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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Lignite-based nitrogenous fertilizers  

SciTech Connect

A sample of lignite from Elbistan was oxidized by nitric acid in two stages, using relatively dilute acid in the first stage and concentrated acid in the second stage, and then the oxidized product was ammoniated so that a coal-based fertilizer could be produced. The experiments of all the stages were designed by a 1/2 X full factorial design. It was observed that base exchange capacity and nitrogen content of coal-based fertilizers produced in this work were as good as or better than those obtained by other investigators.

Baris, H.; Dincer, S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually. Emissions. (fertilizers that use nitric acid or ammonium bicarbonate result in emissions of nitrogen oxides, nitrous oxide, ammonia and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.) ~Indirect: Phosphorus in excess causes eutrophication

Toohey, Darin W.

3

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence arbuscular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence by examining the joint effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment, nitrogen (N) fertilization and plant, community composition, grassland, niche partitioning hypothesis, nitrogen fertilization, plant richness

Minnesota, University of

4

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence arbuscular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence by examining the joint effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment, nitrogen (N) fertilization and plant enrichment, community composition, grassland, niche partitioning hypothesis, nitrogen fertilization, plant

Minnesota, University of

5

Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia utilizing a source of carbon, a source of nitrogen, and/or a source of hydrogen. Implementing an electrolyte serving as ionic charge carrier, (1) ammonium nitrate is produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers are produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source; (3) ammonia is produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate is produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source. The electrolyte can be solid.

Aulich, Ted R.; Olson, Edwin S.; Jiang, Junhua

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization on Bioenergy Sorghum Yield and Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................... 77 Economics of fertilizing biomass feedstocks ................................................. 77 Biomass feedstock yield response to applied nitrogen: An example ........... 79 CONCLUSIONS...

Zilahi-Sebess, Szilvia

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia, at low temperature and pressure, preferably at ambient temperature and pressure, utilizing a source of carbon, a source of nitrogen, and/or a source of hydrogen or hydrogen equivalent. Implementing an electrolyte serving as ionic charge carrier, (1) ammonium nitrate is produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers are produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source; (3) ammonia is produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source or a hydrogen equivalent such as carbon monoxide or a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate is produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source. The electrolyte can be aqueous, non-aqueous, or solid.

Aulich, Ted R. (Grand Forks, ND); Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Jiang, Junhua (Grand Forks, ND)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

Response of photosynthesis and nitrogen nutrition in Juglans nigra L. with different nitrogen fertilizers Michael Nicodemus and Douglass F. Jacobs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response of photosynthesis and nitrogen nutrition in Juglans nigra L. with different nitrogen INTRODUCTION N fertilization has been shown to positively affect photosynthesis in most studies N fertilization and photosynthesis is largely due to ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase (RUBISCO

9

Effect of Nitrogen Fertilization and Forage Maturity on the Nutritive Value of Bahiagrass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by NICOLE MARION KENNEY EFFECT OF NITROGEN FERTILIZATION AND FORAGE MATURITY ON THE NUTRITIVE VALUE OF BAHIAGRASS... Senior Scholars Thesis by NICOLE MARION KENNEY iii ABSTRACT Effect of Nitrogen Fertilization and Forage Maturity on the Nutritive Value of Bahiagrass. (April 2010) Nicole Marion Kenney Department of Animal Science Texas A&M University...

Kenney, Nicole M

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

10

J.-P. Denuit et al.Management of nitrogen fertilization of winter wheat and potato Original article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.-P. Denuit et al.Management of nitrogen fertilization of winter wheat and potato Original article Management of nitrogen fertilization of winter wheat and potato crops using the chlorophyll meter for crop results from a new field-scale N management strategy for winter wheat and potato crops in Belgium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

Economic Optimum Rates and Returns from Nitrogen Fertilization of Coastal Bermudagrass for Hay in East Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BULLETIN THE TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION1 J. E. Miller, Director/ Texas A&M University/ College Station, f exas B-1151 May 1975 ECONOMIC OPTIMUM RATES AND RETURNS FROM NITROGEN FERTILIZATION OF COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS FOR HAY IN EAST... at the Texas A&M University Agricultural Research and Extension Center at Overton. The 5-year study compared urea, ammoniutn nitrate, ammonium sulfate and two nitrogen experimental con- trolled-release materials (sulfur-coated ureas) on a rela- tively deep...

Matocha, J. E.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Effect of Fertilizer Loaded Nanoclay/Superabsorbent Polymer Composites on Nitrogen and Phosphorus Release in Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A leaching study was conducted to evaluate effectiveness of fertilizer loaded nanoclay/superabsorbent polymer composites (NCPCs) as a...di-ammonium phosphate (DAP) and urea solution. Release of P and total minera...

Subhas Sarkar; S. C. Datta; D. R. Biswas

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Long-term tillage, cropping sequence, and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management practices that may increase soil organic matter (SOM) storage include conservation tillage, especially no till (NT), enhanced cropping intensity, and fertilization. My objectives were to evaluate management effects on labile [soil...

Dou, Fugen

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

Use of Spectroradiometers to Guide In-season Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Irrigated Cotton in West Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Use of Spectroradiometers to Guide In-season Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Irrigated Cotton in West Texas Following water, nitrogen (N) is the most important constraint to upland cotton production. Most of the cotton in the semiarid western U.S.A. is irrigated, and in areas like the Southern High

Behmer, Spencer T.

15

Chromatographic Determination of Total Nitrogen Following the Kjeldahl Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......23745 (1986). 3. B.M. Jones, and C.G. Daughton. Chemiluminescence vs. Kjeldahl determination of nitrogen in oil shale retort waters and organo- nitrogen compounds. Anal. Chem. 57: 232025 (1985). 4. B.T. Croll, T. Tomlinson......

Serban Moldoveanu

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Increasing Price of Nitrogen Nitrogen fertilizer is often the largest contributor to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

events; the distribution of more than 5,700 publications; and access to web-based guidance on deep and associated costs. Since 2007, the importance of deep-soil testing for nitrogen management has been-sampling methods and procedures. Economic and Environmental Impact The economic impact of deep-soil testing

17

The influence of irrigation water salinity on optimal nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium liquid fertilizer rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nitrogen fertilizer to compensate for leaching losses (Miyamoto, 1984). The effect of salt stress on mineral status of plants has been studied extensively for many agronomic and horticultural crops (Al-Saidi and Alawi, 1984; Al-Saidi et al. , 1985... cultivars (Al-Saidi and Alawi, 1984; Al- Saidi et al. , 1985). Ten flowering annuals were grown in saline water with electrical conductivities of 0. 8, 1. 5, 3. 0, or 4. 5 dS m from a 2:1 equivalent weight basis of CaCI2 and NaCI in tap water (Devitt...

Campos Nu?n?ez, Ricardo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

18

Total nitrogen removal in a hybrid, membrane-aerated activated sludge process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total nitrogen removal in a hybrid, membrane-aerated activated sludge process Leon S. Downing wastewater. Air-filled hollow-fiber membranes are incorporated into an activated sludge tank removal in activated sludge. ª 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The removal

Nerenberg, Robert

19

The use of diagnostic tools to manage the nitrogen fertilization of potato in Tunisia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Martin, M. 1997. Diagnosis of potato nitrogen status. In G.during the development of potato. In order to have a goodcritical dilution curve for potato. The calculation of the

BEHI, OMAR; Marouani, Amel; Ben Haj Salah, Halim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

New technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions from nitrogenous fertilizer in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1995 and still in effect today] and charging a lower price for fer-tilizer...eliminate the negative effect of the changing fertilizer price on grain production...Emission from Fossil Fuel Mining. Intergovernmental...representing a global average, but they may...

Wei-feng Zhang; Zheng-xia Dou; Pan He; Xiao-Tang Ju; David Powlson; Dave Chadwick; David Norse; Yue-Lai Lu; Ying Zhang; Liang Wu; Xin-Ping Chen; Kenneth G. Cassman; Fu-Suo Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Use of the Chlorophyll Meter to Guide In-season Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Irrigated Cotton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cotton Following water, nitrogen (N) is the most important constraint to upland cotton production. Most of the cotton in the semiarid western U.S.A. is irrigated, and in areas like the Southern High Plains, center recommendations for cotton in the semiarid western USA (Zhang et al., 1998). Soil nitrate-N measured in early

Mukhtar, Saqib

22

Mycorrhizae and phosphorus fertilization effects on survival, growth, total biomass and leaf nutrient levels of two-year old Leucaena leucocephala  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MYCORRHIZAE AND PHOSPHORUS FERTILIZATION EFFECTS ON SURVIVAL, GRONTH& TOTAL BIOMASS AND LEAF NUTRIENT LEVELS OF TWO-YEAR CLD LEUCAENA LEUCOCEPHALA A Thesis by DAVID KAHURIA MBUGUA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Forestry MYCORRHIZAE AND PHOSPHORUS FERTILIZATION EFFECTS ON SURVIVAL, GROWTH& TOTAL BIOMASS AND LEAF NUTRIENT LEVELS OF TWO-YEAR OLD LEUCAENA...

Mbugua, David Kahuria

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Relation of the Total Nitrogen of the Soil to its Needs as Shown in Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sanders s ilt ____________ C orn 30.0 29.28.0 1.39 .4170 19081908 SsC orn 8.2G rass 4.6 9.9 1908 D1929 Yazoo clay _____________ C orn 15.3 32.9 1909 DD2822 Sherm an lo am _________ M usta rd 1.5 2.4 19091910 DC orn 37.5 41.0 D A verage _ __________ 14...TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS 564-812-5m BULLETIN NO. 151 AUGUST I912 Relation of the Total Nitrogen of the Soil to its Needs as Shown in Pot Experiments ofG. S. P'RAPS, Chemist. Shwnh????? COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS C O U N T Y...

Fraps, G. S.

1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Building Fertile Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

matter and/or fertilizers. j Phosphorous (P) sources:Plants need phosphorous to grow, flower, and develop healthyof P. Unlike nitrogen, phosphorous lasts a long time once

Lindsey, Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Production of a nitrogeneous humic fertilizer by the oxidation-ammoniation of lignite  

SciTech Connect

Two lignite samples were oxidised with HNO/sub 3/ (20% wt) at 75 C and treated afterwards with NH/sub 3/ in a fluidised-bed reactor in a temperature range 100-375 C. The effects of temperature, NH/sub 3/ flow rate, and reaction time on the total N/sub 2/ content of the product are reported. The product contained 7-13% wt of total N/sub 2/ which increased as the ammoniation temperature increased. Soil nitrification measurements of the N/sub 2/-enriched lignites showed that the maximum conversion to nitrates and rate of nitrification are exhibited by the product obtained at the lowest ammoniation temperature, i.e. 100 C. Maximum conversion to nitrates at that temperature was 45%, which compares well with similar products such as ammoniated peat (35%) and ammonium nitrohumates (45%).

Coca, J.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The effect of foliar fertilizers on nitrogen and zinc accumulation and distribution and p14 sC assimilation and partitioning in senescent and nonsenescent sorghum genotypes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foliar spray at the rates of 0, 6 and 12 kg urea ha-' (1. 2% N solution) at 10 days intervals from hoot stage (May 31) to 25 days post physiological maturity (August 12). Zinc was applied as a foliar spray at the rates of 0 and 2 Kg ZnSO, ha-' (0. 09...THE EFFECT OF FOLIAR FERTILIZERS ON NITROGEN AND ZINC ACCUMULATION AND DISTRIBUTION AND ~4C ASSIMILATION AND PARTITIONING 1N SENESCENT AND NONSENESCENT SORGHUM GENOTYPES A Thesis RICARDO ANTONIO GARCIA-SALAS Submitted to the Graduate College...

Garcia-Salas, Ricardo Antonio

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Combined effects of nitrogen fertilization and biochar on the net global warming potential, greenhouse gas intensity and net ecosystem economic budget in intensive vegetable agriculture in southeastern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Field experiments were conducted to determine the effects of nitrogen (N) fertilization and biochar addition on the net global warming potential (net GWP), greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) and net ecosystem economic budget (NEEB). These experiments were conducted in an intensive vegetable field with 4 consecutive vegetable crops in 2012 and 2013 in southeastern China. The experiment was conducted with a 32 factorial design in triplicate at N fertilizer rates of 0, 1475, 1967kgNha?1 and biochar rates of 0, 20, and 40tha?1. Although CH4 emissions were not obviously affected by N fertilization, N2O emissions increased by 27.2116.2% and the net GWP increased by 30.6307.2%. Consequently, the GHGI increased significantly, but vegetable yield and the NEEB did not improve. Furthermore, biochar amendments did not significantly influence CH4 emissions, but significantly decreased the N2O emissions by 1.725.4%, the net GWP by 89.6700.5%, and the GHGI by 89.5644.8%. In addition, vegetable yields significantly increased by 2.174.1%, which improved the NEEB. Thus, N fertilization did not increase vegetable yields or the NEEB. However, N fertilization did increase the net GWP and GHGI. In contrast, biochar additions resulted in lower N2O emissions and net GWP and GHGI, but increased vegetable yield and the NEEB in the intensive vegetable production system. Therefore, appropriate biochar amendment should be studied to combat changing climate and to improve the economic profits of vegetable production.

B. Li; C.H. Fan; H. Zhang; Z.Z. Chen; L.Y. Sun; Z.Q. Xiong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Effect of Increasing Nitrogen Deposition on Soil Microbial Communities  

SciTech Connect

Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure impact soil microbial communities, 12 samples were collected from the BioCON plots in which nitrogenous fertilizer was added to simulate the effect of increasing nitrogen deposition and 12 samples from without added fertilizer. DNA from the 24 samples was extracted using a freeze-grind protocol, amplified, labeled with a fluorescent dye, and then hybridized to GeoChip, a functional gene array containing probes for genes involved in N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all genes detected was performed to analyze microbial community patterns. The first two axes accounted for 23.5percent of the total variation. The samples fell into two major groups: fertilized and non-fertilized, suggesting that nitrogenous fertilizer had a significant impact on soil microbial community structure and diversity. The functional gene numbers detected in fertilized samples was less that detected in non-fertilizer samples. Functional genes involving in the N cycling were mainly discussed.

Xiao, Shengmu; Xue, Kai; He, Zhili; VanNostrand, Joy D.; Liu, Jianshe; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

29

Effects of Nitrogen and Sulfur Fertilization on Free Amino Acids, Sugars, and Acrylamide-Forming Potential in Potato  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, 13 varieties of potato were grown in a field trial in 2010 and treated with different combinations of N and S. Potatoes were analyzed immediately after harvest to show the effect of N and S fertilization on concentrations of free asparagine, other free amino acids, sugars, and acrylamide-forming potential. ... (4-7) With respect to potato, De Wilde et al. showed that concentrations of sugars in tubers rose in response to N deprivation by up to 100% compared with adequately fertilized potatoes,(8) and Kumar et al. similarly reported that plants adequately fertilized with N had lower reducing sugar concentration at harvest. ... To examine how sulfur deprivation may affect acrylamide formation in cooked potatoes, three varieties of potato were grown under conditions of either severe sulfur deprivation or an adequate supply of sulfur. ...

Nira Muttucumaru; Stephen J. Powers; J. Stephen Elmore; Donald S. Mottram; Nigel G. Halford

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Commercial Fertilizers in 1921-22.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the investment. . The haphazard use of potash in fertilizer under all conditions should be discontinued. Texas soils can get on much better without fertilizer potash than without phosphoric acid or nitrogen. There has been in the past much waste of potash... ........................................ Bryan Cotton Oil and Fertilizer Co., Bryan . Texas.- Star Brand Cotton and Corn Fertilizer-Guarantee .... Analysis ........................................ Analysis ........................................ Star Rrand Potato Fertilizer...

Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Global metaanalysis of the nonlinear response of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions to fertilizer nitrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...selected field studies from the literature where in situ measurements of...and in studies identified in reviews by Bouwman (8), Jungkunst...Dataset S1) when available: literature reference; location...fertilizer. Glob Change Biol Bioenergy 16(1):156 ZZQQhy170...

Iurii Shcherbak; Neville Millar; G. Philip Robertson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

33

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

34

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

35

Commercial Fertilizers and Their Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......................................................................................... 36 Fertilizers for Irish Potatoes..................................................................... 38 Fertilizers for Sweet Potatoes ........................ ......................................... 40 Fertilizers for Alfalfa.... The rice farmer who wastes his rice straw ashes is losing about 37 pounds of potash per acre, which he will be obliged to buy back some day. The rice farmer loses about $2.70 worth of nitrogen per acre when he burns his straws Cotton stalks, when burned...

Fraps, G. S.

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

37

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

38

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

39

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

40

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

42

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

43

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

44

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

45

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

46

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

47

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

48

Commercial Fertilizers in 1920-21.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- better without fertilizer potash than without phosphoric a( nitrogen. There has been in the past much waste of potash. BULK SALES. cted Ieen ~ive f er- Fertilizers may be sold in bulk by manufacturers direct to consumers for their own use; the tax... ........................................ Bryan Cotton Oil and Fertilizer Co., Bryan . Texas.- Star Brand Phospho Special Fertilizer-Guarantee ..... Analysis ........................................ Star Brand Potato Fertilizer-Guarantee ............. Analysis...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.)

1921-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional nitrogen responses Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tons of nitrogen fertilizer each year, combines dinitro- gen... National Park (Colorado, USA): a response to anthropogenic nitrogen deposition." Geobiology 1... Nitrogen...

50

Nitrogen fertilizer: Retrospect and prospect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...analyze the course of consumption of a material such...has slowed. Because consumption of crops...efficiency. Just as fuel per output of motion rather than fuel per area of frame...the efficiency of an engine, N per output of...

Charles R. Frink; Paul E. Waggoner; Jesse H. Ausubel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Tracing the Fate of Enhanced Organic Carbon Production during a Southern Ocean Fe Fertilization Experiment using Natural Variations in Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition  

SciTech Connect

This project focused on the N and C natural stable isotope response during SOFeX--a purposeful iron (Fe) addition experiment in the Fe limited Southern Ocean. One purpose of the study was to determine if relief of phytoplankton Fe stress would increase productivity sufficiently to enhance C export from surface to deep waters. We proposed that N and C stable isotopes would be useful for tracing this export. Iron was added to waters north and south of the Antarctic Polar Front in waters to the southwest of New Zealand. While both sites have high-nutrient, low chlorophyll conditions (HNLC) typical of Fe limitation, [SiO4] a required nutrient for diatoms was low at the northerly site and high at the southern location. The most extensive coverage occurred at the southern site. Here, FeSO4 was added four different times over an {approx}two week period. We found that: (1) Particulate organic nitrogen and carbon in the mixed layer increased by a factor of 2-3 in response to the Fe addition in the southern patch. (2) PN accumulation and NO3- drawdown were both 1-2 {micro}M during the occupation of the bloom, suggesting retention of particulates within the mixed layer of the southern patch. (3) {sub 15}N of PN and of NO{sub 3}{sup -} increased by 1-2{per_thousand} as [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] decreased, and there is a clear contrast between in- and out-patch stations with respect to particulate {sub 15}N. The isotopic fractionation factor for NO{sub 3}{sup -} was near 5-6{per_thousand} and appears to have been unaffected by Fe fertilization. In contrast, there was little change in {delta}{sup 13}C. (4) The > 54 {micro}m size fraction was typically lighter than the 1-54 {micro}m size fraction by about 0.5 {per_thousand} in {delta}{sup 13}C. In the south patch, this difference increased as the bloom progressed, and with increasing PN concentration. This result may have been caused by large chain-forming diatoms responded to the Fe addition and were likely isotopically lighter than smaller flagellates. Similar observations were made for {delta}{sup 13}C.

Altabet, M.A.

2005-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

52

Commercial Fertilizers in 1938-39 and Their Uses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................... 1.5 Potash ...................................................................................................................................... 6.0 Names of fertilizers. Fertilizers are frequently named by numbers, such as a 4-8-4 fertilizer, a... of potash at 6.0 cents per pound mould be $1.20. The following is an example of a calcuIation at the prices given above: Valuation of 4-8-4 fertilizer Nitrogen ............................................................................................ 4...

Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.)

1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Water Use Efficiency, Irrigation Management and Nitrogen Utilization in Rice Production in the North of Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Iran with nearly 165 million hectare of land area and amount of rainfall equal to 300mm in 67% of its territorial land, is considered as a semi-dry region in the world. Rice production in Iran needs to be increased to feed a growing population, whereas water for irrigation is getting scarce. One way to decrease water consumption in paddy field is the change of irrigation regime and replacement of continuous submergence to alternate submergence. In order to investigate the effect of different regimes of irrigation and nitrogen fertilizer on yield of hybrid rice, an experiment was conducted at the Rice Research Institute of Iran during crop season 2008. The experiment was arranged in split plot based on completely randomized block design with 3 replications in which water regimes were main factor included continuous submergence and alternately submergence (irrigation intervals of 5, 8 and 11days) and nitrogen fertilizer levels were sub factor included 0, 90, 120 and 150kg/ha. Grain yield,water use efficiency,relative water content,total nitrogen,grain nitrogen and nitrogen harvest index were statistically the same under continuous submergence and irrigation interval of 5 and 8 days and were lowest in 11- day interval.total nitrogen,grain nitrogen and nitrogen harvest index decreased with the increment of nitrogen.we concluded that 8- day interval could reduce water consumption in paddy fields in the North of Iran.

Majid Ashouri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A three-dimensional total odd nitrogen (NOy) simulation during SONEX using a stretched-grid chemical transport model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assimilation System (GEOS-STRAT DAS). A new algorithm is used to estimate the lightning flash rates needed to calculate NOy emission by lightning. This algorithm parameterizes the flash rate in terms of upper. The lightning algorithm reproduces the temporally and spatially averaged total flash rate accurately; however

Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

55

nitrogen metabolism in lakes i. measurement of nitrogen fixation with ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

the originally introduced nitrogen gas and the total amount of .... This is accom- of spontaneous O2 production, which .... free nitrogen been available; the cost of.

56

DSM, Kemira to swap fertilizer operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DSM, Kemira to swap fertilizer operations ... The latest move being contemplated entails a portfolio swap between DSM of the Netherlands and Finland's Kemira. ... DSM, for its part, aims to concentrate on the high-nitrogen sector of the market. ...

DERMONT O'SULLIVAN

1988-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

57

Impacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic carbon dioxide may result from this atmospheric nitrogen fertilization, leading to a decreaseImpacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the Open Ocean R. A. Duce,1 * J. LaRoche,2 K quantities of atmospheric anthropogenic fixed nitrogen entering the open ocean could account for up to about

Ward, Bess

58

Availability of soil organic phosphorus and fertilizer phosphorus applied to coastal bermudagrass (cynodon dactylon l.) on Houston black clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Kissel A two-year field study was conducted to determine the effect of moldboard plow1ng and nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization on P availability, Coastal bermudagrass yield, and m1neralization of soil organic matter. The field study... included 4 tillage-P fertil1zer comb1nations w1th six different annual N application rates. In addition, a three-month greenhouse study was conducted to determine the dry matter y'. elds and total P uptake in Coastal bermuda- grass with changes in soil...

Krautmann, Jolly Yang

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

59

Energy Conservation in Fertilizer Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil. Table 1 shows current United States fertilizer production estimates. No. of Total Annual No. of PCR Annual Type of Plants in Plaot liSA Production lToos) PCR Type Plaots Production l,IoosJ NPKS 100 10 x 10 6 28 2.5 x 10 6 DAP/MAP 26... 10.9 x 10 6 4 3 x 10 6 . Table I USA Fertilizer Production - 1984, Estimated PCR Technology The Pipe-Cross Reactor was developed initially to contain the violent reaction in fertilizer pro duction which occurred during ammoniating of sulfu ric...

Mings, W. J.; Sonnett, W. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Commercial Fertilizers in 1936-37.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, where the plant food is likely to leach out (See Bulletin No. 490). Side dressings of cotton with nitrate of soda, sulphate of ammonia, or other sources of nitrogen are not generally to be recommended, but may be used when the fertilizer applied...1,TURAL AND MECHANICAL COI,I,EGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WAI,TON, I'resident This is the annual Fertilizer Control Bulletin. It contains statistics regarding fertilizers sold in Texas, information regarding the fer- tilizer law, and analyses of samples...

Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.)

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Quantifying Cradle-to-Farm Gate Life Cycle Impacts Associated with Fertilizer used for Corn, Soybean, and Stover Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fertilizer use can cause environmental problems, particularly eutrophication of water bodies from excess nitrogen or phosphorus. Increased fertilizer runoff is a concern for harvesting corn stover for ethanol production.

62

Analyses of Commercial Fertilizers Sold during 1956-57.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

containing both nitrogen and available phosphoric acid, such as 4-16-0 (ammoniated su- perphosphate), 16-20-0, 11-48-0 and 13-39-0 (am- monium phosphates), also were approved as ma- terials. TEXAS FERTILIZER COMMITTEE The Texas Fertilizer Committee...

Fudge, J. F.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Commercial fertilizers 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compendium of tables on consumption of commercial fertilizers in the USA in 1993, including types of different fertilizers and consumption of each.

Berry, J.T.; Montgomery, M.H.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nitrogen and phosphorus dynamics in tropical soils of Mali, West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low soil fertility is one of the major biophysical constraints affecting African agriculture. Phosphorus and nitrogen are the two most common limiting nutrients. Before fertility amendment recommendations are made a soil's natural nutrient...

Blanton-Knewtson, Sharon Joy

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Nutrient Management Module No. 3 Nitrogen Cycling,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, it is important to first understand the various transformations that N undergoes within the soil. Nitrogen Cycling to be the sum of ammonium and nitrate, although urea, a type of organic N, may also be plant available. Nitrogen a fraction) by dry yield (in lb/ac). It's useful to compare actual uptake rates to N fertilizer rates

Lawrence, Rick L.

66

Analyses of Commercial Fertilizers Sold During 1952-53.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through August 31. 1953 . Fertilizers and fertilizer materials sold during the fertilizer year beginning July 1. 1952. amounted to 570. 506 tons. which was a 7 percent decrease over the tonnage sold during the preceding year . Grades of the 1-2-1 ratio... percent of the total of 287. 307 tons of unmixed fertilizer sold . Inspection fees equivalent to 558. 808 tons of fertilizer were collected on fertilizers sold during the Texas fiscal year ending August 31. 1953. as compared with 621. 943 tons sold...

Ogier, T. L.

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The effect of fertilizer practices on N balance and global warming potential of maizesoybeanwheat rotations in Northeastern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Long-term agronomic studies are useful to determine cropping system nitrogen (N) use efficiency and the fate of applied fertilizers. We used a subtractive fertilizer experiment incorporating N, phosphorous (P), potassium (K) and swine manure to determine long-term changes in grain yield, soil organic carbon (SOC), total soil nitrogen (N), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The experiment was conducted on a 22-year maizesoybeanwheat rotation in Northeastern China. Crop residues were removed for cooking fuel and forage according to local practices. Five fertilizer treatments were applied annually: control (no fertilizer), NK, NP, NPK, and NPKOM (N, P, K and manure). The NPKOM treatment increased SOC and total soil N by 4.59 and 0.45Mgha?1, respectively. In contrast, SOC decreased by 10.6 and 6.64Mgha?1 in the control and NK treatments, respectively. The NPKOM treatment had an average of 2.9 times more N2O emissions than the other fertilizer treatments. The cropping system balances for N and SOC, together with fuel use for farming practices and manure handling, were used to calculate the global warming potential (GWP) of the different fertilizer treatments. Due to SOC sequestration, the GWP of the NPKOM treatment (6.77MgCequivalentha?1) was significantly lower than that of both the control (14.4MgCequivalentha?1) and the NK treatment (12.8MgCequivalentha?1). The results suggest that in rainfed agricultural systems in Northeastern China, the application of manure supplemented with NPK can simultaneously achieve higher grain yield and lower GWP compared to mineral fertilizers alone.

Yunfa Qiao; Shujie Miao; Xiaozeng Han; Mengyang You; Xia Zhu; William R. Horwath

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

SHORT COMMUNICATION Nitrogen recovery from shrimp pond efuent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the water as ammonia (total ammonia nitrogen, TAN), through either direct excretion by animals or ammoni

Lorenzen, Kai

69

GISbased modeling approach to estimate nitrogen loading and load reduction in lakes/ reservoirs with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, crop cultivation areas, livestock populations, and atmospheric deposition. Nitrogen sources in Texas led to increases in energy and food production, use of fertilizer and animal manure, atmospheric

Yang, Zong-Liang

70

Nitrogen Deposition in the Southern High Plains Nitrogen is necessary for life on earth, but  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the environment. Dinitrogen contains two nitrogen atoms held together by one of nature's strongest chemical bonds in the environment include ammonia (NH3) and its related compounds, amines (NH2), nitrite (NO2) and nitrate (NO3 responsible for producing 500 million tons of nitrogen fertilizer each year, combines dinitro- gen

Mukhtar, Saqib

71

Nature and Use of Commercial Fertilizers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Texas market. Formula 1.8-2-2 Fertilizer. This fertilizer contains 8 per cent available phosphoric acicl, 2 per cent potash and 1.65 per cent nitrogen. It may be prepared by mixing the following ingredients : ............. Acid phosphate, 14 per... phosphoric acid is rorth $1.00 per 100 pounds, the 14 per cent acid phosphate is worth $1.17 per 100 pounds, or very nearly 20 per cent more. Thus the consumer who purchases 14 per cent of acid phos- phate, when both I2 and 14 per cent are selling a...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Commercial Fertilizers 1994  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a compilation of annual data about fertilizer use in the USA, including statistics about various kinds of fertilizer, how much and where they are used, chemical composition, etc.

Berry, J.T.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Commercial Fertilizers and Commercial Poisonous Insecticides.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- "Ammoniated Raw Bone Superfosfate," will, if true to name, give us some indication of the source of the nitrogen. But in many other cases the name affords us no evidence as to the source from which the ma- terials are obtained. At other times the name....27 ................. Stern's Ammoniated Raw Bone Superfosfate 10.32 Kainit .-. --. ---- -. ...................................... ...... Standard Ammoniated Soluble Guano ........................... 8.85 "egetable Fertilizer...

Harrington, H. H. (Henry Hill)

1903-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.; Edlund, D.J.; Miller, W.K.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas. 5 figs.

Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.; Edlund, D.J.; Miller, W.K.

1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

78

Methane Consumption in Temperate and Subarctic Forest Soils: Rates, Vertical Zonation, and Responses to Water and Nitrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diffusive gas transport...sphere and the water content of...29). Soil nitrogen content and...Influence of nitrogen fertilization...in mineral waters with resorcinol...Low-pressure solubility of gases in liquid water. Chem. Rev...

A. P. S. Adamsen; G. M. King

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and nutrient limitation in lakes and ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

174 8.2. 5.1. 15.9. 1.7. 26 19. Arctic. (2) n Mean min max sd. 43 31.1 21.9 38.4. 3.8 ..... Tech. Rep. 585: 30. . 1977. Ammonium and urea uptake by some freshwater algae. .... SMITH, W. O., JR., I. D. WALSH, B. C. BOOTH, AND J. W. DEMING.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Detonation of Ammonium Nitrate Fertilizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detonation of Ammonium Nitrate Fertilizer ... charge of the fertilizer enclosed in -inch Shelby seamless tubing, 3 inches in diameter and 20 inches in length, detonated with extreme violence. ...

1947-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Effects of Adding Sewage Sludge and Urea-Phosphate Fertilizers to the Great Sippewissett Salt Marsh, Falmouth, MA on Heavy Metals and Microbial N-Cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Adding Sewage Sludge and Urea-Phosphate Fertilizers to the Great Sippewissett Salt Marsh in sludge form. Metals were not found to inhibit nitrification nor denitrification. Neither fertilizer nor, microbes, nitrogen cycle, sewage sludge, urea phosphate fertilizer, heavy metals INTRODUCTION Pollution

Vallino, Joseph J.

82

Cotton Fertilizer Tests in the El Paso Area, 1943-51.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the El Paso Valley Experiment Station (1, 3, 4, 8) and similar findings at other stations (2, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12) in the arid West lead to the fol- lowing conclusions regarding the fertilization of short staple cotton : Nitrogen Nitrogen...

Lyerly, Paul J.; Christensen, Paul D.

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Tree Fertilization Soil Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, increase root density, maintain tree health #12;#12;pH ­ effects nutrient availability · Symptoms of high pHTree Fertilization #12;Soil Analysis vs. Foliar Analysis #12;Macronutrients N P K Mg S Ca

84

Fertilizer Experiments with Cotton.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIBRARY. A & M COLLEGE, CAMPUS I TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 469 DIVISION OF AGRONOMY Fertilizer Experiments with Cotton AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE... of seven years experiments with fertilizers on cotton at Troup, Nacogdoches, Angleton, College Station, Beeville, Tem- ple, and Denton, Texas, are reported in this Bulletin. The Kirvin fine sandy loam at Troup and the Nacogdoches and Ruston fine sandy...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Irish Potato Fertilizer Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO 101 January, 1908. ish Potato Fertilizer Experiments - Postoffice, COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS OFFICERS. GOVERNING BOARD. (Board of Directors... was sc Be Irish Potato Fl nents W. S. Hotchkiss and E. J. Kyle. e fertilizer work with the Irish potato at Troupe was first planned fall of 1902. The results which were gotten upon harvesting the the spring of 1903 were so opposed, especially...

Hotchkiss, W.S.; Kyle, E. J. (Edwin Jackson)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Characterization of Nitrogen use efficiency in sweet sorghum  

SciTech Connect

Sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) has the potential to augment the increasing demand for alternative fuels and for the production of input efficient, environmentally friendly bioenergy crops. Nitrogen (N) and water availability are considered two of the major limiting factors in crop growth. Nitrogen fertilization accounts for about 40% of the total production cost in sorghum. In cereals, including sorghum, the nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) from fertilizer is approximately 33% of the amount applied. There is therefore extensive concern in relation to the N that is not used by the plant, which is lost by leaching of nitrate, denitrification from the soil, and loss of ammonia to the atmosphere, all of which can have deleterious environmental effects. To improve the potential of sweet sorghum as a leading and cost effective bioenergy crop, the enhancement of NUE must be addressed. To this end, we have identified a sorghum line (SanChi San) that displays about 25% increase in NUE over other sorghum lines. As such, the overarching goal of this project is to employ three complementary strategies to enhance the ability of sweet sorghum to become an efficient nitrogen user. To achieve the project goal, we will pursue the following specific objectives: Objective 1: Phenotypic characterization of SanChi San/Ck60 RILs under low and moderate N-availability including biochemical profiles, vegetative growth and seed yield Objective 2: Conduct quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis and marker identification for nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in a grain sorghum RIL population. Objective 3: Identify novel candidate genes for NUE using proteomic and gene expression profiling comparisons of high- and low-NUE RILs. Candidate genes will be brought into the pipeline for transgenic manipulation of NUE This project will apply the latest genomics resources to discover genes controlling NUE, one of the most complex and economically important traits in cereal crops. As a result of the completion of the proposed work, we will have: 1) identified novel alleles in wild sorghum germplasm that is useful to improve both cultivated grain and sweet sorghum; 2) been able to select individuals plants that exhibit high NUE within a breeding population on the basis of these markers; 3) acquired essential information necessary to examine the roles of GS and GOGAT, AlaT, along with impact of transcription factor Dof1, on N assimilation in sweet sorghum; and 4) The information learned will provide new opportunities for improving NUE in sorghum and other cereals.

Dweikat, Ismail [University of Nebraska; Clemente, Thomas [University of Nebrask

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

ODD NITROGEN PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including observed nitrogen dioxide, Pure Appl. Geophys,Stratosphere Observation of Nitrogen Dioxide Rates of Ozoneby photolysis of nitrogen dioxide and regeneration of ozone:

Johnston, Harold S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

THE NITROGEN OXIDES CONTROVERSY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including observed nitrogen dioxide," Pure App. Geophys.HN0 ) and probably nitrogen dioxide (N0 ) at a few parts perorganic molecule and nitrogen dioxide. Several examples

Johnston, Harold S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Species richness in a successional grassland: effects of nitrogen enrichment and plant litter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) that was experimentally introduced to the study site as seed. Additions of nitrogen fertilizer to experimental plots over two growing seasons increased plant production as indicated by increases in both living plant biomass and litter biomass. Increased productivity...

Foster, Bryan L.; Gross, Katherine L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Equine in vitro fertilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-culturing with equine oviductal epithelial cells, 50 embryos obtained by in-vitro fertilization showed some degree of development. Sixteen embryos developed to the 2-cell stage, three to 3-cell, seven to the 4-cell, one to the S-cell, two to the 6-cell, one... to the 7-cell, two to the 8-cell, two to the 16-cell, seven to early morula (between 16 and 32 cells), eight to morulas and one to blastocyst. Some embryos developed excessively rapid and could not be considered fertilized embryos. Probably those fast...

Vasquez C., Juan Carlos

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nitrate movement in soils and nitrogen uptake efficiency as affected by nitrogen source, time of application, and a nitrification inhibitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NITRATE MOVEMENT IN SOILS AND NITROGEN UPTAKE EFFICIENCY AS AFFECTED BY NITROGEN SOURCEs TINE OF APPLICATIONs AIJD A NITRIFICATION INHIBITOR A Thesis by KENNETH PHAIJON BANKS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University..., Norwood silt loam (Typic Udifluvent) and Houston Black clay (Udic Pellustert) to determine the amount of N03-N leaching from various N fertilizer sources. Nitrate N movement, as affected by time of application, was determined for (NHq)2 Sop, urea...

Banks, Kenneth Phanon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effect of feed intake and method of feeding and digestibility of nitrogen, amino acids and energy at the distal end of the small intestine and over the total tract in growing-finishing swine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and feed:gain ratios of the ad libi- tum fed pigs was similar to performance obtained in commercial pork pro- duction systems. Feeding level or feeding method did not affect (P&, 05) nutrient digestibilities determined at the distal end of the small in... EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE A 3x3 Latin Square designed trial was conducted in duplicate to de- termine if feeding level and method of feeding affects the availability of nitrogen, selected amino acids and energy at the end of the small in- testine and over...

Haydon, Keith Dale

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

The impact of water and nitrogen limitation on maize biomass and resource-use efficiencies for radiation, water and nitrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The impact of limited water and nitrogen (N) supply on maize productivity and on the utilisation efficiency of key production resources (radiation, water and N) was quantified in two field experiments during consecutive seasons in Canterbury, New Zealand. In experiment 1 crops were subjected to five N treatment rates (0400kgN/ha) and, in experiment 2, to three N (0 to 250kg/haN) and two water regimes (dryland and fully irrigated) using a rain-shelter structure. Limited N and water reduced yield and affected resource-use efficiencies. Total biomass ranged from 8Mg DM/ha for dryland nil N crops to up to 28MgDM/ha for fully irrigated and N fertilised crops. Radiation use efficiency declined with N and water limitation from a maximum of 1.4gDM/MJ to 0.6g DM/MJ. Transpiration water use efficiency was higher in water stressed crops than irrigated crops (5070kgDM/ha/mm) and increased linearly with N fertilizer rates in proportion to the increase in radiation use efficiency. The crop conductance decreased from 0.19mm/MJ in irrigated crops to 0.07mm/MJ in dryland crops with negligible response to N fertilizer rates. Nitrogen use efficiency declined with N input rates from 100 to 150kg DM/kg N, being inversely related to the efficiency of both water and radiation use. Dryland crops recovered 25% less N from applied fertilizer than irrigated crops. These results highlight that benchmarks of resource efficiency need to consider the level of intensification of the production system and illustrate trade-offs between yield targets and the efficiency of water and N use, that depend on the scale of analysis. To establish a balance between economic returns and environmental impacts, these trade-offs need to be managed depending on the relative values assigned to the use-efficiency of each input resource in relation to crop productivity.

Edmar I. Teixeira; Michael George; Thibault Herreman; Hamish Brown; Andrew Fletcher; Emmanuel Chakwizira; John de Ruiter; Shane Maley; Alasdair Noble

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Non-point source pollution in Indian agriculture: Estimation of nitrogen losses from rice crop using remote sensing and GIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents a detailed understanding of nitrogenous fertilizer use in Indian agriculture and estimation of seasonal nitrogen loosses from rice crop in Indo-Gangetic plain region, the food bowl of the Indian sub-continent. An integrated methodology was developed for quantification of different forms of nitrogen losses from rice crop using remote sensing derived inputs, field data of fertilizer application, collateral data of soil and rainfall and nitrogen loss coefficients derived from published nitrogen dynamics studies. The spatial patterns of nitrogen losses in autumn or kharif and spring or rabi season rice at 1נ1km grid were generated using image processing and GIS. The nitrogen losses through leaching in form of urea-N, ammonium-N (NH4-N) and nitrate-N (NO3-N) are dominant over ammonia volatilization loss. The study results indicate that nitrogen loss through leaching in kharif and rabi rice is of the order of 34.9% and 39.8% of the applied nitrogenous fertilizer in the Indo-Gangetic plain region. This study provides a significant insight to the role of nitrogenous fertilizer as a major non-point source pollutant from agriculture.

Abha Chhabra; K.R. Manjunath; Sushma Panigrahy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

96

Commercial Fertilizers 1924-25.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................... 10.00 Analysis ................................... 11.34 ................................... Analysis 11.53 Fidelity Chemical Corporation. Houston. Texas- Fidelity Ammoniated Superphosphate with potask Fertilizer...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach; Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.)

1925-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Relation of Soil Nitrogen, Nitrification and Ammonification to Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................ 6 Relation of the Crops to the Total Nitrogen of the Soil ........... 7 Relation of the Different Crops ................................. 8 Relation of Surface Soil to Subsoil ............................. 13 Acid Soils Compared with Non-Acid... of Production of Nitrates to the Results of the Pot Ex- periments ................................................ 21 Extensive Work ............................................ 24 Relation of Nitric Nitrogen to Nitrogen Removed by First Crop .... 24...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1921-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and absolute contributions of nitric acid (HNO3) and NOx (nitric oxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO2)) to totalTropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest A thesis. Steven C. Wofsy Cassandra Volpe Horii Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition

99

Plant responses associated with adaptation to low nitrogen stresses in selected Cynodon cultivars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with low stress tolerant bermudgrass cultivars. Four Cynodon cultivars, Midway, Tifgreen, Texturf 10, and FB-119, were maintained at three nitrogen fertility levels for 10 bi-weekly observations of shoot height, internode length, number..., representing two species, were Midway (Cynodon dactylon x C. transvaalensis) which has a high nitrogen requirement; Tifgreen (C. dactylon x C. trans- vaalensis), a medium nitrogen requirement; and Texturf 10 (C. dac- tylon) and FB-119 (C. dactylon) both...

Sifers, Samuel I.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

National Fertilizer Development Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

h-L h-L National Fertilizer Development Center May 15, 1980 nww Hr. William Et Mott, Director Environmental Control Technology Division Office of Environment Dcpartiaent of Energy Washington, DC 20545 Dear Mr. Mott: This is in response to your letter of May 5 requesting ccmments on a report dated Xarct; 1930 which summarizes a preliminary radiological survey of facilities used in the early 1950's for studies of recovery of uranium from leached zone ore. I have made a few suggested changes to the report, which is being returned to you. * Thaul, you for the opportunity to review this report. Sincerely, , Enclosure Development Branch . 1 -a' . I . . . PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY MUSCLE SHOALS, ALA&A Work .performed by the Health and Safety Research Division

102

Commercial Fertilizers in 1948-49.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. F. FUDGE, State Chemist T. L. OGIER, Associate State Chemist Department of Agronomy [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Preface This is the 47th annual fertilizer bulletin. It contains in- formation regarding the Texas fertilizer law... of Fertilizers 17 Analyses of Fertilizers. 1948-49 .................................................................... 19 Summary ............................................................................................................ 19 BULLETIN 714...

Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Simulation of soil water dynamics and rice crop growth as affected by bunding and fertilizer application in inland valley systems of West Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rice production in rainfed inland systems is constrained by rainfall distribution and the heterogeneity of the topography that frequently lead to runoff causing erosion and loss of nutrients especially nitrogen. The use of water-saving and nutrient management technologies such as bunding and fertilizer application could help farmers maintain soil moisture and reduce nutrient losses thereby increase rice production. This study used the crop model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) to assess soil water dynamics and rice crop growth as affected by bunding and fertilizer application in inland valley systems of West Africa. The model was parameterized using observed soil water characteristics and crop parameters and run against observation data collected from 2007 to 2010 in a factorial trial combining bund and fertilizer rate. Simulation of soil water condition was satisfactory for unbunded conditions with coefficients of determination (R2) from comparison between simulated and observed soil water content between 0.64 and 0.68 depending on soil depth. Depth of ponded water during the growing period was adequately predicted in three out of four years. Simulated LAI development, total aboveground biomass and grain yield compared well with field observations in unbunded plots, the MRE (mean relative error) of simulated yield was 618%. In bund plots in 2009 and 2010, the grain yield was overestimated by the model when no fertilizer was applied (MRE=45%). Although negative effect of elevated iron concentration in the rice plant reduces the model performance, it was used to indicate effective effect of iron on the growth of crop the presence of bund in very wet year. The general use of the model for rainfed rice production at a large scale requires identification of areas with iron toxicity risk.

Omonlola Nadine Worou; Thomas Gaiser; Kazuki Saito; Heiner Goldbach; Frank Ewert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Commercial Fertilizers in 1945-46.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS GIBB GILCHRIST, President 6000 Copies This is the 44th annual fertilizer bulletin. It contains in- formation regarding the Texas Fertilizer Laws, statistics con- cerning the sale of )fertilizer during the 1945... ................................................................................................................ 16 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] BULLETIN NO. 684 October, 1946 COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS IN 1945-1946 J. F. Fudge, State Chemist, and T. L. Ogier, Associate State Chemist This is the 44th annual fertilizer bulletin published in compliance...

Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Commercial Fertilizers in 1946-47.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF TEXAS GIBB GILCHRIST, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] PREFACE This is the 45th annual fertilizer bulletin. It contains information regarding the Texas fertilizer laws, statistics concerning the sale of fertilizer during the 1946... ............................................................................................................... Summary 17 JLLETIN NO. 696 October, 1947 COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS IN 1946-47 J. F. Fudge, State Chemist, and T. L. Ogier, Associate State Chemist Department of Agronomy This is the 45th annual fertilizer bulletin published in compliance with the Texas...

Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Nitrogen dioxide detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Agnew, Stephen F. (Los Alamos, NM); Christensen, William H. (Buena Park, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

REVIEW PAPER Factors and processes affecting plant biodiversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fertilization . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Nitrogen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Phosphorous

Boyer, Edmond

108

Reading Comprehension - Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Liquid Nitrogen Nitrogen is the most common substance in Earth's _________ crust oceans atmosphere trees . In the Earth's atmosphere, nitrogen is a gas. The particles of a gas move very quickly. They run around and bounce into everyone and everything. The hotter a gas is, the _________ slower faster hotter colder the particles move. When a gas is _________ cooled warmed heated compressed , its particles slow down. If a gas is cooled enough, it can change from a gas to a liquid. For nitrogen, this happens at a very _________ strange warm low high temperature. If you want to change nitrogen from a gas to a liquid, you have to bring its temperature down to 77 Kelvin. That's 321 degrees below zero _________ Kelvin Celsius Centigrade Fahrenheit ! Liquid nitrogen looks like water, but it acts very differently. It

109

Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Commercial Fertilizers in 1910 - 1911.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ton represents the cost of the plant food in the un- raw material at retail in large markets. It is not the price ch the fertilizer is sold. T'he selling price includes cost of mix- szcks, transportation, manufacturer's profit, in addition...-11. tables beginning at the top of page 7 give a list of the fertilizers red for sale in Texas for September 1, 1910, to September 1, In addition to the name and address of the manufacturer and e of the brand, the following information and analyses...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Courtship rate signals fertility in an externally fertilizing fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to clutch size (Shapiro Giraldeau 1996...figure-1). (c) Correlates of fertilization...J. Bryant, and C. E. Soos 1995 Operational...1086/285516 ) Shapiro, D. Y. , and A...R. R. , D. Y. Shapiro, A. Marcanato, and C. W. Petersen 1995...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Commercial Fertilizers in 1949-50.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. F. FUDGE, State Chemist T. L. OGIER, Associate State Chemist [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Digest This is the 48th annual fertilizer bulletin, It contains information regarding the Texas fertilizer law, statistics con- cerning the sale...-50 .................................................................... 20 Summary ............................................................................................................. 20 BULLETIN 726 SEPTEMBER 1950 Commercial Fertilizers in 7 949 -50 J. F. FUDGE, State Chemist, and T. L. OGIER, Associate...

Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Effect of fertilizer treatments on the fruit quality of the Halehaven peach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resulted in a tree condition described by Jones, Van Horn and Finch (9) that would lead to a decrease 1n ascorbic acid. Under the cond1tions of drought and nitrogen fertilizer it can be seen that fruit size was greatly affected. In fact it was imposs... changes in Florida oranges. U. '. D. A. Tech. Bul. 753& 20-37. 9. Jones, W. W. , C. W. Van Horn and A. H. Finch. 1945. The influence oi' nitrogen nutrition of the tree upon the ascorbic acid content and other chemical and physical characteristics...

Storey, James Benton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Analyses of Commercial Fertilizers Sold during 1955-56.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

!,ear Grades of the 1-2-1 ratio accounted for 67 percent and the 1-1-1 ratio for 11 percent of the total lli' 281,797 tons of mixed goods sold. Nitrogenous materials accounted for 44 percent, superphosph;tl~ for 27 percent and ammoniated phosphates...

Fudge, J. F.

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed. 13 figs.

Goldstein, A.H.; Rogers, R.D.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates be inferred for important trace gases such as ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Chemical transport models.11 to 3.79. Total nitrogen dioxide columns can be retrieved from space in the 405­465 nm window

Haak, Hein

117

Fertilizers for Rice in Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the rice-growing area, however, dif- ferent soils responded differently to fertilizers applied to rice. In the experiments on Lake Charles clay soil near Devers, in Liberty County, and on the light-colored soils in Orange County, applications of super... ........................................ Tests in Liberty County 14 ........................................ Tests in Orange County 15 ................ Work with Manganese, Copper. Zinc. Iron. and Boron 16 Acknowledgments .......................................... 16 Summary...

Wyche, R. H. (Robert Henry)

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 2: Comparisons between different liquors  

SciTech Connect

This continuation of earlier work reports fuel nitrogen release for black liquors at two temperatures during pyrolysis of single droplets in an oxygen-free environment. Approximately half of the 20--60% fuel nitrogen released was ammonia and half was molecular nitrogen. The total amount of fixed nitrogen released during pyrolysis was almost linearly proportional to the liquor nitrogen content. The yield of fixed nitrogen for birch liquors was significantly higher than for pine liquors, and the yield for bagasse liquor was extremely high.

Aho, K.; Nikkanen, S. (A. Ahlstrom Corp., Varkaus (Finland)); Hupa, M. (Abo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

120

Fertilizer Imports/Exports | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fertilizer Imports/Exports Fertilizer Imports/Exports Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Fertilizer Imports/Exports Dataset Summary Description This product provides U.S. annual data on imports and exports of selected fertilizer types. The data cover imports from 1995 to 2009 and exports from 1990 to 2009 for 26 major fertilizer products and materials, and for 82 major trading countries. Tags {U.S.,imports,exports,fertilizer,agriculture,USDA} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated July 5, 2012 Publisher Economic Research Service, Department of Agriculture

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Commercial Fertilizers in 1944-45.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION C. H. McDowell, Acting Director . College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 674 September 1945 COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS IN 1944-45 G. S. FRAPS, and T. L. OGIER DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY r Ll ~~TF'Y 'P A, & M. c...C)LL~L AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS GIBB GILCHRIST, President 6500 Copies This is the annual Fertilizer Control Bulletin. It conta statistics regarding fertilizers sold in Texas, information rega ing the fertilizer law, and analyses of samples...

Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1945-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The earned income tax credit and fertility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Government programs designed to provide income safety nets often restrict eligibility to families with children, creating an unintended fertility incentive. This paper considers whether dramatically changing ince...

Reagan Baughman; Stacy Dickert-Conlin

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogeosciences, 6, 20992120, 2009 www.biogeosciences.net/6/2099/2009/ Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Biogeosciences Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.... Inclusion of fundamental ecological interactions between carbon and nitrogen cycles in the land component of an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) leads to decreased carbon uptake associated with CO2 fertil- ization, and increased carbon...

Thornton, P. E.; Doney, S. C.; Lindsay, Keith; Moore, J. K.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Fung, I.; Lamarque, J. F.; Feddema, Johannes J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The Abundance of Interstellar Nitrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the HST Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), we have obtained high S/N echelle observations of the weak interstellar N I 1160, 1161 A absorption doublet toward the stars Gamma Cas, Lambda Ori, Iota Ori, Kappa Ori, Delta Sco, and Kappa Sco. In combination with a previous GHRS measurement of N I toward Zeta Oph, these new observations yield a mean interstellar gas phase nitrogen abundance (per 10$^6$ H atoms) of 10$^6$ N/H = 75 +/- 4. There are no statistically significant variations in the measured N abundances from sightline to sightline and no evidence of density-dependent depletion from the gas-phase. Since N is not expected to be depleted much into dust grains in these diffuse sightlines, its gas-phase abundance should reflect the total interstellar abundance. Consequently, the GHRS observations imply that the abundance of interstellar nitrogen (gas plus grains) in the local Milky Way is about 80% of the solar system value of 10$^6$ N/H = 93 +/- 16. Although this interstellar abundance deficit is somewhat less than that recently found for oxygen and krypton with GHRS, the solar N abundance and the N I oscillator strengths are too uncertain to definitively rule out either a solar ISM N abundance or a 2/3 solar ISM N abundance similar to that of O and Kr.

David M. Meyer; Jason A. Cardelli; Ulysses J. Sofia

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

In search of a fertile future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... NORSK Hydro is Norway's largest company and is 51 per cent state owned. With ... a long way since its origin as a regional producer of fertilizers. Not only has Norsk Hydro joined the ranks of world leaders in fertilizer production by the acquisition of large ...

1987-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

Herbicide and fertilizers promote analogous phylogenetic responses but opposite functional responses in plant communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Throughout the world, herbicides and fertilizers change species composition in agricultural communities, but how do the cumulative effects of these chemicals impact the functional and phylogenetic structure of non-targeted communities when they drift into adjacent semi-natural habitats? Based on long-term experiment we show that fertilizer and herbicides (glyphosate) have contrasting effects on functional structure, but can increase phylogenetic diversity in semi-natural plant communities. We found that an increase in nitrogen promoted an increase in the average specific leaf area and canopy height at the community level, but an increase in glyphosate promoted a decrease in those traits. Phylogenetic diversity of plant communities increased when herbicide and fertilizer were applied together, likely because functional traits facilitating plant success in those conditions were not phylogenetically conserved. Species richness also decreased with increasing levels of nitrogen and glyphosate. Our results suggest that predicting the cumulative effects of agrochemicals is more complex than anticipated due to their distinct selection of traits that may or may not be conserved phylogenetically. Precautionary efforts to mitigate drift of agricultural chemicals into semi-natural habitats are warranted to prevent unforeseeable biodiversity shifts.

Lo?c Pellissier; Mary S Wisz; Beate Strandberg; Christian Damgaard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Frostbite Theater - Just for Fun - How to Make Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Total Lunar Eclipse of December 21, 2010 The Total Lunar Eclipse of December 21, 2010 Previous Video (The Total Lunar Eclipse of December 21, 2010) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Viewer Requests!) Liquid Nitrogen Viewer Requests! How to Make Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream What do you do if you need to make ice cream in a hurry? Liquid nitrogen to the rescue! [ Show Transcript ] Steve: Okay! So, We are here at Jefferson Lab and it's about 100 degrees outside and we though "Why not make a little bit of ice cream?" Now, of course we don't have a lot of ice cream on hand, but we do have half-and-half, sugar and vanilla and, since we are at Jefferson Lab where we have a superconductive accelerator, we have lots of liquid nitrogen. So, we're going to make ourselves some liquid nitrogen ice cream. So, Joanna

128

Soilplant nitrogen cycling modulated carbon exchanges in a western temperate conifer forest in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen controls, on the seasonal and inter-annual variability of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) in a western temperate conifer forest in British Columbia, Canada, were simulated by a coupled carbon and nitrogen (C&N) model. The model was developed by incorporating plantsoil nitrogen algorithms in the Carbon-Canadian Land Surface Scheme (C-CLASS). In the coupled C&N-CLASS, the maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco (Vcmax) is determined non-linearly from the modelled leaf Rubisco-nitrogen, rather than being prescribed. Hence, variations in canopy assimilation and stomatal conductance are sensitive to leaf nitrogen status through the Rubisco enzyme. The plantsoil nitrogen cycle includes nitrogen pools from photosynthetic enzymes, leaves and roots, as well as organic and mineral reservoirs from soil, which are generated, exchanged, and lost by biological fixation, atmospheric deposition, fertilization, mineralization, nitrification, root uptake, denitrification, and leaching. Model output was compared with eddy covariance flux measurements made over a 5-year period (19982002). The model performed very well in simulating half-hourly and monthly mean NEP values for a range of environmental conditions observed during the 5 years. C&N-CLASS simulated NEP values were 274, 437, 354, 352 and 253gCm?2 for 19982002, compared to observed NEP values of 269, 360, 381, 418 and 264gCm?2, for the respective years. Compared to the default C-CLASS, the coupled C&N model showed improvements in simulating the seasonal and annual dynamics of carbon fluxes in this forest. The nitrogen transformation to soil organic forms, mineralization, plant nitrogen uptake and leaf Rubisco-nitrogen concentration patterns were strongly influenced by seasonal and annual temperature variations. In contrast, the impact of precipitation was insignificant on the overall forest nitrogen budget. The coupled C&N modelling framework will help to evaluate the impact of nitrogen cycle on terrestrial ecosystems and its feedbacks on Earth's climate system.

M. Altaf Arain; Fengming Yuan; T. Andrew Black

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Water Vapor Transport and the Production of Precipitation in the Eastern Fertile Crescent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Persian Gulf, etc.) may have a relatively strong affect on the total precipitation falling in the Fertile is the Mediterranean, and to the south is the Persian Gulf. While it has been generally accepted that the area sensitivity to changes in the condition of the Persian Gulf relative to the Mediterranean Sea. This may have

Evans, Jason

130

Viscosity Measurements on Nitrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity Measurements on Nitrogen ... (15)?Clarke, A. G.; Smith, E. B. Low-temperature viscosities and intermolecular forces of simple gases. ... The coupling also serves as a frictionless bearing for a slender rotating cylindrical body which is slowed down due to the viscous drag of the fluid surrounding the cylinder. ...

Daniel Seibt; Eckhard Vogel; Eckard Bich; Daniel Buttig; Egon Hassel

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

131

ODD NITROGEN PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

This chapter is in three parts. The first concerns interpretations that can be made from atmospheric observations regarding nitrogen compounds and ozone, the second reviews some predictions made by atmospheric models, and the third compares between certain model results and atmospheric measurements with an emphasis on detecting evidence of significant disagreements.

Johnston, Harold S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Commercial Fertilizers in 1932-33.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- tion for Free Fertilizer Analysis," to the State Chemist, College Statior,, Texas, before taking any sample. The proper sampling of a fertilizer re- quires care. If the sample is not properly taken, it does not represent . - -- - - COMMERCIAL... .............. 27.95 1 28.86 Ford Motor Company 49 .'?I 2 50.47 Gilmer Cotton Oil & Fertilizer Company 1 4 35.05 1 36.69 Gulf States Chemical Company. Inc. ........... 1 0 1 48.00 1 50.50 International Agricultural Corporation / 31 1 0 25.96 1 26...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.)

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freeze the Rainbow! Freeze the Rainbow! Previous Video (Freeze the Rainbow!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Fire!) Liquid Nitrogen and Fire! Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze! What happens when the freezing power of liquid nitrogen meets the antifreezing power of ethylene glycol? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: What happens when the freezing power of liquid nitrogen... Steve: ...meets the antifreezing power of ethylene glycol! Joanna: While a mix of 70 percent ethylene glycol and 30 percent water doesn't freeze until 60 degrees below zero, it's still no match for liquid nitrogen. At 321 degrees below zero, liquid nitrogen easily freezes

134

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Let's Freeze Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Freeze the Rainbow!) Freeze the Rainbow! Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! What happens when the world's most beloved cryogenic liquid meets one of the most common household appliances? Find out when we try to microwave liquid nitrogen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: A little while ago we received an email from Star of the Sea Catholic School in Virginia Beach, Virginia, asking what happens when you place liquid nitrogen in a microwave. Well, I just happen to have some liquid nitrogen! Steve: And I just happen to have a microwave!

135

Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility Facility Cargill Fertilizer Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597°, -82.3017728° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.9903597,"lon":-82.3017728,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

136

Ocean Fertilization: Science, Policy, and Commerce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past 20 years there has been growing interest in the concept of fertilizing the ocean with iron to abate global warming. This interest was catalyzed by basic scientific experiments showing that iron limits primary ...

Strong, Aaron L.

137

The effect of nitrogen and date of seeding upon certain morphological and agronomic characters of the rice (Oryza sativa L.) variety Belle Patna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be used but after basic seed formation the cycle turned to starch formation qnd nitrogen assimila- tion in the seed was decreased. Other studies by Hall (14, 16) sug- gested that a delay of fertilization and initial flooding increased the seed yield... be used but after basic seed formation the cycle turned to starch formation qnd nitrogen assimila- tion in the seed was decreased. Other studies by Hall (14, 16) sug- gested that a delay of fertilization and initial flooding increased the seed yield...

Siwi, Bernard Hendrik

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

Study of the moisture-fertility requirements of cotton in the Brazos River Valley, 1957  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TREATMENT WITHIN EACH MOISTURE PLOT Scale: I = 25 Figure 2 ths goal of finding the specific fertil1ty treatment which would give the best results. Planting Deltapine TPSA Regular cotton, a locally adapted variety, was planted on Apr11 ll. The cotton... of the irrigation water supply. Fourth, It was felt that the use of the pre-planting irrigatIon to Insure adequate soll moisture during the early growing season would provide a better opportunity to compare reactions to the various fertility treatments. A total...

Keese, Carroll Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

Commercial Fertilizers in 1914-15.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

....................................... Table I.-Analyses of Commercial Fertilizers. Season of 1914 Manufacturer. Place of Business and Brand . wift & Co .. Fort Worth. Texas. Harvey. La.. and ~hreve-1 1 port. La.- Swift's Ammoniated Raw Bone Superphosphate...!ysis ........................................ COIIBIERCI AL FEP,TII;IZERS IN 191 4-1 915 . Table I.-Analyses of Commercial Fertilizers. Season of 191 1-19 15 . Swift & Co., Fort Worth. Texas. Harvey. Ls., and Shreve- port. La.-Continued. Swift's Superphosphate (Potash Ammoniated)-Guaran- tee...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Commercial Fertilizers in 1943-44.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. S. FRAPS; and T. L. OGIER DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY 7- - - - - -- -- -- - - -- I I TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, Director ' I College Station, Texas I BULLETIN NO. 662 October 1944 I COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS IN 1943...-44 1 I - I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I GIBB GILCHRIST, President I AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS 5000 Copies [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] This is the annual Fertilizer Control Bulletin. It contains statistics...

Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locatingdominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater[186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locatingtotal dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

145

Genomic Differences Between Highly Fertile and Sub-Fertile Holstein Dairy Heifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based upon services per conception (SPC); those animals with a single SPC were determined to be highly fertile and animals with greater than or equal to 4 SPC were classified as sub-fertile. Whole genome association analysis was performed on 20...

Navarrette, Ashley Elizabeth

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

147

Commercial Fertilizers in 1909-10.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the manufacturer or consumer. We wish to emphasize this statement: No free analysis of fertilizers or insecticides will be made until we are satisfied that the sample is a fair representative of the goods. DIRECTIONS I?OR TAKING SAMPLES. The following... is sold. The selling price includes cost of mixing, sacks, transportation, manufacturer's profit, in addition to the cost of the raw material. le follov I Texas : FERTILIZER VALUATIONS, 1909-1 0. uble in e taken ring valuations have been adopted...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Commercial Fertilizers in 1947-48.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, Director College Station, Texas BULLETIN 705 September 1948 COlTlmERGlFll FERTILIZERS In 1947-48 J. F. FUDGE, State Chemist T. L. OGIER, Associate State Chemist DEPARTMENT OF AGRONOMY Lf...ERATy A~rjculturzr &? ; $1 jCev~elax Collaga Sta tijn, 1 Gxas THE TEXAS AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE SYS'l'EM GIBB GILCHRIST, Chancellor [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] PREFACE This is the 46th annual fertilizer bulletin. It contains...

Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Carbon dioxide enrichment: Data on the response of cotton to varying CO{sub 2}, irrigation, and nitrogen  

SciTech Connect

This document presents results from field CO{sub 2}-enrichment experiments conducted over five consecutive growing seasons, 1983--1987. These results comprise data concerning the effects of continuous CO{sub 2} enrichment on the growth of cotton under optimal and limiting levels of water and nitrogen. Unlike many prior C0{sub 2} enrichment experiments in growth chambers or greenhouses, these studies were conducted on field-planted cotton at close to natural conditions using the open-top chamber approach. Measurements were made on a variety of crop response variables at intervals during the growing season and upon crop harvest. The initial experiment examined the effects of varying C0{sub 2} concentration only. In the following two seasons, the interactive effects of C0{sub 2} concentration and water availability were studied. In the final two seasons, the effects of the three-way interaction between C0{sub 2} concentration, water availability, and nitrogen fertility were investigated. The data comprise three types of information: identification variables (such as year, institution and situ codes, and treatment regimens), intermediate growth measurements (such as plant height, leaf area index, number of flowers, and dry weight of leaves) taken at various times during the growing season, and crop harvest results (such as lint yield, seed yield, and total aboveground dry biomass). They are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NAP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NAP consists of this document and a magnetic tape (or a floppy diskette, upon request) containing machine-readable files. This document provides sample listings of the CO{sub 2} enrichment response data as they appear on the magnetic tape or floppy diskette and provides detailed descriptions of the design and methodology of these experiments, as well as a complete hard copy listing of all of the data in the form of a supplemental text provided as an appendix.

Sepanski, R.J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Kimball, B.A.; Mauney, J.R.; La Morte, R.L.; Guinn, G.; Nakayama, F.S.; Radin, J.W.; Mitchell, S.T.; Parker, L.L.; Peresta, G.J.; Nixon, P.E. III; Savoy, B.; Harris, S.M.; MacDonald, R.; Pros, H.; Martinez, J. [Agricultural Research Service, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Lakatos, E.A. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Soil and Water Science

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Carbon dioxide enrichment: Data on the response of cotton to varying CO sub 2 , irrigation, and nitrogen  

SciTech Connect

This document presents results from field CO{sub 2}-enrichment experiments conducted over five consecutive growing seasons, 1983--1987. These results comprise data concerning the effects of continuous CO{sub 2} enrichment on the growth of cotton under optimal and limiting levels of water and nitrogen. Unlike many prior C0{sub 2} enrichment experiments in growth chambers or greenhouses, these studies were conducted on field-planted cotton at close to natural conditions using the open-top chamber approach. Measurements were made on a variety of crop response variables at intervals during the growing season and upon crop harvest. The initial experiment examined the effects of varying C0{sub 2} concentration only. In the following two seasons, the interactive effects of C0{sub 2} concentration and water availability were studied. In the final two seasons, the effects of the three-way interaction between C0{sub 2} concentration, water availability, and nitrogen fertility were investigated. The data comprise three types of information: identification variables (such as year, institution and situ codes, and treatment regimens), intermediate growth measurements (such as plant height, leaf area index, number of flowers, and dry weight of leaves) taken at various times during the growing season, and crop harvest results (such as lint yield, seed yield, and total aboveground dry biomass). They are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NAP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NAP consists of this document and a magnetic tape (or a floppy diskette, upon request) containing machine-readable files. This document provides sample listings of the CO{sub 2} enrichment response data as they appear on the magnetic tape or floppy diskette and provides detailed descriptions of the design and methodology of these experiments, as well as a complete hard copy listing of all of the data in the form of a supplemental text provided as an appendix.

Sepanski, R.J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center); Kimball, B.A.; Mauney, J.R.; La Morte, R.L.; Guinn, G.; Nakayama, F.S.; Radin, J.W.; Mitchell, S.T.; Parker, L.L.; Peresta, G.J.; Nixon, P.E. III; Savoy, B.; Harris, S.M.; MacDonald, R.; Pros, H.; Martinez, J. (Agricultural Research Service, Phoenix, AZ (United States)); Lakatos, E.A. (Arizona Univ., Tucs

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Effects of nitrogen additions on above- and belowground carbon dynamics in two tropical forests  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing rapidly in tropical regions, adding N to ecosystems that often have high background N availability. Tropical forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, yet the effects of N deposition on C cycling in these ecosystems are poorly understood. We used a field N-fertilization experiment in lower and upper elevation tropical rain forests in Puerto Rico to explore the responses of above- and belowground C pools to N addition. As expected, tree stem growth and litterfall productivity did not respond to N fertilization in either of these Nrich forests, indicating a lack of N limitation to net primary productivity (NPP). In contrast, soil C concentrations increased significantly with N fertilization in both forests, leading to larger C stocks in fertilized plots. However, different soil C pools responded to N fertilization differently. Labile (low density) soil C fractions and live fine roots declined with fertilization, while mineral-associated soil C increased in both forests. Decreased soil CO2 fluxes in fertilized plots were correlated with smaller labile soil C pools in the lower elevation forest (R2 = 0.65, p\\0.05), and with lower live fine root biomass in the upper elevation forest (R2 = 0.90, p\\0.05). Our results indicate that soil C storage is sensitive to N deposition in tropical forests, even where plant productivity is not N-limited. The mineral-associated soil C pool has the potential to respond relatively quickly to N additions, and can drive increases in bulk soil C stocks in tropical forests.

Cusack, D.; Silver, W.L.; Torn, M.S.; McDowell, W.H.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen and Fire!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Antifreeze! Antifreeze! Previous Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery!) Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery! Liquid Nitrogen and Fire! A burning candle is placed in a container of liquid nitrogen! Filmed in front of a live studio audience. Well, they were live when we started... [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Steve: Now, then. I'm a little bit afraid to ask this next question because I think I already know the answer, but is anyone in here feeling a little... dangerous? You're willing to take a chance? Because I am willing to do an experiment they haven't let me do since 'The Incident.' Now, because of the danger, I cannot have a volunteer. I must do this on my

153

Substitution of corn by mesquite pod meal in pellet diets for lambs: nitrogen compounds metabolism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantification of total excretion of urine is essential to describe processes such as nitrogen balance, or even to estimate metabolizable energy and microbial protein synthesis by excretion of purine derivativ...

M. L. A. Pereira; T. C. J. Pereira

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Bioavailability of Effluent-derived Organic Nitrogen along an Estuarine Salinity Gradient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Total maximum daily loads for nitrogen (N) are currently being established for the Chesapeake Bay watershed. While we know inorganic N is bioavailable in the environment and therefore its input contributes to cul...

Katherine C. Filippino; Margaret R. Mulholland; Peter W. Bernhardt

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Effect of nitrogen-containing compounds in catalytic feedstock on the composition of gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrotreated vacuum gasoil from straight-run distillation of a Russian export mixture (GRES) and the same gasoil after treatment with sulfuric acid (OGRES) so that nitrogen-containing compounds were totally re...

I. K. Shishkova; D. S. Stratiev

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Commercial Fertilizers in 1931-32 and Their Uses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT s~"~~"ZI~~~~~' A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 460 OCTOBER, 1932 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS IN 1931-32 AND THEIR USES AGJXICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL... per cent, and the use of fertilizer on cotton apparently de- creased much more than 40 per cent. Practically all the sales fif mixed fertilizers were confined to about 20 analyses. The Bulletin contains a discussio ! use of fertilize] nd...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

What Happens to Nitrogen in Soils?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains the chemistry of nitrogen, the processes by which nitrogen is added to and removed from the soil, and methods of preventing nitrogen losses on agricultural lands....

Provin, Tony; Hossner, L. R.

2001-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

158

Commercial Fertilizers in 1915-16.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's Ammoniated Phosphate \\Vithout Potash- .................................... Guarantee ........................................ Analysis ................ Analysis . Planter's ~&rnb;ia&d ' iih'ds'phatk' 'NO . 122 Without ........................ Potash... and Brand. Arkansas Fertilizer Co., Little Rock, Ark.- \\\\-hite Diamond Acid Phosphate. ......................... White Diamond Ammoniated Bone Superphosphate. ........ 'Vhite Diamond Ammoniated Bone Superphosphate Without -- - Potash...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1916-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Commercial Fertilizers in 1911-1912.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................. ................................ Looelady Fidelity Ammoniated Superphosphate With .................... ~o%a.~h--Guarantee Houston ................................ Houston ................................ ...... Fidelity Cereal Cultivator-Guarantee. Lovelady... 14457 13988 14362 1 4466 13953 14093 14131 Mew Orleans Acid L Fertilizer Co., New Or- leans, Lo. Ammoniated Raw Bone Super Phosphate- Guarantee ............................ Kirbyville ............................... Carthage...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Commercial Fertilizers in 1919-20.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Guarantee .................. ......................................... Analysis ......................................... Analysis Fidelity Chemical Corporation, Houston, Texas.- Fidelity Ammoniated Superphosphate With Potash Fertilizer... ........................................... 15.96 27961 27967 27993 27962 27991 28005 28043 28145 28214 28269 28291 27929 27944 27986 28296 Swift & CO., Fort Worth. Texas. Harvey and Shreveport. La.- Swift's Ammoniated Raw Bone Superphosphate- Guarantee...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.)

1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effect of Fertilizer Placement on Perennial Pastures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACRE I OF DALLISGRASS AND WHITE CLOVER AS IN- FT.UENCED BY FERTILIZER AND METHOD OF FERTILIZER PLACEMENT, 1952 130 0 3.040 3,720 3,390 3,380 0 1" 30 3,420 3,340 3,290 3.350 4,210 3,620 3,110 3,650 30 30 3.958 4,890 3,430 4.093 60 30 5,790 5.f... ACRE I OF DALLISGRASS AND WHITE CLOVER AS IN- FT.UENCED BY FERTILIZER AND METHOD OF FERTILIZER PLACEMENT, 1952 130 0 3.040 3,720 3,390 3,380 0 1" 30 3,420 3,340 3,290 3.350 4,210 3,620 3,110 3,650 30 30 3.958 4,890 3,430 4.093 60 30 5,790 5.f...

Smith, J. C.; Riewe, Marvin E.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Plant growth is influenced by glutamine synthetase-catalyzed nitrogen metabolism  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia assimilation has been implicated as participating in regulation of nitrogen fixation in free-living bacteria. In fact, these simple organisms utilize an integrated regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism; we except to observe an integration of nitrogen and carbon fixation in plants; how could these complex systems grow efficiently and compete in the ecosystem without coordinating these two crucial activities We have been investigating the role of ammonia assimilation regulating the complex symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes. Just as is observed in the simple bacterial systems, perturbation of ammonia assimilation in legumes results in increased overall nitrogen fixation. The perturbed plants have increased growth and total nitrogen fixation capability. Because we have targeted the first enyzme in ammonia assimilation, glutamine synthetase, this provides a marker that could be used to assist selection or screening for increased biomass yield. 45 refs., 4 tabs.

Langston-Unkefer, P.J.

1991-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fertility in China in 2000: a county level analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Undoubtedly, China?s family planning policy is largely responsible for the nation?s current low fertility, as well as the geographical variation in fertility just mentioned. Research has shown, however, that other factors have played a part in this fertility...

Terrell, Heather Kathleen Mary

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Does economic development drive the fertility rebound in OECD countries?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Does economic development drive the fertility rebound in OECD countries? Angela Luci, Olivier Thévenon 167 2010 #12;2 #12;3 Does economic development drive the fertility rebound in OECD countries.thevenon@ined.fr We examine how far changes in fertility trends are related to ongoing economic development in OECD

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

165

Field measurements of ammonia volatilization from surface applications of nitrogen fertilizers to a calcareous soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrolysis study . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . 71 Table 14 Effect of added soil water and added urease on loss of NH3 from Solution 32 applied at a rate of 224 kg N/ha in the field Page 72 15 Effect of method of application and added urease... on loss of NH from Solution 32 applied at a r2te of 112 kg N/ha in the field . . . . . . . . . . 74 16 Some physical and chemical characteris- tics of Houston Black clay . . . . . . . . 89 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page A schematic of the apparatus used...

Hargrove, W. L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

166

RESPONSE OF TWO CANOLA VARIETIES (Brassica napus L.) TO NITROGEN FERTILIZER LEVELS AND ZINC FOLIAR APPLICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and yield attributes of canola plants (combined data ofand yield attributes of canola plants (combined data ofby imports from abroad. Canola (Brassica napus ) is one of

El Habbasha, El Sayed Fathi; El Salam, Mostafa Abd

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Soil Nitrogen Mineralization Potential for Improved Fertilizer Recommendations and Decreased Nitrate Contamination of Groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to determine optimum conditions for estimating soil microbial biomass (SMB) from previously dried soils and to identify a quick, reliable biochemical predictor of soil N mineralization potential. Initial evaluations were conducted on a Weswood silty clay loam...

Franzluebbers, Alan; Haney, Richard; Hons, Frank

168

Flax Response to Nitrogen and Phosphorus Fertilization Grant Jackson, WTARC, Conrad, MT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Flax has the potential to become a major source of oil for bio-diesel or bio- products because

Lawrence, Rick L.

169

Impacts of nitrogen fertilization on volatile organic compound emissions from decomposing plant litter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decomposing litter from 12 plant species over 125 days, measuring both CO2 and VOC emissions throughout with C emissions as VOCs ranging from 0% to 88% of C emissions as CO2. Methanol was the dominant VOC was occasionally large enough to account for the increased CO2 emissions on a per unit C basis, suggesting that N

Fierer, Noah

170

New technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions from nitrogenous fertilizer in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of greenhouse gas (N 2 O and CO...Greenhouse gas emissions from...prospect of coal-fired power generation energy-saving...m-3 natural gas, and 0.08...electricity generation using coal, hydro, and nuclear power in China and...

Wei-feng Zhang; Zheng-xia Dou; Pan He; Xiao-Tang Ju; David Powlson; Dave Chadwick; David Norse; Yue-Lai Lu; Ying Zhang; Liang Wu; Xin-Ping Chen; Kenneth G. Cassman; Fu-Suo Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

New technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions from nitrogenous fertilizer in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...production in China using a life cycle method. Their...locomotives is 2.46 kg of diesel oil per 1,000 t of freight...Association and N trade data from the General Administration of Customs. This...XH, Zuo TY (2006) [Life cycle inventories of fossil fuels...

Wei-feng Zhang; Zheng-xia Dou; Pan He; Xiao-Tang Ju; David Powlson; Dave Chadwick; David Norse; Yue-Lai Lu; Ying Zhang; Liang Wu; Xin-Ping Chen; Kenneth G. Cassman; Fu-Suo Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

New technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions from nitrogenous fertilizer in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...locomotives is 2.46 kg of diesel oil per 1,000 t of freight...for an internal combustion engine (45% of journeys) and 11...combustion by internal combustion engines for vehicle transportation...Association and N trade data from the General Administration of Customs...

Wei-feng Zhang; Zheng-xia Dou; Pan He; Xiao-Tang Ju; David Powlson; Dave Chadwick; David Norse; Yue-Lai Lu; Ying Zhang; Liang Wu; Xin-Ping Chen; Kenneth G. Cassman; Fu-Suo Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Instant Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freezing Balloons! Freezing Balloons! Previous Video (Freezing Balloons!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Shattering Flowers!) Shattering Flowers! Instant Liquid Nitrogen Balloon Party! Need a bunch of balloons blown-up quickly? Liquid nitrogen to the rescue! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: We've been making videos for a while now and we've learned that people like balloons and liquid nitrogen! Steve: So... Here you go! Balloon: Crackling... Balloon: Pop! Joanna: Ooh! Balloon: Pop! Balloon: Pop! Steve: If you'd like to know the science of what's going on behind this, please one of our first videos, "Liquid Nitrogen Experiments: The Balloon."

174

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

175

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

176

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

177

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

179

It's Elemental - The Element Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen The Element Nitrogen [Click for Isotope Data] 7 N Nitrogen 14.0067 Atomic Number: 7 Atomic Weight: 14.0067 Melting Point: 63.15 K (-210.00°C or -346.00°F) Boiling Point: 77.36 K (-195.79°C or -320.44°F) Density: 0.0012506 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words nitron and genes, which together mean "saltpetre forming." Say what? Nitrogen is pronounced as NYE-treh-gen. History and Uses: Nitrogen was discovered by the Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford in 1772. It is the fifth most abundant element in the universe and makes up

180

Fertile, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fertile, Iowa: Energy Resources Fertile, Iowa: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.2644001°, -93.418263° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.2644001,"lon":-93.418263,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nitrogen removal from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Phosphorus Fertilization of Direct Seeded Tomatoes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harllnqlm 0 Rroodearf loo 200 300 4M) Broodcoat 0 Band Harnnqsn Cloy Ohtonee tba~ P war placed from center of row (hrj 8-1 101 July 1970 Phosphorus Fertilization of Direct Seeded Tomatoes %Ob Appllrd (lb/l) !xas A&M University xas... of Literature .............................. 3 Materials and Methods ...................................................... 4 Results and Discussion ..................................................... 5 Influence of Phosphorus Rate and Placement on Early...

Hipp, Billy W.

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen NITROGEN 13.4.2002 4-1 Chapter 4 Nitrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the nitric oxide is oxidized to nitrogen dioxide, so the environmental effects of emissions of bothZevenhoven & Kilpinen NITROGEN 13.4.2002 4-1 Chapter 4 Nitrogen 4.1 Introduction Probably the most damaging of the hazardous nitrogen compounds formed during combustion are nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen

Laughlin, Robert B.

185

Analyses of Commercial Fertilizers Sold during 1954-55.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate Fertilizer Guaranteed 33.50 195 34.10 750 33.68 1175 33.89 2741 33.80 Davison Chemical Company. Gretna, Louisiana Davco Bull Doa Fertilizer 5-10-5 Guaranteed 5.00 139 5.03 1336 4.77 Davco Bull Dog Fertilizer 4-12-4 Goldenrod 12... Nitrate Fertilizer Guaranteed 33.50 195 34.10 750 33.68 1175 33.89 2741 33.80 Davison Chemical Company. Gretna, Louisiana Davco Bull Doa Fertilizer 5-10-5 Guaranteed 5.00 139 5.03 1336 4.77 Davco Bull Dog Fertilizer 4-12-4 Goldenrod 12...

Fudge, J. F.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

187

Discharge characteristics of atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency glow discharges with argon/nitrogen  

SciTech Connect

In this letter, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges in {gamma} mode with argon/nitrogen as the plasma-forming gas using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes driven by radio-frequency power supply at 13.56 MHz are achieved. The preliminary studies on the discharge characteristics show that, induced by the {alpha}-{gamma} coexisting mode or {gamma} mode discharge of argon, argon-nitrogen mixture with any mixing ratios, even pure nitrogen, can be employed to generate the stable {gamma} mode radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges and the discharge voltage rises with increasing the fraction of nitrogen in the argon-nitrogen mixture for a constant total gas flow rate.

Wang Huabo; Sun Wenting; Li Heping; Bao Chengyu; Gao Xing; Luo Huiying [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Public Health and Family Medicine, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100069 (China); Beijing Center for Diseases Control and Prevention, Beijing 100013 (China)

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

189

Commercial Fertilizers and Poisonous Insecticides in 1908-9.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It is not easy to take a fair sample of a fertilizer, iand the analysis of a sample which does not fairly represent the goods might possibly work an injustice to the manufacturer or consumer. We wish to emphasize this statement: No free analysis of fertilizers... OF FERTILIZERS 1908-09. The tables beginning at the top of page 9 give a list of the fertilizers registered for sale in Texas September 1, 1908 to September 1, 1909. In ad- dition to the name and address of the manufacturer and the name of the brand...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1909-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Analysis of Commercial Fertilizers Sold during 1957-58.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mahoning Co. Phillips Chemical Co. Pittsburg Fertilizer Co. Red Star Fertilizer Div., SFSA Smith-Douglass Co. South Texas Fertilizer & Chemical Company Southwest Chemical Co. 7. :- Swift & Co., Plant Food Div., Houston Swift & Co., Plant Food Div... 20% Superphosphate 0-20-0 Guaranteed 00.00 20.00 00.00 1242 00.00 21.00 00.00 FIDELITY CHEMICAL CORP., HOUSTON, TEXAS Fidelity 5-10-5 Fertilizer Guaranteed 5.00 10.00 5.00 433 5.15 11.30 5.00 Fertlome Plant Food 6-12-4 Guaranteed . 6.00 12...

Fudge, J. F.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect

In recent years there has been an increasing demand to reduce and control the amount of dissolved gases in steel. Hydrogen and nitrogen are two of the most important gases which when dissolved in liquid steel affect its properties significantly. Several steelmaking additions have been investigated in this research for their effect on the hydrogen and nitrogen content of steels. It has been established that calcium hydroxide (hydrated lime) acts as a source of hydrogen. Carburizers, such as metallurgical coke, were found to result in no hydrogen pickup when added to liquid steel. Addition of petroleum coke, on the other hand, increased the hydrogen content of liquid steel. Ferroalloy such as medium carbon ferromanganese when added to the liquid iron was found to increase its nitrogen content, the increase being proportional to the amount of ferroalloy added. Similarly, addition of pitch coke, which had a significant nitrogen impurity, increased the nitrogen content of liquid iron. A mathematical model was developed to quantify the absorption of nitrogen and hydrogen from the air bubbles entrained during tapping of liquid steel. During the bottom stirring of liquid metal in a ladle, the inert gas escaping from the top displaces the slag layer and often forms an open eye. The absorption of atmospheric nitrogen through the spout eye was estimated for different slag thickness and gas flow rate. The ultimate goal of this research was to develop a comprehensive set of equations which could predict the nitrogen and hydrogen pickup from their various sources. Estimates of hydrogen and nitrogen pickup during the steel transfer operations such as tapping and ladle stirring and the predicted pickup from steelmaking additions were integrated into empirical equations. The comprehensive model is designed to predict the gas pickup under varying operating conditions such as the metal oxygen and sulfur content, the total tapping or stirring time, the stirring gas flow rate and the slag thickness. The model predictions are based on mathematical and empirical evidence which are derived from thermodynamic and kinetic fundamental principles.

Richard J. Fruehan; Siddhartha Misra

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

193

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

194

Commercial Fertilizers in 1942-43.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Texas for 1942-43 were 0-14-7, 3-10-0, 3-8-5, 3-15-0, 3-12-6, -2, 4-12-4, 4-10-7; 10-10-0 and 10-20-0 were restricted to fruits and tables in the Rio Grande Valley, and 6-30-0 and 10-20-0 to West Texas. 3-8-7 was sold as Victory Garden Fertilizer...-10-7 ........................................................................................................................ 18,865 Superphosphate . 2070 ............................................................................... 7, 344 Nitrate of soda, 167, ........................................................................................ 5, 857 3-15...

Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.); Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Puberty and fertility in Santa Gertrudis heifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) December 1976 ABSTRACT Puberty and Fertility in Santa Gertrudis Heifers (December 1976) Lee Dexter Shipp, B. S. , Texas Tech Vniversity Co-Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. J. N. Wiltbank Dr. P. G. Harms The effects of age, weight and skeletal size... the synchronization treatment and did not appear (P&. 05) to have an adverse effect. vi ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author is grateful to Dr. J. N. Wiltbank for his planning and guidance of this research project and for the encouragement and inspiration he provided...

Shipp, Lee Dexter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

EFFECT OF NITROGEN OXIDE PRETREATMENTS ON ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxygen react to give nitrogen dioxide, which rapidly reactsis simultaneous, the nitrogen dioxide formed reacts withaccomplished by absorbing nitrogen dioxide in water, usually

Borrevik, R.K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

198

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

199

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

200

IN THIS ISSUE Nitrogen on Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGRONOMY NOTES July 2005 IN THIS ISSUE COTTON Nitrogen on Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Protecting Cotton Squares and Blooms / University of Florida / Larry Arrington, Interim Dean. #12;2 Nitrogen on Cotton Now is the time to apply N

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

203

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

204

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

205

Analysis of Commercial Fertilizers Sold During 1951-52.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by different manufacturers, as based on ac- tual analysis of official samples, with guaranteed valuations and selling prices, and show the extent to which the various fertilizer manufacturers met or exceeded their guarantees. CONTENTS Page... .................................................................................. .. 16 Relation of Valuation Guaranteed to Valuation Found .............. .. ...... 17 How to Obtain Free Analysis of Fertilizers .............................................. 18...

Ogier, T. L.; Fudge, J. F.

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Tomato Varieties and Fertilizers for the Lower Rio Grand Valley.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LTBRARY. A M COLLEGE. CBWPUS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR College Station, Brazos County, Texas BULLETIN NO. 438 NOVEMBER, 1931 DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE B ' , %> I . Tomato Varieties and Fertilizers far... of Fertilizer Treatment on "Pocketing" 37 Acknowledgments ........................................... 37' .................................................. Summary 37 Literature Cited ............................................ 38 BULLETIN NO. 438 NOVEMBER...

Friend, W. H. (William Heartsill)

1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

WORKING PAPER N 2009 -16 Marital fertility and wealth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the exception in explaining the Industrial Revolution1 . At the time fertility fell (apx. 1800), France advances of the Industrial Revolution to be transformed into higher living standards and sustained economic growth. Understanding the revolution in fertility behavior between the Malthusian and the modern eras has

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OXIDES OF NITROGEN Nitrogen Dioxide (N0 2) Nitrous Oxide (NFigure 7. Emissions of nitrogen dioxide from gas turbines (by AiResearch(8)) . Nitrogen dioxide emissions from a

Matthews, Ronald D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Removal of nitrogen and sulfur from oil-shale  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for enhancing the removal of nitrogen and sulfur from oil-shale. The process consists of: (a) contacting the oil-shale with a sufficient amount of an aqueous base solution comprised of at least a stoichiometric amount of one or more alkali metal or alkaline-earth metal hydroxides based on the total amount of nitrogen and sulfur present in the oil-shale. Also necessary is an amount sufficient to form a two-phase liquid, solid system, a temperature from about 50/sup 0/C to about 350/sup 0/C., and pressures sufficient to maintain the solution in liquid form; (b) separating the effluents from the treated oil-shale, wherein the resulting liquid effluent contains nitrogen moieties and sulfur moieties from the oil-shale and any resulting gaseous effluent contains nitrogen moieties from the oil-shale, and (c) converting organic material of the treated oil-shale to shale-oil at a temperature from about 450/sup 0/C to about 550/sup 0/C.

Olmstead, W.N.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

211

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen Show!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insulators! Insulators! Previous Video (Insulators!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Superconductors!) Superconductors! Liquid Nitrogen Show! All of your favorite liquid nitrogen experiments all in one place! Flowers! Balloons! Racquetballs! Nothing is safe! Just sit back, relax, and enjoy the show! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Usually, every couple years, Jefferson Lab hosts an Open House. This is the one time the public and come and tour our accelerator and end stations. Steve: During the 2010 Open House, our cameraman snuck into one of the ongoing cryo shows that are held throughout the day. He missed half of it. So if you want to see the entire thing, check our website to see when the

212

NITROGEN REMOVAL FROM NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process for the denitrogenation of natural gas. Large proven reserves in the Lower-48 states cannot be produced because of the presence of nitrogen. To exploit these reserves, cost-effective, simple technology able to reduce the nitrogen content of the gas to 4-5% is required. Technology applicable to treatment of small gas streams (below 10 MMscfd) is particularly needed. In this project membranes that selectively permeate methane and reject nitrogen in the gas were developed. Preliminary calculations show that a membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 3 to 5 is required to make the process economically viable. A number of polymer materials likely to have the required selectivities were evaluated as composite membranes. Polyacetylenes such as poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) [PTMSP] and poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP] had high selectivities and fluxes, but membranes prepared from these polymers were not stable, showing decreasing flux and selectivity during tests lasting only a few hours. Parel, a poly(propylene oxide allyl glycidyl ether) had a selectivity of 3 at ambient temperatures and 4 or more at temperatures of {minus}20 C. However, Parel is no longer commercially available, and we were unable to find an equivalent material in the time available. Therefore, most of our experimental work focused on silicone rubber membranes, which have a selectivity of 2.5 at ambient temperatures, increasing to 3-4 at low temperatures. Silicone rubber composite membranes were evaluated in bench-scale module tests and with commercial-scale, 4-inch-diameter modules in a small pilot plant. Over six days of continuous operation at a feed gas temperature of {minus}5 to {minus}10 C, the membrane maintained a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 3.3. Based on the pilot plant performance data, an analysis of the economic potential of the process was prepared. We conclude that a stand-alone membrane process is the lowest-cost technology for small gas streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. The membrane process can recover more than 60-70% of the hydrocarbon content of the gas at a cost of $0.60-0.70/Mscfd. The capital cost of the process is about $100-200/Mscf. A number of small operators appear to be ready to use the technology if these costs can be demonstrated in the field. A second, and perhaps better, application of the technology is to combine the membrane process with a cryogenic process to treat large gas streams containing 10-20% nitrogen. The combination process achieves significant synergies. The membrane process performs a bulk separation of the gas, after which the cryogenic process treats the membrane residue (nitrogen-enriched) gas to recover more methane. Overall, hydrocarbon recoveries are greater than 95%. The capital cost of the combination process is lower than that of either process used alone and the processing costs are in the range $0.30-0.40/Mscf. This operating cost would be attractive to many gas producers. MTR is collaborating with a producer of cryogenic systems to further develop the combination process. A number of innovations in membrane process designs were made during the project; four U.S. patents covering various aspects of the technology were filed and issued.

K.A. Lokhandwala; M.B. Ringer; T.T. Su; Z. He; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans; A. Morisato; K. Amo; A. DaCosta; R.W. Baker; R. Olsen; H. Hassani; T. Rathkamp

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Commercial Fertilizers and Poisonous Insecticides in 1907-8.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the State Chemist is satisfied that it represents the goods from which it was taken. It is not easy to take a fair sample of a fertilizer, and the analysis of an unrepresentative Sam- ple might possibly work an injustice to the manufacturer or consumer..., manufacturer's profit and dealer's profit, in addi- tion to the cost of the raw material. FERTILIZER VALUATIONS, 1907-08. The following valuations have been adopted for commercial fertilizers in Texas for the season of 1907-08 : Cents per pound...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

215

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

216

Variable rate spreader for real-time spot-application of granular fertilizer in wild blueberry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The commercial variable rate (VR) fertilizer spreader can change fertilizer rates in different management zones using global positioning system (GPS) guided prescription maps. The VR fertilizer spreader allows the independent control only on half of ... Keywords: Controller, Digital photography, Fertilizer, Sensing and control system, Spot-application, Wild blueberry

Hassan S. Chattha; Qamar U. Zaman; Young K. Chang; Scott Read; Arnold W. Schumann; Gordon R. Brewster; Aitazaz A. Farooque

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Newsrooms fertile ground for burnout among layoff survivors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of stress "coupled with journalists' often priest-like commitment and passion for the work" makes journalism "a fertile field for burnout development," reports Scott Reinardy, assistant professor in the William ...

Reinardy, Scott

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

219

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

220

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

222

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

223

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

224

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

225

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

226

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

227

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

228

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

229

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

230

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

231

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

232

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

233

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

234

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

235

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

236

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

237

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

238

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

239

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

240

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

242

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

243

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

244

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

245

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

246

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

247

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

248

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

249

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

250

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

251

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

252

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

253

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

254

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

255

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

256

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

257

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

258

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

259

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

260

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

262

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

263

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

264

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

265

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

266

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

267

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

268

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

269

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

270

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

271

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

272

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

273

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

274

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

275

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

276

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

277

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

278

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

279

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

280

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Analytica Chimica Acta 463 (2002) 283293 Determination of total phosphorus and nitrogen in turbid waters by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Bestrecoveriesofphosphorusandnitrogenby microwaveheatingwereobtainedwhensolutionsweredigestedat95 Cfor40 min.Quantitativerecoveriesofphosphorusfrom Chlorella suspensions up to 1000 mg/l were analysis; NEIS no. 3 Chlorella; NEIS no. 2 pond sediment Corresponding author. Tel.: +61-26201-2531; fax

Canberra, University of

282

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition » Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen.

283

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

284

Modelling and simulation of nutrient dispersion from coated fertilizer granules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The usage of Controlled-Release Fertilizer (CRF) is essential in plants and crops to fulfill the need and requirement for the modern agriculture which now feeds 6 billion people. Therefore modeling and simulation of nutrient release from coated fertilizer has become the best method to study the behavior of some parameters toward water saturation in and nutrient release from the coated-fertilizer granule. This paper is the improvement development of modeling and computer simulation by Basu [1] which include some of the factors affecting the water saturation time and nutrient release time from a coated-fertilizer. The effect of granule radius the diffusivity of water and nutrient the temperature of surrounding the contact areas and the characteristic of the coating are studied and the simulation was developed using MATLAB software. The studies and understanding of this project is very important and useful especially to determine the important parameters in the manufacturing process of the coated-fertilizer granule and also will be useful for the farmers/users in the selection of the best fertilizers for their crops.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O[sub 2]/cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N[sub 2]. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N[sub 2] at a much quicker rate than unexcited N[sub 2], greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed. 1 fig.

Chen, H.L.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

286

Environmental biogeochemistry. V. 1: Carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

V. 1: Carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur and selenium cycles. V. 2: Metals transfer and ecological mass balances. Ann Arbor Sci. Publ., Inc., Ann. Arbor, Mich.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

287

Nitrogen Deposition in the Southern High Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen Deposition in the Southern High Plains Nitrogen is necessary for life on earth, but getting too much of it can be harmful. Recent research in delicate alpine watersheds of the western United States has suggested that the amount... Nitrogen Deposition in the Southern High Plains Conservation of mass: It?s not just a good idea, it?s the law Nitrogen, along with every other element in nature, obeys certain physical laws. The first of those laws, the law of conservation of mass...

Upadhyay, Jeetendra; Auvermann, Brent W.; Bush, K. Jack; Mukhtar, Saqib

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

288

Nitrogen oxide emissions from a kraft recovery furnace  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) emissions from a rebuilt kraft recovery furnace slightly exceeded the specified limit of 1.1 lb/ton (0.55 kg/metric ton) of black-liquor solids. Mill trials were undertaken to determine whether NOx emissions could be minimized by modifying furnace operation. NOx emissions increased when secondary air was shifted to tertiary ports. NOx emissions fell when the amounts of primary and total air were decreased, but this increased emissions of other pollutants. After demonstrating that best operation of the furnace could not meet the permit with an emissions limit that matched the furnace's performance at best operation.

Prouty, A.L.; Stuart, R.C. (James River Corp., Camas, WA (United States)); Caron, A.L. (NCASI West Coast Regional Office, Corvallis, OR (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Mechanisms of plant species impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, this microbial nitrogen loop is driven by plant-supplied carbon and provides a strong negative feedback through by an increase in the relative nitrogen content in decomposing litter and a much lower carbon-to-nitrogen ratio by a microbial nitrogen loop. Nitrogen is released from the soil organic matter and incorporated into microbial

Minnesota, University of

290

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

291

Energy cost improvement of the nitrogen oxides synthesis in a low pressure plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of XIXth century, the synthesis of nitrogen oxides by an electric discharge through the air has been a microwave discharge. The total pressure is equal to 50 torr. The optimal value of energy consumption, equal with the industrial process used at present, and by 78 % in comparison with those obtained with a plasmajet arc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

292

Sources of organic nitrogen at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sources of organic nitrogen at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field S. Q. LANG,1 G environment, the Lost City hydrothermal field (30°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Total hydrolizable amino acid (THAA carbon (2.5­15.1%). The amino acid distributions, and the relative concentrations of these compounds

Gilli, Adrian

293

Mechanisms of Oxygen Reduction Reaction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene for Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mechanisms of Oxygen Reduction Reaction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene for Fuel Cells ... At each step, the optimization structure was obtained, and adsorption energy for these molecules on the N-graphene was calculated. ... In this figure, for the first step, the reference energy state is the total energy of optimized N-graphene and OOH molecules. ...

Lipeng Zhang; Zhenhai Xia

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

294

NITROGEN ISOTOPES IN PALEOCLIMATE JULIAN P. SACHS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

denitrification, the conversion of nitrate to N2 gas with its subsequent loss to the atmosphere (25-180 Tg N of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and is the precursor to petroleum deposits it is important to understand nitrogen of nitrogen is atmospheric dinitrogen gas (N2), consisting of 3.9 x 109 Tg N (Wada and Hattori, 1990

Sachs, Julian P.

295

Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ) : ,- Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding T. W. Eagar Department of }faterials, mechanisms, and expected levels of oxygen and nitrogen contamination during gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc indicating the importance of dec9mposition of SiOz into silicon monoxide and oxygen are presented, indicating

Eagar, Thomas W.

296

Technology Innovations and Experience Curves for Nitrogen Oxides Control Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

red power plants. Nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) is one of the sixeffects, including nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and ground-levelgradually oxidized to nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) once emitted

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.; Taylor, Margaret R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Insulators!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Popping Film Canisters! Popping Film Canisters! Previous Video (Popping Film Canisters!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Show!) Liquid Nitrogen Show! Insulators! Cups full of water are placed into bowls of liquid nitrogen! Which cup will insulate the best? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a container of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And these are two plastic cups! Joanna: Let's see which cup is the better insulator! Steve: Okay! So, um, how do we do that? Joanna: Well, we'll pour water into each of the cups and then we'll pour the liquid nitrogen into each of the bowls. If we then place the cup in the bowl, the heat from the water will try to pass through the cup into the

298

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Freezing Balloons!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Season Two Bloopers Season Two Bloopers Previous Video (Season Two Bloopers) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Instant Liquid Nitrogen Balloon Party!) Instant Liquid Nitrogen Balloon Party! Freezing Balloons! What happens when a balloon full of air is plunged into a container full of liquid nitrogen? Play the video to find out! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a container of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And this is a really big balloon! Joanna: Let's see what happens when we place the balloon in the liquid nitrogen! Steve: Okay! Wait! Wait! Wait! Wait! Wait! Isn't the balloon going to pop? Joanna: We'll see! Steve: Aw, man... Huh. Okay, so the balloon didn't pop. But, there's

299

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

nitrogen oxides | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 20 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279720 Varnish cache server nitrogen oxides Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect

The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

Delnick, Frank M.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nitrogen Fixation and Dentrification in Sediments of Eutrophic Mediterranean-Type Estuaries: Seasonal Patterns and Responses to Anthropogenic Nitrogen Inputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and mechanisms controlling sediment nitrogen fixation in aKane T & Fong P. 2007. Sediment nitrogen fixation in UpperKane T & Fong P. 2007. Sediment nitrogen fixation in Upper

Kane, Tonya Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nitrogen-doped Graphene and Its Electrochemical Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

doped Graphene and Its Electrochemical Applications. Nitrogen-doped Graphene and Its Electrochemical Applications. Abstract: Nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) is obtained by...

305

Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines Injection Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines...

306

The determination of compressibility factors of gaseous propane-nitrogen mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thc Beg;voc cf kBSTBACT The propane-nitrogen system has been investigated in the gaseous phase at a temperature of 300 F. and at pressures up to 4/0 atmospheres. Compressibility curves for three mixtures of this system have been determined. A... the pressure corresponding to the "n " expansion ? th? the partial pressure of nitrogen the partial pressure oi' propane the total pressure of a gaseous system the universal gas constant (0. 08206 liter-atmosphere/ gram mole - oK) the absolute...

Hodges, Don

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

Below population replacement fertility rates: Can assisted reproductive technology (ART) help reverse the trend?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective This paper considers the potential contribution that assisted reproductive technology (ART) may make to population replenishment in countries that have experienced extended periods of below-population-replacement Total Fertility Rates (TFR), by focusing on the specific situation of Singapore, which has recorded ultra-low \\{TFRs\\} for many years. Methods The factors contributing to ultra-low \\{TFRs\\} in Singapore, the economic and social consequences of endemic below-population-replacement fertility rates and remedial measures initiated by the government are critically analysed, focussing specifically on the government's subsided ART provisions of the Marriage and Parenthood package. In addition the paper provides a close analysis of available contemporary data regarding ART and ART outcomes both in Singapore and internationally. Results Despite limited public accessibility to data concerning ART outcomes in Singapore, it is possible to make some assessment of the potential contribution of publicly-funded ART provision and the possible extension of access to elective oocyte preservation to population replenishment. Conclusions Subsidised ART can-at best-make a marginal contribution to government population policy.

Eric Blyth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Dissociation and excitation coefficients of nitrogen molecules and nitrogen monoxide generation  

SciTech Connect

The excitation coefficient ?{sub N2} is calculated for the excited metastable level of N{sub 2}(A{sub 3}?{sub u}{sup +}) in nitrogen molecules. In addition, the dissociation coefficient of nitrogen molecules is investigated by making use of the Boltzmann distribution of the electrons in atmospheric plasmas. The excitation and electron-impact dissociation coefficients of nitrogen molecules are analytically expressed in terms of the electron temperature T{sub e} for evaluations of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in atmospheric plasmas. As an application example of these coefficients, the nitrogen monoxide generation through a microwave torch is carried out for a development of medical tool. The nitrogen monoxide concentration from a microwave plasma-torch can be easily controlled by the nitrogen flow rate, mole fraction of the oxygen gas, and the microwave power. A simple analytic expression of the nitrogen monoxide concentration is obtained in terms of the oxygen molecular density and gas flow rate. The experimental data agree remarkably well with the theoretical results from the analytical expression. A microwave nitrogen-torch can easily provide an appropriate nitrogen monoxide concentration for the wound healings.

Uhm, Han S.; Na, Young H.; Choi, Eun H.; Cho, Guangsup [Department of Electronic and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University 447-1 Wolgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Electronic and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University 447-1 Wolgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Global metaanalysis of the nonlinear response of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions to fertilizer nitrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...programs, the US Department of Energy Office of Science (Grant DE-FCO2-07ER64494) and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Grant DE-ACO5-76RL01830...Tsukuba 3602 N 14012 E 12 Brazil Capivari, San Paolo 2293...

Iurii Shcherbak; Neville Millar; G. Philip Robertson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Dry matter, yield components and pulping quality studies on four varieties of kenaf as influenced by nitrogen fertilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

content + ? '1 Nitrooen (ko ha ) V=. ic y 1 i anu. !g Iyo. 1 Cuba 20;2 F. ye r g ]. ade s 7 l 67 3a 33 31. 1. 8 28. 03 26. 55 ] 34 32. 75 35. 73 31. 98 31. 00 32. 54' 33. 45 30. 00 28. 78 29. 52 32. 00 + . . i'; im' er =. '. d t' in r... content + ? '1 Nitrooen (ko ha ) V=. ic y 1 i anu. !g Iyo. 1 Cuba 20;2 F. ye r g ]. ade s 7 l 67 3a 33 31. 1. 8 28. 03 26. 55 ] 34 32. 75 35. 73 31. 98 31. 00 32. 54' 33. 45 30. 00 28. 78 29. 52 32. 00 + . . i'; im' er =. '. d t' in r...

Idem, Nditoi Udo Akpan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Development of rapid methods for estimating the fertilizing ability (nitrogen and potassium) of pig slurry and its changes during storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studied. The volume of biogas produced, the biogas required for the maintenance of fermentation (self. The digester output expressed as ml biogas/M3 tank/day ranged from 0.4 to 1.3 m"11' m3. d over a period of 9 can be checked #12;by the ratio of biogas production to organic matter input : 0.20 to 0.3 M3/kg

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

312

The influence of management and nitrogen fertilization on forage and seed production in Dallisgrass, Paspalum dilatatum Poir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIBRARY. A A AI COLLEGE QF TEXAS T '8 3 -I JJ F I U S JJ 0 S 0 F H A IJ A 9 S:-I 5 EJ T A I D AJ I T R G. G E M . P 3 JI T I L I Z A T I O N ' 0 JJ PvO, PAQSAIJDSS'SJJ P 'JJ O JJ- JJ 'C T I Q JJ I JIJ D, A L'L' I. S 8 JI A S S~ l' P A:. S 7... A L JJ N La Jo S liras'haaxi SuhmNtad So 4hs. GraCuahe Sohool of the Agr9. saltvral ant BsohanA. eal goIIsgs of Texas Ia IaLrAial fulfQ3aIsiat, of the rsqufremsdts for the dsgrss of -3XX'ATATUK. X ~ J Streetese 'f Apyxeyed, as to style an6...

Streetman, L. J

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

Stimulation of precocious flowering of rooted slash pine cuttings, loblolly pine grafts, and Virginia pine seedlings by two nitrogen fertilizers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, at the recommended rate and thereby, replaced the need for the weekly applications of the nutr1ent solution. No other fert1lization was used until June, 1979. The appropriate fert11i zer treatments were applied in July, 1979. The ammoni um n1trate and urea fert1...

Holmes, Penelope Joy Dennis

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Sustainability of Forage-based Livestock Production Systems in South Texas in an Era of High Synthetic Nitrogen Fertilizer Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability of Forage-based Livestock Production Systems in South Texas in an Era of High as a component of the forage crop. Forage-based livestock production systems in south Texas are either extensive of legumes in for- age production systems in this area. Soils in this region tend to be high pH, and many

315

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration ... Large-scale soil application of biochar may enhance soil fertility, increasing crop production for the growing human population, while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. ...

J.-D. Mao; R. L. Johnson; J. Lehmann; D. C. Olk; E. G. Neves; M. L. Thompson; K. Schmidt-Rohr

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fertility patterns among the minority populations of China: A multilevel analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minorities. Finally, in addition to the direct impacts of socioeconomic, marital, and cultural assimilation on minority fertility, several cross-level interactions are significant and indirectly affect women's fertility. Findings reported...

Chang, Chiung-Fang

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Economic Removal of Nitrogen from LNG  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, economic factors have made transportation of natural gas in the form of LNG increasingly attractive. Shipping costs and heating value ... control necessitate specifications limiting the nitrogen ...

J-P. G. Jacks; J. C. McMillan

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Nitrogen fixation by a methanogenic archaebacterium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... fixing microbial systems able to convert wastes which are low in combined nitrogen, including lignocellulose biomass substrates, industrial wastes and food process wastes such as ... substrates, industrial wastes and food process wastes such as whey, to CH4.

Patti A. Murray; Stephen H. Zinder

1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Nitrogen oxide delivery systems for biological media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elevated levels of nitric oxide (NO) in vivo are associated with a variety of cellular modifications thought to be mutagenic or carcinogenic. These processes are likely mediated by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as ...

Skinn, Brian Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Fertilizer Facts: December 1999, Number 22 Canola Nutrient Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fertilizer Facts: December 1999, Number 22 Canola Nutrient Management Grant Jackson Western Triangle Ag. Research Center, Conrad With the development of more reliable pest control methods, canola has become an important oilseed crop that offers small grain producers an excellent rotational crop. Canola

Lawrence, Rick L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Microfluidic Facility, Harvard Medical School LIQUID NITROGEN TANK HANDLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidic Facility, Harvard Medical School LIQUID NITROGEN TANK HANDLING HMS microfluidics/microfabrication facility has one high pressure liquid nitrogen tank which supplies the nitrogen for some equipment normal operation. In case the liquid nitrogen tank is malfunctioning and requires to be shut down or replaced make

Paulsson, Johan

323

Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FA17 Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document. If a fish species which consumes small natural foods is grown, such as the bluegill or golden shiner, then pond fertilization can increase the production of these fish. Fertilizers provide nutrients

Watson, Craig A.

324

WILL THE STORK RETURN TO EUROPE AND JAPAN? UNDERSTANDING FERTILITY WITHIN DEVELOPED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 WILL THE STORK RETURN TO EUROPE AND JAPAN? UNDERSTANDING FERTILITY WITHIN DEVELOPED NATIONS James specialize in household production and fertility is high. In an intermediate phase, women have increasing opportunities to earn a living outside the home yet still shoulder the bulk of household production. Fertility

Lotko, William

325

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

326

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

327

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

328

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

329

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

330

Properties of nitrogen doped silicon films deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition from disilane and ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen doped silicon films have been deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition from disilane Si2H6 and ammonia NH3. Deposition kinetics is investigated, pointing out the influences of the deposition temperature, the total pressure and the gas flow rates. According to the Bruggeman theory, variations of the NH3/Si2H6 gaseous ratio allow for a wide range of the SiNx stoichiometry as well as a good control of the film nitrogen doping. The different behaviours of the nitrogen atom in silicon films are discussed and an overview of the nitrogen doped silicon physical properties (optical, mechanical and electrical) is proposed for the development of boron-doped polysilicon gates.

P Temple-Boyer; L Jalabert; E Couderc; E Scheid; P Fadel; B Rousset

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Fertilization effects on the ecohydrology of a southern California annual grassland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen limits leaf gas exchange, canopy development, and evapotranspiration in many ecosystems. In dryland ecosystems, it is unclear whether increased anthropogenic nitrogen inputs alter the widely recognized dominance ...

Parolari, Anthony Joseph

332

Nitrogen is a natural and necessary part of every healthy ecosystem, but too much nitrogen in our rivers,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), sewage treatment plants, and animal ma- nure. Once in water, nitrogen can change in chemical form

Torgersen, Christian

333

Indicators of Fertility Change in a Developing Nation: Examining the Impact of Motorcycles as a Distance Demolishing Technology on Fertility Change in Rural Indonesia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Given the consistent findings in the development literature that fertility is associated with economic growth for individuals, families, and even influences a country's Gross Domestic (more)

Muir, Jonathan A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl Phosphate: Phosphorus Nitrogen Synergism  

SciTech Connect

The effect of nitrogen additives like urea, guanidine carbonate and melamine formaldehyde on the flame retardant efficacy of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of activation energy of decomposition of treated cotton indicated that nitrogen additives enhance the thermal stability during the burning process. SEM pictures of chars formed after LOI test showed the formation of protective polymeric coating on the surface. The surface of chars formed were evaluated using FTIR-ATR and XPS analysis which showed that the coating was composed of Phosphorus-Nitrogen-Oxygen containing species. Formation of this coating during the burning process could lead to the synergistic interaction of phosphorus and nitrogen. Based on the experimental data we have further proposed several reaction mechanisms which could contribute to synergistic action and formation of protective coating on the surface of char.

Gaan, Sabyasachi; Sun, Gang; Hutches, Katherine; Engelhard, Mark H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

336

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

337

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

338

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Dry Ice vs. Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Previous Video (Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water!) Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water! Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Dry ice is cold. Liquid nitrogen is cold, too. What happens when the two are mixed together? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Have you ever wondered what happens when you mix dry ice and liquid nitrogen? Steve: Well, we just happen to have a chunk of dry ice left over from when we filmed 'How to Make a Cloud Chamber,' and here at Jefferson Lab, liquid nitrogen flows like water, so we're going to find out!

339

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Total Maximum Daily Load Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) The overall goal of the Clean Water Act is to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation’s waters." In 1999, EPA proposed changes to Section 303(d), to establish Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for watersheds that do not meet this goal. The TMDL is the highest amount of a given pollutant that is permissible in that body of water over a given period of time. TMDLs include both waste load allocation (WLA) for point sources and load allocations for non-point sources. In Appalachia, acid mine drainage (AMD) is the single most damaging non-point source. There is also particular concern of the atmospheric deposition of airborne sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury compounds. States are currently in the process of developing comprehensive lists of impaired waters and establishing TMDLs for those waters. EPA has recently proposed a final rule that will require states to develop TMDLs and implement plans for improving water quality within the next 10 years. Under the new rule, TMDL credits could be traded within a watershed.

340

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Open Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration K. Coale coale@mlml.calstate.edu (831) 632-4400 Moss Landing Marine Laboratories 8272 Moss Landing Road Moss Landing, California 95039 USA Abstract The trace element iron has been recently shown to play a critical role in nutrient utilization, phytoplankton growth and therefore the uptake of carbon dioxide from the surface waters of the global ocean. Carbon fixation in the surface waters, via phytoplankton growth, shifts the ocean/atmosphere exchange equilibrium for carbon dioxide. As a result, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and iron flux to the oceans have been linked to climate change (glacial to interglacial transitions). These recent findings have led some to suggest that large scale

342

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Sweet Potato Fertilizer Experiments at Substation No. 2, Troup.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President BULLETIN NO. 277 MARCH, 1921 SWEET POTATO FERTILIZER EXPERIMENTS AT SUBSTATION NO. 2; TROUP B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR tmLLIU)E BTATION.... Pecos, Reeves County V. L. CORY, B. S., Superintendent No. 10. College Station, Rrazas County (Feedlng and Breedlng Substation) L. J. MCCALL, Superintendent No. 11. Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County G. T. McN~ss, Superintendent **No. 12. Chillicothe...

Hotchkiss, W. S.

1921-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Availability of Nitrous Nitrogen to Plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V, .=DL ULL LI~C a~ailability 01 ILILKLL~: IIILIU~~I~ LU curn, l~aa, 8011 31LY3 1 27.3 .53 .I447 1 I 1 5: 1250 .I349 ic nitrogen ( 37.P' 1 -59 1 .2195 ru.. nv / 36.6 .57 1 .2086 I -2141 1 .O7b/ I 1. gm. nitrous nitrogen 30.2 1 .64 1 .I933 1... .12 -.01 ' .09 V1 -- I w 01 ---- I ------ el M - 1 --O6 X * ---- ------ U1 $ !z - --- i d $ --- - I -20 2 Y * F - I M 4 M .34 I --- .20 M .14 5 nitrogen --- --- -.02 .14 -.48 -.01 -12 .18 .OS...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Sterges, A. J.

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

complexes between nitrogen dioxide, nitric acid, nitrous1992) Indoor ozone and nitrogen dioxide: A potential pathwaybed of SiO 2 pellets. Nitrogen dioxide is introduced from a

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. , (2008a). Carbonyl and nitrogen dioxide emissions fromstudy of indoor nitrogen dioxide levels and respiratoryand modeled nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) concentrations. All

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nitrogen mobilization and recycling in trees. Photosynthesisloci mapping for nitrogen recycling in rice. Journal ofNitrogen Assimilation and Recycling Stphanie M. Bernard 1

Bernard, S.M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic nitrogen cycle Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biological nitrogen fixation of gaseous nitrogen. The water cycle is important to ecosystem... and Nitrogen Cycles As ... Source: Barboza, Perry - Institute of Arctic Biology,...

349

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Optimizing hydrocarbon recoveries in nitrogen rejection units  

SciTech Connect

In order to address conceptual questions such as process selection and natural gas liquids plant integration, an understanding of the effects of several additional factors on nitrogen rejection unit design is important. These factors, which may influence optimum hydrocarbon recovery, installed compression, etc., include current and forecast values for natural gas and utilities, project life, plant size, feed gas composition and product specifications, feed pressure, and process variations. Prices, project life, and plant size are analyzed in detail and presented in terms of methane recoveries as a function of nitrogen content in the feed for both double and single column processes. Trends are qualitatively discussed for the remaining factors. 13 references.

Chesney, J.D.; Davis, R.A.; Hilton, M.F.; Vines, H.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Enzymatic solubilization of nitrogenous constituents of carrots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of enzyme concentration upon nitrogen so1ubi 1i zed in carrot tops ( 10g dry weight) . Conditions of assay: pH = 3. 5, i ncubati on time = 20 hr, incubation temperature = 45'C. 24 hydrolysis. These data confirm earlier reports that -. 01% is the pro... roots and tops, a concentration of 1. 0% A-12-C at pH 3. 5 provided the maximum increase in soluble ni trogenous consti tuents . For car~ot roots, a concentration of 1. 0/ ficin at pH 4, 5 provided the maximum increase in soluble nitrogen. With carrot...

Curry, James Cannon

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Biexciton emission from single isoelectronic traps formed by nitrogen-nitrogen pairs in GaAs  

SciTech Connect

We have studied photoluminescence (PL) from individual isoelectronic traps formed by nitrogen-nitrogen (NN) pairs in GaAs. Sharp emission lines due to exciton and biexciton were observed from individual isoelectronic traps in nitrogen atomic-layer doped (ALD) GaAs. The binding energy of biexciton bound to individual isoelectronic traps was approximately 8 meV. Both the exciton and biexciton luminescence lines show completely random polarization and no fine-structure splitting. These results are desirable to the application to the quantum cryptography used in the field of quantum information technology.

Takamiya, Kengo; Fukushima, Toshiyuki; Yagi, Shuhei; Hijikata, Yasuto; Yaguchi, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku , Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Yoshita, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Onabe, Kentaro [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Katayama, Ryuji [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

354

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

355

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

356

Quantification and characterization of dissolved organic nitrogen in wastewater effluents by electrodialysis treatment followed by size-exclusion chromatography with nitrogen detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can act as a precursor of nitrogenous disinfection byproducts during oxidative water treatment. Quantification and characterization of DON are still challenging for waters with high concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, including ammonia, nitrate and nitrite) relative to total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) due to the cumulative analytical errors of independently measured nitrogen species (i.e., DON=TDN? NO 2 ? ? NO 3 ? ? NH 4 + /NH3) and interference of DIN species to TDN quantification. In this study, a novel electrodialysis (ED)-based treatment for selective DIN removal was developed and optimized with respect to type of ion-exchange membrane, sample pH, and ED duration. The optimized ED method was then coupled with size-exclusion chromatography with organic carbon, UV, and nitrogen detection (SEC-OCD-ND) for advanced DON analysis in wastewater effluents. Among the tested ion-exchange membranes, the PC-AR anion- and CMT cation-exchange membranes showed the lowest DOC loss (17%) during ED treatment of a wastewater effluent at ambient pH (8.0). A good correlation was found between the decrease of the DIN/TDN ratio and conductivity. Therefore, conductivity has been adopted as a convenient way to determine the optimal duration of the ED treatment. In the pH range of 7.08.3, ED treatment of various wastewater effluents with the PC-AR/CMT membranes showed that the relative residual conductivity could be reduced to less than 0.50 (DIN removal >90%; DIN/TDN ratio ?0.60) with lower DOC losses (6%) than the previous dialysis and nanofiltration methods (DOCloss >10%). In addition, the ED method is shorter (0.5h) than the previous methods (>124h). The relative residual conductivity was further reduced to ?0.20 (DIN removal >95%; DIN/TDN ratio?0.35) by increasing the ED duration to 0.7h (DOC loss=8%) for analysis by SEC-OCD-ND, which provided new information on distribution and ratio of organic carbon and nitrogen in different molecular weight fractions of effluent organic matter.

Kangmin Chon; Yunho Lee; Jacqueline Traber; Urs von Gunten

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Oxygen vs. Liquid Nitrogen - Liquid Oxygen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Paramagnetism) Paramagnetism Liquid Oxygen and Fire! What happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a test tube of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And this is a test tube of liquid oxygen! Joanna: Let's see what happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire. Steve: Fire?! Joanna: Yeah! Steve: Really?! Joanna: Why not! Steve: Okay! Joanna: As nitrogen boils, it changes into nitrogen gas. Because it's so cold, it's denser than the air in the room. The test tube fills up with

358

Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Redmond, OR); Lyon, David K. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

First Principles Prediction of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotubes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Principles Prediction of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotubes as a High-Performance Cathode for Li-S Batteries. First Principles Prediction of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotubes as a...

360

Method for Detection of Microorganisms That Produce Gaseous Nitrogen Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with 02-free nitrogen; the tubes were...dishes to reduce water evaporation...Detection of gas producers. Culture...conductivity detector; nitrogen was used as the...Low-pressure solubility of gases in liquid water. Chem. Rev...

Gary E. Jenneman; Anne D. Montgomery; Michael J. McInerney

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Breath is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 SCIENCE Breath is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapour, inert gases. On the basis of proton affinity, the major constituents of air and breath (nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide

362

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

363

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Nitrogen chemistry during oil shale pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Real time evolution of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN), two major nitrogen-containing volatiles evolved during oil shale pyrolysis, was measured by means of a mass spectrometer using chemical ionization and by infrared spectroscopy. While the on-line monitoring of NH{sub 3} in oil shale pyrolysis games was possible by both techniques, HCN measurements were only possible by IR. We studied one Green River Formation oil shale and one New Albany oil shale. The ammonia from the Green River oil shale showed one broad NH{sub 3} peak maximizing at a high temperature. For both oil shales, most NH{sub 3} evolves at temperatures above oil-evolving temperature. The important factors governing ammonia salts such as Buddingtonite in Green River oil shales, the distribution of nitrogen functional groups in kerogen, and the retorting conditions. The gas phase reactions, such as NH{sub 3} decomposition and HCN conversion reactions, also play an important role in the distribution of nitrogen volatiles, especially at high temperatures. Although pyrolysis studies of model compounds suggests the primary nitrogen product from kerogen pyrolysis to be HCN at high temperatures, we found only a trace amount of HCN at oil-evolving temperatures and none at high temperatures (T {gt} 600{degree}C). 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Oh, Myongsook S.; Crawford, R.W.; Foster, K.G.; Alcaraz, A.

1990-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

365

Introduction Air Quality and Nitrogen Dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Global update 2005. Primary sources of air pollutants include combustion products from power generationIntroduction Air Quality and Nitrogen Dioxide Air pollution can be defined as "the presence effects to man and/or the environment". (DEFRA) "Clean air is considered to be a basic requirement

366

groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

producer profits. This will, in turn, benefit water bodies in the area that receive stream baseflow fromgroundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer water withdraws are used for irrigation while the cities of Vernon, Burk- burnett and Electra and many

367

OXYGEN ADSORPTION ON NITROGEN CONTAINING CARBON SURFACES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OXYGEN ADSORPTION ON NITROGEN CONTAINING CARBON SURFACES Alejandro Montoya, Jorge O. Gil, Fanor-rich site of the carbon basal plane of graphite and then, it dissociates into oxygen atoms.1,2 Oxygen atoms at the edge of the carbon surface can form covalent bonds with oxygen. These sites can chemisorb

Truong, Thanh N.

368

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 NITROGEN #2NITROGEN #2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(BFB), (CFB) (BFB), (CFB) Fuel nitrogen content Excess air Air staging Limestone addition , - (BFB), (CFB) SO2 level SNCR ­ NH3 , - SNCR ­ urea SCR - Pressure , (but NO2 ) #12;HELSINKI

Zevenhoven, Ron

370

Evolutionary tradeoffs can select against nitrogen fixation and thereby maintain nitrogen limitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. evolutionary ecology model Biological nitrogen (N) fixation--the conversion of atmo- spheric N2 gas) but is equally important to explaining the paradox of N limitation. Unlike the successional question

Menge, Duncan

371

Temperature and nutrient supply interact to control nitrogen fixation ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperature and nutrient supply interact to control nitrogen fixation in oligotrophic streams: An experimental examination. Marcarelli, Amy M., Wayne A.

372

Predicting plant available nitrogen in land-applied biosolids  

SciTech Connect

The rate at which biosolids (municipal sewage sludge) may be applied to land is dependent on factors including concentrations of metals, pathogens, toxic organic compounds, and nutrients. Where other properties are not limiting, land application rates are often based on matching crop N needs with the plant available N (PAN). The objectives of this study were to quantify biosolids PAN under field conditions and to propose methods including computer simulation to estimate biosolids PAN in a land application program. Six biosolids were evaluated over a 2-yr period. Laboratory incubations were used to obtain decomposition kinetics. Field studies provided a relationship between inorganic fertilizer N rate and sorghum sudangrass [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] tissue N concentration, which was used to determine biosolids PAN in a Captina silt loam soil. Biosolids PAN released during the field experiment was linearly related to biosolids C/N ratio, organic N, or total N. Computer model predictions of PAN in the field were also linearly related to field estimates of biosolids PAN. Decay series obtained using the computer model, average biosolids decomposition kinetics, and average application site weather were very similar to decay series obtained using the computer model, actual weather, and kinetic data. Either decay series and routine analytical data for biosolids are proposed to estimate PAN for a given situation. Use of the computer model and weather data makes the approach site-specific, while analytical data for a specific biosolids makes the approach biosolids-specific.

Gilmour, J.T.; Skinner, V.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Vapour nucleation in a cryogenicfluiddissolvednitrogen mixture during rapid depressurization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the dissolved nitrogen comes out of the...effect of dissolved nitrogen was not addressed...non-condensable gas (nitrogen) in a cryogenic...g. superheated water or pure refrigerants...to estimate the solubility of nitrogen in...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Nitrogen use in switchgrass grown for bioenergy across the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen use in switchgrass grown for bioenergy across the USA V.N. Owens a , D.R. Viands b , H Available online 17 August 2013 Keywords: Nitrogen removal Switchgrass Bioenergy Nitrogen use efficiency as a forage, conservation, and bioenergy crop [1e5]. It offers a number of distinct benefits including broad

Pawlowski, Wojtek

375

QuestionQuestion How does nitrogen deposition affect roadside  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. 2004. Concentrations of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide at roadside verges, and their contributionQuestionQuestion How does nitrogen deposition affect roadside plant community composition? 1. Is there a gradient of nitrogen deposition to freeway verges from traffic exhaust? 2. Are there other sources of N

Hall, Sharon J.

376

Simple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'' and spatial variations of gaseous dry N deposition (i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ammonia (NH3)), thoughSimple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds Heather E. Golden the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts

Elliott, Emily M.

377

A chronology of human understanding of the nitrogen cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nitrogen and hydrogen gas [7,22,23...process surpassed natural N fixation [31...of the nitrogen cascade was proposed...terrestrial 104 118 --natural - - 30 50 50 170...consequences in the natural environment...2003 The nitrogen cascade. Bioscience 53...anthropogenic trace gases. In Interactions...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

How extensive are the impacts of nitrogen pollution in Great  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the 1940s atmospheric nitrogen pollution has steadily increased, primarily as a consequence in the deposition of atmospheric nitrogen pollutants are likely to have contributed to improved forest productivityHow extensive are the impacts of nitrogen pollution in Great Britain's forests? Protecting our

379

Special Aspects of Nitrogen Fixation by Blue-Green Algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Aspects of Nitrogen Fixation by Blue-Green Algae Rosalie M. Cox P. Fay When carbon dioxide...required for nitrogen fixation in this alga. A ratio of pyruvate decarboxylation to...independent of photosynthesis in blue-green algae. Special aspects of nitrogen fixation...

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nitrogen-concentration control in GaNAs/AlGaAs quantum wells using nitrogen ?-doping technique  

SciTech Connect

GaNAs/Al{sub 0.35}Ga{sub 0.65}As multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with nitrogen ?-doping were fabricated on GaAs (100) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High controllability of nitrogen-concentrations in the MQWs was achieved by tuning nitrogen ?-doping time. The maximum nitrogen concentration in the MQWs was 2.8%. The MQWs exhibit intense, narrow photoluminescence emission.

Mano, Takaaki; Jo, Masafumi; Kuroda, Takashi; Noda, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Sakuma, Yoshiki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Elborg, Martin; Sakoda, Kazuaki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in Jordanian petroleum sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bioremediation, or the use of micro-organisms to decontaminate soil or groundwater, is being increasingly seen as an effective, environment-friendly treatment for oil-contaminated sites. In this study, the results are presented concerning a laboratory screening of several natural bacterial consortia and laboratory tests to establish the performance in degradation of hydrocarbons contained in oily sludge from the Jordan Oil Refinery Plant. As a result of the laboratory screening, 18 isolates were selected and grouped into two main clusters; cluster 1 containing 12 isolates grown at 43°C, and cluster 2 containing six isolates grown at 37°C. Three natural bacterial consortia with ability to degrade total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were prepared from these isolates. Experiments were conducted in Erlenmeyer flasks under aerobic conditions, with TPH removal percentage varying from 5.9% to 25.1%, depending upon consortia type and concentration. Consortia 7B and 13B exhibited the highest TPH removal percentages of 25% and 23%, respectively before nutrient addition. TPH removal rate was enhanced after addition of nutrients to incubated flasks. The highest TPH reduction (37%) was estimated after addition of a combination of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur to consortia 7B. This is the first report concerning biological treatment of total petroleum hydrocarbon by bacteria isolated from the oil refinery plant, where it lay the ground for full integrated studies recommended for hydrocarbon degradation that assist in solving sludge problems.

Bassam Mrayyan; Mohammad Battikhi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Spartina alterniflora response to fertilizer, planting dates, and elevation in Galveston Bay, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spartina alterniflora transplant response to 5 fertilizer rates, 2 planting dates, and different elevations was evaluated on sandy dredged material, Bolivar Peninsula, Texas in 1977. Survival, sh...

J. W. Webb; J. D. Dodd

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting fertility differentials Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asked Questions about Landscape Fertilization ... Source: Jawitz, James W. - Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting female fertility Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the behavior and Summary: Abstract I will determine how female breeding coloration (FBC) affects mate choice by male long... and fertilization take place during ovulation...

386

Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks to climate in Earth system models.

Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Commercial Fertilizers and Poisonous Insecticides in 1906-7.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used in Texas is comparatively small. The amount is increasing and may be expected to increase yearly. The quantity sold in Texas in 1905-06 was 13,500 tons. In 1906-07 it was 19,200 tons, this being an increase of 42 per cent. This does not in... to the soil in such forms that the plant can take it up easily. It thus supplements the avail- able plant food of the soil and increases the crop if the soil does not provide enough plant food. The essential constituents of a fertilizer are phos- phoric...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1907-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Partners for Profit... Coastal Bermudagrass, Fertilizer, and Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Station, Texas I Appreciation is expressed to the Tennessee Valley Authority for providing partial funds for printing. J S 111'1 I c.;l~ I 8 -/:);).3 (l a. '"A I JvJ(Y PARTNERS FOR PROFIT ... COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS, FERTILIZER AND MANAGEMENT J. Neal... Service; W. B. Anderson, B. E. Conrad, F. L. Fisher, E. C. Holt, R. D. Kay, J. E. Matocha and D. M. Vietor of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station; and John Culp, Fred Myers and Y. C. Smith of the Tennessee Valley Authority. 10 [BIaBk Page in...

Pratt, J. Neal; Lovell, Ashley C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Freeze the Rainbow!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! Previous Video (Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze!) Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze! Freeze the Rainbow! Starburst candy. They're fruity. They're chewy. They're delicious! But, can they survive taking a bath in liquid nitrogen? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: A student visiting Jefferson Lab from Huntington Middle School in Newport News, Virginia, asked what happens to a starburst if you put it in liquid nitrogen. Well, we're going to find out! Steve: At room temperature, starburst isn't really all that special. I can kind of squish it if I squeeze it hard enough and, if I drop it, nothing

390

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Giant Koosh Ball!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor! Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor! Previous Video (Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse!) Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Giant Koosh Ball! Sometimes, you just want to know what's going to happen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! A while ago, I was at the mall and I saw this. And, the first thing that popped into my head was 'I wonder what would happen if we were to put this in liquid nitrogen?' Now, that's one thing I really love about science. If you have a question, you can, sometimes, do an experiment to find out what the answer is! Here at the Lab, we have a lot of liquid nitrogen, so that's

391

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Let's Freeze Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shattering Pennies! Shattering Pennies! Previous Video (Shattering Pennies!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave!) Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! Let's Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! By removing the hottest molecules, we're able to freeze liquid nitrogen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Today, we're going to freeze liquid nitrogen! Joanna and Steve: Yeah! Joanna: The obvious way to do this is to put the liquid nitrogen into something colder. Something that we have lots of around here! Something like... liquid helium! Steve: Yes! Joanna: Yeah, but we're not going to do that. Instead, we're going to freeze the nitrogen by removing the hottest molecules!

392

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

393

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The design of stable high nitrogen systems  

SciTech Connect

A general strategy for the design of high nitrogen systems with an adequate degree of stability has been elaborated. The design of nitro compounds in which terminal nitro groups are bonded to the chain of several heteroatoms is a specific case within the strategy. In the process of working out the strategy a number of new high nitrogen systems (dinitrazenic acid or dinitroamide HN{sub 3}O{sub 4} and its salts, nitrodiazene oxides RN{sub 3}O{sub 3} and tetrazine dioxides) were discovered. A new of new types of nitro compounds (bicyclo nitro-bis-hydroxylamine, nitrohydrazine, nitrohydroxylamine, sulfo-N-nitroimide and bis-N-nitroimide) were synthesized. This study opens new prospects in the field of the synthesis of high energy materials.

Tartakovsky, V.A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

396

PROJECT TITLE: Evaluation of Seed and Fertilizer Opener Configurations for Optimizing Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to which crop root penetration is achieved. Root penetration measured after harvest for two air drill. These evaluations were conducted using the `Concord' air drill with seeding rate and overall fertilizer rate (70

Maxwell, Bruce D.

397

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

398

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

399

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

400

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

402

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

403

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

404

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

405

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

406

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

407

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

408

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

409

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

410

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

411

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

412

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

413

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

414

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

415

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

416

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

417

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

418

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

419

Inbreeding uncovers fundamental differences in the genetic load affecting male and female fertility in a butterfly  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...viability and sterility load (T ) was obtained from P and F2 data (8:74^2:76...Lloyd, unpublished data). The qualitative...and female fertility loads indicates that this...of female fertility load). The Drosophila data and our own point...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

422

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not been preceded by the evolution of nitrogen fixation, and if these organisms had not also acquired the ability to fix nitrogen at the beginning of or very early in their history. The evolution of nitrogen fixation also appears to have been a precondition for the evolution of (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosynthesis. Given that some form of chlorophyll is obligatory for true photosynthesis, and its light absorption and chemical properties make it a "universal pigment," it may be predicted that the evolution of nitrogen fixation and photosynthesis are also closely linked on other Earth- like planets.

John W. Grula

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Biogeochemical cycling in an organic-rich coastal marine basin. 10. The role of amino acids in sedimentary carbon and nitrogen cycling  

SciTech Connect

Hydrolyzable amino acids were measured in cores and surface sediment samples collected over a 14 month period from the rapidly accumulating, anoxic sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, NC. The concentration of total hydrolyzable amino acids (THAAs) shows an exponential decrease with depth, in a manner similar to total organic carbon and total nitrogen. Carbon and nitrogen in THAAs averages 10-15% of the total organic carbon and 30-40% of the total nitrogen in these sediments. In surface sediments the concentration of THAAs do not show strong seasonal variations, with the exception of a small apparent decrease during the winter months. Aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine and alanine are the most abundant individual amino acids in Cape Lookout Bight sediments. The distribution of individual amino acids in these sediments is very similar to that observed in the two major sources of organic matter, vascular salt marsh plants and marine plankton. The mole fractions of most amino acids show no depth variation in Cape Lookout Bight sediments. Kinetic modeling of these data indicates that the deposition of amino acids to the surface of these sediments is 5.8 {plus minus} 1.0 mol{center dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}. Approximately 46 {plus minus} 16% of this input is remineralized in the upper 40 cm. The recycling of amino acids accounts for 82 {plus minus} 43% of the total nitrogen regeneration and 27 {plus minus} 11% of the regeneration of total organic carbon in these sediments. The mean residence time of metabolizable amino acids is approx. 9 months, a value which is comparable to the mean residence time of both metabolizable organic carbon and nitrogen in these sediments.

Burdige, D.J.; Martens, C.S. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Towards closing the nitrogen flow in UK agriculture: An explorative study of integrated food and bioenergy production with increased nitrogen recirculation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nitrogen is an essential growth factor in nature and for food production. It exists in many forms, including reactive nitrogen compounds available for plant uptake, (more)

Skenhall, Sara Alongi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Decision Support System for Optimum Use of Fertilizers  

SciTech Connect

The Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) is an expert system being developed by the Site-Specific Technologies for Agriculture (SST4Ag) precision farming research project at the INEEL. DSS4Ag uses state-of-the-art artificial intelligence and computer science technologies to make spatially variable, site-specific, economically optimum decisions on fertilizer use. The DSS4Ag has an open architecture that allows for external input and addition of new requirements and integrates its results with existing agricultural systems infrastructures. The DSS4Ag reflects a paradigm shift in the information revolution in agriculture that is precision farming. We depict this information revolution in agriculture as an historic trend in the agricultural decision-making process.

Hoskinson, Reed Louis; Hess, John Richard; Fink, Raymond Keith

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

A Decision Support System for Optimum Use of Fertilizers  

SciTech Connect

The Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) is an expert system being developed by the Site-Specific Technologies for Agriculture (SST4Ag) precision farming research project at the INEEL. DSS4Ag uses state-of-the-art artificial intelligence and computer science technologies to make spatially variable, site-specific, economically optimum decisions on fertilizer use. The DSS4Ag has an open architecture that allows for external input and addition of new requirements and integrates its results with existing agricultural systems' infrastructures. The DSS4Ag reflects a paradigm shift in the information revolution in agriculture that is precision farming. We depict this information revolution in agriculture as an historic trend in the agricultural decision-making process.

R. L. Hoskinson; J. R. Hess; R. K. Fink

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not ...

Grula, J W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

429

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

430

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

431

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

432

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

433

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

434

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

435

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

436

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

437

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

438

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

439

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

440

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

442

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shadowband Spectroradiometer SPEC-TOTDN : Shortwave Total Downwelling Spectrometer UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett Value-Added Products VISST : Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst...

443

,"New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","12312014"...

444

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

445

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to...

446

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

447

Nitrogen oxides emission trends in Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides from space provide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 5 Nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia Abstract Monthly emission estimates present first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric

Haak, Hein

448

Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of...

449

Nitrogen-Doped Graphene and its Application in Electrochemical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Doped Graphene and its Application in Electrochemical Biosensing. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene and its Application in Electrochemical Biosensing. Abstract: Chemical doping with foreign...

450

Flexible, integrated NGL recovery/nitrogen rejection systems  

SciTech Connect

As the oil and gas industry uses nitrogen to recover more of the expensive hydrocarbons below the ground, there is a need for gas processing facilities above the ground that can efficiently and effectively handle the nitrogen coproduced with the hydrocarbon stream. Some of the key general economic variables that must be considered when evaluating proposed nitrogen rejection projects are reviewed. This work discusses the design of the nitrogen/ natural gas processing facilities. It also reviews these process specific criteria and examines some pertinent examples of process design and equipment selection features, which provide the flexibility and integration required to meet the demands of these interrelated driving forces.

Browne, L.W.; Aberle, J.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Absorption of Foliar-Applied Nitrogen by Cotton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wax, and nitrogen-15 absorption. Crop Science 37:807-811.water- deficit stress, and the absorption of foliar-appliedgrowth favorable for N absorption and translocation. Four

Oosterhuis, Derrick M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Introduction Ammonium is the most reduced form of inorganic nitrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

144 Introduction Ammonium is the most reduced form of inorganic nitrogen in seawater time. Uncertainties result from a com- bination of factors including: sample storage effects, contami

453

Thermal bubble behaviour in liquid nitrogen under electric fields.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes thermally induced bubble behaviour changes in liquid nitrogen (LN2) under electric fields. Cryogenic liquids such as LN2 have been used not only (more)

Wang, Ping

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Mass balance for wastewater nitrogen in the Central ArizonaPhoenix ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A complete nitrogen mass balance for all wastewater generated in the Central ArizonaPhoenix ecosystem was developed using data from the 18 largest wastewater treatment plants (99% of flow). Components included total N in raw wastewater, denitrification in wastewater treatment plants, biosolids production, and effluent (reuse, recharge, and discharge). Denitrification and biosolids production remove 81% of wastewater N. Nearly all biosolids are recycled to cotton fields within the ecosystem. Most effluent is recycled within the ecosystem. As the result of wastewater management practices developed to reuse wastewater, wastewater N is either deliberately volatilized or accumulates within the system; only 4% of the original wastewater N is exported via the Gila River.

Lisa Lauver; Lawrence A Baker

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin) Michael T. Crimmins,* Jason M. Stevens, and Gregory, North Carolina 27599 crimmins@email.unc.edu Received July 21, 2009 ABSTRACT The total synthesis of a hemiaminal and acid chloride to complete the synthesis. In 2004, Pettit and Crews independently reported

456

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S RENSEN a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for total re verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation generally is less energy e cient than

Skogestad, Sigurd

457

Continuous improvement in nitrogen rejection unit design  

SciTech Connect

The design and fabrication of Nitrogen Rejection Units (NRU) has advanced considerably over the past 15 years. Improvements have been made in all aspects of producing an NRU plant and cold box. This paper presents the primary areas involved that have seen these improvements. (1) Process design: the two-column process has been superseded by an approach which utilizes multiple flash drums and one column. This leads to a smaller and lower cost cold box. With low nitrogen content feeds, the prefractionater recovers half the methane as a high pressure residue gas and reduces the cold box size. (2) Mechanical Design: improved software enables the design process to be more accurate, eliminate piping and equipment interferences, reduce the size of the box and save design time. (3) Manufacturing: the interfacing of the 3D software design tools and the manufacturing process enables the shop floor personnel to reduce the manufacturing time by 10%. All of these individual improvements have reduced the real cost of an NRU substantially over the past 15 years.

O`Brien, J.V. [Process Systems International, Inc., Westborough, MA (United States); Maloney, J.J. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Method and apparatus for nitrogen oxide determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for determining nitrogen oxide content in a high temperature process gas, which involves withdrawing a sample portion of a high temperature gas containing nitrogen oxide from a source to be analyzed. The sample portion is passed through a restrictive flow conduit, which may be a capillary or a restriction orifice. The restrictive flow conduit is heated to a temperature sufficient to maintain the flowing sample portion at an elevated temperature at least as great as the temperature of the high temperature gas source, to thereby provide that deposition of ammonium nitrate within the restrictive flow conduit cannot occur. The sample portion is then drawn into an aspirator device. A heated motive gas is passed to the aspirator device at a temperature at least as great as the temperature of the high temperature gas source. The motive gas is passed through the nozzle of the aspirator device under conditions sufficient to aspirate the heated sample portion through the restrictive flow conduit and produce a mixture of the sample portion in the motive gas at a dilution of the sample portion sufficient to provide that deposition of ammonium nitrate from the mixture cannot occur at reduced temperature. A portion of the cooled dilute mixture is then passed to analytical means capable of detecting nitric oxide.

Hohorst, Frederick A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

The fate of phosphorus fertilizer in Amazon soya bean fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and aluminium and hydrogen (1 M calcium acetate) at the University of Sao Paulo. Another...total phosphorus major element analysis by lithium borate flux fusion digestion and X-ray...difference between total P (as determined by lithium borate flux fusion) and the sum of the...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The influence of testers and fertility levels in the evaluation of inbred lines of corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TABLES 1, Analysis of variance oi' top-erose yields for the combined fertility levels. 8. Analysis of varianoe of top-erose yields by lines on the two fer- tility levels, 5. Mean yields of each liae with all testers for cash fertility level showing... the interaction of lines with fertility levels. 4 ~ Mean squares for yield i' or sash pair of seleotions within the Sg liaes liste4 by tester parents, 5. Frequenoy of top-erose yields erpresse4 as stan4ar4 errors above or below the mean of all top crosses...

Collier, Jesse W

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Oil bioremediation in salt marsh mesocosms as influenced by nitrogen, phosphorus, and bacterial seeding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glasshouse experiments were conducted to determine the effects of N and P fertilization and bacterial seeding on crude oil degradation in salt marsh mesocosms containing marsh soil and Spartina alterniflora. Fertilization with urea, NH4, and N03...

Wright, Alan Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Solubility of Nitrogen in Water at High Pressures and Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas Solubility Measurement and Modeling for the Nitrogen + Water System from 274.18 K to 363.02 K ... Two recent events allow a more detailed picture of the solubility of hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and the noble gases in water to be given, than could have been given even a year ago. ...

John B. Goodman; Norman W. Krase

1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment S. Marsili wastewater is too low, full denitrification is difficult to obtain and an additional source of organic carbon predictive control; wastewater treatment plant Introduction The problem of improving the nitrogen removal

465

Nitrogen cycling in a changing world: Response of a California grassland to multiple global change factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

removal and fertilization would interact antagonistically; however, results from this experiment show that they always interact in an additive

Carey, Chelsea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Nitrogen utilization efficiency in sorghum cultivars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrids were found to vary up to 204 in their total dry matter production per unit N uptake (Maranville et al. , 1980b). That study reported a significant hybrid x year interaction, showing environment can affect the N use efficiency ranking between... are grown at a lower N availability status, however. Maranville et al. (1980a) defined three N utilization efficiency terms: NE1 ? total dry matter produced per unit of N uptake, NE2 ? total grain yield per unit N uptake, and NE3 ? the product of NE2...

Reed, Stewart Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

467

Biogeochemical cycling in an organic-rich coastal marine basin. 5. Sedimentary nitrogen and phosphorus budgets based upon kinetic models, mass balances, and the stoichiometry of nutrient regeneration  

SciTech Connect

The rapid rates of sediment accumulation (approx.10-20 cm/yr) in the recently formed Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, have resulted in the deposition of approximately 157 moles of carbon, 14 moles of nitrogen and 1.3 moles of phosphorus, per square meter annually. The metabolism of the organic matter in these anoxic sediments is dominated by sulfate reduction and fermentation reactions. Sedimentary nitrogen and phosphorus budgets are estimated using 3 related approaches: 1) a kinetic model of solid phase diagenesis; 2) direct measurements of nutrient burial and regeneration; and 3) nutrient recycling rates estimated from annual rates of sulfate reduction and the SO/sub 4/:NH/sub 4/ and SO/sub 4/:PO/sub 4/ stoichiometry of nutrient regeneration. The mass balances derived agree reasonably well and indicate that approximately 30% of the total nitrogen and 15% of the total phosphorus deposited in these sediments are recycled. The mean residence time for recycled nutrients within the sediment is 4 to 6 months for nitrogen and 1.5 to 2 years for phosphorus. Nitrogen regeneration, like carbon, appears to be controlled by the microbially-mediated metabolism of labile organic matter. The greater asymmetry and lower percent turnover in phosphorus cycling is apparently due to changes in its solubility under oxidized and reduced conditions and selective regeneration prior to deposition.

Klump, J.V.; Martens, C.S.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas extinction. We retrieve ozone and nitrogen dioxide number densities and aerosol extinction from transmission), Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III

469

Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal plant disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Keywords: biodiversity, ecosystem, elevated carbon dioxide, nitrogen enrichment, parasites, plant pathogensEffects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal Three components of global change, elevated CO2 , nitrogen addition, and decreased plant species

Crews, Stephen

470

6/4/2013 Page 1 of 12 Nitrogen Dioxide SOP Standard Operating Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6/4/2013 Page 1 of 12 Nitrogen Dioxide SOP Standard Operating Procedures Nitrogen Dioxide and Nitric Oxide Print a copy and insert into your laboratory the precautions and safe handling procedures for the use of Nitrogen Dioxide

Cohen, Ronald C.

471

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates #12 Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission es- timates / by Bas Subject headings: satellite retrieval / nitrogen dioxide / ozone / air pollution / emis- sion estimates

Haak, Hein

472

Eddy-covariance observations of the atmosphere-biosphere exchange of nitrogen oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Kesselmeier, J. : Nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) uptake byM. : Leaf uptake of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) in a tropicalMorikawa, H. : Atmospheric nitrogen dioxide gas is a plant

Min, Kyung-Eun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Atmospheric input of nitrogen to the coastal region of southeastern Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inorganic nitrogen (DIN; NH4+, N03-), and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) were measured in rainwater collected at three sampling sites (College Station, Houston, and Galveston, Texas). Dry deposition rate of nitrogen species was also measured...

Shon, Zang-Ho

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

474

Questions and Answers - Is there anything colder than liquid nitrogen?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How cold is liquid nitrogen? How cold is liquid nitrogen? Previous Question (How cold is liquid nitrogen?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen, would your body instantly crystallize?) If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen,would your body instantly crystallize? Is there anything colder than liquid nitrogen? Yes, there are things colder than liquid nitrogen, like most of the Universe! I assume, though, that you mean things on the Earth. There actually is an entire branch of science called cryogenics that deals with really cold things. Generally the science of cryogenics is when the temperature goes below that which we can reach with conventional refrigeration equipment, around 250 degrees (Fahrenheit) below zero. Many

475

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Popping Film Canisters!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploding Rubber Stopper! Exploding Rubber Stopper! Previous Video (Exploding Rubber Stopper!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Insulators!) Insulators! Popping Film Canisters! What happens when liquid nitrogen is trapped inside a sealed container? Play the video to find out! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a container of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And these are a bunch of film canisters! Joanna: Let's see what happens when we trap the liquid nitrogen in the film canisters! Steve: Okay! Now the room, and everything in it, is way too hot for the liquid nitrogen to stay as a liquid. As soon as the liquid nitrogen touches anything in the room, it boils and changes into a gas.

476

Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Marysville, OH); Qiu, Dongming (Dublin, OH); Dritz, Terence Andrew (Worthington, OH); Neagle, Paul (Westerville, OH); Litt, Robert Dwayne (Westerville, OH); Arora, Ravi (Dublin, OH); Lamont, Michael Jay (Hilliard, OH); Pagnotto, Kristina M. (Cincinnati, OH)

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

477

Soil phosphorus status and fertilizer use in select agricutural soils in Nicaragua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A survey of small, medium and large Nicaraguan producers indicated a heavy reliance on imported complete fertilizer. Analysis of soils sampled from the large-scale commercial producers found low P retention in the lowland heavy clay soils...

Niemeyer, Patrick G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

RAW MATERIALS USED FOR THE PHOSPHATE FERTILIZER PRODUCTION IN ROMANIA -NEW RADIOMETRIC DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of phosphate fertilizer produced by sulfuric acid attack and the nature of phosphogypsum of sedimentary origin, rarely of igneous origin and exceptionally of metamorphic origin. Sedimentary phosphates

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

479

A study of the effects of natural fertility, weather and productive inputs in Chinese agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation of the relations in China between farm output, the natural fertility of agricultural land, and the use of anthropogenic farm inputs. The methodology is presented as a potential increment ...

Eckaus, Richard S.; Tso, Katherine Kit-Yan.

480

Nutrients: Use of Forest Fertilization and Nutrient Efficient Genotypes to Manage Nutrient Stress in Conifer Stands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Growth responses to fertilizers by many tree species across a wide range of stand and site conditions indicate that suboptimal nutrition frequently limits forest productivity. Much of the increase in stemwood ...

J. L. Troth; R. G. Campbell; H. L. Allen

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-scale soil application of biochar may enhance soil fertility, increasing crop production while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. But reaching these outcomes requires an understanding of the relations...

J. D. Mao; R. L. Johnson; J. Lehmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

E-Print Network 3.0 - agroforestry soil fertility Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORIGINAL PAPER J. Lehmann 7 T. Feilner 7 G... to inorganic fertilizers under high soil pH and leaching conditions, but larger improvements of crop yields... could be achieved...

483

Impact of Foliar Fertilizer Containing Iodine on Golden Delicious Apple Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on marketable Golden Delicious/M.9 apple production. At thecontaining fertilizer on apple fruits firmness and theirold Golden Delicious/M.9 apple trees Trees were spaced at

Szwonek, Eugeniusz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

485

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

486

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

487

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

488

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

489

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

490

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

491

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

492

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

493

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

494

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

495

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

496

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

497

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

498

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

499

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

500

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells