User Interface. MAP can be run with up to 512 processors, to profile serial, OpenMP and MPI codes. The Allinea MAP web page and 'Allinea DDT and MAP User Guide' (available as $ALLINEA_TOOLS_DOCDIR/userguide.pdf after loading an allineatools module) are good resources for learning more about some of the advanced MAP features. Loading the Allinea Tools Module To use MAP, first load the 'allineatools' module to set the correct

159

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

160

Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 14251436 A development of ozone abatement strategies for the Grenoble  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the time evolution of the ozone isopleths at the maximums locations (south and north west valleys). r 2003

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Formation of ozone and oxidation of methane in a direct current corona discharge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than in the positive corona when using air, while the reverse was observed with oxygen. At low currents and high gas flow rates, the ozone production rate increased linearly with corona current independent of gas flow rate. At high currents... humidity) and positive corona. Their results show: (1) a linear relation between ozone concentration and corona current; (2) an (non- linear) inverse relation between the ozone concentration and air flow; and (3) for a given corona current, the ozone...

Tangirala, Umashanker

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Meteorological Simulations of Ozone Episode Case Days during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study  

SciTech Connect

Meteorological simulations centered around the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez have been performed during an ozone episode that occurred on Aug. 13,1996 during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study field campaign. Simulations were petiormed using the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model using a 1,2,4, and 8 km horizontal grid size nested mesh system. Investigation of the vertical structure and evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer for the Aug. 11-13 time period is emphasized in this paper. Comparison of model-produced wind speed profiles to rawirisonde and radar profiler measurements shows reasonable agreement. A persistent upper-level jet was captured in the model simulations through data assimilation. In the evening hours, the model was not able to produce the strong wind direction shear seen in the radar wind profiles. Based on virtual potential temperature profile comparisons, the model appears to correctly simulate the daytime growth of the convective mixed layer. However, the model underestimates the cooling of the surface layer at night. We found that the upper-level jet significantly impacted the turbulence structure of the boundary layer, leading to relatively high turbulent kinetic energy (tke) values aloft at night. The model indicates that these high tke values aloft enhance the mid-morning growth of the boundary layer. No upper-level turbulence measurements were available to verify this finding, however. Radar profiler-derived mixing heights do indicate relatively rapid morning growth of the mixed layer.

Brown, M.J.; Costigan, K.; Muller, C.; Wang, G.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Yields of Secondary Organic Aerosol from Reactions between Ozone and Surface-Adsorbed d-Limonene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yields of Secondary Organic Aerosol from Reactions between Ozone and Surface-Adsorbed d, terpenes can adsorb onto building materials, and Springs et al. (2011) determined that ozone did, in fact, react with terpenes adsorbed to surfaces. The purpose of this work was to determine the yield of ozone

Siegel, Jeffrey

164

PPPL-3281, Preprint: January 1998, UC-426 Synthesis of Ozone at Atmospheric Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-coupled plasma (ICP) torch to synthesize ozone at atmospheric pressure is explored. Ozone concentrations up1 PPPL-3281, Preprint: January 1998, UC-426 Synthesis of Ozone at Atmospheric Pressure by a Quenched Induction-Coupled Plasma Torch B.C. Stratton1, R. Knight2, and D.R. Mikkelsen1, A. Blutke3, and J

165

1 Ozone pollution forecasting 3 Herve Cardot, Christophe Crambes and Pascal Sarda.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contents 1 Ozone pollution forecasting 3 Herv´e Cardot, Christophe Crambes and Pascal Sarda. 1;1 Ozone pollution forecasting using conditional mean and conditional quantiles with functional covariates Herv´e Cardot, Christophe Crambes and Pascal Sarda. 1.1 Introduction Prediction of Ozone pollution

Crambes, Christophe

166

Emergency Exit Maps | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Exit Maps SSRL Exit Maps Exit map 219 exit map trailer 274 exit map 450 trailers exit map trailer 271 exit map trailer 270 exit map trailer 294 exit maps 118 & 117 exit...

167

Career Map: Instrumentation Coordinator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Instrumentation Coordinator positions.

168

Career Map: Engineering Manager  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Engineering Manager positions.

169

Career Map: Environmental Scientist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Environmental Scientist positions.

170

Career Map: Construction Worker  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Construction Worker positions.

171

Career Map: Industrial Engineer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Industrial Engineer positions.

172

Career Map: Mechanical Engineer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Mechanical Engineer positions.

173

Career Map: Aerospace Engineer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Aerospace Engineer positions.

174

Career Map: Resource Scientist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Resource Scientist positions.

175

Career Map: Electrical Engineer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Electrical Engineer positions.

176

Career Map: Research Scientist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Research Scientist positions.

177

Career Map: Transportation Worker  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Transportation Worker positions.

178

Career Map: Meteorological Technician  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Meteorological Technician positions.

179

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

180

Differential maps, difference maps, interpolated maps, and long term prediction  

SciTech Connect

Mapping techniques may be thought to be attractive for the long term prediction of motion in accelerators, especially because a simple map can approximately represent an arbitrarily complicated lattice. The intention of this paper is to develop prejudices as to the validity of such methods by applying them to a simple, exactly solveable, example. It is shown that a numerical interpolation map, such as can be generated in the accelerator tracking program TEAPOT, predicts the evolution more accurately than an analytically derived differential map of the same order. Even so, in the presence of appreciable'' nonlinearity, it is shown to be impractical to achieve accurate'' prediction beyond some hundreds of cycles of oscillation. This suggests that the value of nonlinear maps is restricted to the parameterization of only the leading'' deviation from linearity. 41 refs., 6 figs.

Talman, R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and degradation of filter media additives Title Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and degradation of filter media additives Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Wenhao Chen, Michael G. Apte, Nuan Li, Michael Spears, Jérémie Almosni, Gregory Brunner, Jianshun(Jensen) Zhang, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 45 Start Page 3561 Issue 21 Pagination 3561-3568 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group

182

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Forests (1980) Maximum Potential Biomass Density Land Use (1980) Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By County) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit)

183

Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure samplers Title Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure samplers Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Mullen, Nasim A., Marion L. Russell, Melissa M. Lunden, and Brett C. Singer Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 80 Pagination 184-189 Date Published 12/2013 Keywords aldehyde; exposure; indoor air quality; passive sampler; residential Abstract This study investigated formaldehyde and acetaldehyde passive sampling rates and ozone interference for the DNPH-based Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure sampler. Previous studies have shown that ozone interferes with active sampling by this cartridge. Our study included one laboratory and six field experiments conducted in Northern California homes. Passive sampling rates of 1.10 ± 0.09 and 0.86 ± 0.10 mL/min determined for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are lower than previously reported. In a controlled laboratory experiment there were small, statistically insignificant impacts of subsequent ozone exposure on formaldehyde and acetaldehyde mass passively collected on the samplers. This sampler is inexpensive, easy to deploy and to transport by mail, and has a high sampling capacity when used passively; it is suitable for a wide-range of monitoring applications. However, the passive sampling rate remains in question given the internally consistent, but different results obtained in our study and the previous study.

184

Biofouling control with ozone at the Bergen Generating Station  

SciTech Connect

The results of a study designed to evaluate the effectiveness of ozone as an alternative to chlorine for condenser biofouling control in a once-through cooling system are reported. Tests were conducted at PSE and G's Bergen Generating Station using a pilot-scale condenser system to simulate plant condenser operations. Three model condensers were operated under identical conditions with only the biocide treatment differing. Comparisons of ozone and chlorine were made and the minimum effective levels of each were determined by daily measurements of the heat transfer coefficient across the model condenser tubes and/or the water side pressure drop. Final evaluation was based on the mass of biofouling material collected from the tubewalls. Test results indicate that chlorine is capable of effective biofouling control when applied for 2 hours/day at a level as low as 0.1 mg/l. Ozone, applied on the same schedule, requires 0.5 mg/l for effective control. The results of this study are representative of only the Bergen site. Water quality at each particular site will influence the development of the biofouling organisms, the chemical reactions of the biocides, and therefore, the effectiveness of the treatment methodology. The results suggest that further examination of ozonation for biofouling control is warranted. Although much more costly than chlorine, its effects on indigenous ecosystems may prove ozone to be better suited for application at selected power plants. It must be emphasized, however, that much more information is necessary before ozone can be recommended as an environmentally acceptable alternative to chlorine.

Sugam, R.; Guerra, C.R.; DelMonaco, J.L.; Singletary, J.H.; Sandvik, W.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

187

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

188

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

189

Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats  

SciTech Connect

Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased ?{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. Ozone metabolic effects are only slightly exacerbated in geriatric rats.

Bass, V. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Cascio, W.E. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Phillips, P.M. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Andrews, D. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Miller, D. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Doerfler, D.L. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kodavanti, U.P., E-mail: kodavanti.urmila@epa.gov [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

The effect of solids retention time on tertiary ozonation and carbon adsorption of petrochemical wastewaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and biochemical oxygen demands were measured before and after ozaontion as well as the amount of ozone consumed. Non-adsorbable COD was measured and a comparison of ozonized and unozonized wastewater made. BOD concentration rose after ozonation, but decreased... of solids retention time on nonadsorbable COD, with and without ozonation. 39 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Biochemical and chemical oxygen demand data. COD removal and ozone consumption data 21 26 iVon-adsorbable COD data for bio-oxidized effluent. . 3O...

Buys, Ronald Earl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

191

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

192

Synthesis of Ozone at Atmospheric Pressure by a Quenched Induction-Coupled Plasma Torch  

SciTech Connect

The technical feasibility of using an induction-coupled plasma (ICP) torch to synthesize ozone at atmospheric pressure is explored. Ozone concentrations up to ~250 ppm were produced using a thermal plasma reactor system based on an ICP torch operating at 2.5 MHz and ~11 kVA with an argon/oxygen mixture as the plasma-forming gas. A gaseous oxygen quench formed ozone by rapid mixing of molecular oxygen with atomic oxygen produced by the torch. The ozone concentration in the reaction chamber was measured by Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy over a wide range of experimental configurations. The geometry of the quench gas flow, the quench flow velocity, and the quench flow rate played important roles in determining the ozone concentration. The ozone concentration was sensitive to the torch RF power, but was insensitive to the torch gas flow rates. These observations are interpreted within the framework of a simple model of ozone synthesis.

A. Blutke; B.C. Stratton; D.R. Mikkelsen; J. Vavruska; R. Knight

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Thematic Maps 9 Thematic Maps: Visualizing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thematic Maps 9 Thematic Maps: Visualizing Spatial Variability and Shared Benefits SSSSSpatial Agreements Figure 5. GIS and visualization: from bottom to top -- topography, social water stress index and Mexico..... By superimposing several different data sets within a Geographic Information System (GIS

Wolf, Aaron

194

ARM XDC Datastreams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

StreamsTotal Ozone Mapping StreamsTotal Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Documentation TOMS Instrument External Datastream Descriptions ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Information updated on March 16, 2006, 3:32 pm GMT General Data Description Global data derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the Earth Probe satellite, consisting of daily values of aerosol index, ozone and reflectivity remapped into a regular 1x1.25 deg grid. Users of these data should acknowledge the support of the NASA Goddard Ozone Processing Team. Expand All Collapse All Data Stream Names toms : Total Ozone Mapping Experiment Spectrometer Measurement Description

195

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Abstract Research into the practicality of digital mapping by Placer Dome Exploration...

196

Learning about ozone depletion Paul J. Crutzen & Michael Oppenheimer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learning about ozone depletion Paul J. Crutzen & Michael Oppenheimer Received: 12 January 2007 Mainz, Germany M. Oppenheimer (*) Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA e-mail: omichael@princeton.edu M. Oppenheimer Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International

Oppenheimer, Michael

197

Investigation of the Atmospheric Ozone Impacts of Methyl Iodide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. R. Holmes (1977): Nitrogen Dioxide Photolysis in the LosO3 Ozone NO Nitric Oxide NO2 Nitrogen Dioxide NO3 NitrateNitrogen Pentoxide HONO Nitrous Acid HNO3 Nitric Acid HNO4 Peroxynitric Acid HO2H Hydrogen Peroxide CO Carbon Monoxide SO2 Sulfur Dioxide

Carter, W P L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

556 2010 ASHRAE Chemical reactions between ozone and terpenoids can  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system. This investigation models the influence of HVAC systems on SOA influential HVAC parameters are the flow rates through the system,particlefiltrationefficiency,andindoortemperature for the residential and commercial models, as well as ozone removal on used filters for the commercial model

Siegel, Jeffrey

199

International Gathering Plans Ways To Safeguard Atmospheric Ozone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

International Gathering Plans Ways To Safeguard Atmospheric Ozone ... Everyone's for it, as was evidenced in Helsinki recently where senior government officials from more than 80 countries, together with delegates representing many interested groups and organizations, attended a week-long meeting to seek ways of safeguarding it. ...

DERMOT A. O'SULLIVAN

1989-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ozone Treatments of Fresh Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, has made it a useful agent for seawater disin fection (Blogoslawski et aI., 1975; Blogoslawski, 1977 to extend the storage life of many perishable foods by slowing decomposi tion caused by microorganisms. These studies were reviewed by Farquhar and Rice (1982). Storage life extension of fish using ozone was first

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Massive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The magnitude and duration of the predicted ozone reductions are greater than those calculated in the 1980's for global thermonuclear war scenarios involving yields that exceed the ones we considered by factors of >1000. At the time, global models had...

Michael J. Mills; Owen B. Toon; Richard P. Turco; Douglas E. Kinnison; Rolando R. Garcia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

COBE Sky Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COBE sky map COBE sky map This map of the ancient sky shows the minute variations in the microwave background discovered by the team led by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory astrophysicist George Smoot. As seen in the map, vast regions of space have minute variations in temperature. Over billions of years, gravity magnified these small differences into the clusters of galaxies we observe today. Displayed horizontally across the middle of the map is the Milky Way galaxy. The image, a 360-degree map of the whole sky, shows the relic radiation from the Big Bang. The map was derived from one year of data taken by the Differential Microwave Radiometers onboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer satellite. Using Galactic coordinates, the map shows the plane of the Milky Way galaxy horizontally and the center of our galaxy at its

203

Memory-mapped transactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Memory-mapped transactions combine the advantages of both memory mapping and transactions to provide a programming interface for concurrently accessing data on disk without explicit I/O or locking operations. This interface ...

Sukha, Jim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Integrable quantum mappings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A quantum R-matrix structure is presented for a family of exactly integrable multidimensional rational mappings related to lattice versions of the Kortewegde Vries equation. It is shown that these mappings possess a commuting family of invariants.

F. W. Nijhoff; H. W. Capel; V. G. Papageorgiou

1992-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

WIPP Projects Interative Map  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

View WIPP Projects in a larger map. To report corrections, please emailWeatherizationInnovation@ee.doe.gov.

206

National Hydropower Map  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

High-resolution map produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory showing hydropower resources throughout the United States.

207

SERC Grants Interactive Map  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

View SERC Grants in a larger map. To report corrections, please email SustainableEnergyWAP@ee.doe.gov.

208

Studying the feedback effects of aerosols on ozone and temperatures in Los Angeles with an Eulerian air pollution model  

SciTech Connect

An Eulerian air pollution model (GATOR/MMTD) was used to study the effects of aerosols on surface solar radiation, surface air temperatures, and ozone mixing ratios. Model results were also compared to data from the Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS) period of August 27-29, 1987. Gross errors for sulfate, sodium, light absorption, temperature, surface solar radiation, sulfur dioxide gas, formaldehyde gas, and ozone were lowest among parameters compared (1-40%). Gross errors for elemental carbon, organic carbon, total particulate mass, ammonium, ammonia gas, nitric acid gas, and light scattering, were larger (40-61%). Gross errors for particulate nitrate were largest (65-70%). Doubling of the land-based particulate emissions inventory caused gross errors of total particulate mass and elemental carbon to increase by factors of more than two. Also, setting lateral boundary inflow concentrations of particles to zero caused slight (< 1%) erosion of results for most species, large erosion (10%) for sodium and chloride, but slight improvement (< 1%) for a few species. Spinning up the meteorological model 24 hours in advance caused most gross errors to increase. Finally, model predictions for several parameters, with and without the inclusion of aerosols, were compared to data. The presence of aerosols reduced peak daytime surface solar radiation by approximately 6.4% (55 W m-2), increased night-time temperatures by about 0.77 K, decreased daytime temperatures by about 0.08 K, and increased overall temperatures (day plus night during the two day simulation period) by 0.43 K. The relatively small cooling during the day was due to heat trapping by elemental carbon-containing aerosols. The presence of aerosols also caused ozone mixing ratios to decrease by 2%.

Jacobson, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

MAPS MANUAL 2010 PROTOCOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAPS MANUAL 2010 PROTOCOL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF CONSTANT-EFFORT BIRD-BANDING STATIONS AS PART OF THE MONITORING AVIAN PRODUCTIVITY AND SURVIVORSHIP (MAPS) PROGRAM David F. De;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank MAPS biologists Eric Feuss, Denise Jones, Sara Martin, Eric (Zed) Ruhlen, Hillary Smith

DeSante, David F.

210

MAPS MANUAL 2014 PROTOCOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAPS MANUAL 2014 PROTOCOL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF CONSTANT-EFFORT BIRD-BANDING STATIONS AS PART OF THE MONITORING AVIAN PRODUCTIVITY AND SURVIVORSHIP (MAPS) PROGRAM David F. De;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank MAPS biologists Eric Feuss, Denise Jones, Sara Martin, Eric (Zed) Ruhlen, Hillary Smith

DeSante, David F.

211

MAPS MANUAL 2008 PROTOCOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAPS MANUAL 2008 PROTOCOL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF CONSTANT-EFFORT BIRD-BANDING STATIONS AS PART OF THE MONITORING AVIAN PRODUCTIVITY AND SURVIVORSHIP (MAPS) PROGRAM David F. De;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank MAPS biologists Eric Feuss, Denise Jones, Sara Martin, Eric (Zed) Ruhlen, Jim Saracco

DeSante, David F.

212

MAPS MANUAL 2013 PROTOCOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAPS MANUAL 2013 PROTOCOL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF CONSTANT-EFFORT BIRD-BANDING STATIONS AS PART OF THE MONITORING AVIAN PRODUCTIVITY AND SURVIVORSHIP (MAPS) PROGRAM David F. De;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank MAPS biologists Eric Feuss, Denise Jones, Sara Martin, Eric (Zed) Ruhlen, Hillary Smith

DeSante, David F.

213

MAPS MANUAL 2011 PROTOCOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAPS MANUAL 2011 PROTOCOL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF CONSTANT-EFFORT BIRD-BANDING STATIONS AS PART OF THE MONITORING AVIAN PRODUCTIVITY AND SURVIVORSHIP (MAPS) PROGRAM David F. De;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank MAPS biologists Eric Feuss, Denise Jones, Sara Martin, Eric (Zed) Ruhlen, Hillary Smith

DeSante, David F.

214

MAPS MANUAL 2012 PROTOCOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAPS MANUAL 2012 PROTOCOL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF CONSTANT-EFFORT BIRD-BANDING STATIONS AS PART OF THE MONITORING AVIAN PRODUCTIVITY AND SURVIVORSHIP (MAPS) PROGRAM David F. De;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank MAPS biologists Eric Feuss, Denise Jones, Sara Martin, Eric (Zed) Ruhlen, Hillary Smith

DeSante, David F.

215

Real-Time Traffic Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

d. (2007). Barcelona Traffic Map. Barcelona. 2007. Berendt,Spatial Thinking with Geographic Maps: An Empirical Study.Data on Choropleth Maps in Series." Annals of the

Goldsberry, Kirk Patrick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Site Map - EERE Commercialization Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Quick Links Energy Innovation Portal Site Map Commercialization Home Page About Success Stories Legacy Initiatives Small...

217

Site Map | DOE Data Explorer  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Site Map Site Map Home Basic Search Advanced Search DDE FAQ About DDE Site Map Data ID Service Contact Us Website PoliciesImportant Links...

218

Maps & Web Mapping: An Introduction to Cartography Edition (2015)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maps & Web Mapping: An Introduction to Cartography 1st Edition (2015) By Keith Clarke Links Showcase Site http://www.pearsonhighered.com/clarke-1e-info/index.html Catalog Link Maps & Web Mapping

Clarke, Keith

219

EQUUS Total Return Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EQUUS Total Return Inc EQUUS Total Return Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EQUUS Total Return Inc Place Houston, Texas Product A business development company and VC investor that trades as a closed-end fund. EQUUS is managed by MCC Global NV, a Frankfurt stock exchange listed management and merchant banking group. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

220

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

223

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

224

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

225

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

226

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

227

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

228

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

229

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

230

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

231

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

232

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

233

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

234

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

235

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

236

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

237

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

238

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

239

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

240

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

242

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

243

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

244

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

245

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

246

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

247

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

248

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

249

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

250

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

251

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

252

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

253

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

254

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

255

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

256

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

257

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

258

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

259

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

260

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

262

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

263

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

264

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

265

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

266

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

267

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

268

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

269

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

270

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

271

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

272

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

273

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

274

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

275

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

276

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

277

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

278

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

279

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

280

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

282

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

283

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

284

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

285

Aeromagnetic map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

map Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: Aeromagnetic mapInfo GraphicMapChart Cartographer Zietz and Kirby Published U.S. Geological Survey,...

286

Maps of Selected State Subdivisions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Summary Maps of Selected State Subdivisions Map 1: Alaska Map 2: California Map 3: Louisiana Map 4: New Mexico Map 5: Texas Map 6: Western Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 7: Central Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 8: Eastern Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 1: Alaska AK 50 - North Onshore and Offshore AK 10 - South Onshore AK 05 - South State Offshore AK 00 - South Federal Offshore Map 2: California CA 50 - Coastal Region Onshore CA 90 - Los Angeles Basin Onshore CA 10 - San Joaquin Basin Onshore

287

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

288

Ozonized water generator based on coaxial dielectric-barrier-discharge in air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A coaxial dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) as an ozonized water reactor system has been developed and described. It operates in the air at an atmospheric pressure. In the reactor one of the dielectric layers is flowing water. Ozone and ozonized water are generated in the same volume of the discharge. The ozone production and its dissolution in the water simultaneously occur leading to increases of the reactor efficiency. Filamentary 50Hz DBD has been performed using up to 20kV applied voltage. The obtained ozone concentrations correspond to the values typically suggested for the treatment of potable and wastewater. The efficiency can be further increased by addition of small amount of the oxygen in the DBD device. The periodical time dependence of the dissolved ozone concentration in Danube water is found and discussed.

Milorad M. Kuraica; Bratislav M. Obradovi?; Dragan Manojlovi?; Daliborka R. Ostoji?; Jago Puri?

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Impact of HVAC filter on indoor air quality in terms of ozone removal and carbonyls generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study aims at detecting ozone removal rates and corresponding carbonyls generated by ozone reaction with HVAC filters from various building, i.e., shopping mall, school, and office building. Studies were conducted in a small-scale environmental chamber. By examining dust properties including organic carbon proportion and specific surface area of dusts adsorbed on filters along with ozone removal rates and carbonyls generation rate, the relationship among dust properties, ozone removal rates, and carbonyls generation was identified. The results indicate a well-defined positive correlation between ozone removal efficiency and carbonyls generation on filters, as well as a positive correlation among the mass of organic carbon on filters, ozone removal efficiency and carbonyls generations.

Chi-Chi Lin; Hsuan-Yu Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Catalytic ozonation of azo dye active brilliant red X-3B in water with natural mineral brucite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural mineral brucite was used directly in catalytic ozonation of dye wastewater of active brilliant red X-3B. Compared with single ozonation, degradation of X-3B increased from 47% to 89%, and removal rate of COD increased from 9% to 32.5% in catalytic ozonation for 15min. The catalytic ozonation of X-3B followed a direct oxidization mechanism by ozone molecule, and this was actually a homogeneous catalysis of OH? due to dissolution of Mg(OH)2 from natural brucite. As a natural mineral catalyst, brucite has supplied an economical and feasible choice for catalytic ozonation of X-3B in industrial wastewater.

Yuming Dong; Kun He; Bo Zhao; Ying Yin; Lin Yin; Aimin Zhang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Storm-Scale Ensemble Kalman Filter Assimilation of Total Lightning Flash-Extent Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) demonstrates the potential benefit from ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) assimilation of total lightning flash mapping data. Synthetic lightning data were generated to mimic the Geostationary ...

Edward R. Mansell

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Category:NREL Map Files | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL Map Files NREL Map Files (Redirected from NREL Map Files) Jump to: navigation, search This category contains map files produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Pages in category "NREL Map Files" This category contains only the following page. N NREL Map Files Media in category "NREL Map Files" The following 200 files are in this category, out of 1,237 total. (previous 200) (next 200) Banglmetst 221.pdf Banglmetst 221.pdf 5.42 MB BrazilTMYst 238.pdf BrazilTMYst 238.pdf 12.31 MB Cammetst 58.pdf Cammetst 58.pdf 188 KB Central America 50m Wind Power.pdf Central America 50m Wi... 1.54 MB China Chifeng 50m Wind Power.pdf China Chifeng 50m Wind... 383 KB China Enshi 50m Wind Power.pdf China Enshi 50m Wind P... 451 KB China Fuzhou 50m Wind Power.pdf China Fuzhou 50m Wind ...

293

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

295

Meeting the New Ozone Standard: Challenges and Opportunities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation by Anna Garcia, executive director of the Ozone Transport Commission, was part of the July 2008 Webcast sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Clean Energy and Air Quality Integration Initiative that was titled Role of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in Improving Air Quality and Addressing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goals on High Electric Demand Days.

296

Generalized qudit Choi maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the linear programming prescription of Ref. \\cite{PRA72}, the $d\\otimes d$ Bell diagonal entanglement witnesses are provided. By using Jamiolkowski isomorphism, it is shown that the corresponding positive maps are the generalized qudit Choi maps. Also by manipulating particular $d\\otimes d$ Bell diagonal separable states and constructing corresponding bound entangled states, it is shown that thus obtained $d\\otimes d$ BDEW's (consequently qudit Choi maps) are non-decomposable in certain range of their parameters.

M. A. Jafarizadeh; M. Rezaeen; S. Ahadpour

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

Impact of Wildfires on Ozone Exceptional Events in the Western U.S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of Wildfires on Ozone Exceptional Events in the Western U.S. ... ? National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80307, United States ...

Daniel A. Jaffe; Nicole Wigder; Nicole Downey; Gabriele Pfister; Anne Boynard; Stephen B. Reid

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Establishing Policy Relevant Background (PRB) Ozone Concentrations in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, Colorado ... Processes that contribute to PRB ozone concentrations include photochemistry associated with natural emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and carbon monoxide (CO) from sources such as biogenic emissions (not including agricultural activities), wildfires, lightning, the long-range transport of ozone and its precursors from outside of North America, and stratospheric-tropospheric exchange (STE) of ozone. ... Models generally find little ozone production in wildfire plumes for short aging times (days) because NOx emissions are low and conversion to peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN) is rapid. ...

Elena C. McDonald-Buller; David T Allen; Nancy Brown; Daniel J. Jacob; Daniel Jaffe; Charles E. Kolb; Allen S. Lefohn; Samuel Oltmans; David D. Parrish; Greg Yarwood; Lin Zhang

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. Ozone removal by HVAC filters. Atmospheric Environmentozone reactions on HVAC filters cannot be ignored as aof pollutants from HVAC filters may be degradation of

Destaillats, Hugo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric ozone increases Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 78 Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 336 Time-Scale Analysis for Reactive Deposition of Ozone via Passive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorate ozone effects Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: students confuse the relationship between the ozone hole and the greenhouse effect, thus confusing... , and to suggest more effective teaching methods. 2....

302

Dot Density Maps Dot density maps, or dot maps, portray the geographic distribution of discrete phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dot Density Maps Dot density maps, or dot maps, portray the geographic distribution of discrete for representing geographic patterns. Dot density maps are particularly useful for understanding global distribution of the mapped phenomenon and comparing relative densities of different regions on the map. Dot

Klippel, Alexander

303

Maps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Energy.gov » News & Blog » Maps About Energy.gov » News & Blog » Maps Maps Map Title Topics - Any - Tax Credits, Rebates, Savings Energy Efficiency -Homes --Heating & Cooling ---Heating ---Cooling ---Heat Pumps --Water Heating ---Swimming Pool Heaters --Home Weatherization ---Home Energy Audits ---Insulation ---Sealing Your Home ---Ventilation --Saving Electricity ---Lighting ---Appliances & Electronics ---Buying & Making Electricity --Design & Remodeling ---Windows, Doors, & Skylights --Landscaping -Vehicles --Alternative Fuel Vehicles --Fuel Economy --Batteries --Biofuels --Clean Cities -Building Design --Construction --Commercial Weatherization --Commercial Heating & Cooling --Commercial Lighting --Solar Decathlon -Manufacturing Energy Sources -Renewables --Solar ---SunShot --Wind --Water

304

Maps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Energy.gov » News & Blog » Maps About Energy.gov » News & Blog » Maps Maps Map Title Topics - Any - Tax Credits, Rebates, Savings Energy Efficiency -Homes --Heating & Cooling ---Heating ---Cooling ---Heat Pumps --Water Heating ---Swimming Pool Heaters --Home Weatherization ---Home Energy Audits ---Insulation ---Sealing Your Home ---Ventilation --Saving Electricity ---Lighting ---Appliances & Electronics ---Buying & Making Electricity --Design & Remodeling ---Windows, Doors, & Skylights --Landscaping -Vehicles --Alternative Fuel Vehicles --Fuel Economy --Batteries --Biofuels --Clean Cities -Building Design --Construction --Commercial Weatherization --Commercial Heating & Cooling --Commercial Lighting --Solar Decathlon -Manufacturing Energy Sources -Renewables --Solar ---SunShot --Wind --Water

305

Maps of Svalbard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... NORGES SVALBARD og Ishavs-undersokelser, now known as Norsk Polarinstitutt, has begun the issue of a detailed map of Svalbard in folded sheets, ...

1948-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Evaluating the Vertical Distribution of Ozone and Its Relationship to Pollution Events in Air Quality Models Using Satellite Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most regional scale models that are used for air quality forecasts and ozone source attribution do not adequately capture the distribution of ozone in the mid- and upper troposphere, but it is unclear how this...

Jessica L. Neu; Gregory Osterman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Integrated Management Requirements mapping  

SciTech Connect

This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia`s approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Integrated Management Requirements mapping  

SciTech Connect

This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia's approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Enridged contour maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The visualization of scalar functions of two variables is a classic and ubiquitous application. We present a new method to visualize such data. The method is based on a non-linear mapping of the function to a height field, followed by visualization as ... Keywords: contours, flow visualization, height fields, mapping, multivariate visualization

Jarke J. van Wijk; Alexandru Telea

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Maps & Geographic Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geog 380 Maps & Geographic Information Geog 488/588 GIS 1: Introduction to GIS Geog 475/575 Digital 495/595 Maps, Models & GIS Geog 489/589 Building a GIS Data Base with GPS Geog 492/592 GIS 2: Advanced Compilation & Data Base Design Geog 490/590 GIS Programming Geog 410/510 Applied GIS: 3-D Visualization Geog

312

Introgression & mapping Fiber cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Germplasm Introgression Genomics & mapping Fiber cell initiation Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping and breeding. Research activities commonly include plant breeding, genetics, genomics, cytogenetics, molecular methods. (C, S) · Contribute uniquely to genomics and its relevance to genetic improvement (C,S) · Harness

313

Responses measured in the exhaled breath of human volunteers acutely exposed to ozone and diesel exhaust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exhaled breath collection is used to identify and monitor inflammatory or oxidative components in breath. Exhaled breath sample collection is noninvasive and would greatly benefit human pollutant exposure research. We demonstrate the efficacy of exhaled breath collection and analysis in two human exposure studies to ozone (O3) and diesel exhaust, respectively. O3 study: we collected exhaled breath (gas phase) from healthy human volunteers (age 1835 years, 12 subjects) immediately before and after exposure to filtered air or 0.4 ppm O3 for 2 h with and without intermittent exercise. Six subjects received antioxidant supplementation for 2 weeks before their O3 exposure, while the remaining six subjects received placebo treatments. We demonstrate increased amounts of non-polar carbonyls exhaled immediately post O3 exposure. The O3-induced increase in exhaled carbonyl concentrations was attenuated in the group receiving antioxidants. Our data demonstrate that exhaled exposure biomarkers can be measured in the breath gas phase in humans exposed to O3. Diesel study: we collected exhaled breath condensate (EBC; liquid phase) from healthy human volunteers (age 1840 years; 10 subjects) immediately before, immediately after and 20 h post filtered air or diesel exhaust (106 9 g m?3) exposure. Clean air and diesel exposures were separated by 3 weeks to 6 months. We obtained reproducible intra-subject EBC volumes and total protein concentrations across our six collection time points. Diesel exposure did not affect either EBC volume or total protein concentrations. Our data demonstrated EBC volume and total protein reproducibility over several months. Volume and total protein concentration may serve as normalizing factors for other EBC constituents.

K Sawyer; J M Samet; A J Ghio; J D Pleil; M C Madden

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

maps | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

maps maps Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): 50 m wind power density (W/m2) maps of Sri Lanka (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential within Sri Lanka, with supplemental information on political boundaries, transmission lines, roads, and terrain relief. Source NREL Date Released June 30th, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GEF GIS maps NREL Sri Lanka SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Maps (zip, 799.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

315

Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Facility Total Energy Facilities Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Total China Investment Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total China Investment Co Ltd Total China Investment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Total (China) Investment Co. Ltd. Place Beijing, China Zip 100004 Product Total has been present in China for about 30 years through its activities of Exploration & Production, Gas & Power, Refining & Marketing, and Chemicals. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

317

A Comparative Study of Ozone and Ultraviolet Light/Hydrogen Peroxide for Decolorizing Textile Dyeing Waste Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generates free radicals and oxygen as shown below. (2) Figure 2 Laboratory ozone contactor OJ + HOO. ---> HO. + 2 O 2 Color Measurements (3) A Bausch and Lomb color spectrophotometer was used in conjunction with The hydroxyl radicals react with dyes... constants depend on the conditions of the experiment. Conditions affecting rate of color removal with ozone include input rate for ozone, mass transfer efficiency of ozone in the contactor, and concentration of dye. 168 ESL-IE-94-04-39 Proceedings from...

Namboodri, C. G.; Perkins, W. S.; Walsh, W. K.

318

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Wind Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the MapSearch site. For information on how the 50m maps were developed, access the GIS Data Background page. For information on how some of the other wind maps were...

319

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Solar Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For more PV resource maps, access the MapSearch site. For Geographic Information System (GIS) solar resource data, access the Data Resources page. For interactive maps and tools...

320

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, in situ ambient absorption gas cell mea- surements for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, and ground-based zenith for ozone and nitrogen dioxide that are retrieved from measured spectra of the zenith sky

Dirksen, Ruud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ozone levels in passenger cabins of commercial aircraft on North American  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ozone levels in passenger cabins of commercial aircraft on North American Ozone levels in passenger cabins of commercial aircraft on North American and transoceanic routes Title Ozone levels in passenger cabins of commercial aircraft on North American and transoceanic routes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Bhangar, Seema, Shannon Cowlin, Brett C. Singer, Richard G. Sextro, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 42 Issue 11 Pagination 3938-43 Abstract Ozone levels in airplane cabins, and factors that influence them, were studied on northern hemisphere commercial passenger flights on domestic U.S., transatlantic, and transpacific routes. Real-time data from 76 flights were collected in 2006-2007 with a battery-powered UV photometric monitor. Sample mean ozone level, peak-hour ozone level, and flight-integrated ozone exposures were highly variable across domestic segments (N = 68), with ranges of 100 ppbv) ozone levels on domestic flights were associated with winter-spring storms that are linked to enhanced exchange between the lower stratosphere and the upper troposphere.

322

Surface ozone background in the United States: Canadian and Mexican pollution influences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of anthropogenic emissions from Canada, Mexico, and outside North America on daily maximum 8-hour average ozone Surface ozone Air quality standard Chemical transport model Global model a b s t r a c t We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) with 1 ? 1 horizontal resolution to quantify the effects

Park, Rokjin

323

Atmospheric Environment 33 (1999) 1821--1845 The relation between ozone, NO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ozone production efficiency, and removal rates of chemically active species. Use of these methods) chemical regimes. These regimes are associated with the chemistry of odd hydrogen radicals and appear production 1. Introduction The relation between ozone and its two main precur- sors, NO V ("NO

Sillman, Sanford

324

A Laboratory Method For Measuring The Ozone Emission From In-duct Air Cleaners.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Emission rate, HVAC air cleaners, electrostatic precipitators, coronas, standard test method 1 Introduction and to ozone byproducts. Currently there are standards and regulations that limit ozone emissions from portable cleaners (i.e., Viner et al., 1992), are generally exempt from standards and regulations because

Siegel, Jeffrey

325

Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change? Dennis L. Hartmann of Climate Change (IPCC) assess- ment of the status of global warming, which reported that winter stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse warming are possible. These interactions may be responsible

Limpasuvan, Varavut

326

Stratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In this paper we focus on South Eastern South America (SESA), a region that has exhibited one of the largest South America 1 Introduction The depletion of ozone in the polar Antarctic strato- sphere (i.e. `theStratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South

327

Experimental study of reactions between ozone and building products M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F. Maupetit*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ozone and building products and document their potential impact on indoor air quality. PreliminaryExperimental study of reactions between ozone and building products M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F experiments were conducted on four building products: two carpets, a gypsum board and a pine wood board

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

328

Validation of Ozone Monitoring Instrument nitrogen dioxide columns E. A. Celarier,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Validation of Ozone Monitoring Instrument nitrogen dioxide columns E. A. Celarier,1 E. J. Brinksma the standard nitrogen dioxide (NO2) data product (Version 1.0.), which is based on measurements made), Validation of Ozone Monitoring Instrument nitrogen dioxide columns, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D15S15, doi:10

329

Ground-level nitrogen dioxide concentrations inferred from the satellite-borne Ozone Monitoring Instrument  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground-level nitrogen dioxide concentrations inferred from the satellite-borne Ozone Monitoring; published 28 August 2008. [1] We present an approach to infer ground-level nitrogen dioxide (NO2), Ground-level nitrogen dioxide concentrations inferred from the satellite-borne Ozone Monitoring

Martin, Randall

330

Tropospheric ozone trends at Mauna Loa Observatory tied to decadal climate variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii reveal little change in tropospheric ozone levels during spring a suite of chemistry­climate model simulations. We show that the flow of ozone-rich air from Eurasia towards Hawaii during spring weakened in the 2000s as a result of La-Niña-like decadal cooling

331

Isolation and characterization of five ozone-inductible cDNA clones from Atriplax canescens (saltbush)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and water deficit were examined, and those cDNAs were sequenced. Clone 012-1, hybridized with three RNA species, is initially induced in response to both ozone and water deficit stress, but is repressed to prolonged ozone and sulfur dioxide exposure. Clone...

No, Eun-Gyu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

332

Measurements of springtime Antarctic ozone depletion and development of a balloon borne ultraviolet photometer  

SciTech Connect

The research described herein consists of two parts. The first part is a description of the design of a balloon borne ultraviolet photometer to measure ozone and the results of a flight using this instrument. The second part describes modifications made on the standard commercially available electrochemical ozonesonde and the results of some experiments performed both in the laboratory and during stratospheric balloon flights. Using this modified ECC system, 33 successful balloon flights were made at McMurdo Station, Antarctica during the austral spring of 1986 to study the temporal and vertical development of the so-called Antarctic Ozone Hole. Photometric measurements of ozone in the atmosphere can be accomplished by exploiting 253.65 nanometer absorption feature of ozone. Using a single light source and beam splitting optics, matched optical paths can be generated through two absorption cells. The ozonesonde data gave a very clear picture of the development of the Ozone Hole. The results can be summarized as follows: (1) Depletion occurs between about 12 and 20 km. (2) The most efficient region of ozone depletion decreases in altitude with time. Height profiles show subregions where ozone removal is highly efficient. (3) At 18 km, the ozone mixing ratio decays with a half-life of 25 days.

Harder, J.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Role of Material Porosity on Ozone Uptake for Metakaolin-Concrete Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a diminished environmental impact, clay may cause increased removal of ozone, an important indoor pollutant velocity, Heterogeneous Chemistry, Construction Materials 1 Introduction Metakaolin-cement systems hold ozone uptake. Cement is an essential component in the building industry used in formulating concrete

Siegel, Jeffrey

334

Effects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion of Silver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion The corrosion of Ag contaminated with NaCl particles in gaseous environments containing humidity and ozone analyzed using a coulometric reduction technique. The atmospheric corrosion of Ag was greatly accelerated

335

Tropospheric ozone climatology over Irene, South Africa, from 1990 to 1994 and 1998 to 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tropospheric ozone climatology over Irene, South Africa, from 1990 to 1994 and 1998 to 2002 R. D in South Africa are reported for the period 1990 to 1994 and a more recent period, 1998 to 2002, when), Tropospheric ozone climatology over Irene, South Africa, from 1990 to 1994 and 1998 to 2002, J. Geophys. Res

Thompson, Anne

336

Ensemble-based air quality forecasts: A multimodel approach applied to ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ensemble-based air quality forecasts: A multimodel approach applied to ozone Vivien Mallet1., and B. Sportisse (2006), Ensemble-based air quality forecasts: A multimodel approach applied to ozone, J, the uncertainty in chem- istry transport models is a major limitation of air quality forecasting. The source

Boyer, Edmond

337

Formation of Ozone and Growth of Aerosols in Young Smoke Plumes from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics and Chemistry Abstract The combustion of biomass is a major source of atmospheric trace gasesFormation of Ozone and Growth of Aerosols in Young Smoke Plumes from Biomass Burning by Matthew and Planetary Sciences #12;Formation of Ozone and Growth of Aerosols in Young Smoke Plumes from Biomass Burning

338

Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2 and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2006 Home Work Assignment No. 4, Ozone Chemistry Problems 11.8 and 11.9 (sub-part 1 and 2 only). Daniel Jacob, Atmospheric Chemistry #12;2 Problem 2: 2 2. Consider an air parcel ventilated

Weber, Rodney

339

Transatlantic transport of pollution and its effects on surface ozone in Europe and North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transatlantic transport of pollution and its effects on surface ozone in Europe and North America; published 3 July 2002. [1] We examine the transatlantic transport of anthropogenic ozone and its impact Head (Ireland) and Sable Island (Canada) are used to evaluate transatlantic transport in the model

Palmer, Paul

340

Atmospheric Environment 39 (2005) 13731382 A hierarchical Bayesian model to estimate and forecast ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reserved. Keywords: Statistical model; Space­time models; Air pollution; Ozone; Meteorology 1. Introduction describing the spatial­temporal behavior of ambient air pollutants such as ozone (O3) and particulate matter. Statistical space­time models are useful for illuminating relationships between different air pollutants

Irwin, Mark E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials Paper # 715 Donna A and unpainted drywall as passive ozone control surfaces in a room-sized laboratory chamber. Mean deposition-50%, resulted in increased reactivity for activated carbon. In our model for a typical house, about 35

Siegel, Jeffrey

342

Unit I-2 Linear Maps 1 Linear maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unit I-2 Linear Maps 1 Unit I-2 Linear maps Unit I-2 Linear Maps 2 Linear map · V & U are vector spaces over the same scalars · a function f: VU is a linear map if it preserves the vector space transformation [particularly when f: RnRm] ­ linear operator when f: V V [same v.s.] ­ linear mapping ­ linear

Birkett, Stephen

343

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Solar Maps Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Maps Development - How the Maps Were Made Solar Maps Development - How the Maps Were Made 10km The State University of New York/Albany satellite radiation model was developed by Richard Perez and collaborators at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and other universities for the U.S. Department of Energy. Specific information about this model can be found in Perez, et al. (2002). This model uses hourly radiance images from geostationary weather satellites, daily snow cover data, and monthly averages of atmospheric water vapor, trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the hourly total insolation (sun and sky) falling on a horizontal surface. Atmospheric water vapor, trace gases, and aerosols are derived from a variety of sources. The procedures for converting the collector at

344

Site Map - Pantex Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map Site Map Page Content Pantex.com Mission & Strategies Mission National Security Nuclear Explosive Operations Nuclear Material Operations HE Operations Strategies Advance HE Center of Excellence Exemplify a High Reliability Organization Health & Safety Safety Training Occupational Medicine Contractor Safety Environment Environmental Projects & Operations Regulatory Compliance Waste Operations Environmental Management System Environmental Document Library Public Meetings Doing Business With Pantex Procurement How We Buy Subcontracting Opportunities Supplier Information Profile Suspect/Counterfiet Items Business Definitions Documents and Forms Accounts Payable Work for Others Our Capabilities How to do Business with the Pantex eXMC Employee Information Benefits

345

Fractional Standard Map  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties of the phase space of the standard map with memory are investigated. This map was obtained from a kicked fractional differential equation. Depending on the value of the parameter of the map and the fractional order of the derivative in the original differential equation this nonlinear dynamical system demonstrates attractors (fixed points, stables periodic trajectories, slow converging and slow diverging trajectories, ballistic trajectories, and fractal-like structures) and/or chaotic trajectories. At least one type of fractal-like sticky attractors in the chaotic sea was observed.

Mark Edelman; Vasily E. Tarasov

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

Tropospheric and Lower Stratospheric Ozone Profiles From AERI-X Emission Spectra  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropospheric and Lower Stratospheric Ozone Profiles Tropospheric and Lower Stratospheric Ozone Profiles From AERI-X Emission Spectra P. F. Fogal and F. J. Murcray Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Denver Denver, Colorado Introduction The University of Denver Atmospheric Emission Radiometric Interferometer-Extended (AERI-X) has been in regular operation at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program site, conditions permitting, since the mid-1990s. We present here the analysis of several spectra from May 10, 1999, and demonstrate the ability to retrieve the tropospheric ozone profile at the ARM site. While the presence of ozone in the stratosphere is of vital importance for several reasons, in the troposphere, ozone is a pollutant and a powerful oxidizer. For these reasons, it is

347

Comparative evaluation of effects of ozonated and chlorinated thermal discharges on estuarine and freshwater organisms  

SciTech Connect

As a part of a program at PSE and G designed to examine the feasibility of ozonation as an alternative to chlorination for control of biofouling in once-through cooling systems, the biological effects of ozonated and chlorinated thermal discharges were evaluated with estuarine and freshwater organisms. Mortality at salinities between 0.5 to 2.5 ppt with mummichog and white perch indicated greater toxicity for chlorine while the alewife, spottail shiner, rainbow trout and white perch in freshwater were more sensitive to ozone. Behavioral and physograhic results were consistent with those observed in toxicity studies. Initial cough response and avoidance concentrations of mummicog and white perch in estuarine waters were lower when exposed to chlorine than to ozone. In freshwater, blueback herring, alewife, rainbow trout, spottail shiner, banded killifish, and white perch avoided lower concentrations of ozone than chlorine.

Guerra, C.R.; Sugam, R.; Meldrim, J.W.; Holmstrom, E.R.; Balog, G.E.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Dynamics of acyclic interval maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vol. 6 (2009) Dynamics of acyclic interval maps [16] D.orbits and bifurcation of maps of the interval. SIAM J.Dynamics of acyclic interval maps Morris W. Hirsch He who

Hirsch, Morris W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Maps of Selected State Subdivisions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map 8: Eastern Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 1: Alaska AK 50 - North Onshore and Offshore AK 10 - South Onshore AK 05 - South State Offshore AK 00 - South Federal Offshore Map...

350

Web Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help » Web Site Map Help » Web Site Map Web Site Map The links listed below include all pages on the site except document topic pages. Home Privacy/Security Help Web Site Map Mailing Services Remove me from the List Contact Us About Us News and Events News Archives News/Media FAQs Internet Resources Documents DUF6 EIS Historical Context What is an EIS? Why EIS is Needed Who is Responsible? EIS Process EIS Topics EIS Alternatives EIS Schedule Public Involvement Opportunities Public Comment Form For More Info DUF6 Management and Uses Management Responsibilities DUF6 Storage How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored Cylinder Leakage DUF6 Storage Safety DUF6 PEIS Cylinder Surveillance and Maintenance Conversion Potential DU Uses "Business Case" for R&D on Beneficial Uses of DU Catalysts for Destruction of Air Pollutants

351

Surveying & Mapping Surveying  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in many states. Tuition Discount Residents from New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts services involve locating boundaries, land development, and mapping. Most careers. Employers Graduates work for both private firms and public agencies. The Bureau

Thomas, Andrew

352

ARM - Instrument - maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsmaps Documentation MAPS : XDC documentation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at...

353

RMOTC - Contact Us - Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maps M ap - RMOTCs testing facility is located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming RMOTC's test site, NPR-3, is located about 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming. For driving...

354

Dating the Vinland Map  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory, the University of Arizona, and the Smithsonian Institution used carbon-dating technology to determine the age of a controversial parchment that might be the first-ever map of North America.

None

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

SRNL Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE DOE-EM DOE-SR NNSA SRS SRNS Site Map Disclaimer Legal Information SRNL * Aiken * SC * 29808-0001 * SRNL Operator: 803-725-6211 SRNL is the DOE Office of Environmental...

356

Logistic Map Potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop and illustrate methods to compute all single particle potentials that underlie the logistic map, x --> sx(1-x) for 02. We illustrate the methods numerically for the cases s=5/2 and s=10/3.

Thomas Curtright; Andrzej Veitia

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

357

NREL: MapSearch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to easily search our collection of maps created by the Geographic Information System (GIS) team. Please use the search box and the filters on the left of the screen to limit...

358

Wind Career Map  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

This wind career map explores an expanding universe of wind energy occupations, describing diverse jobs across the industry, charting possible progression between them, and identifying the high-quality training necessary to do them well.

359

Directions and Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Directions & Maps Directions & Maps Plan Your Visit Visit About the Museum Museum Hours Directions & Maps When to Visit Arrange for a Visit Around Los Alamos Contact Us invisible utility element Directions and Maps Aerial View of Los Alamos Aerial approach to the Los Alamos airport Where we're located Los Alamos (elevation 7,355 feet) is perched high atop the Pajarito Plateau in the Jemez Mountains, 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe. The Bradbury Science Museum is located in downtown Los Alamos at the corner of Central Avenue and 15th Street. If you're driving here and using GPS navigation, our address is 1350 Central Avenue, Los Alamos, NM 87544. How to get here From Albuquerque take I-25 north to Santa Fe (take NM 599 for most direct route), then US 84/285 north to Pojoaque. At Pojoaque take the NM 502 exit

360

Wind Career Map: Resource List  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following resources were used in the development of the Wind Career Map, associated job profile information, or are potential resources for interested Wind Career Map viewers.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Category:Map PDF Files | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PDF Files PDF Files Jump to: navigation, search This category contains map files that originated in PDF format. Media in category "Map PDF Files" The following 200 files are in this category, out of 277 total. (previous 200) (next 200) Black.Warrior.Basin usgs.map.pdf Black.Warrior.Basin us... 148 KB BOEMRE atlantic.OCS.multiple.use.map.2003.pdf BOEMRE atlantic.OCS.mu... 3.06 MB BOEMRE lease.platforms.santa.barb.map.5.2010.pdf BOEMRE lease.platforms... 1.41 MB BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.200... 1.39 MB BOEMRE oil.gas.plant.platform.sta.brbra.map.4.2010.pdf BOEMRE oil.gas.plant.p... 234 KB BOEMRE platforms.leases.longbeach.map.5.2010.pdf BOEMRE platforms.lease... 57 KB BOEMRE US.CSB.bathy.map.pdf BOEMRE US.CSB.bathy.ma... 824 KB BOEMRE US.CSB.Map.pdf

362

Category:Map Image Files | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Image Files Image Files Jump to: navigation, search This category contains map files that originated in an image format (such as gif or jpeg). Media in category "Map Image Files" The following 200 files are in this category, out of 1,687 total. (previous 200) (next 200) Australia-Solar-Map.png Australia-Solar-Map.png 55 KB Banglmetst 221.pdf Banglmetst 221.pdf 5.42 MB Black.Warrior.Basin usgs.map.pdf Black.Warrior.Basin us... 148 KB BOEMRE atlantic.OCS.multiple.use.map.2003.pdf BOEMRE atlantic.OCS.mu... 3.06 MB BOEMRE lease.platforms.santa.barb.map.5.2010.pdf BOEMRE lease.platforms... 1.41 MB BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.200... 1.39 MB BOEMRE oil.gas.plant.platform.sta.brbra.map.4.2010.pdf BOEMRE oil.gas.plant.p... 234 KB BOEMRE platforms.leases.longbeach.map.5.2010.pdf

363

Fatty Acid Carcass Mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FATTY ACID CARCASS MAPPING A Thesis by STACEY NICOLE TURK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2008... Major Subject: Animal Science FATTY ACID CARCASS MAPPING A Thesis by STACEY NICOLE TURK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

Turk, Stacey N.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

Wind Resource Maps (Postcard)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the wind resource potential that would be possible from development of the available windy land areas after excluding areas unlikely to be developed. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to Wind Powering America's online wind energy resource maps.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Ronald Coifman (Yale University) Roy Lederman (Yale University) #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data How to compare images across sensors? Figure: Sokolov Mine

Hirn, Matthew

366

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department of Mathematics Yale University July 26, 2012 Bell Labs #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Joint work with Ronald Coifman and Roy Lederman. #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Overview 1 High

Hirn, Matthew

367

THE SCALE PROBLEM FOR OLD MAPS (and mental maps)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE SCALE PROBLEM FOR OLD MAPS (and mental maps) Waldo Tobler From the theory of cartography we know that the instantaneous scale at a point on any map is always represented by the equation: dS2 /ds2 = g cos2 + 2g cos sin + g sin2 . This shows that the scale on a map is generally different in all

Tobler, Waldo

368

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department of Mathematics Yale University November 29, 2012 Kansas State University Colloquium #12;Diffusion Maps;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data How to compare images across sensors? Figure: Sokolov Mine in 2009 and 2010

Hirn, Matthew

369

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department in Honor of the 70th Birthday of David R. Larson #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Joint work with Ronald Coifman and Roy Lederman. #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data High Dimensional Data

Hirn, Matthew

370

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn September 3, 2013 #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Simon Adar, Tel Aviv University Eyal Ben Dor, Tel, Clarkson University Yoel Shkolnisky, Tel Aviv University #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Heat equation

Hirn, Matthew

371

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

372

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

373

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

374

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

375

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

376

AutoGC systems for enhanced ozone monitoring network  

SciTech Connect

In response to a requirement for an on-line, automated ozone-precursor analyzer, a Perkin-Elmer Model ATD-400 Thermal Desorption System was specially adapted for the collection of whole-air samples. The C{sub 2} to n-C{sub 10} hydrocarbons were trapped using Peltier cooling on adsorbents at {minus}30 C. Multidimensional chromatography allowed the C{sub 2} to C{sub 6} fraction to be separated using a porous layer open tubular column while a methyl silicone column separated the C{sub 6} to C{sub 10} fraction. No cryogen was used in the collection or analysis. An air generator equipped for automatic restart and special software allowed the system to recover from power failures. Ozone precursor concentrations were detected over 5000 hours of continuous operation at the 0.1 ppbV level. Area repeatability was less than 10%, with retention time precision over 100 hours of approximately 1%RSD for most compounds. Remote communications allowed chromatography to be monitored and files to be downloaded to a central office. Results were converted to EPA AIRS database format using special conversion software. Data were archived using external Bernoulli disks.

Seeley, I. [Perkin-Elmer Corp., Norwalk, CT (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

INFLUENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE AND CARBON DIOXIDE ON INSECT DENSITIES.  

SciTech Connect

The combustion of fossil fuels is profoundly altering the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Beginning with the Industrial Revolution, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has increased from approximately 280 to 370 {micro}l l{sup -1} in 2004, and it is expected to exceed 550 {micro}l l{sup -1} by 2050. Tropospheric ozone has risen even more rapidly than CO{sub 2} and average summer concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere are expected to continue to increase by 0.5-2.5% per year over the next 30 years. Although elevated CO{sub 2} stimulates photosynthesis and productivity of terrestrial ecosystems, ozone (O{sub 3}) is deleterious. In addition to directly affecting the physiology and productivity of crops, increased concentrations of tropospheric CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} are predicted to lower the nutritional quality of leaves, which has the potential to increase herbivory as insects eat more to meet their nutritional demands. We tested the hypothesis that changes in tropospheric chemistry affect the relationship between plants and insect herbivores by changing leaf quality. The susceptibility to herbivory of soybean grown in elevated CO{sub 2} or O{sub 3} was examined using free air gas concentration enrichment (SoyFACE). FACE technology has the advantage that plants are cultivated under realistic field conditions with no unwanted alteration of microclimate or artificial constraints on the insect community.

DELUCIA, E.; DERMODY, O.; O'NEILL, B.; ALDEA, M.; HAMILTON, J.; ZANGERL, A.; ROGER, A.; BERENBAUM, M.

2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

Evaluating ozone dose for AOC removal in two-step GAC filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Upgrading an existing post-ozonation plant with two-step granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration for assimilable organic carbon (AOC) removal was studied. The effects of ozone dose on AOC formation and its removal in the subsequent two-step GAC filtration was studied using chemically pretreated 2 to 14 C humic lake water. Two parallel pilot-plant trains with different ozone doses (0 to 1.2 mgO3/mgTOC) and a shortterm ozonation study were performed. The optimum ozone dose for maximum AOC formation was 0.40.5 mgO3/mgTOC. The AOC-P17 of ozonated water was three-fold higher and AOC-NOX over ten-fold higher than in non-ozonated water, while the following biofiltration (first step) removed 51 % and 72 % of AOC-P17 and AOC-NOX, respectively. The adsorber (second step) contributed to less than 10% of the overall AOC reduction. It appeared that biofiltration is a feasible method in upgrading water treatment plants for AOC removal even when treating cold humic waters, while the subsequent adsorber seems to have less significance for AOC removal.

R. Vahala; T. Ala-Peijari; J. Rintala; R. Laukkanen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Effect of ozonation on fungal resistance of bamboo and oak flooring materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignocellulosic materials are gaining increased interest as renewable sources of building materials. However, chemical and microbiological degradation can occur when lignocellulosic materials are exposed to environmental stressors such as ozone and elevated humidity. In this study, the effects of ozone treatment and solvent extraction on fungal growth rates of bamboo and oak flooring materials were investigated. One set of samples was extracted with a mixture of cyclohexane and ethanol solvents for 72h to remove extractable compounds. Another set of materials was exposed continuously to ozone (2000?Lm?3 or 2000ppbv) for one to five weeks. Solvent-extracted and ozone-treated samples were incubated in closed chambers at 85% or 55% RH and 30C. Incubated samples were removed at regular time intervals for fungal growth evaluation. Ozone treatment caused chemical changes in bamboo and oak, which appeared to reduce bamboo's resistance to fungal attack. Longer ozone exposure led to higher susceptibility to fungal growth. Untreated and ozone-treated oak showed no evidence of fungal growth, suggesting that this material may contain fungi-inhibitory compounds that are not removed by these treatments. Also, a delay in fungal growth on cyclohexane/ethanol-extracted bamboo was observed, probably due to the extraction process removing substances that enhanced fungal growth.

Chi Hoang; Tinh Nguyen; Deborah Stanley; Andrew Persily; Richard L. Corsi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Career Map: Assembler and Fabricator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Assembler and Fabricator positions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Career Map: Analyst/Researcher  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Analyst/Researcher positions.

382

Career Map: Land Acquisition Specialist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Land Acquisition Specialist positions.

383

Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect

The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10?wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300?C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O{sub 3} attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides.

Lushington, Andrew; Liu, Jian; Tang, Yongji; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang, E-mail: xsun@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Effect of ozone and granular activated coal (GAC) on the bioactivity of drinking water  

SciTech Connect

In this research, the appearance of easily biodegradable organic material in ozonation and granular activated coal (GAC) filtration was studied. The amount of bioactivity was measured by conventional AOC analyses used in two different modes and also using quite a new growth potential (GP) method. GAC filtration without ozone doubled the amount of AOC of the chemically treated surface water, whereas by ozonation with GAC filtration it was possible to halve the amount of the AOC. The measurement of GP was noticeably simpler than measuring AOC, but for wider use more parallel studies are needed for the comparability of the results of the analysis.

Sallanko, J.; Iivari, P.; Heiska, E. [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland). Water Resources and Environmental Engineering Laboratory

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

SRNL - Directions and Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map of SRS, with Georgia and South Carolina Map of SRS, with Georgia and South Carolina Directions and Maps The Savannah River National Laboratory is located at the Savannah River Site , a 310 square mile site located in the southeastern coastal area of the United States in the state of South Carolina. It is bordered to the west by the Savannah River and Georgia, and is close to several major cities, including Augusta and Savannah (Ga.), Columbia, Greenville, and Charleston (S.C.). It is in an area residents refer to as the Central Savannah River Area, or CSRA. The Aiken County Technology Laboratory (which houses SRNL's biotechnology laboratories and certain waste treatment technology laboratories) and the Center for Hydrogen Research are located at Aiken County's Savannah River Research Campus, located adjacent to SRS.

386

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

387

Manhattan Project: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SITE MAP SITE MAP Resources > Site Map THE MANHATTAN PROJECT Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 1939-1942: Early Government Support Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 1942: Difficult Choices More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 1942-1944: The Uranium Path to the Bomb Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943

388

mapping | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mapping mapping Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Latitude Tilt Irradiance NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Jan 2008)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005) Parameter: Latitude Tilt Radiation (kWh/m^2/day) Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/ Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections online Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords GIS global irradiance latitude mapping NASA renewable energy solar solar PV SWERA TILT UNEP Data text/csv icon Latitude Tilt Radiation (kWh/m^2/day) (csv, 11.8 MiB) application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 5 MiB)

389

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

390

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

391

On the moduli space of generalized holomorphic maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the anomalies of the topological A and B models with target space geometry of Hitchin's generalized type. The dimension of the moduli space of generalized holomorphic maps is also computed, which turns out to be equal to the total anomaly if the moduli space is unobstructed. We obtain this result by identifying the infinitesimal deformations of such maps and by using the Grothendieck-Riemann-Roch formula.

Stefano Chiantese

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share Maps NREL's GIS team develops maps for various renewable resources and for specific projects. As a benefit to the public, a majority of static maps are offered and Google Map (KML/KMZ) files on a tool called MapSearch. Biomass Maps Maps showing the biomass resources available in the United States by county. Feedstock categories include crop residues; forest residues; primary and secondary mill residues; urban wood waste; and methane emissions from manure management, landfills, and domestic wastewater treatment. Federal Energy Management Program The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) teamed with Geospatial Analysis staff at NREL to update the analysis for this project and created an interactive FEMP Screening Map application. The previous maps have been

393

Maps and inverse maps in open quantum dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Two kinds of maps that describe evolution of states of a subsystem coming from dynamics described by a unitary operator for a larger system, maps defined for fixed mean values and maps defined for fixed correlations, are found to be quite different for the same unitary dynamics in the same situation in the larger system. An affine form is used for both kinds of maps to find necessary and sufficient conditions for inverse maps. All the different maps with the same homogeneous part in their affine forms have inverses if and only if the homogeneous part does. Some of these maps are completely positive; others are not, but the homogeneous part is always completely positive. The conditions for an inverse are the same for maps that are not completely positive as for maps that are. For maps defined for fixed mean values, the homogeneous part depends only on the unitary operator for the dynamics of the larger system, not on any state or mean values or correlations. Necessary and sufficient conditions for an inverse are stated several different ways: in terms of the maps of matrices, basis matrices, density matrices, or mean values. The inverse maps are generally not tied to the dynamics the way the maps forward are. A trace-preserving completely positive map that is unital cannot have an inverse that is obtained from any dynamics described by any unitary operator for any states of a larger system.

Jordan, Thomas F., E-mail: tjordan@d.umn.ed [Physics Department, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN 55812 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Maps and inverse maps in open quantum dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two kinds of maps that describe evolution of states of a subsystem coming from dynamics described by a unitary operator for a larger system, maps defined for fixed mean values and maps defined for fixed correlations, are found to be quite different for the same unitary dynamics in the same situation in the larger system. An affine form is used for both kinds of maps to find necessary and sufficient conditions for inverse maps. All the different maps with the same homogeneous part in their affine forms have inverses if and only if the homogeneous part does. Some of these maps are completely positive; others are not, but the homogeneous part is always completely positive. The conditions for an inverse are the same for maps that are not completely positive as for maps that are. For maps defined for fixed mean values, the homogeneous part depends only on the unitary operator for the dynamics of the larger system, not on any state or mean values or correlations. Necessary and sufficient conditions for an inverse are stated several different ways: in terms of the maps of matrices, basis matrices, density matrices, or mean values. The inverse maps are generally not tied to the dynamics the way the maps forward are. A trace-preserving completely positive map that is unital can not have an inverse that is obtained from any dynamics described by any unitary operator for any states of a larger system.

Thomas F. Jordan

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

395

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

396

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

398

OZONE TREATMENT OF SOLUBLE ORGANICS IN PRODUCED WATER (FEAC307)  

SciTech Connect

Oil production is shifting from ''shallow'' wells (0-650 ft water depth) to off-shore, deep-water operations (>2,600 ft.). Production from these operations is now approaching 20%. By 2007, it is projected that as much as 70% of the U.S. oil production will be from deep-water operations. The crude oil from these deep wells is more polar, thus increasing the amount of dissolved hydrocarbons in the produced water. Early data from Gulf of Mexico (GOM) wells indicate that the problem with soluble organics will increase significantly as deep-water production increases. Existing physical/chemical treatment technologies used to remove dispersed oil from produced water will not remove dissolved organics. GOM operations are rapidly moving toward design of high-capacity platforms that will require compact, low-cost, efficient treatment processes to comply with current and future water quality regulations. This project is an extension of previous research to improve the applicability of ozonation and will help address the petroleum industry-wide problem of treating water containing soluble organics. The goal of this project is to maximize oxidation of water-soluble organics during a single-pass operation. The project investigates: (1) oxidant production by electrochemical and sonochemical methods, (2) increasing the mass transfer rate in the reactor by forming microbubbles during ozone injection into the produced water, and (3) using ultraviolet irradiation to enhance the reaction if needed. Industrial collaborators include Chevron, Shell, Phillips, BP Amoco, Statoil, and Marathon Oil through a joint project with the Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF). The research and demonstration program consists of three phases: (1) Laboratory testing in batch reactors to compare effectiveness of organics destruction using corona discharge ozone generation methods with hydrogen peroxide generated sonochemically and to evaluate the enhancement of destruction by UV light and micro-bubble spraying. (2) Continuous-flow studies to determine the efficacy of various contactors, the dependency of organics destruction on process variables, and scale-up issues. (3) Field testing of a prototype system in close collaboration with an industrial partner to generate performance data suitable for scale-up and economic evaluation.

Klasson, KT

2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

399

MAPS Annual General Meeting Minutes (April 7, 2009) Page 1 of 3 McMaster Association of Part-Time Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAPS Annual General Meeting ­ Minutes (April 7, 2009) Page 1 of 3 McMaster Association of Part highlighted the Board of Director's Report, namely the MAPS 30th Anniversary Bursary Endowment. #12;MAPS of Directors of not fewer than 10, and not more than 16, members. A total of 11 full members of MAPS had been

Hitchcock, Adam P.

400

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Field Mapping | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping Field Mapping Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Mapping Details Activities (59) Areas (35) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Collection and Mapping Parent Exploration Technique: Data Collection and Mapping Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map surface geology and hydrothermal alteration. Stratigraphic/Structural: Map fault and fracture patterns, kinematic information. Hydrological: Map surface manifestations of geothermal systems. Thermal: Map surface temperature. Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 400.0040,000 centUSD 0.4 kUSD 4.0e-4 MUSD 4.0e-7 TUSD / hour Median Estimate (USD): 600.0060,000 centUSD

402

Genetic algorithm eclipse mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we analyse capabilities of eclipse mapping technique, based on genetic algorithm optimization. To model of accretion disk we used the "fire-flies" conception. This model allows us to reconstruct the distribution of radiating medium in the disk using less number of free parameters than in other methods. Test models show that we can achieve good approximation without optimizing techniques.

Halevin, A V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

PARKING MAP Sales Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PARKING MAP BayDr. Main Entrance Parking Sales Office Main Entrance Kiosk East Remote Lot, B, C111, MC, N, NC, , Medical M 2hr 112 Core West Structure A, B, EV, MC, N, NC, , Medical P 2hr 113

Wilmers, Chris

404

Historical Maps Online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geospatial data to see change over time. The online map collection can be accessed over the Internet from search engines, library catalogs, GIS databases and many other entry points. Rumsey continues to add new content to the online collection and develops...

Rumsey, David Y.

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Climatology and Trends in the Forcing of the Stratospheric Ozone Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thorough analysis of the ozone transport was carried out using the Transformed-Mean Eulerian (TEM) tracer transport equation and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re- Analysis (ERA-40). In ...

Monier, Erwan

407

The impact of traffic emissions on atmospheric ozone and OH: results from QUANTIFY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the boundary layer. The effect of ship emissions does notfor road. Globally the effect of ship emissions on ozone insouthern hemisphere the effect of ship emissions is among

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Three-dimensional simulations of wintertime ozone variability in the lower stratosphere  

SciTech Connect

The evolution of ozone has been calculated for the winters of 1979 and 1989 using winds derived from the authors stratospheric data assimilation system (STRATAN). The ozone fields calculated using this technique are found to compare well with satellite-measured fields for simulations of 2-3 months. Here the authors present comparisons of model fields with both satellite and sonde measurements to verify that stratospheric transport processes are properly represented by this modeling technique. Attention is focussed on the northern hemisphere middle and high latitudes at the 10-hPa level and below, where transport processes are most important to the ozone distribution. First-order quantities and derived budgets from both the model and satellite data are presented. By sampling the model with a limb-viewing satellite and then Kalman filtering the observations of the model, it is shown that transient subplanetary-scale features that are essential to the ozone budget are missed by the satellite system.

Rood, R.B.; Douglass, A.R.; Kaye, J.A. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA)); Geller, M.A.; Yuechen, Chi (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA)); Allen, D.J.; Larson, E.M.; Nash, E.R.; Nielsen, J.E. (Applied Research Corp., Landover, MD (USA))

1991-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ultraviolet-ozone-treated PEDOT:PSS as anode buffer layer for organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultraviolet-ozone-treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)was used as the anode buffer layer in copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene-based solar cells. The power conversion e...

Zisheng Su; Lidan Wang; Yantao Li; Haifeng Zhao; Bei Chu

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Reductions in ozone concentrations due to controls on variability in industrial flare emissions in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High concentrations of ozone in the Houston/Galveston area are associated with industrial plumes of highly reactive hydrocarbons, mixed with NOx. The emissions leading to these plumes can have significant temporal variability, ...

Nam, Junsang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An Approach to the Detection of Long-Term Trends in Upper Stratospheric Ozone from Space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A central problem in the detection of long-term trends in upper stratospheric ozone from orbiting remote sensors involves the separation of instrument drifts from true geophysical changes. Periodic flights of a Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet ...

John E. Frederick; Xufeng Niu; Ernest Hilsenrath

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Ozonation of Mutagenic and Carcinogenic Polyaromatic Amines and Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons in Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, University of Notre Dame...Present address: Department of Microbiology, Harvard School of Public...titration method of Saltzman and Gilbert (25). The effective ozone...Saitzman, B. E., and Gilbert, N. lodometric microdetermination...

Gary R. Burleson; Michael J. Caulfield; and Morris Pollard

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Evaluation of a novel ozone generation technique for disinfection of poultry hatchers and processed broiler carcasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When comparing electrochemically generated ozone(03)(2.94.2 wt % inside the (hatcher) and formaldehyde (16 n-A formalin + 7.5 g potassium pertnanganate) for disinfection of Salmonella enteiltidis (SE) contaminated agar plates and typical hatchery...

Ramirez, Gerardo Arturo

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Real-World Studies of Ambient Ozone Formation as a Function of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

-- Washington D.C. ace29lawson.pdf More Documents & Publications Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. Health Impacts Program DOE's...

415

Verification of the WRF model during a high ozone event over Houston, TX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High ozone values were observed in Houston, TX during August 25 - September 1, 2000. A comparison of WRF data with observations and MM5 data was conducted to determine the WRF model's performance in simulating the meteorological conditions...

Ames, Douglas Seeley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

416

Ozone production by nanoporous dielectric barrier glow discharge in atmospheric pressure air  

SciTech Connect

This study is aimed at demonstrating plasma-chemical ozone production based on low temperature atmospheric pressure glow discharge through nanoporous dielectric barriers. The 20 kHz ac driven discharge is formed in air or oxygen gas flowing in the axial direction of the cylindrical plasma reactor containing four parallel aluminum rods covered with nanoporous alumina films. The discharge utilizing nanoporous dielectric barrier is more uniform and more energy efficient in ozone generation than the discharge through smooth-surface dielectric barriers.

Cho, J. H.; Koo, I. G.; Choi, M. Y.; Lee, W. M. [Department of Chemistry and Division of Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

417

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Abstract Research into the practicality of digital mapping by Placer Dome Exploration identified hardware and software solutions to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of field work. The goal of the research was to find a lightweight hardware-software system that allows the user to build a digital map from field observations in much the same way as pen and paper methods. The focus of the research was to minimize the size and weight of computer systems. Systems identified consist of a wearable PC or handheld

418

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Interplay of air pollution and asthma immunopathogenesis: A focused review of diesel exhaust and ozone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Controlled human exposure experiments with diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) and ozone serve to illustrate the important role pollutants play in modulating both allergic mechanisms and immune responses to affect the immunopathogenesis of airway diseases such as asthma. For DEP, evidence is stronger for the exacerbation of existing asthma rather than for the development of new disease. To the extent that this enhancement occurs, the augmentation of Th2-type immunity seems to be a common element. For ozone, neutrophilic inflammation, altered immune cell phenotype and function and oxidative stress are all marked responses that likely contribute to underlying immune-inflammatory features of asthma. Evidence is also emerging that unique gene signatures and epigenetic control of immune and inflammatory-based genes are playing important roles in the magnitude of the impact ozone is having on respiratory health. Indeed, the interplay between air pollutants such as DEP and ozone and asthma immunopathogenesis is an ongoing concern in terms of understanding how exposure to these agents can lead to worsening of disease. To this end, asthmatics may be pre-disposed to the deleterious effects of pollutants like ozone, having constitutively modified host defense functions and gene signatures. Although this review has utilized DEP and ozone as example pollutants, more research is needed to better understand the interplay between air pollution in general and asthma immumopathogenesis.

Neil E. Alexis; Chris Carlsten

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Ozone response of foliage and cells of sensitive and tolerant potato cultivars  

SciTech Connect

The ozone response was contrasted between Cherokee' and Norchip', relatively ozone-sensitive and -tolerant potato cultivars, respectively. Leaf conductance of the two cultivars was determined with a diffusive resistance porometer before, during and after a 3-hour exposure to 0.25 ppm ozone (490 ..mu..g m3). While Cherokee foliage had a higher leaf conductance at the onset of the ozone exposure, conductance of Norchip foliage was too high throughout the experiment to account for relative tolerance of the latter cultivar. Norchip and Cherokee both exhibited abaxial and bifacial necrosis with more numerous lesions on the abaxial surface. Abaxial and bifacial necrosis were characterized by injured spongy, and spongy plus palisade cells, respectively. The percent of injured cell types were the same in both cultivars, but the absolute number of cells injured was greater in Cherokee than Norchip. Two types of cell injury were observed in necrotic lesions. One type of injury was characterized by collapsed, basophilic cells and the other by intact, basophilic cells. The ozone response of isolated leaf protoplasts of the two cultivars was similar. Two types of protoplast injury were observed, one characterized by lysis and the other by reduced staining with fluorescein diacetate. Maximum protoplast response to ozone was observed within the first 5 minutes of a 15 minute exposure. Little additional protoplast response occurred after 10 minutes.

Illman, B.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Maps for general open quantum systems and a theory of linear quantum error correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that quantum subdynamics of an open quantum system can always be described by a Hermitian map, irrespective of the form of the initial total system state. Since the theory of quantum error correction was developed based on the assumption of completely positive (CP) maps, we present a generalized theory of linear quantum error correction, which applies to any linear map describing the open system evolution. In the physically relevant setting of Hermitian maps, we show that the CP-map based version of quantum error correction theory applies without modifications. However, we show that a more general scenario is also possible, where the recovery map is Hermitian but not CP. Since non-CP maps have non-positive matrices in their range, we provide a geometric characterization of the positivity domain of general linear maps. In particular, we show that this domain is convex, and that this implies a simple algorithm for finding its boundary.

A. Shabani; D. A. Lidar

2009-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

422

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

423

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

424

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

425

NDB Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site map NDB Home Search Structures Search DNA Search RNA Advanced Search Nucleic acid tools RNA 3D motif atlas Non-redundant lists RNA base triples atlas WebFR3D R3D Align Contact NDB Mailing Address About NDB NDB Members Goal References Publications Site map Tools Software Standards Standard Reference Supplementary Information Ideal Geometries X-PLOR Parameters Valence Geometries RNA Ontology Consortium mmCIF Resources PDBML Resources Education Introduction to Nucleic Acids: DNA Definition of terms RNA Base Pair Families RNA Base-Phosphate Families Base Stacking Interactions Non Redundant list Equivalence classes RNA 3D Motifs Relative Frequency Introduction to Nucleic Acids: RNA Nucleic Acid Highlight (PDB): DNA DNA Polymerase Nucleosome Transfer RNA RNA Polymerase Self-splicing RNA

426

Technology Transfer: Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map About Us About Technology Transfer Contact Us Available Technologies Advanced Materials Biofuels Biotechnology and Medicine Developing World Energy Environmental Technologies Imaging and Lasers Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Nanotechnology and Microtechnology Software and Information Technology For Industry Licensing Overview Frequently Asked Questions Partnering with Berkeley Lab Licensing Interest Form Receive New Tech Alerts For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Forms Record of Invention (Word doc -- please do not use earlier PDF version of the form) Software Disclosure and Abstract (PDF, use Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader 9 and up ONLY to complete the form) Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Empolyment Export Control FAQs for Researchers

427

Husimi Maps in Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method for bridging the gap between the Dirac effective field theory and atomistic simulations in graphene based on the Husimi projection, allowing us to depict phenomena in graphene at arbitrary scales. This technique takes the atomistic wavefunction as an input, and produces semiclassical pictures of quasiparticles in the two Dirac valleys. We use the Husimi tech- nique to produce maps of the scattering behavior of boundaries, giving insight into the properties of wavefunctions at energies both close to and far from the Dirac point. Boundary conditions play a significant role to the rise of Fano resonances, which we examine using the Husimi map to deepen our understanding of bond currents near resonance.

Douglas J. Mason; Mario F. Borunda; Eric J. Heller

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

428

Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.007_V2012 world map Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals Year Annex B Countries Non Annex B Countries Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) 1990 3894 90 2111 46 1991 3801 94 2299 38 1992 3750 109 2263 44 1993 3685 107 2339 48 1994 3656 107 2469 54 1995 3681 110 2570 59 1996 3704 111 2657 72 1997 3727 114 2737 74 1998 3746 118 2698 82 1999 3678 124 2718 90 2000 3725 130 2821 90 2001 3781 120 2936 92 2002 3764 128 3013 94 2003 3853 123 3347 98 2004 3888 135 3683 107 2005 3933 142 3926 106

429

Spectral conditions for positive maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a partial classification of positive linear maps in matrix algebras which is based on a family of spectral conditions. This construction generalizes celebrated Choi example of a map which is positive but not completely positive. It is shown how the spectral conditions enable one to construct linear maps on tensor products of matrix algebras which are positive but only on a convex subset of separable elements. Such maps provide basic tools to study quantum entanglement in multipartite systems.

Dariusz Chruscinski; Andrzej Kossakowski

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

430

Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential Michael Schaetzel Undergraduate ? Environmental Studies ? University of Kansas L O C A T S I O N BIOMASS ENERGY POTENTIAL o According to DOE, Biomass has the potential to provide 14% of... the nations power o Currently 1% of national power supply o Carbon neutral? combustion of biomass is part of the natural carbon cycle o Improved crop residue management has potential to benefit environment, producers, and economy Biomass Btu...

Schaetzel, Michael

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

432

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Feminism, Maps and GIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Until recently, there was not much connection between feminism and cartography or GIS (geographic information science and/or system) but today they are increasingly intertwined. The meaning and purpose of mapping have significantly changed in recent decades due to several reasons. For example, the mapping process has become computerized, virtually all spatial information is now digital, and GIS has emerged as essential when working with spatial data. At the same time, women have increased their visibility and presence in science and technologies. Feminist scholarship, too, has made a profound impact on social science and geography and has come to inform and influence the fields of cartography and GIS. This article discusses the changing relationship of cartography and GIS and presents major feminist critiques of these fields. After examining the undervalued contribution of women to both cartography and GIS, the article focuses on an ongoing engagement of feminism with GIS and practices of mapping. This engagement includes reclaiming the power of vision, creating a range of feminist cartographies, and the broader impacts of geospatial technologies on women's daily lives.

M. Pavlovskaya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Power Maps in Algebra and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Maps in Algebra and Topology Kathryn Hess Preface The case of commutative algebras The Hochschild complex of a twisting cochain Power maps on the Hochschild complex Topological relevance Power Maps in Algebra and Topology Kathryn Hess Institute of Geometry, Algebra and Topology Ecole

Thévenaz, Jacques

435

Refining Restriction Enzyme Genome Maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A genome map is an ordering of a set of clones according to their believed position on a DNA string. Simple heuristics for genome map assembly based on single restriction enzyme with complete digestion data can lead to inaccuracies and ambiguities. This ... Keywords: constraint query languages, genome mapping, set constraints

Peter Z. Revesz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

C3Bio.org - Usage: Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(.jpg, .jpeg, .jpe, .bmp, .tif, .tiff, .png, .gif) Submit You are here: Home Usage Maps Users Currently Online Usage: Maps Overview Maps Users Currently Online...

438

Ozone Measurements at Geesthacht (53.4 N, 10.4 E) with an Advanced Raman Lidar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An advanced Raman lidar, which measures ozone, water vapor, aerosol backscatter, and extinction profiles simoultaneously and independently, has been in routine operation at Geesthacht since February 1995. Results...

Marcus Seiwazi; Jens Reichardt

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Quantitative maps of groundwater resources in Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Africa, groundwater is the major source of drinking water and its use for irrigation is forecast to increase substantially to combat growing food insecurity. Despite this, there is little quantitative information on groundwater resources in Africa, and groundwater storage is consequently omitted from assessments of freshwater availability. Here we present the first quantitative continent-wide maps of aquifer storage and potential borehole yields in Africa based on an extensive review of available maps, publications and data. We estimate total groundwater storage in Africa to be 0.66million km3 (0.361.75millionkm3). Not all of this groundwater storage is available for abstraction, but the estimated volume is more than 100 times estimates of annual renewable freshwater resources on Africa. Groundwater resources are unevenly distributed: the largest groundwater volumes are found in the large sedimentary aquifers in the North African countries Libya, Algeria, Egypt and Sudan. Nevertheless, for many African countries appropriately sited and constructed boreholes can support handpump abstraction (yields of 0.10.3ls?1), and contain sufficient storage to sustain abstraction through inter-annual variations in recharge. The maps show further that the potential for higher yielding boreholes (>5ls?1) is much more limited. Therefore, strategies for increasing irrigation or supplying water to rapidly urbanizing cities that are predicated on the widespread drilling of high yielding boreholes are likely to be unsuccessful. As groundwater is the largest and most widely distributed store of freshwater in Africa, the quantitative maps are intended to lead to more realistic assessments of water security and water stress, and to promote a more quantitative approach to mapping of groundwater resources at national and regional level.

A M MacDonald; H C Bonsor; B Dochartaigh; R G Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

GyroLAGfluxgate magnetic total field, vectors, and tensors mapping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Endurance (hrs) 3.8 to 5 Fuel consumption (L/hr) 18 to 24 Aircraft...speed of 100 km/hr) Engine type 914 Rotax turbo...rotor system. The final engine-of-choice for the...dual-redundant ignition and fuel injection systems are...

L. Ameglio; G. Jacobs; J. von Ludwig; M. Munschy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

442

Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants  

SciTech Connect

Understanding and quantifying outdoor and indoor sources of human exposure are essential but often not adequately addressed in health-effects studies for air pollution. Air pollution epidemiology, risk assessment, health tracking and accountability assessments are examples of health-effects studies that require but often lack adequate exposure information. Recent advances in exposure modeling along with better information on time-activity and exposure factors data provide us with unique opportunities to improve the assignment of exposures for both future and ongoing studies linking air pollution to health impacts. In September 2006, scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) along with scientists from the academic community and state health departments convened a symposium on air pollution exposure and health in order to identify, evaluate, and improve current approaches for linking air pollution exposures to disease. This manuscript presents the key issues, challenges and recommendations identified by the exposure working group, who used cases studies of particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutant exposure to evaluate health-effects for air pollution. One of the over-arching lessons of this workshop is that obtaining better exposure information for these different health-effects studies requires both goal-setting for what is needed and mapping out the transition pathway from current capabilities to meeting these goals. Meeting our long-term goals requires definition of incremental steps that provide useful information for the interim and move us toward our long-term goals. Another over-arching theme among the three different pollutants and the different health study approaches is the need for integration among alternate exposure assessment approaches. For example, different groups may advocate exposure indicators, biomonitoring, mapping methods (GIS), modeling, environmental media monitoring, and/or personal exposure modeling. However, emerging research reveals that the greatest progress comes from integration among two or more of these efforts.

McKone, Thomas E.; Ryan, P. Barry; Ozkaynak, Haluk

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

On the temperature dependence of organic reactivity, nitrogen oxides, ozone production, and the impact of emission controls in San Joaquin Valley, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) experiences some of the worst ozone air quality in the US, frequently exceeding the California 8 h standard of 70.4 ppb. To improve our understanding of trends in the number of ozone violations ...

Pusede, S. E.

444

Category:USDA Map Files | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Map Files Map Files Jump to: navigation, search This category contains map files produced by the United States Department of Agriculture. Media in category "USDA Map Files" The following 32 files are in this category, out of 32 total. USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-AZ.pdf USDA-CE-Production-GIF... 249 KB USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-CA.pdf USDA-CE-Production-GIF... 323 KB USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-CO.pdf USDA-CE-Production-GIF... 264 KB USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-FL.pdf USDA-CE-Production-GIF... 274 KB USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-GA.pdf USDA-CE-Production-GIF... 410 KB USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-IA.pdf USDA-CE-Production-GIF... 303 KB USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-ID.pdf USDA-CE-Production-GIF... 212 KB USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-IL.pdf USDA-CE-Production-GIF... 387 KB USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-IN.pdf

445

EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on Google Bookmark EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on Delicious Rank EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on Digg Find More places to share EERE: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Site Map on AddThis.com... Site Map About Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program Weatherization Services

446

Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

Whitfield, R. G.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

447

Category:USGS Map Files | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USGS Map Files USGS Map Files Jump to: navigation, search This category contains map files produced by the United States Geological Survey. Media in category "USGS Map Files" The following 7 files are in this category, out of 7 total. Black.Warrior.Basin usgs.map.pdf Black.Warrior.Basin us... 148 KB Fut oilp 03.pdf Fut oilp 03.pdf 10.02 MB Undiscovered.nat.gas.sacrametno.basin.2006.map.jpg Undiscovered.nat.gas.s... 81 KB Uscells1msmall.oil.gas.pdf Uscells1msmall.oil.gas... 3.33 MB USGS-Geothermal-System-Locations.png USGS-Geothermal-System... 754 KB USGS-Western-USA-Geothermal-Favorability.png USGS-Western-USA-Geoth... 1.56 MB Usgs.9.2010.Fig01.pdf Usgs.9.2010.Fig01.pdf 4.02 MB Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:USGS_Map_Files&oldid=325392

448

Auto GC system for enhanced ozone monitoring network  

SciTech Connect

A Perkin-Elmer Model ATD-400 Thermal Desorption System was specially adapted for the collection of whole-air samples. The C{sub 2} to n-C{sub 10} hydrocarbons were trapped using Peltier cooling on Carbotrap/Carbosieve adsorbents at {minus}30 C. A Deans switch allowed the C{sub 2} to C{sub 6} fraction to be separated using a porous layer open tubular column while a methyl silicone column separated the C{sub 6} to C{sub 10} fraction. No cryogen was used in the collection or analysis. Ozone precursor concentrations were detected at the 0.1 ppbV level. Area repeatability was less than 10%, with retention time precision over 100 hours of approximately 1% RSD for most compounds. Remote communications allowed chromatography to be monitored and files to be downloaded to a central office. Data in .CSV format was directly assimilated by spreadsheet software for diurnal inspection and customized reporting. Data were achieved using external Bernoulli disks.

Seeley, I.; Tipler, A. [Perkin-Elmer Corp., Norwalk, CT (United States); Broadway, G. [Perkin-Elmer Ltd., Beaconsfield (United Kingdom)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Defect mapping system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline materials in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a laser for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate rastor mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. 20 figures.

Sopori, B.L.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

450

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

451

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

453

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Hydrogen Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Maps Below are some examples of how geographic information system (GIS) modeling is used in hydrogen infrastructure, demand, market and resource analyses. The JPG images...

454

Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2 3 emissions of ozone precursors. The climate and16 emission effect in combination will increase afternoon mean increases18 in global (excluding China) anthropogenic emissions, 37% to Chinese emission19 increases

Wu, Shiliang

455

A numerical study of mass transfer of ozone dissolution in bubble plumes with an Euler-Lagrange Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as a model problem for a water purification system. The effect of bubble diameter and plume structure on mass are widely observed and exploited in engineering applications, with water purification using ozone bubble the mass transfer process of ozone dissolution in a bubble plume inside a rectangular water tank

Huang, Huaxiong

456

Impact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F. Maupetit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indoor air quality (IAQ) since they produce secondary pollutants, mainly aldehydes which are known to document the impact on IAQ of outdoor ozone during summer air pollution episodes. For this purpose, a oneImpact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F

Boyer, Edmond

457

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

458

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

459

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

460

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

462

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

463

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

464

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

465

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

466

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

467

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

468

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

469

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

470

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

471

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

472

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

473

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

474

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

475

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

476

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

477

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

478

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

479

Wave maps on a wormhole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider equivariant wave maps from a wormhole spacetime into the three-sphere. This toy-model is designed for gaining insight into the dissipation-by-dispersion phenomena, in particular the soliton resolution conjecture. We first prove that for each topological degree of the map there exists a unique static solution (harmonic map) which is linearly stable. Then, using the hyperboloidal formulation of the initial value problem, we give numerical evidence that every solution starting from smooth initial data of any topological degree evolves asymptotically to the harmonic map of the same degree. The late-time asymptotics of this relaxation process is described in detail.

Piotr Bizo?; Micha? Kahl

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

480

Arizona Map for Commercial Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

styleseiasitewideF.css" rel"stylesheet" type"textcss" > Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Background Information on CBECS > 2003 CBECS climate zone map corrections...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total ozone mapping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Fault Mapping | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fault Mapping Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Fault Mapping Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Collection and Mapping Parent Exploration Technique: Data Collection and Mapping Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Locates active faults in the area of interest Hydrological: Can reveal whether faults are circulating hydrothermal fluids Thermal: Dictionary.png

482

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

483

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

484

map_legend  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Natural Gas Market Hub a Surface Congressional District (113th) Underground b Coal Mines U.S. States Map Legend County Boundary Power Plants K A B C E 0 G L H I J Biomass Coal Geothermal Market Hubs Transmission and Pipelines Hydro Natural Gas Other Fossil Gases Petroleum Pumped Storage Solar Wind Wood Petroleum Import Site f Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Site 4 j Petroleum Refinery h DOT NPMS Gas Transmission Pipeline Due to security constraints, only a single county's pipelines can be shown at a time for this layer. The natural gas interstate, intrastate, and gathering pipelines layer (see below) can be viewed across larger geographic areas, but is not as accurate or complete. DOT NPMS Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Hazardous liquids include crude oil, product, liquid petroleum gas, natural gas liquid, hydrogen gas,

485

SRS - Website Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1/2011 1/2011 SEARCH GO menu spacer SRS Home Savannah River Site Website Map About SRS Mission & Vision Where We Are SRS History Fact Sheets Tour SRS Contact SRS SRS Organizations Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS) Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR) Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) USDA Forest Service - Savannah River Wackenhut Services, Inc. Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MOX) Parsons Related Links & Resources Department of Energy (DOE) Department of Energy - Environmental Management (DOE-EM) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) News News Releases Video Releases Fact Sheets Photo Gallery Speakers Media Contacts Business Opportunities Community Reuse Organization Technology Transfer Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)

486

Report Title: Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Title: Title: Mapping of Reservoir Properties and Facies Through Integration of Static and Dynamic Data Report Type: Final Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: October 1, 2000 Reporting Period End Date: September 30, 2004 Principal Authors: Albert C. Reynolds, Dean S. Oliver, Yannong Dong, Ning Liu, Guohua Gao, Fengjun Zhang & Ruijian Li Date Report Issued: December 2004 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-00BC15309 Petroleum Engineering Department The University of Tulsa 600 South College Avenue Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

487

Maestro: Replica-Aware Map Scheduling for MapReduce  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MapReduce has emerged as a leading programming model for data-intensive computing. Many recent research efforts have focused on improving the performance of the distributed frameworks supporting this model. Many optimizations are network-oriented and ... Keywords: MapReduce, Hadoop, cloud computing, replication, scheduling

Shadi Ibrahim; Hai Jin; Lu Lu; Bingsheng He; Gabriel Antoniu; Song Wu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Thermochemical Kinetics for Multireference Systems: Addition Reactions of Ozone  

SciTech Connect

The 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of ozone to ethyne and ethene provide extreme examples of multireference singlet-state chemistry, and they are examined here to test the applicability of several approaches to thermochemical kinetics of systems with large static correlation. Four different multireference diagnostics are applied to measure the multireference characters of the reactants, products, and transition states; all diagnostics indicate significant multireference character in the reactant portion of the potential energy surfaces. We make a more complete estimation of the effect of quadruple excitations than was previously available, and we use this with CCSDT/CBS estimation of Wheeler et al. (Wheeler, S. E.; Ess, D. H.; Houk, K. N. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 1798.) to make new best estimates of the van der Waals association energy, the barrier height, and the reaction energy to form the cycloadduct for both reactions. Comparing with these best estimates, we present comprehensive mean unsigned errors for a variety of coupled cluster, multilevel, and density functional methods. Several computational aspects of multireference reactions are considered: (i) the applicability of multilevel theory, (ii) the convergence of coupled cluster theory for reaction barrier heights, (iii) the applicability of completely renormalized coupled cluster methods to multireference systems, (iv) the treatment by density functional theory, (v) the multireference perturbation theory for multireference reactions, and (vi) the relative accuracy of scaling-type multilevel methods as compared with additive ones. It is found that scaling-type multilevel methods do not perform better than the additive-type multilevel methods. Among the 48 tested density functionals, only M05 reproduces the best estimates within their uncertainty. Multireference perturbation theory based on the complete-active-space reference wave functions constructed using a small number of reaction-specific active orbitals gives accurate forward barrier heights; however, it significantly underestimates reaction energies.

Zhao, Yan; Tishchenko, Oksana; Gour, Jeffrey R.; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse; Piecuch, Piotr; Truhlar, Donald G.

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

489

Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives  

SciTech Connect

Prior research suggests that chemical processes taking place on the surface of particle filters employed in buildings may lead to the formation of harmful secondary byproducts. We investigated ozone reactions with fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester and polyolefin filter media, as well as hydrolysis of filter media additives. Studies were carried out on unused media, and on filters that were installed for 3 months in buildings at two different locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Specimens from each filter media were exposed to {approx}150 ppbv ozone in a flow tube under a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent RH). Ozone breakthrough was recorded for each sample over periods of {approx}1000 min; the ozone uptake rate was calculated for an initial transient period and for steady-state conditions. While ozone uptake was observed in all cases, we did not observe significant differences in the uptake rate and capacity for the various types of filter media tested. Most experiments were performed at an airflow rate of 1.3 L/min (face velocity = 0.013 m/s), and a few tests were also run at higher rates (8 to 10 L/min). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were quantified downstream of each sample. Those aldehydes (m/z 31 and 45) and other volatile byproducts (m/z 57, 59, 61 and 101) were also detected in real-time using Proton-Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Low-ppbv byproduct emissions were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, and were higher when the filters were loaded with particles, as compared with unused filters. No significant differences were observed when ozone reacted over various types of filter media. Fiberglass filters heavily coated with impaction oil (tackifier) showed higher formaldehyde emissions than other samples. Those emissions were particularly high in the case of used filters, and were observed even in the absence of ozone, suggesting that hydrolysis of additives, rather than ozonolysis, is the main formaldehyde source in those filters. Emission rates of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not found to be large enough to substantially increase indoor concentrations in typical building scenarios. Nevertheless, ozone reactions on HVAC filters cannot be ignored as a source of low levels of indoor irritants.

Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jrmie; Brunner, Gregory; Zhang, Jianshun (Jensen); Fisk, William J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Central American geologic map project  

SciTech Connect

During the Northeast Quadrant Panel meeting of the Circum-Pacific Map Project held in Mexico City, February 1985, Central American panel members proposed and adopted plans for compiling a geologic map of Central America, probably at a scale of 1:500,000. A local group with participants from each country was organized and coordinated by Rolando Castillo, director, Central American School of Geology, University of Costa Rica, for the geologic aspects, and Fernando Rudin, director, Geographic Institute of Costa Rica, for the topographic base. In 1956, the US Geological Survey published a geologic map of the region at a scale of 1:1 million. Subsequent topographic and geologic mapping projects have provided a large amount of new data. The entire area is now covered by topographic maps at a scale of 1:50,000, and these maps have been used in several countries as a base for geologic mapping. Another regional map, the Metallogenic Map of Central America (scale = 1:2 million), was published in 1969 by the Central American Research Institute for Industry (ICAITI) with a generalized but updated geologic base map. Between 1969 and 1980, maps for each country were published by local institutions: Guatemala-Belize at 1:500,000, Honduras at 1:500,000, El Salvador at 1:100,000, Nicaragua at 1:1 million, Costa Rica at 1:200,000, and Panama at 1:1 million. This information, in addition to that of newly mapped areas, served as the base for the Central American part of the Geologic-Tectonic Map of the Caribbean Region (scale = 1:2.5 million), published by the US Geological Survey in 1980, and also fro the Northeast Quadrant Maps of the Circum-Pacific Region. The new project also involves bathymetric and geologic mapping of the Pacific and Caribbean margins of the Central American Isthmus. A substantial amount of new information of the Middle America Trench has been acquired through DSDP Legs 67 and 84.

Dengo, G.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Link maps and map meetings: Scaffolding student learning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With student numbers decreasing and traditional teaching methods having been found inefficient, it is widely accepted that alternative teaching methods need to be explored in tertiary physics education. In 2006 a different teaching environment was offered to 244 first year students with little or no prior formal instruction in physics. Students were invited to attend additional enrichment classes 1 h a week called map meetings. The focus of these classes was a different type of visual presentation of physics material called link maps. Link maps explicitly show the key concepts covered in lectures and how these interrelate to help novices establish their physics schemata. In each map meeting the link map for the different topic was interactively discussed by the researcher before the students worked on problems in groups using the link map. The class ended with the researcher going through one problem, talking aloud about how to logically attack it. The results were promising. Each week about 20% of the class voluntarily attended map meetings whereas 22% reported that they did not attend due to timetable clashes. Two questionnaires revealed that students thought the classes were helpful for gaining an overview of physics and for developing their problem solving abilities. In the final examination the 32 students who had attended at least eight out of ten map meetings achieved, on average, 9 points out of 90 better in the examination (p=0.004) than a comparison group (N=40) with similar academic background which had not attended map meetings. The results of this study suggest that map meetings are a valuable learning environment for physics novices. Further investigations are currently being undertaken.

Christine Lindstrm and Manjula D. Sharma

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

492

GIS Mapping Technician Prince George  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GIS Mapping Technician Prince George Salary $48,942.48 - $55,662.83 annually An excellent opportunity to apply your GIS mapping expertise BCTS was established in 2003 to offer fibre to the market Northern GIS Service Centre, a collaborative model where GIS resources are shared between four Business

Northern British Columbia, University of

493

Category:PVGIS Map Files | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PVGIS Map Files PVGIS Map Files Jump to: navigation, search This category contains map files produced by the Photovoltaic Geographical Information System. Media in category "PVGIS Map Files" The following 85 files are in this category, out of 85 total. PVGIS-4-gs13.png PVGIS-4-gs13.png 398 KB PVGIS-Africa-SolarPotential-img-v2.png PVGIS-Africa-SolarPote... 1.73 MB PVGIS-Alps-solar-map.png PVGIS-Alps-solar-map.png 1.83 MB PVGIS-Europe-solar-opt-publication.png PVGIS-Europe-solar-opt... 5.04 MB PVGIS-gs13.nigeria.png PVGIS-gs13.nigeria.png 123 KB PVGIS-Mediterranean-globrad-opt-angle.png PVGIS-Mediterranean-gl... 4.54 MB PVGIS-solar-horiz-AL.png PVGIS-solar-horiz-AL.png 747 KB PVGIS-solar-horiz-AT.png PVGIS-solar-horiz-AT.png 611 KB PVGIS-solar-horiz-BA.png PVGIS-solar-horiz-BA.png

494

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

495

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

496

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

497

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

498

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

499

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

500

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0