National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for total lighting technology

  1. Universal Lighting Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lighting Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Universal Lighting Technologies Place: Nashville, Tennessee Zip: 37214-3683 Product: Universal Lighting Technologies...

  2. Radioluminescent lighting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The glow-in-the-dark stereotype that characterizes the popular image of nuclear materials is not accidental. When the French scientist, Henri Becquerel, first discovered radioactivity in 1896, he was interested in luminescence. Radioluminescence, the production of light from a mixture of energetic and passive materials, is probably the oldest practical application of the unstable nucleus. Tritium-based radioluminescent lighting, in spite of the biologically favorable character of the gaseous tritium isotope, was included in the general tightening of environmental and safety regulations. Tritium light manufacturers would have to meet two fundamental conditions: (1) The benefit clearly outweighed the risk, to the extent that even the perceived risk of a skeptical public would be overcome. (2) The need was significant enough that the customer/user would be willing and able to afford the cost of regulation that was imposed both in the manufacture, use and eventual disposal of nuclear materials. In 1981, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were investigating larger radioluminescent applications using byproduct nuclear material such as krypton-85, as well as tritium. By 1982, it appeared that large source, (100 Curies or more) tritium gas tube, lights might be useful for marking runways and drop zones for military operations and perhaps even special civilian aviation applications. The successful development of this idea depended on making the light bright enough and demonstrating that large gas tube sources could be used and maintained safely in the environment. This successful DOE program is now in the process of being completed and closed-out. Working closely with the tritium light industry, State governments and other Federal agencies, the basic program goals have been achieved. This is a detailed report of what they have learned, proven, and discovered. 91 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs. (JF)

  3. Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again July 27, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert Induction lighting is one of the best kept secrets in energy-efficient lighting. Simply stated, induction lighting is essentially a fluorescent light without electrodes or filaments, the items that frequently cause other bulbs to burn out quickly. Thus, many induction lighting units have an extremely long life of up

  4. Visible Light Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Technologies Place: Albuquerque, New York Zip: 87113 Product: New Mexico-based LED lighting fixture maker. References: Visible Light Solar Technologies1 This article is...

  5. (Lighting and) Solid-State Lighting: Science, Technology, Economic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Topics cover the basics of light-emitting diode (LED) operation; a 200-year history of lighting technology; the importance of white light and color vision to the evolutionary ...

  6. Emerging Lighting Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon fupwgspring11kinzey.pdf More Documents & Publications Solid-State Lighting Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting General Service LED Lamps

  7. Laser-Compton Light Source Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser-Compton Light Source Technology Laser-Compton light source technology enables production of mono-energetic gamma rays and x rays. In the gamma-ray regime, these sources ...

  8. Common Industrial Lighting Upgrade Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The phosphor materials can be altered to change the color of the visible light from cool ... However, the better color rendering and increased effcacy (or the effciency of the light ...

  9. Promising Technology: Wireless Lighting Occupancy Sensors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Occupancy sensors and controls detect human presence, and modulate light settings accordingly. When there is no human presence detected, the system can dim or turn off lights. This technology ensures that lights are not used when there are no occupants present, which can lead to significant energy savings.

  10. Smart Grid Technology Gives Small Business New Light | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Gives Small Business New Light Smart Grid Technology Gives Small Business New Light September 21, 2011 - 3:58pm Addthis Smart grid technology installations provided not ...

  11. (Lighting and) Solid-State Lighting: Science, Technology, Economic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Perspectives Lighting and) Solid-State Lighting: Science, Technology, Economic Perspectives - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization

  12. Beijing Sanyuan Green Lighting Technology Development Co Ltd...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sanyuan Green Lighting Technology Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Sanyuan Green Lighting Technology Development Co., Ltd Place: Beijing, Beijing...

  13. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors ...

  14. Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market 2005 ...

  15. Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility ...

  16. Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions Milestones Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions ...

  17. Funding Opportunity for Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D – 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 6, 2013, DOE announced solid-state lighting funding opportunity DE-FOA-0000973, "Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2014." A total of up to $10 million in funding is...

  18. Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Improve the efficiency of diesel engines for light duty applications ...

  19. Common Industrial Lighting Upgrade Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Common Industrial Lighting Upgrade Technologies Common Industrial Lighting Upgrade Technologies This tip sheet provides information on two lighting types and upgrade options, fluorescent lighting and high-bay lighting, for the purpose of improving plant-wide lighting performance. PDF icon Common Industrial Lighting Upgrade Technologies (January 2010) More Documents & Publications Energy Savings Potential of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications - Report Energy Savings

  20. Brief History of Artificial Lighting Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Artificial Lighting Technology - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  1. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Light...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Light Water Reactors Chapter 4: Technology Assessments Past, Present, and Future of the ... peacetime uses came online in 1957. Light water reactors (LWRs) are now a mature ...

  2. Solid State Lighting LED Core Technology R&D Roundtable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The document should be referenced as: DOE SSL Program, "Solid State Lighting LED Core Technology R&D Roundtable," November 2015. Authors Monica Hansen LED Lighting Advisors Nnamnor ...

  3. Zhejiang Sunflower Light Energy Science Technology Co Ltd | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhejiang Sunflower Light Energy Science & Technology Co Ltd Place: Shaoxing, Zhejiang Province, China Zip: 312071...

  4. THE TENTH ANNUAL SOLID-STATE LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy THE TENTH ANNUAL SOLID-STATE LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP THE TENTH ANNUAL SOLID-STATE LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP More than 230 lighting leaders from across North America gathered in Portland, OR, November 17-18, 2015, for the tenth annual Solid-State Lighting Technology Development Workshop, hosted by DOE. The diverse audience spanned the spectrum of SSL stakeholders, representing lighting, control, and components companies as well as research

  5. Outdoor Solid-State Lighting Technology Deployment | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) technology has the potential to reduce U.S. lighting energy usage ... Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% Phase 2 LEEP Campaign ...

  6. AEO2013 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight Variable Fixed Heatrate 6 nth-of-a- kind Online Size Lead time Cost in 2012 Contingency Optimism Cost in 2012 4 O&M 5 O&M in 2012 Heatrate Technology Year 1 (MW) (years) (2011 $/kW) Factor 2 Factor 3 (2011 $/kW) (2011 $/MWh) (2011$/kW) (Btu/kWh) (Btu/kWh) Scrubbed Coal New 7 2016 1300 4 2,694 1.07 1.00 2,883 4.39 30.64 8,800 8,740 Integrated Coal-Gasification Comb Cycle (IGCC) 7 2016 1200 4 3,475 1.07 1.00 3,718 7.09

  7. Three SBIR Grants Awarded for Solid-State Lighting Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science has awarded Three Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants targeting advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology:

  8. Four SBIR Grants Awarded for Solid-State Lighting Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science has awarded four Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants targeting advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology:

  9. FEMP Exterior Solid-State Lighting Technology Pilot | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting Marine Corps Base Quantico (MCBQ) in Virginia Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings...

  10. Zhejiang Guangyi Light Energy Technologies Co Gytech | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Co (Gytech) Place: Zhuji, Zhejiang Province, China Sector: Solar Product: Solar products company engaged in PV cell and module as well solar heating and lighting...

  11. Vision 2020: Lighting Technology Roadmap | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References: Vision 2020: Lighting Technology Roadmap1 Overview "Continued innovation in lamps and other system components, as well as in design practices, have made...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office AVTA: Light Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Data | Department of Energy Office AVTA: Light Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Data Vehicle Technologies Office AVTA: Light Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Data The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports testing and data collection on a wide range of advanced and alternative fuel vehicles and technologies through the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) . The following table has downloadable performance, reliability, and driver behavior data for selected

  13. Advanced Lighting Technologies | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-Time Feedback From Street Lights You use a GPS to provide real-time data from your car. Now, technologists from the Controls, Electronics and Signal Processing... Read More...

  14. Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light duty diesel aftertreatment system consisting of a DOC and selective catalytic reduction catalyst on filter (SCRF), close coupled to the engine with direct gaseous ammonia delivery is designed to reduce cold start NOx and HC emissions

  15. Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 ...

  16. California Lighting Technology Center (University of California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    gTechnologyCenter(UniversityofCalifornia,Davis)&oldid765625" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference needed Missing content Broken link Other...

  17. Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-06-30

    Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle – i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: • Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder – Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. • Environmental Impact Review – Designs are comparable across lifecycle phases, subsystems, and environmental impact category, and can be normalized to a userdefined functional unit. • Drill-down Review – These provide an indepth look at individual lamp designs with the ability to review across subsystem or lifecycle phase.

  18. FEMP Exterior Solid-State Lighting Technology Pilot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP's) exterior solid-state lighting initiative and technology pilot.

  19. Next Generation Lighting Technologies (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Siminovittch, Micheal

    2014-05-06

    For the past several years, Michael Siminovittch, a researcher in the Environmental Energy Technologies Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has worked to package efficient lighting in an easy-to-use and good-looking lamp. His immensely popular "Berkeley Lamp" has redefined how America lights its offices.

  20. Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solid-State Lighting Program and an exterior solid-state lighting federal technology deployment pilot project.

  1. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cell shipments Total Inventory, start-of-year 328,658 Manufactured during reporting year ... Table 5. Source and disposition of photovoltaic cell shipments, 2013 (peak kilowatts) ...

  2. Total............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592

  3. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierker,S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, g.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

    2008-12-01

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  4. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, Janos; Long, Danielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z. -X.; Schenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; Stephenson, Brian; Sthr, Joachim; Zholents, Alexander

    2009-01-28

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  5. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500...... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to ...

  6. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending Components Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur

  7. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to

  8. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.5 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 3.9 2.4 1.5 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 4.4 3.2 1.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 3.5 2.4 1.1 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 3.2 2.1 1.1 2,500 to

  9. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7

  10. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to

  11. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1

  12. Total................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to

  13. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7

  14. Total...................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500............................................ 3.2 0.4 Q 0.6 1.7 0.4 500 to 999................................................... 23.8 4.8 1.4 4.2 10.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499............................................. 20.8 10.6 1.8 1.8 4.0 2.6 1,500 to 1,999............................................. 15.4 12.4 1.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 2,000 to 2,499............................................. 12.2 10.7 1.0 0.2 Q Q 2,500 to

  15. Total.........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3

  16. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1

  17. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4

  18. Total...........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8

  19. Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; Dave Watson; Steve Purdy

    2005-10-01

    The high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multi-sensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 30% lower than a comparable wired system for a typical 16,000 square-foot office building, with a payback period of less than 3 years.

  20. Brief History of Solid-State Lighting Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solid-State Lighting Technology - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  1. Superconducting RF Linac Technology for ERL Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Tennant

    2005-08-01

    Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) offer an attractive alternative as drivers for light sources as they combine the desirable characteristics of both storage rings (high efficiency) and linear accelerators (superior beam quality). Using superconducting RF technology allows ERLs to operate more efficiently because of the inherent characteristics of SRF linacs, namely that they are high gradient-low impedance structures and their ability to operate in the long pulse or CW regime. We present an overview of the physics challenges encountered in the design and operation of ERL based light sources with particular emphasis on those issues related to SRF technology. These challenges include maximizing a cavity???????¢????????????????s Qo to increase cryogenic efficiency, maintaining control of the cavity field in the presence of the highest feasible loaded Q and providing adequate damping of the higher-order modes (HOMs). If not sufficiently damped, dipole HOMs can drive the multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability which ERLs are particularly susceptible to. Another challenge involves efficiently extracting the potentially large amounts of HOM power that are generated when a bunch traverses the SRF cavities and which may extend over a high range of frequencies. We present experimental data from the Jefferson Lab FEL Upgrade, a 10 mA ERL light source presently in operation, aimed at addressing some of these issues. We conclude with an outlook towards the future of ERL based light sources.

  2. Integrated envelope and lighting technologies for commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, S.; Schuman, J.

    1992-07-01

    Fenestration systems are major contributors to peak cooling loads in commercial buildings and thus to HVAC system costs, peak electric demand, and annual energy use. These loads can be reduced significantly through proper fenestration design and the use of daylighting strategies. However, there are very few documented applications of energy-saving daylighted buildings today, which suggests that significant obstacles to efficient fenestration and lighting design and utilization still exist. This paper reports results of the first phase of a utility-sponsored research, development, and demonstration project to more effectively address the interrelated issues of designing and implementing energy-efficient envelope and lighting systems. We hypothesize that daylighting and overall energy efficiency will not be achieved at a large scale until true building integration has been accomplished to some meaningful degree. Moving beyond the vague concept of ``intelligent` buildings long popular in the design sector, we attempt to integrate component technologies into functional systems in order to optimize the relevant building energy performance and occupant comfort parameters. We describe the first set of integrated envelope and lighting concepts we are developing using available component technologies. Emerging and future technologies will be incorporated in later phases. Because new hardware systems alone will not ensure optimal building performance, we also discuss obstacles to innovation within the design community and proposed strategies to overcome these obstacles.

  3. Integrated envelope and lighting technologies for commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, S.; Schuman, J.

    1992-07-01

    Fenestration systems are major contributors to peak cooling loads in commercial buildings and thus to HVAC system costs, peak electric demand, and annual energy use. These loads can be reduced significantly through proper fenestration design and the use of daylighting strategies. However, there are very few documented applications of energy-saving daylighted buildings today, which suggests that significant obstacles to efficient fenestration and lighting design and utilization still exist. This paper reports results of the first phase of a utility-sponsored research, development, and demonstration project to more effectively address the interrelated issues of designing and implementing energy-efficient envelope and lighting systems. We hypothesize that daylighting and overall energy efficiency will not be achieved at a large scale until true building integration has been accomplished to some meaningful degree. Moving beyond the vague concept of intelligent' buildings long popular in the design sector, we attempt to integrate component technologies into functional systems in order to optimize the relevant building energy performance and occupant comfort parameters. We describe the first set of integrated envelope and lighting concepts we are developing using available component technologies. Emerging and future technologies will be incorporated in later phases. Because new hardware systems alone will not ensure optimal building performance, we also discuss obstacles to innovation within the design community and proposed strategies to overcome these obstacles.

  4. Energy Department Offers $10 Million for Energy-Saving Lighting Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department announced nearly $10 million to support research, development, and manufacturing of solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies.

  5. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary November 2014

  6. Technologies for Upgrading Light Water Reactor Outlet Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel S. Wendt; Piyush Sabharwall; Vivek Utgikar

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy could potentially be utilized in hybrid energy systems to produce synthetic fuels and feedstocks from indigenous carbon sources such as coal and biomass. First generation nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) technology will most likely be based on conventional light water reactors (LWRs). However, these LWRs provide thermal energy at temperatures of approximately 300°C, while the desired temperatures for many chemical processes are much higher. In order to realize the benefits of nuclear hybrid energy systems with the current LWR reactor fleets, selection and development of a complimentary temperature upgrading technology is necessary. This paper provides an initial assessment of technologies that may be well suited toward LWR outlet temperature upgrading for powering elevated temperature industrial and chemical processes during periods of off-peak power demand. Chemical heat transformers (CHTs) are a technology with the potential to meet LWR temperature upgrading requirements for NHESs. CHTs utilize chemical heat of reaction to change the temperature at which selected heat sources supply or consume thermal energy. CHTs could directly utilize LWR heat output without intermediate mechanical or electrical power conversion operations and the associated thermodynamic losses. CHT thermal characteristics are determined by selection of the chemical working pair and operating conditions. This paper discusses the chemical working pairs applicable to LWR outlet temperature upgrading and the CHT operating conditions required for providing process heat in NHES applications.

  7. New and Underutilized Technology: High Bay LED Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following information outlines key deployment considerations for high bay LED lighting within the Federal sector.

  8. Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Improve the efficiency of diesel engines for light duty applications through technical advances in system optimization.

  9. OLEDWORKS DEVELOPS INNOVATIVE HIGH-PERFORMANCE DEPOSITION TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MANUFACTURING COST OF OLED LIGHTING

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The high manufacturing cost of OLED lighting is a major barrier to the growth of the emerging OLED lighting industry. OLEDWorks is developing high-performance deposition technology that addresses...

  10. Energy Department Awards Nearly $10 Million for Efficient Lighting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    As solid-state electronic technology, LED lighting also offers new potential for advanced lighting control, including color tuning and intelligent, adaptive lighting. In total, the ...

  11. Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DE-FOA-0000973) | Department of Energy Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2014 (DE-FOA-0000973) Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2014 (DE-FOA-0000973) December 6, 2013 - 4:27pm Addthis This funding opportunity is closed. Through research and development of solid-state lighting (SSL),including both light-emitting diode (LED) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) technologies, the objectives of this opportunity are to: Maximize the

  12. Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26Germantown Building ... Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF ...

  13. Framework for Evaluating the Total Value Proposition of Clean Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pater, J. E.

    2006-02-01

    Conventional valuation techniques fail to include many of the financial advantages of clean energy technologies. By omitting benefits associated with risk management, emissions reductions, policy incentives, resource use, corporate social responsibility, and societal economic benefits, investors and firms sacrifice opportunities for new revenue streams and avoided costs. In an effort to identify some of these externalities, this analysis develops a total value proposition for clean energy technologies. It incorporates a series of values under each of the above categories, describing the opportunities for recapturing investments throughout the value chain. The framework may be used to create comparable value propositions for clean energy technologies supporting investment decisions, project siting, and marketing strategies. It can also be useful in policy-making decisions.

  14. Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2015 Funding

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunity | Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2015 Funding Opportunity Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2015 Funding Opportunity October 14, 2014 - 3:57pm Addthis This funding opportunity is closed. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a solid-state lighting (SSL) R&D funding opportunity on October 14, 2014. Under this funding opportunity (DE-FOA-0001171, "Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D -

  15. FEMP Exterior Solid-State Lighting Technology Pilot

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 | FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM femp.energy.gov LED Value & Challenges Source: Acuity Brands Lighting * Value - Superior photometrics, CRI - Long life - Efficiency ...

  16. Lighting System Optimization: Leveraging the New Technology Paradigm

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Commercial Advanced Lighting Controls Project 14 Advanced Control Demonstration Projects Utility EE Program Specs and Qualified Products List Training Programs for Designers and...

  17. DOE Announces Selections from Solid-State Lighting Core Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    much more energy efficient, longer lasting, and cost competitive by targeting a product system efficiency of 50 percent with lighting that accurately reproduces sunlight spectrum. ...

  18. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    much more energy efficient, longer lasting, and cost competitive by targeting a product system efficiency of 50 percent with lighting that accurately reproduces sunlight spectrum. ...

  19. Promising Technology: Parabolic Aluminized Reflector Light-Emitting Diodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Parabolic aluminized reflectors, or PARs, are directional lamps typically used in recessed lighting. In contrast to CFLs, LEDs offer additional advantages including no warm up time, improved dimming and control capabilities, and for some products much greater efficacy ratings.

  20. Light-Duty Lean GDI Vehicle Technology Benchmark

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  1. HOTEL-CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS MEETING AND TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MEETING AND TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201 1-877-901-6632 The room block reserved at the Portland...

  2. Four SBIR Grants Awarded for Solid-State Lighting Technology | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Four SBIR Grants Awarded for Solid-State Lighting Technology Four SBIR Grants Awarded for Solid-State Lighting Technology May 14, 2014 - 11:25am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science has awarded four Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants targeting advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology: VoltServer, Inc. - Low-Cost, High Efficiency Integration of SSL and Building Controls using a PET Power Distribution System Innotec, Corp. - Integrating

  3. New EM Technology: Spray Lights up Contamination Hot Spots

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. – Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers have developed a new technology to determine the extent of contamination in Cold War facilities that could replace costly and time-consuming traditional survey methods used by EM.

  4. Fact #868: April 13, 2015 Automotive Technology Has Improved Performance and Fuel Economy of New Light Vehicles – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for Automotive Technology Has Improved Performance and Fuel Economy of New Light Vehicles

  5. BTO Awards Small Business Grants for Lighting, Building-Integrated Heat and Moisture Exchange Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science has awarded four Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants targeting advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) and building-integrated heat and moisture exchange technology.

  6. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology Research Call (Round 6)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce four selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

  7. Solid-State Lighting Technology: Current State of the Art and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the Art and Grand Challenges Solid-State Lighting Technology: Current State of the Art and ... The lamp is basically a blue LED coated with green and red phosphors. Some of the blue ...

  8. DOE Awards Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants for Solid-State Lighting Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants targeting advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The SBIR program seeks to increase...

  9. DOE Awards Seven Small Business Innovation Research Grants for Solid-State Lighting Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded seven Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants targeting advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The SBIR program seeks to...

  10. Energy Department Announces $10 Million to Advance Innovative, Energy-Saving Lighting Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    As part of cutting energy waste and doubling energy productivity by 2030, the Energy Department today announced nearly $10 million to support research, development, and manufacturing of solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies across the country.

  11. DOE Awards Five Small Business Innovation Research Grants for Solid-State Lighting Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded five Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants targeting advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The SBIR program seeks to increase...

  12. Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the U.S. Market Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S. Market 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) ...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Light-Duty Diesel Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about light-duty...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Modeling for Light and Heavy Vehicle Market Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Energetics at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about modeling for light and heavy...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Ultra Efficient Light Duty Powertrain with Gasoline Low Temperature Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Delphi Powertrain at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ultra efficient light duty...

  16. EXC-12-0005- In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 10, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Halco Lighting Technologies (Halco) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation...

  17. Maximizing Energy Savings with New Technologies in Lighting and Lighting Controls

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Materials for Harsh Service Conditions: 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 1 4 1.1 Overview of Materials for Harsh Service Conditions .................................................................... 1 5 1.2 Challenges and Opportunities ....................................................................................................... 2 6 1.3 Public

  18. 1366 Technologies Shines a Light on American Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An inside look at 1366 Technologies' innovative approach to solar manufacturing. Documenting how a $4 million grant from the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), through the Recovery Act is helping to make their ambitious goal of producing “solar at the cost of coal” a reality.

  19. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LIGHT-DUTY VEHICLES Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 2013 Prepared by ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY Argonne, Illinois 60439 managed by U Chicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357 This report

  20. Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Requirements of the U.S. Market | Department of Energy 4 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Ricardo, Inc. PDF icon 2004_deer_greaney.pdf More Documents & Publications Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market US Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Research Progress Review of Diesel Emission Control Technology

  1. Promising Technology: Retrofit Lights to Light-Emitting Diodes in Refrigerators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEDs increase in efficacy at lower temperatures, in contrast with conventional fluorescents. The low temperatures in display cases, therefore, make this an attractive application of LEDs to reduce energy consumption. In addition to saving lighting energy, an LED retrofit can potentially reduce the cooling load in a display case because LEDs emit less heat than do fluorescent bulbs.

  2. Advanced Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental concern in projecting the future attributes of light-duty vehicles-passenger cars, sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks, and minivans-is how to represent technological change and the market forces that drive it. There is always considerable uncertainty about the evolution of existing technologies, what new technologies might emerge, and how consumer preferences might influence the direction of change. Most of the new and emerging technologies expected to affect the performance and fuel use of light-duty vehicles over the next 25 years are represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS); however, the potential emergence of new, unforeseen technologies makes it impossible to address all the technology options that could come into play. The previous section of Issues in Focus discussed several potential technologies that currently are not represented in NEMS. This section discusses some of the key technologies represented in NEMS that are expected to be implemented in light-duty vehicles over the next 25 years.

  3. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources: A White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, a= Janos; Long, Gabrielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-02-03

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects (Figure 1.1). The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  4. Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  5. Fact #853 December 29, 2014 Stop/Start Technology is in nearly 5% of All New Light Vehicles Produced- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #853: December  29, 2014 Stop/Start Technology is in nearly 5% of All New Light Vehicles Produced

  6. Energy Department Announces $10 Million for Innovative, Energy-Saving Lighting R&D Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Obama Administration’s effort to cut energy waste and double energy productivity by 2030, the Energy Department today announced $10 million to support research, development and manufacturing of solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies across the country.

  7. Advanced Light Extraction Structure for OLED Lighting | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Light Extraction Structure for OLED Lighting Advanced Light Extraction Structure for OLED Lighting Lead Performer: Pixelligent Technologies, LLC - Baltimore, MD Partners: OLEDWorks, LLC - Rochester, NY DOE Total Funding: $1,000,000 Cost Share: $250,000 Project Term: 9/10/2014 - 8/31/2016 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0000973) Project Objective This project will develop a novel internal light extraction (ILE) design to improve the light

  8. Compact modeling of total ionizing dose and aging effects in MOS technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esqueda, Ivan S.; Barnaby, Hugh J.; King, Michael Patrick

    2015-06-18

    This paper presents a physics-based compact modeling approach that incorporates the impact of total ionizing dose (TID) and stress-induced defects into simulations of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices and integrated circuits (ICs). This approach utilizes calculations of surface potential (?s) to capture the charge contribution from oxide trapped charge and interface traps and to describe their impact on MOS electrostatics and device operating characteristics as a function of ionizing radiation exposure and aging effects. The modeling approach is demonstrated for bulk and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOS device. The formulation is verified using TCAD simulations and through the comparison of model calculations and experimental I-V characteristics from irradiated devices. The presented approach is suitable for modeling TID and aging effects in advanced MOS devices and ICs.

  9. Compact modeling of total ionizing dose and aging effects in MOS technologies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Esqueda, Ivan S.; Barnaby, Hugh J.; King, Michael Patrick

    2015-06-18

    This paper presents a physics-based compact modeling approach that incorporates the impact of total ionizing dose (TID) and stress-induced defects into simulations of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices and integrated circuits (ICs). This approach utilizes calculations of surface potential (ψs) to capture the charge contribution from oxide trapped charge and interface traps and to describe their impact on MOS electrostatics and device operating characteristics as a function of ionizing radiation exposure and aging effects. The modeling approach is demonstrated for bulk and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOS device. The formulation is verified using TCAD simulations and through the comparison of model calculations and experimentalmore » I-V characteristics from irradiated devices. The presented approach is suitable for modeling TID and aging effects in advanced MOS devices and ICs.« less

  10. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 1 Report Technology Evaluation of Hydrogen Light Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Rousseau, Aymeric

    2007-12-01

    This task analyzes the candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles for near-term use in the Southeastern U.S. The purpose of this work is to assess their potential in terms of efficiency and performance. This report compares conventional, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) with gasoline and hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) as well as fuel cell and fuel cell hybrids from a technology as well as fuel economy point of view. All the vehicles have been simulated using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT). First, some background information is provided on recent American automotive market trends and consequences. Moreover, available options are presented for introducing cleaner and more economical vehicles in the market in the future. In this study, analysis of various candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles is performed using PSAT and, thus, a brief description of PSAT features and capabilities are provided. Detailed information on the simulation analysis performed is also offered, including methodology assumptions, fuel economic results, and conclusions from the findings.

  11. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Baldwin; Magdy Tawfik; Leonard Bond

    2010-06-01

    In support of expanding the use of nuclear power, interest is growing in methods of determining the feasibility of longer term operation for the U.S. fleet of nuclear power plants, particularly operation beyond 60 years. To help establish the scientific and technical basis for such longer term operation, the DOE-NE has established a research and development (R&D) objective. This objective seeks to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which addresses the needs of this objective, is being developed in collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. In moving to identify priorities and plan activities, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring (OLM) Technologies was held June 10–12, 2010, in Seattle, Washington. The workshop was run to enable industry stakeholders and researchers to identify the nuclear industry needs in the areas of future OLM technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. It also sought to identify approaches for collaboration that would be able to bridge or fill the technology gaps. This report is the meeting proceedings, documenting the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for a plan which is under development that will enable the I&C research pathway to achieve its goals. Benefits to the nuclear industry accruing from On Line Monitoring Technology cannot be ignored. Information gathered thus far has contributed significantly to the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. DOE has shown great interest in supplying necessary support to help this industry to move forward as indicated by the recent workshop conducted in support of this interest. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring Technologies provided an opportunity for industry stakeholders and researchers to gather in order to collectively identify the nuclear industry’s needs in the areas of OLM technologies including diagnostics, prognostics, and RUL. Additionally, the workshop provided the opportunity for attendees to pinpoint technology gaps and research capabilities along with the fostering of future collaboration in order to bridge the gaps identified. Attendees concluded that a research and development program is critical to future nuclear operations. Program activities would result in enhancing and modernizing the critical capabilities of instrumentation, information, and control technologies for long-term nuclear asset operation and management. Adopting a comprehensive On Line Monitoring research program intends to: • Develop national capabilities at the university and laboratory level • Create or renew infrastructure needed for long-term research, education, and testing • Support development and testing of needed I&C technologies • Improve understanding of, confidence in, and decisions to employ these new technologies in the nuclear power sector and achieve successful licensing and deployment.

  12. Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Bluhm; James Coffey; Roman Korotkov; Craig Polsz; Alexandre Salemi; Robert Smith; Ryan Smith; Jeff Stricker; Chen Xu; Jasmine Shirazi; George Papakonstantopulous; Steve Carson; Claudia Goldman; Soren Hartmann; Frank Jessen; Bianca Krogmann; Christoph Rickers; Manfred Ruske; Holger Schwab; Dietrich Bertram

    2011-01-02

    Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exacerbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectronic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availability of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a clear focus on economics and the work plan focused both on doped ZnO process and OLED device structure that would be consistent with the new TCO. The team successfully made 6 inch OLEDs with a serial construction. More process development is required to optimize commercial OLED structures. Feasibility was demonstrated on two different light extraction technologies: 1/4 lambda refractive index matching and high-low-high band pass filter. Process development was also completed on the key precursors for the TCO, which are ready for pilot-plant scale-up. Subsequently, Arkema has developed a cost of ownership model that is consistent with DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing targets as outlined in the DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing 2010 report. The overall outcome of this project was the demonstration that doped zinc oxide can be used for OLED devices without a drop-off in performance while gaining the economic and sustainable benefits of a more readily available TCO. The broad impact of this project, is the facilitation of OLED lighting market penetration into general illumination, resulting in significant energy savings, decreased greenhouse emissions, with no environmental impact issues such as mercury found in Fluorescent technology. The primary objective of this project was to develop a commercially viable process for 'Substrates' (Substrate/ undercoat/ TCO topcoat) to be used in production of OLED devices (lamps/luminaries/modules). This project focused on using Arkema's recently developed doped ZnO technology for the Fenestration industry and applying the technology to the OLED lighting industry. The secondary objective was the use of undercoat technology to improve light extraction from the OLED device. In optical fields and window applications, technology has been developed to mitigate reflection losses by selecting appropriate thicknesses and refractive indices of coatings applied either below or above the functional layer of interest. This technology has been proven and implemented in the fenestration industry for more than 15 years. Successful completion of this project would provide doped ZnO coated on inexpensive soda lime glass resulting in a significantly lower cost relative to the current ITO coated Flat Panel Display Glass substrates. Additional benefits will be a more consistent TCO that does not need an activation step with better optical performance. Clearly, this will serve to enhance penetration of OLED technologies into the lighting market.

  13. Evaluation of Metal Halide, Plasma, and LED Lighting Technologies for a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light (H 2 LT)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, L. B.; Donohoe, S. P.; Jones, M. H.; White, W. A.; Klebanoff, L. E.; Velinsky, S. A.

    2015-04-22

    This article reports on the testing and comparison of a prototype hydrogen fuel cell light tower (H2LT) and a conventional diesel-powered metal halide light trailer for use in road maintenance and construction activities. The prototype was originally outfitted with plasma lights and then with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Light output and distribution, lighting energy efficiency (i.e., efficacy), power source thermal efficiency, and fuel costs are compared. The metal halide luminaires have 2.2 and 3.1 times more light output than the plasma and LED luminaires, respectively, but they require more power/lumen to provide that output. The LED luminaires have 1.6 timesmore » better light efficacy than either the metal halide or plasma luminaires. The light uniformity ratios produced by the plasma and LED towers are acceptable. The fuel cell thermal efficiency at the power required to operate the plasma lights is 48%, significantly higher than the diesel generator efficiency of 23% when operating the metal halide lights. Due to the increased efficiency of the fuel cell and the LED lighting, the fuel cost per lumen-hour of the H2LT is 62% of the metal halide diesel light tower assuming a kilogram of hydrogen is twice the cost of a gallon of diesel fuel.« less

  14. Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Silverman; Bluhm, Martin; Coffey, James; Korotkov, Roman; Polsz, Craig; Salemi, Alexandre; Smith, Robert; Smith, Ryan; Stricker, Jeff; Xu,Chen; Shirazi, Jasmine; Papakonstantopulous, George; Carson, Steve Philips Lighting GmbH Goldman, Claudia; Hartmann, Sren; Jessen, Frank; Krogmann, Bianca; Rickers, Christoph; Ruske, Manfred, Schwab, Holger; Bertram, Dietrich

    2011-01-02

    Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exaserbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectonic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availablility of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a clear focus on economics and the work plan focused both on doped ZnO process and OLED device structure that would be consistent with the new TCO. The team successfully made 6 inch OLEDs with a serial construction. More process development is required to optimize commercial OLED structures. Feasibility was demonstrated on two different light extraction technologies: 1/4 lambda refractive index matching and high-low-high band pass filter. Process development was also completed on the key precursors for the TCO, which are ready for pilot-plant scale-up. Subsequently, Arkema has developed a cost of ownership model that is consistent with DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing targets as outlined in the DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing 2010 report. The overall outcome of this project was the demonstration that doped zinc oxide can be used for OLED devices without a drop-off in performance while gaining the economic and sustainable benefits of a more readily available TCO. The broad impact of this project, is the facilitation of OLED lighting market penetration into general illumination, resulting in significant energy savings, decreased greenhouse emissions, with no environmental impact issues such as mercury found in Fluorescent technology.

  15. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 3)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce eight selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

  16. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 4)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce 13 selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

  17. Microsoft Word - Science and Technology of Future Light Sources.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    08/39 BNL-81895-2008 LBNL-1090E-2009 SLAC-R-917 Science and Technology of Future Light Sources A White Paper Report prepared by scientists from ANL, BNL, LBNL and SLAC. The coordinating team consisted of Uwe Bergmann, John Corlett, Steve Dierker, Roger Falcone, John Galayda, Murray Gibson, Jerry Hastings, Bob Hettel, John Hill, Zahid Hussain, Chi-Chang Kao, Janos Kirz, Gabrielle Long, Bill McCurdy, Tor Raubenheimer, Fernando Sannibale, John Seeman, Z.-X. Shen, Gopal Shenoy, Bob Schoenlein, Qun

  18. Advanced Light Extraction Material for OLED Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Extraction Material for OLED Lighting Advanced Light Extraction Material for OLED Lighting Lead Performer: Pixelligent Technologies LLC - Baltimore, MD Partners: OLEDWorks LLC DOE Total Funding: $1,000,000 Project Term: April 6, 2015 - April 5, 2017 Funding Opportunity: FY2015 Phase II Release 1 SBIR Awards PROJECT OBJECTIVE The primary goal of this Phase II project is to develop a viable commercial process to manufacture an internal light extraction (ILE) layer to be supplied to OLED

  19. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan for 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  20. LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION, INFORMATION, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-07-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  1. Commercial Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial lighting accounts for more than 20 percent of total commercial building energy use. The Energy Department works to reduce lighting energy use through research and deployment.

  2. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasoyinu, Yemi

    2014-03-31

    Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloy systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.

  3. Evaluation of advanced technologies for residential appliances and residential and commercial lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turiel, I.; Atkinson, B.; Boghosian, S.; Chan, P.; Jennings, J.; Lutz, J.; McMahon, J.; Rosenquist, G.

    1995-01-01

    Section 127 of the Energy Policy Act requires that the Department of Energy (DOE) prepare a report to Congress on the potential for the development and commercialization of appliances that substantially exceed the present federal or state efficiency standards. Candidate high-efficiency appliances must meet several criteria including: the potential exists for substantial improvement (beyond the minimum established in law) of the appliance`s energy efficiency; electric, water, or gas utilities are prepared to support and promote the commercialization of such appliances; manufacturers are unlikely to undertake development and commercialization of such appliances on their own, or development and production would be substantially accelerated by support to manufacturers. This report describes options to improve the efficiency of residential appliances, including water heaters, clothes washers and dryers, refrigerator/freezers, dishwashers, space heating and cooling devices, as well as residential and commercial lighting products. Data from this report (particularly Appendix 1)were used to prepare the report to Congress mentioned previously. For the residential sector, national energy savings are calculated using the LBL Residential Energy Model. This model projects the number of households and appliance saturations over time. First, end-use consumption is calculated for a base case where models that only meet the standard replace existing models as these reach the end of their lifetime. Second, models with efficiencies equal to the technology under consideration replace existing models that reach the end of their lifetime. For the commercial sector, the COMMEND model was utilized to project national energy savings from new technologies. In this report, energy savings are shown for the period 1988 to 2015.

  4. Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Compared to Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Mumbi, Maina

    2009-02-11

    The notion of"productive use" is often invoked in discussions about whether new technologies improve productivity or otherwise enhance commerce in developing-country contexts. It an elusive concept,especially when quantitative measures are sought. Improved and more energy efficient illumination systems for off-gridapplication--the focus of the Lumina Project--provide a case in which a significant productivity benefit can be imagined, given the importance of light to the successful performance of many tasks, and the very low quality of baseline illumination provided by flame-based source. This Research Note summarizes self-reported quantitative and qualitative impacts of switching to LED lighting technology on the prosperity of night-market business owners and operators. The information was gathered in the context of our 2008 market testing field work in Kenya?s Rift Valley Province, which was performed in the towns of Maai Mahiu and Karagita by Arne Jacobson, Kristen Radecsky, Peter Johnstone, Maina Mumbi, and others. Maai Mahiu is a crossroads town; provision of services to travelers and freight carriers is a primary income source for the residents. In contrast, the primary income for Karagita's residents is from work in the large, factory style flower farms on the eastern shores of Lake Naivasha that specialize in producing cut flowers for export to the European market. According to residents, both towns had populations of 6,000 to 8,000 people in June 2008. We focused on quantifying the economics of fuel-based and LED lighting technology in the context of business use by night market vendors and shop keepers. Our research activities with the business owners and operators included baseline measurement of their fuel-based lighting use, an initial survey, offering for sale data logger equipped rechargeable LED lamps, monitoring the adoption of the LED lamps, and a follow-up survey.

  5. Technologies and policies for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from the U. S. automobile and light truck fleet.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotkin, S.

    1999-01-01

    The message conveyed by the above discussion is that there are no shortages of technologies available to improve the fuel efficiency of the U.S. fleet of autos and light trucks. It clearly is technically feasible to improve greatly the fuel economy of the average new light-duty vehicle. Many of these technologies require tradeoffs, however, that manufacturers are unwilling or (as yet) unable to make in today's market and regulatory environment. These tradeoffs involve higher costs (that might be reduced substantially over time with learning and economies of scale), technical risk and added complexity, emissions concerns (especially for direct injection engines, and especially with respect to diesel engine technology), and customer acceptance issues. Even with current low U.S. oil prices, however, many of these technologies may find their way into the U.S. market, or increase their market share, as a consequence of their penetration of European and Japanese markets with their high gasoline prices. Automotive technology is ''fungible'' that is, it can be easily transported from one market to another. Nevertheless, it probably is unrealistic to expect substantial increases in the average fuel economy of the U.S. light-duty fleet without significant changes in the market. Without such changes, the technologies that do penetrate the U.S. market are more likely to be used to increase acceleration performance or vehicle structures or enable four wheel drive to be included in vehicles without a net mpg penalty. In other words, technology by itself is not likely to be enough to raise fleet fuel economy levels - this was the conclusion of the 1995 Ailomar Conference on Energy and Sustainable Transportation, organized by the Transportation Research Board's Committees on Energy and Alternative Fuels, and it is one I share.

  6. Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2014(DE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maximize the energy-efficiency of SSL products in the marketplace Remove market barriers through improvements to lifetime, color quality, and lighting system performance Reduce ...

  7. Monte Carlo Simulation of Light Transport in Tissue, Beta Version

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-12-09

    Understanding light-tissue interaction is fundamental in the field of Biomedical Optics. It has important implications for both therapeutic and diagnostic technologies. In this program, light transport in scattering tissue is modeled by absorption and scattering events as each photon travels through the tissue. the path of each photon is determined statistically by calculating probabilities of scattering and absorption. Other meausured quantities are total reflected light, total transmitted light, and total heat absorbed.

  8. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

  9. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

  10. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

  11. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Terrani, Kurt A.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Worrall, Andrew; Robb, Kevin R.; Snead, Mary A.

    2015-04-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  12. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies Revolution Now: The ... of their total market (e.g. electricity, cars and lighting), they are growing rapidly. ...

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Reactor Safety Technologies Pathway Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradini, M. L.

    2015-06-01

    In the aftermath of the March 2011 multi-unit accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (Fukushima), the nuclear community has been reassessing certain safety assumptions about nuclear reactor plant design, operations and emergency actions, particularly with respect to extreme events that might occur and that are beyond each plant’s current design basis. Because of our significant domestic investment in nuclear reactor technology (99 operating reactors in the fleet of commercial LWRs with five under construction), the United States has been a major leader internationally in these activities. The U.S. nuclear industry is voluntarily pursuing a number of additional safety initiatives. The NRC continues to evaluate and, where deemed appropriate, establish new requirements for ensuring adequate protection of public health and safety in the occurrence of low probability events at nuclear plants; (e.g., mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events initiated by external events like seismic or flooding initiators). The DOE has also played a major role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident. Initially, DOE worked with the Japanese and the international community to help develop a more complete understanding of the Fukushima accident progression and its consequences, and to respond to various safety concerns emerging from uncertainties about the nature of and the effects from the accident. DOE R&D activities are focused on providing scientific and technical insights, data, analyses methods that ultimately support industry efforts to enhance safety. These activities are expected to further enhance the safety performance of currently operating U.S. nuclear power plants as well as better characterize the safety performance of future U.S. plants. In pursuing this area of R&D, DOE recognizes that the commercial nuclear industry is ultimately responsible for the safe operation of licensed nuclear facilities. As such, industry is considered the primary “end user” of the results from this DOE-sponsored work. The response to the Fukushima accident has been global, and there is a continuing multinational interest in collaborations to better quantify accident consequences and to incorporate lessons learned from the accident. DOE will continue to seek opportunities to facilitate collaborations that are of value to the U.S. industry, particularly where the collaboration provides access to vital data from the accident or otherwise supports or leverages other important R&D work. The purpose of the Reactor Safety Technology R&D is to improve understanding of beyond design basis events and reduce uncertainty in severe accident progression, phenomenology, and outcomes using existing analytical codes and information gleaned from severe accidents, in particular the Fukushima Daiichi events. This information will be used to aid in developing mitigating strategies and improving severe accident management guidelines for the current light water reactor fleet.

  14. GUIDED TOUR—CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS MEETING AND TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The guided bus tour will provide a first-hand look at an LED connected lighting system installed in an office space in the 911 Federal Building. This eight-story building constructed in the 1950s...

  15. Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2015 Funding...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    research to develop or improve commercially viable SSL materials, devices, or systems U.S. Manufacturing - accelerating SSL technology adoption through manufacturing innovations ...

  16. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rate of adoption of new vehicle technologies and related reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions rely on how rapidly technology innovations enter the fleet through new vehicle purchases. New technologies often increase vehicle price, which creates a barrier to consumer purchase, but other barriers to adoption are not due to increased purchase prices. For example, plug-in vehicles, dedicated alternative fuel vehicles, and other new technologies face non-cost barriers such as consumer unfamiliarity or requirements for drivers to adjust behavior. This report reviews recent research to help classify these non-cost barriers and determine federal government programs and actions with the greatest potential to overcome them.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Analyzing Real-World Light Duty Vehicle Efficiency Benefits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  18. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loflin, Leonard; McRimmon, Beth

    2014-12-18

    This report summarizes a project by EPRI to include requirements for small modular light water reactors (smLWR) into the EPRI Utility Requirements Document (URD) for Advanced Light Water Reactors. The project was jointly funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report covers the scope and content of the URD, the process used to revise the URD to include smLWR requirements, a summary of the major changes to the URD to include smLWR, and how to use the URD as revised to achieve value on new plant projects.

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Lean Miller Cycle System Development for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about lean miller cycle system...

  20. DOE Announces Selections from Solid-State Lighting Core Technologies Funding Opportunity Announcement and Laboratory Call

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pleased to announce the selection of sixteen (16) applications in response to the Solid-State...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Strength, Light-Weight Engines for Heavy Duty Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high strength,...

  2. Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions Milestones

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The path to 45 percent peak BTE in FY 2010 includes modern base engine plus enabling technologies demonstrated in FY 2008 plus the recovery of thermal energy from the exhaust and EGR systems

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Polyalkylene Glycol (PAG) Based Lubricant for Light & Medium Duty Axles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ford Motor Company at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about polyalkylene glycol (PAG)...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Light-Duty Diesel Combuston

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia Natonal Laboratories and  University of Wisconsin at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  5. Innovative High-Performance Deposition Technology for Low-Cost Manufacturing of OLED Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: OLEDWorks, LLC – Rochester, NYDOE Total Funding: $1,046,452Cost Share: $1,046,452Project Term: 10/1/2013 – 12/31/2015Funding Opportunity: SSL Manufacturing R&D Funding...

  6. DOE Announces Selection of National Laboratory Center for Solid-State Lighting R&D and Seven Projects for Core Technology Research in Nanotechnology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the selection of the National Laboratory Center for Solid-State Lighting...

  7. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Solid Lighting Core Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiangeng Xue; Elliot Douglas

    2011-03-31

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate an ultra-effective light extraction mechanism that can be universally applied to all top-emitting white OLEDs (TE-WOLEDs) and can be integrated with thin film encapsulation techniques. The scope of work proposed in this project includes four major areas: (1) optical modeling; (2) microlens and array fabrication; (3) fabrication, encapsulation, and characterization of TE-WOLEDs; and (4) full device integration and characterization. First, the light extraction efficiency in a top-emitting OLED with or without a microlens array are modeled using wave optics. Second, individual microlenses and microlens arrays are fabricated by inkjet printing of microdroplets of a liquid thiol-ene monomer with high refractive index followed by photopolymerization. Third, high efficiency top-emitting white OLEDs are fabricated, and fully characterized. Finally, optimized microlens arrays are fabricated on TE-WOLEDs with dielectric barrier layers. The overall light extraction efficiency of these devices, as well as its wavelength and angular dependencies, are measured by comparing the efficiencies of devices with and without microlens arrays. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the feasibility of applying inkjet printed microlens arrays to enhance the light extraction efficiency of top-emitting white OLEDs. We have shown that the geometry (contact angle) of the printed microlenses can be controlled by controlling the surface chemistry prior to printing the lenses. A 90% enhancement in the light extraction efficiency has been achieved with printed microlens array on a top-emitting white OLED, which can be further improved to 140% using a more close-packed microlens array fabricated from a molding process. Future work will focus on improvement of the microlens fabrication process to improve the array fill factor and the contact angle, as well as use transparent materials with a higher index of refraction. We will also further optimize the procedures for integrating the microlenses on the top-emitting white OLEDs and characterize the overall light extraction enhancement factor when the microlens array is attached.

  8. Solid-State Lighting Technology: Current State of the Art and Grand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenges Technology: Current State of the Art and Grand Challenges - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel

  9. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Status of Silicon Carbide Joining Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    Advanced, accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems are currently being investigated for potential application in currently operating light water reactors (LWR) or in reactors that have attained design certification. Evaluation of potential options for accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) relative to Zr-based alloys, including increased corrosion resistance, reduced oxidation and heat of oxidation, and reduced hydrogen generation under steam attack (off-normal conditions). If demonstrated to be applicable in the intended LWR environment, SiC could be used in nuclear fuel cladding or other in-core structural components. Achieving a SiC-SiC joint that resists corrosion with hot, flowing water, is stable under irradiation and retains hermeticity is a significant challenge. This report summarizes the current status of SiC-SiC joint development work supported by the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Significant progress has been made toward SiC-SiC joint development for nuclear service, but additional development and testing work (including irradiation testing) is still required to present a candidate joint for use in nuclear fuel cladding.

  10. Evaluation of Metal Halide, Plasma, and LED Lighting Technologies for a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light (H 2 LT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L. B.; Donohoe, S. P.; Jones, M. H.; White, W. A.; Klebanoff, L. E.; Velinsky, S. A.

    2015-04-22

    This article reports on the testing and comparison of a prototype hydrogen fuel cell light tower (H2LT) and a conventional diesel-powered metal halide light trailer for use in road maintenance and construction activities. The prototype was originally outfitted with plasma lights and then with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Light output and distribution, lighting energy efficiency (i.e., efficacy), power source thermal efficiency, and fuel costs are compared. The metal halide luminaires have 2.2 and 3.1 times more light output than the plasma and LED luminaires, respectively, but they require more power/lumen to provide that output. The LED luminaires have 1.6 times better light efficacy than either the metal halide or plasma luminaires. The light uniformity ratios produced by the plasma and LED towers are acceptable. The fuel cell thermal efficiency at the power required to operate the plasma lights is 48%, significantly higher than the diesel generator efficiency of 23% when operating the metal halide lights. Due to the increased efficiency of the fuel cell and the LED lighting, the fuel cost per lumen-hour of the H2LT is 62% of the metal halide diesel light tower assuming a kilogram of hydrogen is twice the cost of a gallon of diesel fuel.

  11. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  12. Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stang, John H.

    1997-12-01

    Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS NOx = 0.50 g/mi PM = 0.05 g/mi CO = 2.8 g/mi NMHC = 0.07 g/mi California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NOx = 0.07 g/mi PM = 0.01 g/mi (2) FUEL ECONOMY The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

  13. Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stang, John H.

    2005-12-19

    Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS -- NOx = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NOx = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY -- The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT -- Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

  14. Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Stang

    2005-12-31

    Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS--NO{sub x} = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NO{sub x} = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY--The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT--Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

  15. Exciting White Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Windows that emit light and are more energy efficient? Universal Display’s PHOLED technology enables windows that have transparent light-emitting diodes in them.

  16. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies Technologies Scientists and engineers at Los Alamos have developed a variety of advanced technologies that anticipate-affect, detect, and neutralize & mitigate all types of explosive threats. v Technologies Since its inception in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been a driving force in explosives science. Scientists and engineers at Los Alamos have developed a variety of advanced technologies that anticipate, detect, and mitigate all types of explosive threats. ANDE:

  17. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Motivation and Computation of Lighting Measures Floorspace by Lighting Equipment Configuration As described in Appendix A, for each building b, the CBECS data set has the total...

  18. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from

  19. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology /newsroom/_assets/images/s-icon.png Technology Delivering science to the marketplace through commercialization, spinoffs and industry partnerships. Health Space Computing Energy Earth Materials Science Technology The Lab All Glen Wurden in the stellarator's vacuum vessel during camera installation in 2014. Innovative imaging systems on the Wendelstein 7-X bring steady-state fusion energy closer to reality Innovative new imaging systems designed at Los Alamos are helping physicists

  20. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow ... Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions ...

  1. Country Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Country Total Percent of U.S. total China 1,461,074 34 Republic of Korea 172,379 4 Taiwan 688,311 16 All others 1,966,263 46 Total 4,288,027 100 Note: All Others includes Canada, Czech Republic, Federal Republic of Germany, Malaysia, Mexico, Philippines and Singapore Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report.' Table 7 . Photovoltaic module import shipments by country, 2013 (peak kilowatts)

  2. Effective White Light Options for Parking Area Lighting | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Effective White Light Options for Parking Area Lighting Effective White Light Options for Parking Area Lighting Document details lighting technologies that provide low-maintenance alternatives to high-pressure sodium lighting. PDF icon white_light_parking_area..pdf More Documents & Publications LED Provides Effective and Efficient Parking Area Lighting at the NAVFAC Engineering Service Center Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report

  3. Lighting Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes & Buildings » Lighting & Daylighting » Lighting Basics Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis Text Version There are many different types of artificial lights (formally called "lamps" in the lighting industry,) which have different applications and uses. Types of lighting include: Fluorescent Lighting High-intensity Discharge Lighting Incandescent Lighting LED Lighting. New lamp designs that use energy-efficient technology are now readily available in the

  4. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Matter and Technologies R&D activities towards a future cw LINAC at GSI Winfried Barth Matter and Technologies Super Heavy Nuclei International Symposium, Texas A & M University, College Station TX, USA, March 31 - April 02, 2015 W. Barth, R&D activities towards a future cw LINAC at GSI 2 R&D activities towards a future cw LINAC at GSI 1. Introduction 2. Status of the Unilac High Current Performance 3. Cavity Development 4. General linac layout 5. R&D approach 6. Status of

  5. EERE Success Story- Chrysler and Partners Achieve 25% Fuel Economy Improvement in Light-Duty Advanced Technology Powertrain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Internal combustion engines have the potential to become substantially more efficient, with laboratory tests indicating that new technologies could increase passenger vehicle fuel economy by more...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about clean...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Combustion Concepts- Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Light Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Robert Bosch at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced combustion concepts -...

  8. Integrated Plastic Substrates for OLED Lighting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plastic Substrates for OLED Lighting Integrated Plastic Substrates for OLED Lighting Lead Performer: Sinovia Technologies - Foster City, CA Partners: - Eastman Kodak Company - Rochester, NY - Vitriflex - San Jose, CA - Solvay, USA Inc. - Houston, TX DOE Total Funding: $1,211,240 Cost Share: $1,249,430 Project Term: 8/1/15 - 3/1/17 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0001171) Project Objective This project will combine a barrier film technology with a

  9. Building Controls and Lighting Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation to State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) February 22, 2011 Francis Rubinstein Lead, Lighting Group Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory fmrubinstein@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Building End Use Energy Consumption Buildings consume 40% of Building
sector
has:
 total U.S. energy Largest
Energy
Use!
 * 71% of electricity *54% of natural gas No Single End Use Dominates Fastest
growth
rate!
 Lawrence

  10. State Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State Total Percent of U.S. total Alabama 1,652 0.0 Alaska 152 0.0 Arizona 912,975 19.9 Arkansas 2,724 0.1 California 2,239,983 48.8 Colorado 49,903 1.1 Connecticut 33,627 0.7 Delaware 3,080 0.1 District of Columbia 1,746 0.0 Florida 22,061 0.5 Georgia 99,713 2.2 Guam 39 0.0 Hawaii 126,595 2.8 Idaho 1,423 0.0 Illinois 8,176 0.2 Indiana 12,912 0.3 Iowa 4,480 0.1 Kansas 523 0.0 Kentucky 2,356 0.1 Louisiana 27,704 0.6 Maine 993 0.0 Maryland 30,528 0.7 Massachusetts 143,539 3.1 Michigan 3,416 0.1

  11. Prospects for LED lighting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Gee, James Martin; Simmons, Jerry Alvon

    2003-08-01

    Solid-state lighting using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has the potential to reduce energy consumption for lighting by 50% while revolutionizing the way we illuminate our homes, work places, and public spaces. Nevertheless, substantial technical challenges remain in order for solid-state lighting to significantly displace the well-developed conventional lighting technologies. We review the potential of LED solid-state lighting to meet the long-term cost goals.

  12. Fact #853 December 29, 2014 Stop/Start Technology is in nearly 5% of All New Light Vehicles Produced

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stop/Start technology improves fuel economy by reducing engine idle time. As a vehicle slows to a stop, the engine is shut down but then immediately restarts when the break pedal is released so...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high efficiency...

  14. 2010 US Lighting Market Characterization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... second largest lighting energy consumer, at 175 TWh per year. Ranked by technology, linear fluorescent lighting ... sensing, daylight harvesting, and individual occupant ...

  15. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce P. Hallbert; J. J. Persensky; Carol Smidts; Tunc Aldemir; Joseph Naser

    2009-08-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program is operated in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of Nuclear Power Plants that are currently in operation. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. Advanced instruments and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear assets. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. The strategic objective of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technology R&D pathway is to establish a technical basis for new technologies needed to achieve safety and reliability of operating nuclear assets and to implement new technologies in nuclear energy systems. This will be achieved by carrying out a program of R&D to develop scientific knowledge in the areas of: • Sensors, diagnostics, and prognostics to support characterization and prediction of the effects of aging and degradation phenomena effects on critical systems, structures, and components (SSCs) • Online monitoring of SSCs and active components, generation of information, and methods to analyze and employ online monitoring information • New methods for visualization, integration, and information use to enhance state awareness and leverage expertise to achieve safer, more readily available electricity generation. As an initial step in accomplishing this effort, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies was held March 20–21, 2009, in Columbus, Ohio, to enable industry stakeholders and researchers in identification of the nuclear industry’s needs in the areas of future I&C technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. Approaches for collaboration to bridge or fill the technology gaps were presented and R&D activities and priorities recommended. This report documents the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for the plan under development to achieve the goals of the I&C research pathway.

  16. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation. View all reports on the TEF Web page, http://www.eere.energy.gov/analysis/transportationenergyfutures/index.html.

  17. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, T.

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  18. Cost of Ownership and Well-to-Wheels Carbon Emissions/Oil Use of Alternative Fuels and Advanced Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, Mr. Amgad; Rousseau, Mr. Aymeric; Wang, Mr. Michael; Ruth, Mr. Mark; Andress, Mr. David; Ward, Jacob; Joseck, Fred; Nguyen, Tien; Das, Sujit

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) updated their analysis of the well-to-wheels (WTW) greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions, petroleum use, and the cost of ownership (excluding insurance, maintenance, and miscellaneous fees) of vehicle technologies that have the potential to significantly reduce GHG emissions and petroleum consumption. The analyses focused on advanced light-duty vehicle (LDV) technologies such as plug-in hybrid, battery electric, and fuel cell electric vehicles. Besides gasoline and diesel, alternative fuels considered include natural gas, advanced biofuels, electricity, and hydrogen. The Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) and Autonomie models were used along with the Argonne and NREL H2A models.

  19. LED Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » LED Lighting LED Lighting LED Lighting The light-emitting diode (LED) is one of today's most energy-efficient and rapidly-developing lighting technologies. Quality LED light bulbs last longer, are more durable, and offer comparable or better light quality than other types of lighting. Check out the top 8 things you didn't know about LEDs to learn more. Energy Savings LED is a highly energy efficient lighting technology, and has the potential to fundamentally

  20. Global Radiological Source Sorting, Tracking, and Monitoring (Gradsstram) Using Emergin RFID and Web 2.0 Technologies to Provide Total Asset and Information Visualization, Paper at 2009 INMM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Randy M.; Kopsick, Deborah A.; Gorman, Bryan L.; Ganguly, Auroop R.; Ferren, Mitch; Shankar, Mallikarjun

    2009-01-01

    Background Thousands of shipments of radioisotopes developed in the United States (U.S.) are transported domestically and internationally for medical and industrial applications, including to partner laboratories in European Union (EU) countries. Over the past five years, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)1 have worked with state first responder personnel, key private sector supply chain stakeholders, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Transportation (DOT), the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring of medical, research and industrial radioisotopes in commerce. ORNL was the pioneer of the international radioisotope shipping and production business. Most radioisotopes made and used today were either made or discovered at ORNL. While most of the radioisotopes used in the commercial sector are now produced and sold by the private market, ORNL still leads the world in the production of exotic, high-value and/or sensitive industrial, medical and research isotopes. The ORNL-EPA-DOE Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) project tested, evaluated, and integrated RFID technologies in laboratory settings and at multiple private-sector shipping and distribution facilities (Perkin Elmer and DHL) to track and monitor common radioisotopes used in everyday commerce. The RFID tracking capability was also tested in association with other deployed technologies including radiation detection, chemical/explosives detection, advanced imaging, lasers, and infrared scanning. At the 2007 EU-U.S. Summit, the leaders of the US Department of Commerce (DOC) and EU European Commission (EC) committed to pursue jointly directed Lighthouse Priority Projects. These projects are intended to foster cooperation and reduce regulatory burdens with respect to transatlantic commerce. The Transatlantic Economic Council (TEC) Lighthouse Project on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) has been directed to develop a joint framework for cooperation on identification and development of best practices for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technologies The RFID Lighthouse Priority Project commits both sides to endeavor to align U.S. and EU regulatory and policy approaches on RFID technologies, including pilot projects in the public sector.

  1. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (CEC), March 1990. Advanced Lighting Technologies Application Guidelines (ALTAG), Building and Appliance Efficiency Office. 3. Dubin, F.S., Mindell, H.L., and Bloome, S., 1976....

  2. Light-Source Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Canada CTST - UCSB Center for Terahertz Science and Technology, USA DFELL - Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory, USA Jlab - Jefferson Lab, USA LCLS - Linear Coherent Light...

  3. Lighting Developments to 2030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ... Lighting Technologies, Costs, and Energy Demand: Global Developments to 2030 View Slides: ...

  4. Lighting Test Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting-Test-Facilities Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors Technology &...

  5. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The amount and quality of light around us affects our health, safety, comfort, and productivity. Our country spends more than $37 billion each year on electricity for lighting, but technologies developed during the past 10 years can help us cut lighting costs by 30% to 60% while enhancing lighting quality and reducing environmental impacts. In a typical indoor lighting system, 50 percent or more of the energy supplied to the lamp can be wasted by obsolete equipment, poor maintenance, or

  6. Outdoor Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outdoor Lighting Outdoor Lighting Outdoor lighting consumes a significant amount of energy-about 1.3 quadrillion Btu annually-costing about $10 billion per year. In the last five years, a number of municipalities have switched to new LED technologies that can reduce energy costs by approximately 50% over conventional lighting technologies and provide additional savings of 20 to 40% with advance lighting controls. Beyond cost and energy savings, the higher efficiency of LED lights provides other

  7. Topanga Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Place: Canoga Park, California Zip: 91303 Product: Stealth-mode high-intensity discharge (HID) lighting technology developer. References: Topanga Technologies1...

  8. Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Processing...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Total Products Other Liquids Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum ...

  9. 2015 DOE SSL Technology Development Workshop Attendee List

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Light Technologies Kyle Landig Sunset Lighting Mike Landig Sunset Lighting Susan Larson Soraa Ben Latson Ecova Jefferay Lawton Microchip Technology Marc Ledbetter Pacific...

  10. Solid-State Lighting Patents Resulting from DOE-Funded Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOLID-STATE LIGHTING BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE Solid-State Lighting Patents Resulting from DOE-Funded Projects As of January 2016, 109 solid-state lighting (SSL) patents have been awarded to research projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Since December 2000, when DOE began funding SSL research projects, a total of 261 patent applications have been submitted, ranging from large businesses (83) and small businesses (97) to universities (69) and national laboratories (12). DOE tracks

  11. DOE Solid-State Lighting Program: Modest Investments, Extraordinary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Modest Investments, Extraordinary Impacts DOE Solid-State Lighting Program Shaping the Future of Solid-State Lighting Today, LED (light-emitting diode) technologies illuminate ...

  12. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the...

  13. Lighting Designer Roundtable on Solid-State Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Roundtable meeting in Chicago of a group of lighting designers focused on examining solid-state lighting (SSL) market and technology issues and encouraging a discussion of designers’ experiences, ideas, and recommendations regarding SSL & SSL industry.

  14. Barge Truck Total

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

  15. TotalView Training 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TotalView Training 2015 TotalView Training 2015 NERSC will host an in-depth training course on TotalView, a graphical parallel debugger developed by Rogue Wave Software, on Thursday, March 26, 2015. This will be provided by Rogue Wave Software staff members. The training will include a lecture and demo sessions in the morning, followed by a hands-on parallel debugging session in the afternoon. Location This event will be presented online using WebEx technology and in person at NERSC Oakland

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 2010 Total Lighting Technology Light Output, by Sector (Trillion Lumen-Hour per Year)(1) Residential Commercial Industrial Other (2) Total Incandescent 1640 49% 180 1% 0 0% 50 1% 1870 5% General (A-type, Decorative) 1390 42% 120 0% 0 0% - - 1510 4% Reflector 190 6% 60 0% 0 0% - - 250 1% Miscellaneous 60 2% 0 0% - - 50 1% 110 0% Halogen 170 5% 240 1% 0 0% 20 0% 430 1% General 20 1% 0 0% 0 0% - - 20 0% Reflector 110 3% 100 0% 0 0% - - 210 1% Low Voltage Display 10 0% 130 1% - - - - 140 0%

  17. Building Technologies Program Planning Summary

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of commercially available but underutilized technologies, lighting controls, expert lighting design, and integrated systems. * Through the EnergySmart Schools subprogram, BTP...

  18. Energy Savings Activities-Lighting

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students use the scientific method to examine school lighting technologies and determine if there are opportunities to save energy and money.

  19. U.S. Lighting Market Characterization Volume II: Energy Efficient Lighting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technology Options (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect U.S. Lighting Market Characterization Volume II: Energy Efficient Lighting Technology Options Citation Details In-Document Search Title: U.S. Lighting Market Characterization Volume II: Energy Efficient Lighting Technology Options Multiyear study to evaluate light sources and identify opportunities for saving energy. This report looks broadly at energy-efficient options in lighting and identifies leading opportunities. Authors: Hong,

  20. Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Windows and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    including the cost of sensor and lighting Reduce ... * Smart shadings * Highly insulated windows * Windows attachment 8 Building Envelope R&D Priorities Technology 2025 ...

  1. Solid-State Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Princeton's approach to solid-state lighting. Read more A Comprehensive Program Solid-state lighting (SSL) technology has the potential to reduce U.S. lighting energy usage by...

  2. Lighting fundamentals handbook: Lighting fundamentals and principles for utility personnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eley, C.; Tolen, T. Associates, San Francisco, CA ); Benya, J.R. )

    1992-12-01

    Lighting accounts for approximately 30% of overall electricity use and demand in commercial buildings. This handbook for utility personnel provides a source of basic information on lighting principles, lighting equipment, and other considerations related to lighting design. The handbook is divided into three parts. Part One, Physics of Light, has chapters on light, vision, optics, and photometry. Part Two, Lighting Equipment and Technology, focuses on lamps, luminaires, and lighting controls. Part Three, Lighting Design Decisions, deals with the manner in which lighting design decisions are made and reviews relevant methods and issues. These include the quantity and quality of light needed for visual tasks, calculation methods for verifying that lighting needs are satisfied, lighting economics and methods for evaluating investments in efficient lighting systems, and miscellaneous design issues including energy codes, power quality, photobiology, and disposal of lighting equipment. The handbook contains a discussion of the role of the utility in promoting the use of energy-efficient lighting. The handbook also includes a lighting glossary and a list of references for additional information. This convenient and comprehensive handbook is designed to enable utility lighting personnel to assist their customers in developing high-quality, energy-efficient lighting systems. The handbook is not intended to be an up-to-date reference on lighting products and equipment.

  3. 2014 Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary; Moore, Sheila A

    2015-03-01

    This is the sixth edition of this report, which details the major trends in U.S. light-duty vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. This report is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), and, in accord with its mission, pays special attention to the progress of high-efficiency and alternative-fuel technologies. After opening with a discussion of energy and economics, this report features a section each on the light-duty vehicle and heavy/medium truck markets, and concluding with a section each on technology and policy. The first section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national (and even international) scale. The following section examines Light-Duty Vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. The discussion of Medium and Heavy Trucks offers information on truck sales and technologies specific to heavy trucks. The Technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure, and the Policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards. In total, the information contained in this report is intended to communicate a fairly complete understanding of U.S. highway transportation energy through a series of easily digestible tables and figures.

  4. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  5. Guiding SSL Technology Advances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guiding SSL Technology Advances Guiding SSL Technology Advances PDF icon Guiding Solid-State Lighting Technology Advances More Documents & Publications Doing Business with DOE's ...

  6. DOE Announces Funding Opportunity for Solid-State Lighting R&D | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 14, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a solid-state lighting (SSL) R&D funding opportunity on October 14, 2014. Under this funding opportunity (DE-FOA-0001171, "Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2015"), a total of up to $10 million in funding is directed toward all three existing DOE SSL R&D program areas: Core Technology Research-the application of fundamental scientific concepts to SSL technology Product

  7. DOE Announces Funding Opportunity for Solid-State Lighting R&D | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 29, 2015 - 3:43pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a solid-state lighting (SSL) R&D funding opportunity on October 29, 2015. Under this funding opportunity (DE-FOA-0001364, "Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D-2016"), a total of up to $10.5 million in funding is directed toward all three existing DOE SSL R&D program areas: Core Technology Research-the application of fundamental scientific concepts to SSL technology Product

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Computational Design and Development of a New, Lightweight Cast Alloy for Advanced Cylinder Heads in High-Efficiency, Light-Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about computational design and...

  9. And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting Up

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operations with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology | Department of Energy And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting Up Operations with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting Up Operations with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology September 30, 2014 - 1:12pm Addthis Developed by Sandia National Laboratories and several industry partners, the fuel cell mobile light (H2LT) offers a cleaner, quieter alternative to

  10. Emerging Technologies (ET)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    commercialization of technologies and systems capable of substantially reducing primary energy use through improved: * Solid-State Lighting (Jim Brodrick) * HVAC, Water Heating ...

  11. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting, Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, M. A.; Goettel, R. T.

    2010-06-22

    U.S. DOE Solid-State Lighting Technology Demonstration GATEWAY Program Report on the TJMaxx Demonstration.

  12. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure Lighting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Parking Structure Lighting at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure Lighting at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters This report documents a solid-state lighting (SSL) technology demonstration at the parking structure of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Headquarters in Washington, DC, in which

  13. lighting controls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors Technology & Innovation Expand Technology & Innovation Utility Resources Expand...

  14. System Reliability Model for Solid-State Lighting Luminaires | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Lead Performer: RTI International - Research Triangle Park, NC Partners: Auburn University - Auburn, AL DOE Total Funding: $2,848,942 Cost Share: $712,234 Project Term: 9/16/2011 - 9/30/2016 Funding Opportunity: Solid State Lighting Core Technology Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA- 0000329) Project Objective The primary objectives of the proposed work will be to develop and validate a reliability model and accelerated life testing (ALT) methodologies for predicting the

  15. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per...

  16. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  17. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  18. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per...

  19. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  20. Solid State Lighting: GATEWAY and CALiPER | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid State Lighting: GATEWAY and CALiPER Solid State Lighting: GATEWAY and CALiPER Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review ...

  1. Picture of the Week: Circuits of light

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Circuits of light This artistic conceptualization of circuits made of light represents a new capability that could lead to advanced sensor systems, quantum information processing technology, and more. March 25, 2016 circuits of light artist's conception Circuits of light: artist's conception View a super-large 300 dpi version of this image on our Lab Flickr site. Circuits of light This artistic conceptualization of circuits made of light represents a new capability that could lead to advanced

  2. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lighting (SSL) technology demonstration at the parking structure of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Headquarters in Washington, DC, in which light-emitting diode (LED) ...

  3. Lighting for Health: LEDs in the New Age of Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    DOE Solid-State Lighting program technology fact sheet that provides background on current science and considerations related to LED light and health.

  4. Solid-State Lighting Recovery Act Award Selections | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid-State Lighting Recovery Act Award Selections Solid-State Lighting Recovery Act Award Selections A chart highlighting core technology research projects and product development ...

  5. The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar, "Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting," held on November 13, 2012. PDF icon Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting Webinar ...

  6. Parallel Total Energy

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-21

    This is a total energy electronic structure code using Local Density Approximation (LDA) of the density funtional theory. It uses the plane wave as the wave function basis set. It can sue both the norm conserving pseudopotentials and the ultra soft pseudopotentials. It can relax the atomic positions according to the total energy. It is a parallel code using MP1.

  7. U.S. Lighting Market Characterization Volume II: Energy Efficient Lighting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technology Options (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect U.S. Lighting Market Characterization Volume II: Energy Efficient Lighting Technology Options Citation Details In-Document Search Title: U.S. Lighting Market Characterization Volume II: Energy Efficient Lighting Technology Options × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service.

  8. Summary Max Total Units

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summary Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water

  9. Country/Continent Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    peak kilowatts) Country/Continent Total Percent of U.S. total Africa 14,279 3.7 Asia/Australia 330,200 86.2 Europe 19,771 5.1 South/Central America 7,748 2.0 Canada 5,507 1.4 Mexico 5,747 1.5 Total 383,252 100.0 Table 8. Destination of photovoltaic module export shipments, 2013 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report.'

  10. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Leavenworth, KS (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect in Leavenworth, KS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a commercial parking lot lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Technology GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The parking lot is for

  11. Nonimaging light concentrator with uniform irradiance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland; Gee, Randy C.

    2003-04-01

    A nonimaging light concentrator system including a primary collector of light, an optical mixer disposed near the focal zone for collecting light from the primary collector, the optical mixer having a transparent entrance aperture, an internally reflective housing for substantially total internal reflection of light, a transparent exit aperture and an array of photovoltaic cells disposed near the transparent exit aperture.

  12. ARM - Measurement - Total carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total carbon The total concentration of carbon in all its organic and non-organic forms. Categories Aerosols, Atmospheric Carbon Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including

  13. 2013 Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Williams, Susan E; Boundy, Robert Gary; Moore, Sheila A

    2014-03-01

    This is the fifth edition of this report, which details the major trends in U.S. light-duty vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. This report is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), and, in accord with its mission, pays special attention to the progress of high-efficiency and alternative-fuel technologies. After opening with a discussion of energy and economics, this report features a section each on the light-duty vehicle and heavy/medium truck markets, and concluding with a section each on technology and policy. The first section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national (and even international) scale. For example, Figures 12 through 14 discuss the connections between global oil prices and U.S. GDP, and Figures 21 and 22 show U.S. employment in the automotive sector. The following section examines Light-Duty Vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. Figures 24 through 51 offer snapshots of major light-duty vehicle brands in the U.S. and Figures 56 through 64 examine the performance and efficiency characteristics of vehicles sold. The discussion of Medium and Heavy Trucks offers information on truck sales (Figures 73 through 75) and fuel use (Figures 78 through 81). The Technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure (Figures 84 through 95), and the Policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standard (Figures 106 through 110). In total, the information contained in this report is intended to communicate a fairly complete understanding of U.S. highway transportation energy through a series of easily digestible nuggets.

  14. Pupillary efficient lighting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Samuel M.; Jewett, Don L.

    1991-01-01

    A lighting system having at least two independent lighting subsystems each with a different ratio of scotopic illumination to photopic illumination. The radiant energy in the visible region of the spectrum of the lighting subsystems can be adjusted relative to each other so that the total scotopic illumination of the combined system and the total photopic illumination of the combined system can be varied independently. The dilation or contraction of the pupil of an eye is controlled by the level of scotopic illumination and because the scotopic and photopic illumination can be separately controlled, the system allows the pupil size to be varied independently of the level of photopic illumination. Hence, the vision process can be improved for a given level of photopic illumination.

  15. Cerenkov Light

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2014-05-22

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  16. Cerenkov Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2013-06-13

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  17. Light Show

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Lightning - Nature's Light Show Lightning provides one of nature's most spectacular displays of energy. Though fascinating to observe, lightning can be dangerous and deadly....

  18. Residential Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  19. Lighting Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When undertaking a lighting renovation in a Federal building, daylighting is the primary renewable energy opportunity. Photovoltaics (PV) also present an excellent opportunity. While this guide...

  20. LED Lighting Forecast | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    This is a positive development in terms of energy consumption, as LEDs use significantly less electricity per lumen produced than many traditional lighting technologies. Report: ...

  1. Astronomy Particle Physics Light Sources Genomics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 - 2 Astronomy Particle Physics Light Sources Genomics Climate * Big Data Software - Broad ecosystem of capabilities and technologies - Research and evaluate - Customize and...

  2. Total DOE/NNSA

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Actuals 2009 Actuals 2010 Actuals 2011 Actuals 2012 Actuals 2013 Actuals 2014 Actuals 2015 Actuals Total DOE/NNSA 4,385 4,151 4,240 4,862 5,154 5,476 7,170 7,593 Total non-NNSA 3,925 4,017 4,005 3,821 3,875 3,974 3,826 3765 Total Facility 8,310 8,168 8,245 8,683 9,029 9,450 10,996 11,358 non-NNSA includes DOE offices and Strategic Parternship Projects (SPP) employees NNSA M&O Employee Reporting

  3. LED Essentials - Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Essentials - Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages LED Essentials - Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages On October 11, 2007, Kevin Dowling, VP of Innovation for Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, presented a broad introduction to LED technology, and discussed the technology status, advantages and disadvantages, current applications, future potential, and evolving path of LED technology from indicator lights to general illumination. View

  4. 2015 SSL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP PRESENTATIONS - Day...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Changing Technology and Business Practices: Rob Fallow, Fortis Construction PDF icon Changing Technology and Business Practices: Chip Israel, Lighting Design Alliance...

  5. Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage - Current Technology Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology Hydrogen storage is a ... for the full platform of light-duty automotive vehicles using fuel cell power plants. ...

  6. CEYX Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Zip: CA 92123 Product: CEYX Technologies Inc, provides software-enabled control systems for light emitting devices. References: CEYX Technologies Inc1 This...

  7. Energy Department Offers $10 Million for Energy-Saving Lighting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    manufacturing of solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies. This funding will help accelerate the development of high-quality light-emitting diode (LED) and organic light-emitting ...

  8. Solar Panel and Induction Lighting Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gresek, Michael

    2014-01-21

    Installation of solar and energy saving lighting technologies at municipal facilities to: Produce and conserve electricity for these facilities; saving money and the environment; lead by example; educate the public on conservation and renewable technologies.

  9. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting

  10. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 2 Report Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ng, Henry K.; Waller, Thomas

    2007-12-01

    An investigation was conducted on the emissions and efficiency from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas (CNG) in light duty vehicles. The different blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. The blends were tested using a Ford F-150 and a Chevrolet Silverado truck supplied by Arizona Public Services. Tests on emissions were performed using four different driving condition tests. Previous investigation by Don Karner and James Frankfort on a similar Ford F-150 using a 30% hydrogen blend showed that there was substantial reduction when compared to gasoline in carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions while the reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emissions was minimal. This investigation was performed using different blends of CNG and hydrogen to evaluate the emissions reducing capabilities associated with the use of the different fuel blends. The results were then tested statistically to confirm or reject the hypotheses on the emission reduction capabilities. Statistically analysis was performed on the test results to determine whether hydrogen concentration in the HCNG had any effect on the emissions and the fuel efficiency. It was found that emissions from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas were a function of driving condition employed. Emissions were found to be dependent on the concentration of hydrogen in the compressed natural gas fuel blend.

  11. U.S. Lighting Market Characterization Volume II: Energy Efficient...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: building technologies program corporate; energy; market; characterization; commercial; industrial; residential; lighting Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  12. LED Parking Lot Lighting Working Group Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the Retailer Energy Alliance LED Parking Lot Lighting Working Group and its Technology Procurement Project.

  13. LED Lighting Facts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research & Development » Technology Application R&D » LED Lighting Facts LED Lighting Facts LED lighting facts - A Program of the U.S. DOE DOE's LED Lighting Facts® program showcases LED products for general illumination from manufacturers who commit to testing products and reporting performance results according to industry standards. For lighting buyers, designers, and energy efficiency programs, the program provides information essential to evaluating SSL products. Central to the

  14. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies in Buildings Technology Characterizations for Energy Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2004-10-11

    The energy use in America's commercial and residential building sectors is large and growing. Over 38 quadrillion Btus (Quads) of primary energy were consumed in 2002, representing 39% of total U.S. energy consumption. While the energy use in buildings is expected to grow to 52 Quads by 2025, a large number of energy-related technologies exist that could curtail this increase. In recent years, improvements in such items as high efficiency refrigerators, compact fluorescent lights, high-SEER air conditioners, and improved building shells have all contributed to reducing energy use. Hundreds of other technology improvements have and will continue to improve the energy use in buildings. While many technologies are well understood and are gradually penetrating the market, more advanced technologies will be introduced in the future. The pace and extent of these advances can be improved through state and federal R&D. This report focuses on the long-term potential for energy-efficiency improvement in buildings. Five promising technologies have been selected for description to give an idea of the wide range of possibilities. They address the major areas of energy use in buildings: space conditioning (33% of building use), water heating (9%), and lighting (16%). Besides describing energy-using technologies (solid-state lighting and geothermal heat pumps), the report also discusses energy-saving building shell improvements (smart roofs) and the integration of multiple energy service technologies (CHP packaged systems and triple function heat pumps) to create synergistic savings. Finally, information technologies that can improve the efficiency of building operations are discussed. The report demonstrates that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. The five technology areas alone can potentially result in total primary energy savings of between 2 and 4.2 Quads by 2025, or 3.8% to 8.1% of the total commercial and residential energy use by 2025 (52 Quads). Many other technologies will contribute to additional potential for energy-efficiency improvement, while the technical potential of these five technologies on the long term is even larger.

  15. Lighting market sourcebook for the US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorsatz, D.; Shown, L.; Koomey, J.; Moezzi, M.; Denver, A.; Atkinson, B.

    1997-12-01

    Throughout the United States, in every sector and building type, lighting is a significant electrical end-use. Based on the many and varied studies of lighting technologies, and experience with programs that promote lighting energy-efficiency, there is a significant amount of cost-effective energy savings to be achieved in the lighting end use. Because of such potential savings, and because consumers most often do not adopt cost-effective lighting technologies on their own, programs and policies are needed to promote their adoption. Characteristics of lighting energy use, as well as the attributes of the lighting marketplace, can significantly affect the national pattern of lighting equipment choice and ownership. Consequently, policy makers who wish to promote energy-efficient lighting technologies and practices must understand the lighting technologies that people use, the ways in which they use them, and marketplace characteristics such as key actors, product mix and availability, price spectrum, and product distribution channels. The purpose of this report is to provide policy-makers with a sourcebook that addresses patterns of lighting energy use as well as data characterizing the marketplace in which lighting technologies are distributed, promoted, and sold.

  16. LED Provides Effective and Efficient Parking Area Lighting at the NAVFAC Engineering Service Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document details new lighting technology that reduces energy consumption and reduces maintenance, while providing effective illumination.

  17. 21 briefing pages total

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law

  18. Lumificient Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lumificient Technologies Place: Minnesota Zip: MN 55369 Product: Lumificient is a manufacturing and distribution firm that designs and develops solid state lighting or LED...

  19. Adura Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Zip: CA 94105 Product: San Francisco-based, producer of wireless lighting control systems. References: Adura Technologies1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  20. Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holton, J.

    2012-02-01

    The Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The high performance lighting strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner's expectations for high quality lighting.

  1. Materials processing with light

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials processing with light, plasmas and other sources of energy At the ARC various processing technologies are used to create materials, struc- tures, and devices that play an increasingly important role in high value-added manufacturing of computer and communications equipment, physical and chemical sensors, biomedical instruments and treatments, semiconductors, thin films, photovoltaics, electronic components and optical components. For example, making coatings, including paint, chrome,

  2. Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S.

    2000-01-01

    A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

  3. Technology Roadmaps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home » Information Resources » Publications » Technology Roadmaps Technology Roadmaps This page contains links to DOE's Technology Roadmaps, multi-year plans outlining solid-state lighting goals, research and development initiatives aimed at accelerating technology advances and market penetration of solid-state lighting, and recent achievements. The following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report Summary of a September meeting open to members of the

  4. How Do You Light Your Home Efficiently? | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Light Your Home Efficiently? How Do You Light Your Home Efficiently? July 22, 2009 - 4:30pm Addthis An average household dedicates 11% of its energy budget to lighting. Installing efficient lighting technologies, using task lighting, flipping the switch, and taking advantage of natural daylight can all help you save on your lighting costs. How do you light your home efficiently? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy

  5. Total Sales of Kerosene

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 79,674 137,928 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 61,327 106,995 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 15,991 27,500 1984-2014 Connecticut 8,800 7,437

  6. Commercial Lighting and LED Lighting Incentives | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Schools Institutional Savings Category Lighting Lighting ControlsSensors Other EE LED Lighting Maximum Rebate Up to 100% of cost; incentives that exceed 5,000 should be...

  7. Light's Darkness

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Padgett, Miles [University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland

    2010-01-08

    Optical vortices and orbital angular momentum are currently topical subjects in the optics literature. Although seemingly esoteric, they are, in fact, the generic state of light and arise whenever three or more plane waves interfere. To be observed by eye the light must be monochromatic. Laser speckle is one such example, where the optical energy circulates around each black spot, giving a local orbital angular momentum. This talk with report three on-going studies. First, when considering a volume of interfering waves, the laser specs map out threads of complete darkness embedded in the light. Do these threads form loops? Links? Or even knots? Second, when looking through a rapidly spinning window, the image of the world on the other side is rotated: true or false? Finally, the entanglement of orbital angular momentum states means measuring how the angular position of one photons sets the angular momentum of another: is this an angular version of the EPR (Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen) paradox?

  8. Lighting fundamentals handbook: Lighting fundamentals and principles for utility personnel. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eley, C.; Tolen, T.; Benya, J.R.

    1992-12-01

    Lighting accounts for approximately 30% of overall electricity use and demand in commercial buildings. This handbook for utility personnel provides a source of basic information on lighting principles, lighting equipment, and other considerations related to lighting design. The handbook is divided into three parts. Part One, Physics of Light, has chapters on light, vision, optics, and photometry. Part Two, Lighting Equipment and Technology, focuses on lamps, luminaires, and lighting controls. Part Three, Lighting Design Decisions, deals with the manner in which lighting design decisions are made and reviews relevant methods and issues. These include the quantity and quality of light needed for visual tasks, calculation methods for verifying that lighting needs are satisfied, lighting economics and methods for evaluating investments in efficient lighting systems, and miscellaneous design issues including energy codes, power quality, photobiology, and disposal of lighting equipment. The handbook contains a discussion of the role of the utility in promoting the use of energy-efficient lighting. The handbook also includes a lighting glossary and a list of references for additional information. This convenient and comprehensive handbook is designed to enable utility lighting personnel to assist their customers in developing high-quality, energy-efficient lighting systems. The handbook is not intended to be an up-to-date reference on lighting products and equipment.

  9. FY 2011 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2011 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2011 NATIONAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total Available Fee Total Fee Earned % ...

  10. FY 2009 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2009 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2009 NATIONAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total Available Fee Total Fee Earned % ...

  11. FY 2008 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2008 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2008 NATIONAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total Available Fee Total Fee Earned % ...

  12. FY 2006 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2006 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2006 NATIONAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total Available Fee Total Fee Earned % ...

  13. FY 2010 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2010 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2010 NATIONAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total Available Fee Total Fee Earned % ...

  14. FY 2007 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2007 National Security Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2007 NATIONAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total Available Fee Total Fee Earned % ...

  15. Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

    2008-01-31

    The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

  16. National Lighting Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Energy National Lighting Energy Consumption Consumption 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all commercial buildings in commercial buildings in 2001 2001 LED (<.1% ) Incandescent 40% HID 22% Fluorescent 38% Lighting Energy Consumption by Lighting Energy Consumption by Breakdown of Lighting Energy Breakdown of Lighting Energy Major Sector and Light Source Type Major Sector and Light Source Type Source: Navigant Consulting, Inc., U.S. Lighting

  17. Brief History of Artificial Lighting Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel ... SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus EnergyWater History ...

  18. Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    2002-05-10

    Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

  19. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Freezer Case Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a report of observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under a U.S. Department of Energy program. The program supports demonstrations of high-performance solid-state lighting (SSL) products in order to develop empirical data and experience with in-the-field applications of this advanced lighting technology for plant-wide improvement.

  20. Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Lighting When you're shopping for lightbulbs, compare lumens and use the Lighting Facts label to be sure you're getting the amount of light, or level of brightness, you want. You can save money and energy while lighting your home and still maintaining good light quantity and quality. Consider energy-efficient lighting options to use the same amount of light for less money. Learn strategies for comparing and buying lighting products and using them efficiently. Featured Lighting Choices

  1. FY 2008 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2008 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2008 HONEYWELL FEDERAL MANUFACTURING & TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total ...

  2. FY 2010 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2010 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2010 HONEYWELL FEDERAL MANUFACTURING & TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total ...

  3. FY 2009 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2009 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2009 HONEYWELL FEDERAL MANUFACTURING & TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total ...

  4. FY 2006 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2006 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2006 HONEYWELL FEDERAL MANUFACTURING & TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total ...

  5. FY 2007 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2007 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2007 HONEYWELL FEDERAL MANUFACTURING & TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total ...

  6. FY 2011 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2011 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2011 HONEYWELL FEDERAL MANUFACTURING & TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total ...

  7. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Lighting and Other Electric Loads Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light bulbs. | Image by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 19469 Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light bulbs. | Image by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 19469 The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two

  8. Lighting the Way to Serious Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting the Way to Serious Savings Lighting the Way to Serious Savings April 1, 2013 - 6:02pm Addthis Smart lighting choices can save you money. Smart lighting choices can save you money. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Make educated choices when buying light bulbs to save energy and money. Pretty much everybody these days uses electric lighting to keep their households and businesses running during the

  9. Doing Business with DOE's Solid-State Lighting Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Doing Business with DOE's Solid-State Lighting Program Solid-state lighting (SSL) is an emerging technology that promises to make a significant impact on solving our nation's energy and environmental challenges. With the promise of being more than ten times as effcient as incandescent lighting and twice as effcient as fuorescent light- ing, SSL products using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) will mean "greener" homes and businesses that use

  10. 2011 Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Boundy, Robert Gary; Diegel, Susan W

    2012-02-01

    This report details the major trends in U.S. light-duty vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. This report is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), and, in accord with its mission, pays special attention to the progress of high-efficiency and alternative-fuel technologies. This third edition since this report was started in 2008 offers several marked improvements relative to its predecessors. Most significantly, where earlier editions of this report focused on supplying information through an examination of market drivers, new vehicle trends, and supplier data, this edition uses a different structure. After opening with a discussion of energy and economics, this report features a section each on the light-duty vehicle and heavy/medium truck markets, and concluding with a section each on technology and policy. In addition to making this sectional re-alignment, this year s edition of the report also takes a different approach to communicating information. While previous editions relied heavily on text accompanied by auxiliary figures, this third edition relies primarily on charts and graphs to communicate trends. Any accompanying text serves to introduce the trends communication by the graphic and highlight any particularly salient observations. The opening section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national (and even international) scale. For example, Figures 11 through 13 discuss the connections between global oil prices and U.S. GDP, and Figures 20 and 21 show U.S. employment in the automotive sector. The following section examines Light-Duty Vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. Figures 26 through 33 offer snapshots of major light-duty vehicle brands in the U.S. and Figures 38 through 43 examine the performance and efficiency characteristics of vehicles sold. The discussion of Medium and Heavy Trucks offers information on truck sales (Figures 58 through 61) and fuel use (Figures 64 through 66). The Technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure (Figures 68 through 77), and the Policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Cash for Clunkers program (Figures 87 and 88) and the Corporate Automotive Fuel Economy standard (Figures 90 through 99) and. In total, the information contained in this report is intended to communicate a fairly complete understanding of U.S. highway transportation energy through a series of easily digestible nuggets.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy and International Association of Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    MOU highlights four key areas on which DOE and IALD will collaborate: Promoting lighting design principles and technologies that improve lighting quality, energy efficiency, and...

  12. Environmental Emissions from Energy Technology Systems: The Total Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San Martin, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    This is a summary report that compares emissions during the entire project life cycle for a number of fossil-fueled and renewable electric power systems, including geothermal steam (probably modeled after The Geysers). The life cycle is broken into Fuel Extraction, Construction, and Operation. The only emission covered is carbon dioxide.

  13. Environmental Emissions From Energy Technology Systems: The Total Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San Martin, Robert L.

    1989-04-01

    This is a summary report that compares emissions during the entire project life cycle for a number of fossil-fueled and renewable electric power systems, including geothermal steam (probably modeled after The Geysers). The life cycle is broken into Fuel Extraction, Construction, and Operation. The only emission covered is carbon dioxide. (DJE 2005)

  14. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Technology Validation and Market Introduction 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for technology validation and market introduction, including ENERGY STAR, building energy codes, technology transfer application centers, commercial lighting initiative, EnergySmart Schools, EnergySmar

  15. Pedestrian Friendly Outdoor Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Koltai, Rita; McGowan, Terry

    2013-12-31

    This GATEWAY report discusses the problems of pedestrian lighting that occur with all technologies with a focus on the unique optical options and opportunities offered by LEDs through the findings from two pedestrian-focused projects, one at Stanford University in California, and one at the Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. Incorporating user feedback this report reviews the tradeoffs that must be weighed among visual comfort, color, visibility, efficacy and other factors to stimulate discussion among specifiers, users, energy specialists, and in industry in hopes that new approaches, metrics, and standards can be developed to support pedestrian-focused communities, while reducing energy use.

  16. Total Eolica | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eolica Jump to: navigation, search Name: Total Eolica Place: Spain Product: Project developer References: Total Eolica1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  17. Fact #837: September 8, Gap between Net Imports and Total Imports of Petroleum is Widening

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Net imports of petroleum (total imports minus exports) were 6.2 million barrels per day in 2013 – the lowest since the 1980's (dark blue line). The widening gap between total imports (light blue...

  18. Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and ...

  19. Shanghai Huiyang New Energy Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Product: China-based technology company to install turnkey solutions for solar and LED lighting systems. References: Shanghai Huiyang New Energy Technology Co Ltd1 This...

  20. Fact #868: April 13, 2015 Automotive Technology Has Improved...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: April 13, 2015 Automotive Technology Has Improved Performance and Fuel Economy of New Light Vehicles Fact 868: April 13, 2015 Automotive Technology Has Improved Performance and ...

  1. Energy Savings Estimates of Light Emitting Diodes in Niche Lighting Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Estimates of Light Emitting Diodes in Niche Lighting Applications Prepared for: Building Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Navigant Consulting Inc. 1801 K Street, NW Suite 500 Washington DC, 20006 September 2008 * Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Savings Estimates of Light Emitting Diodes in Niche Lighting Applications Released: September 2008 Revised: October 2008 This DOE report presents research

  2. Fact #800: October 21, 2013 Characteristics of New Light Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact 800: October 21, 2013 Characteristics of New Light Vehicles over Time From model years 1980 to 2012, there have been significant gains in automotive technology. For new light ...

  3. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm ...

  4. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units ...

  5. Total..............................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North

  6. Total........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351

  7. Total...........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space

  8. Total............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

  9. Total.............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer....................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model.................................. 58.6 7.6 14.2 13.1 9.2 14.6 5.0 14.5 Laptop Model...................................... 16.9 2.0 3.8 3.3 2.1 5.7 1.3 3.5 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..............................

  10. Total..............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269

  11. Total..............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat

  12. Total...............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs

  13. Total...............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs

  14. Total...............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2

  15. Total...............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat

  16. Total...............................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs

  17. Total................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central

  18. Total.................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat

  19. Total.................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment........ 1.2 N Q Q 0.2 0.4 0.2 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment........... 109.8 14.7 7.4 12.4 12.2 18.5 18.3 17.1 9.2 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............. 109.1 14.6 7.3 12.4 12.2 18.2 18.2 17.1 9.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It............... 0.8 Q Q Q Q 0.3 Q N Q Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas................................................... 58.2 9.2 4.9 7.8 7.1 8.8 8.4 7.8 4.2 Central

  20. Total.................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1

  1. Total..................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat

  2. Total..................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central

  3. Total...................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing

  4. Total....................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5

  5. Total.......................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.6 15.1 5.5 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.9 5.3 1.6 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 13.7 9.8 3.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 9.3 6.8 2.5 2.................................................................. 16.2 2.9 1.9 1.0 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 1.5 1.1 0.4 Number of Laptop PCs

  6. Total.......................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.9 8.4 3.4 2.................................................................. 16.2 3.5 2.2 1.3 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.1 1.5 0.6 Number of Laptop PCs

  7. Total.......................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs

  8. Total........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1

  9. Total........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing

  10. Total........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing

  11. Total........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 40.1 21.2 6.9 12.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 Q Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 13.6 5.6 2.3 5.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.0 4.4

  12. Total........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One

  13. Total........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0

  14. Total........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7

  15. Total...........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat

  16. Total...........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat

  17. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat

  18. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a

  19. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a

  20. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat

  1. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a

  2. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat

  3. Total.............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat

  4. Total..............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer .......................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer....................................... 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1......................................................................... 50.3 3.1 3.4 3.4 5.4 2......................................................................... 16.2 0.7 1.1 1.2 2.2 3 or More............................................................ 9.0 0.3

  5. Total.................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................... 17.8 1.8 Q Q 4.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................................ 93.3 5.3 7.0 7.8 7.2 Use Cooling Equipment................................................. 91.4 5.3 7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................................. 65.9 1.1 6.4 6.4 5.4 Without a

  6. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  7. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  8. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.0 1.6 0.3 1.1 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 8.3 4.2 1.3 2.7 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 15.0 8.1 2.7 4.2 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 10.9 6.0 1.8 3.1 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9

  9. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  10. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  11. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week.....................................................

  12. Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  13. Total.........................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less

  14. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic CellModule Shipments Report.'rounding. ... Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic CellModule Shipments Report.' CellModule ...

  15. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 41.8 2,603 2,199 1,654 941 795 598 1-Car Garage...... 9.5 2,064 1,664 1,039 775 624 390 2-Car Garage......

  16. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Type of Glass in Windows Single-pane Glass...... 27.4 ... Q Q N Q N N Proportion of Windows Replaced All......

  17. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Type of Glass in Windows Single-pane Glass......Q Q Q Q Proportion of Windows Replaced All......

  18. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System...... 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump......

  19. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System...... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump......

  20. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System...... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump...... 53.5 ...

  1. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System...... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump......

  2. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment...... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment...... 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use ...

  3. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment...... 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment...... 93.3 ...

  4. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment...... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment...... 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 ...

  5. What's Next for Solid-State Lighting?

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - 2 1 Photo 1: LEDs can be designed to mimic skylights or windows. Photo ©The Sky Factory, Community North Hospital, Indianapolis Photo 2: LEDs can be color tuned to maximize plant growth for indoor agriculture. Photo courtesy of GE Lighting What's Next for Solid-State Lighting? A s we stand on the brink of a lighting revolution spearheaded by light-emitting diode (LED) technology, one question on everyone's minds is: what's next for solid-state lighting (SSL)? Formerly just an intriguing

  6. Strategy Guideline. High Performance Residential Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holton, J.

    2012-02-01

    This report has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner’s expectations for high quality lighting.

  7. Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with Electronic Ballasts: 100fixture De-lamping: 4 - 9lamp Lighting Sensors: 20sensor LED Exit Signs: 20fixture Summary Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers...

  8. Appendix J - GPRA06 vehicle technologies program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The target market for the Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) program include light vehicles (cars and light trucks) and heavy vehicles (trucks more than 10,000 pounds Gross Vehicle Weight).

  9. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  10. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit ... Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review ...

  11. Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some Perspectives | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Emission Control Technology Review Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some Perspectives

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office: Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To support DOE's goal to provide clean and secure energy, the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) invests in research and development that:

  13. CALiPER Snapshot Report: Light Bulbs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    Snapshot reports use data from DOE's LED Lighting Facts product list to compare the LED performance to standard technologies, and are designed to help lighting retailers, distributors, designers, utilities, energy efficiency program sponsors, and other stakeholders understand the current state of the LED market and its trajectory.

  14. Ab Initio Calculations of Light-Ion Fusion Reactions (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ab Initio Calculations of Light-Ion Fusion Reactions Citation Details In-Document Search ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  15. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis Print Electrocatalysts are responsible for expediting reactions in many promising renewable energy technologies. However, the extreme...

  16. Forest Grove Light & Power- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest Grove Light & Power offers a variety of rebates through Conservation Services Department. Rebates vary based on technology, and are available to residential, commercial, and/or...

  17. Solid-State Lighting Subprogram Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Solid-State Lighting subprogram. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer ...

  18. Solid-State Lighting Program Strategy Overview - 2014 BTO Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Solid-State Lighting Program Strategy activities. Through robust feedback, the ...

  19. International Battery Presentation - Keeping The Lights On: Smart...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International Battery Presentation - Keeping The Lights On: Smart Storage for a Smart Grid (July 12, 2011) ... Technologies Office: 2009 Energy Storage R&D Annual Progress ...

  20. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    control light-material interactions, with the goal of achieving ultrahigh efficiency solar cells. ... is developing a transformational high efficiencylow cost photovoltaics technology. ...

  1. Technical Feasibility Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting on the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    technology, since both light source types feature rated lifetimes significantly exceeding those of the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) and low-pressure sodium (LPS) products. ...

  2. Reducing Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Greenhouse Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: The Combined Potential of Hybrid Technology and Behavioral Adaptation Title Reducing Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Greenhouse Gas...

  3. The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project -- A DOE Market Transformation Activity-- Lennie Klebanoff ... Systems Torsten Erbel Multiquip Inc. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Webinar November 13, ...

  4. Partner with DOE and Emerging Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) seeks partnerships to research and develop energy efficient building technologies, including advanced lighting, heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC),...

  5. Bosch Powertrain Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bosch Powertrain Technologies Provides major supplier view of future gasoline engine ... Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Light Duty ...

  6. Everlight TPV Technology JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JV Place: Fujian Province, China Product: China-based company focused on LED chip packaging and LED light strip production. References: Everlight & TPV Technology JV1 This...

  7. The Savannah River Technology Center, a leader in sensor technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, W.C.

    1993-12-01

    This publication highlights the capabilities and achievements of the Savannah River Technology Center in the field of sensor technology. Sensors are developed to provide solutions for environmental and chemical analysis. Most of their sensor systems are based upon fiber optics. Fiber optic probes function in three main modes: as a reflected light probe, from opaque samples; as a transreflectance probe, which sample light reflected back from samples which can pass light; and a flow cell, which monitors light transmitted through a path which passes the process stream being tested. The sensor group has developed fiber optic based temperature probes, has combined fiber optics with sol-gel technology to monitor process streams using chemical indicators, has done development work on slip stream on-line sampling of chemical process streams, has developed software to aid in the analysis of chemical solutions, and has applied this technology in a wide range of emerging areas.

  8. 2015 DOE Solid-State Lighting Project Portfolio

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PROJECT PORTFOLIO: SOLID-STATE LIGHTING January 2015 DOE Solid-State Lighting Project Portfolio January 2015 Executive Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partners with businesses, universities, and national laboratories to accelerate improvements in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. These collaborative, cost-shared efforts focus on developing highly energy-efficient, low cost, white light sources for general illumination. DOE supports SSL research for both light-emitting diode

  9. DOE ZERH Webinar: LED Lighting Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LED Lighting Efficiency DOE ZERH Webinar: LED Lighting Efficiency Description: LED lighting offers efficiency and performance benefits we've never seen in traditional lighting technologies. Commercial buildings have seen rapid growth in LED deployment, and in the residential arena leading builders are now integrating LED lighting packages. And as with any new building system, there are integration challenges along with the process of consumer understanding and acceptance. This webinar will

  10. CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS WORKSHOP REGISTRATION | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The following resources provide information about outdoor lighting control systems. PDF icon 2014 Presentation: What to Look for Today in Control Systems PDF icon 2015 Presentation: Outdoor Lighting Control System Fundamentals PDF icon 2015 Presentation: Lessons Learned from Networked Outdoor Lighting Control System Pilot Projects PDF icon Emerging Technology Primer: Networked Outdoor Lighting Control Systems

    CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS WORKSHOP REGISTRATION The registration fee for the 2016

  11. Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The published moisture loss on drying for sodium tartrate is 15.62% (84.38% total solids). 14.6 Sample size: Determined by sample matrix. 14.7 Sample storage: Samples should be ...

  12. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanton, Donald W.

    2011-06-03

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy’s Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of our objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded.

  13. Electrostatically actuatable light modulating device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    The electrostatically actuatable light modulator utilizes an opaque substrate plate patterned with an array of aperture cells, the cells comprised of physically positionable dielectric shutters and electrostatic actuators. With incorporation of a light source and a viewing screen, a projection display system is effected. Inclusion of a color filter array aligned with the aperture cells accomplishes a color display. The system is realized in terms of a silicon based manufacturing technology allowing fabrication of a high resolution capability in a physically small device which with the utilization of included magnification optics allows both large and small projection displays.

  14. Juice Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Ltd Place: Hertfordshire, England, United Kingdom Zip: EN11 0EX Product: U.K-based lighting fixtures technology LED provider. Coordinates: 51.84005, -0.2751 Show...

  15. Fact #908: January 18, 2016 Light Vehicle Sales Rise for Five...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The months with the highest sales per day are March, May, August, and December. Light Vehicle Sales per Day, 2010-2015 Light vehicles sales per day from 2019 to 2015. Total Light ...

  16. Lighting Developments to 2030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting Choices to Save You Money Lighting Choices to Save You Money This Energy 101 video explores the different lighting options available to consumers. Light your home using the same amount of light for less money. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. New lighting standards took effect in 2012, and money-saving options such as halogen incandescent, CFL, and LED lightbulbs are

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Computational design and development of a new, lightweight cast alloy for advanced cylinder heads in high-efficiency, light-duty engines FOA 648-3a

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about computational design and...

  18. ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The...

  19. U.S. Total Exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Freeport, TX Hidalgo, TX Laredo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Rio Grande, TX Roma, TX Total ...

  20. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 1993 Family Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factor: Less than 5,000 5,000...

  1. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Customers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Customers (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A, 4B, 4D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total New England 6,243,013 862,269 28,017 8 ...

  2. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Customers"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Customers" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A, 4B, 4D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U)" "State","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "New England",6243013,8...

  3. Mobile lighting apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  4. Guiding SSL Technology Advances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's solid-state lighting (SSL) program builds collaborative industry and research community to guise SSL technology innovation. Provides an overview of DOE's SSL program and its comprehensive approach based on long-term relationships with the SSL industry and community. (April 2015)

  5. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Freezer Case Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rishman, E. E.; Tuenge, J. R.

    2009-10-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology combined with occupancy sensors in a set of upright grocery store freezer cases.

  6. Energy Department Solid-State Lighting Efforts Spark New Paradigm

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakthroughs in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology, driven in part by Energy Department research investments, are leading to sweeping changes in the way lighting experts view the vast economic potential of future lighting systems and their growing benefits to society.

  7. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Tungsten halogen lamps are more energy-efficient than standard incandescent lamps. They ... Fluorescent lights are about 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent lighting and last ...

  8. Solid-State Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... HomeSolid-State Lighting Permalink ECIS-Veeco: Research Driving Down the Costs of Efficient LED Lighting Energy, Energy Efficiency, Materials Science, Partnership, Research & ...

  9. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lighting will be examined here: * replacing incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lamps * replacing incandescent exit signs with those lit by light emitting diodes (LED) * ...

  10. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, which causes the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce. High-Efficiency Ballast (HEB): A lighting conservation feature...

  11. Fluorescent Lighting Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light from a fluorescent lamp is first created by an electric current conducted through an inert gas producing ultraviolet light that is invisible to the human eye.

  12. Leavenworth Tree Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Join HERO for our annual Leavenworth Tree Lighting Ceremony & Shopping SATURDAY DECEMBER 12, 2015 Leavenworth Christmas Lighting Festival Visitors return year after year for some...

  13. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    more comprehensive understanding of commercial lighting and the potential for lighting energy savings. Steps to build on this analysis can be taken in many directions. One...

  14. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    are also under consideration. Outside the DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency's Green Lights program promotes energy-efficient lighting as a means to reducing...

  15. residential-lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency Progress Report Evaluation Utility Toolkit Residential Lighting Market Research The Residential Lighting Market Research Project will estimate market savings from...

  16. Energy consumption series: Lighting in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-11

    Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

  17. Cree LED Lighting Solutions Formerly LED Lighting Fixtures LLF...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LED Lighting Solutions Formerly LED Lighting Fixtures LLF Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cree LED Lighting Solutions (Formerly LED Lighting Fixtures (LLF)) Place: Morrisville,...

  18. Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and ...

  19. CATEGORY Total Procurement Total Small Business Small Disadvantaged

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CATEGORY Total Procurement Total Small Business Small Disadvantaged Business Woman Owned Small Business HubZone Small Business Veteran-Owned Small Business Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business FY 2013 Dollars Accomplished $1,049,087,940 $562,676,028 $136,485,766 $106,515,229 $12,080,258 $63,473,852 $28,080,960 FY 2013 % Accomplishment 54.40% 13.00% 10.20% 1.20% 6.60% 2.70% FY 2014 Dollars Accomplished $868,961,755 $443,711,175 $92,478,522 $88,633,031 $29,867,820 $43,719,452 $26,826,374

  20. Technology Roadmaps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmaps Technology Roadmaps May 15, 2015 Solid-State Lighting R&D Plan The Solid-State Lighting (SSL) R&D Plan is a consolidation of the Department of Energy (DOE) SSL Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) and the DOE SSL Manufacturing R&D Roadmap that DOE has published and updated in previous years. The SSL R&D Plan provides analysis and direction for ongoing R&D activities to advance SSL technology and increase energy savings. The Roadmap also reviews SSL technology status and

  1. Transformations in Lighting: The Sixth Annual Solid-State Lighting R&D Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than 400 SSL technology leaders from industry, research organizations, universities, national laboratories, manufacturing, energy efficiency organizations, utilities and municipalities gathered in San Francisco, CA to participate in the "Transformations in Lighting" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on February 3-5, 2009. The workshop, hosted by DOE, with sponsors BetaLED, Echelon, Pacific Gas & Electric, and Southern California Edison, was the sixth annual DOE meeting to accelerate SSL technology advances and guide market introduction of quality SSL products. The workshop brought together a diverse gathering of participants - from the R&D community to lighting designers and architects - to share insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

  2. Pedestrian Friendly Outdoor Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N. J.; Koltai, R. N.; McGowan, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    The GATEWAY program followed two pedestrian-scale lighting projects that required multiple mockups – one at Stanford University in California and the other at Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. The report provides insight into pedestrian lighting criteria, how they differ from street and area lighting criteria, and how solid-state lighting can be better applied in pedestrian applications.

  3. Controls for Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2007-06-22

    This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

  4. LED Lighting Facts Snapshot: Indoor Ambient Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    LED Lighting Facts Snapshot reports reveal how today's products really perform, drawing on analysis of verified performance data from the program's online product list.

  5. Keeping Pace with LED Lighting Trends | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Keeping Pace with LED Lighting Trends Keeping Pace with LED Lighting Trends October 23, 2013 - 10:41am Addthis This year's SSL Market Introduction Workshop will take place in Portland, Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Travel Portland This year's SSL Market Introduction Workshop will take place in Portland, Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Travel Portland Jim Brodrick Jim Brodrick Lighting Program Manager Rapid advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology are reducing the cost, improving the

  6. Walmart Sees the Light for Parking Lots | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Walmart Sees the Light for Parking Lots Walmart Sees the Light for Parking Lots November 1, 2011 - 1:03pm Addthis This Walmart in Leavenworth, Kansas, was the first to include LED parking lot lighting based on a specification developed through the Energy Department's Building Technologies Program, the Retail Energy Alliance and the retailer. Since January, Walmart has planned to install similar lighting system at more than 225 new sites. | Photo courtesy of Walmart. This Walmart in Leavenworth,

  7. Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Campaign for Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings May 27, 2015 - 7:30am Addthis Today the Energy Department launched a new indoor lighting campaign to increase the use of high efficiency lighting technologies in commercial buildings. Through the Better Buildings Alliance, the Department is working

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is developing the scientific basis to extend existing nuclear power plant operating life beyond the current 60-year licensing period and ensure long-term reliability, productivity, safety, and security. The program is conducted in collaboration with national

  9. Solid-State Lighting Webcasts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webcasts Solid-State Lighting Webcasts Below you'll find links to information about past webcast presentations related to solid-state lighting, including presentation slides and question-and-answer sessions, where available. CONNECTED OUTDOOR LIGHTING SYSTEMS FOR MUNICIPALITIES October 22, 2015 A presentation on the current state of connected outdoor lighting system technology and where it is heading. A TECHNICAL DISCUSSION OF TM-30-15 September 22, 2015 A presentation on why and how TM-30-15

  10. Fuels Technologies

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fuels Technologies Program Mission To develop more energy efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies that enable America to use less petroleum. --EERE Strategic Plan, October 2002-- Kevin Stork, Team Leader Fuel Technologies & Technology Deployment Vehicle Technologies Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy DEER 2008 August 6, 2008 Presentation Outline n Fuel Technologies Research Goals Fuels as enablers for advanced engine

  11. Geothermal Technologies Program GRC Presentation, 10/1/2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 1, 2012 Geothermal Technologies Program GRC Presentation, Reno GTP Investments at GRC 12 Total 32 Projects DOE Geothermal Technologies Program has invested over 68M in ...

  12. Category:Electricity Generating Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Electricity Generating Technologies Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B...

  13. Multi-Year Program Plan FY'09-FY'15 Solid-State Lighting Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-01

    President Obama's energy and environment agenda calls for deployment of 'the Cheapest, Cleanest, Fastest Energy Source - Energy Efficiency.' The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) plays a critical role in advancing the President's agenda by helping the United States advance toward an energy-efficient future. Lighting in the United States is projected to consume nearly 10 quads of primary energy by 2012.3 A nation-wide move toward solid-state lighting (SSL) for general illumination could save a total of 32.5 quads of primary energy between 2012 and 2027. No other lighting technology offers the DOE and our nation so much potential to save energy and enhance the quality of our built environment. The DOE has set forth the following mission statement for the SSL R&D Portfolio: Guided by a Government-industry partnership, the mission is to create a new, U.S.-led market for high-efficiency, general illumination products through the advancement of semiconductor technologies, to save energy, reduce costs and enhance the quality of the lighted environment.

  14. Energy Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions Energy Technologies Area (ETA) Building Technology & Urban Systems Energy Analysis & Environmental...

  15. Keeping Light in Tune | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Keeping Light in Tune Much like being slightly off the frequency of a radio station destroys radio reception, the quality of light-emitting technologies has, until now, been severely limited by random fluctuations in the frequency of the emitted photons. Scientists demonstrated how this photon detuning can be suppressed using a series of short, controlled pulses applied to the emitter. The elegant solution is robust and applicable for many quantum systems, removing a major roadblock on the way

  16. solid state lighting | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solid-State Lighting Solid-State Lighting (SSL) is an emerging technology with the potential to address the urgent challenges of revitalizing America's economy, strengthening our national energy security, and reducing our country's greenhouse gas emissions. SSL will mean greener homes and businesses that use substantially less electricity, making them less dependent on fossil fuels. In the coming decade, SSL will become a key to affordable high-performance buildings - buildings that consume less

  17. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting at

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the I-35W Bridge, Minneapolis, MN (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Roadway Lighting at the I-35W Bridge, Minneapolis, MN Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting at the I-35W Bridge, Minneapolis, MN This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology conducted in 2009 at the recently reconstructed I-35W bridge in Minneapolis, MN. The project was supported under

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 2010 Total Lighting Technology Electricity Consumption, by Sector (TWh per Year) (1) Incandescent 136 78% 15 4% 0 0% 4 4% 156 22% General (A-type, Decorative) 112 64% 9 3% 0 0% - - 122 17% Reflector 19 11% 5 2% 0 0% - - 24 3% Miscellaneous 5 3% 0 0% 0 0% 4 4% 9 1% Halogen 12 7% 15 4% 0 0% 1 1% 28 4% General 1 1% 0 0% 0 0% - - 1 0% Reflector 8 5% 7 2% 0 0% - - 15 2% Low Voltage Display 1 0% 7 2% - - - - 8 1% Miscellaneous 2 1% 1 0% 0 0% 1 1% 4 1% Compact Fluorescent 15 9% 16 5% 0 0% 1 1% 32 5%

  19. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Stanton

    2010-12-31

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

  20. Exploration Technologies - Technology Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Amanda I.; Thorsteinsson, Hildigunnur; Reinhardt, Tim; Solomon, Samantha; James, Mallory

    2011-06-01

    This assessment is a critical component of ongoing technology roadmapping efforts, and will be used to guide the Geothermal Technology Program's research and development.

  1. High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies The Energy Department released the High Impact Technology Catalyst: ...

  2. NREL: Technology Transfer - Technology Partnership Agreements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Agreements for Commercializing Technology CRADAs Work for...

  3. NREL: Technology Transfer - Technologies Available for Licensing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Technologies Available for Licensing...

  4. Metacapacitors for LED Lighting: Metacapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-02

    ADEPT Project: The CUNY Energy Institute is developing less expensive, more efficient, smaller, and longer-lasting power converters for energy-efficient LED lights. LEDs produce light more efficiently than incandescent lights and last significantly longer than compact fluorescent bulbs, but they require more sophisticated power converter technology, which increases their cost. LEDs need more sophisticated converters because they require a different type of power (low voltage direct current, or DC) than what's generally supplied by power outlets. The CUNY Energy Institute is developing sophisticated power converters for LEDs that contain capacitors made from new, nanoscale materials. Capacitors are electrical components that are used to store energy. CUNY's unique capacitors are configured with advanced power circuits to more efficiently control and convert power to the LED lighting source. They also eliminate the need for large magnetic components, instead relying on networks of capacitors that can be easily printed on plastic substrate. CUNY's prototype LED power converter already meets DOE's 2020 projections for the energy efficiency of LED power converters.

  5. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tips: Lighting Tips: Lighting Lighting choices save you money. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available in a wide variety of sizes and shapes. Lighting choices save you money....

  6. Longyan Energy Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Longyan Energy Technology Place: Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China Product: A chinese CdTe thin-film PV cells developer with a total...

  7. Review of light water reactor safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, H.S.

    1980-12-01

    A review of the present status of light water reactor (LWR) safety is presented. The review starts with a brief discussion of the outstanding accident scenarios concerning LWRs. Where possible the areas of present technological uncertainties are stressed. To provide a better perspective of reactor safety, it then reviews the probabilistic assessment of the outstanding LWR accidents considered in the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) and discusses the potential impact of the present technological uncertainties on WASH-1400.

  8. Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 79,674 137,928 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 61,327 106,995 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 15,991 27,500 1984-2014 Connecticut 8,800 7,437

  9. Total Imports of Residual Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History U.S. Total 7,281 4,217 5,941 6,842 9,010 5,030 1936-2016 PAD District 1 4,571 2,206 2,952 3,174 3,127 2,664 1981-2016 Connecticut 1995-2015 Delaware 678 85 1995-2015 Florida 351 299 932 836 858 649 1995-2016 Georgia 120 295 210 262 1995-2016 Maine 1995-2015 Maryland 1995-2015 Massachusetts 1995-2015 New Hampshire 1995-2015 New Jersey 1,575 400 1,131 1,712 1,283 843 1995-2016 New York 1,475 998 350 322 234 824 1995-2016 North Carolina

  10. LED Lighting: Applying Lessons Learned from the CFL Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Gordon, Kelly L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Sandahl, Linda J.; Ton, My K.

    2008-08-20

    Light emitting diode (LED) technology has emerged as an exciting new lighting alternative with the potential for significant energy savings. There is concern, however, that white light LEDs for general illumination could take a long, bumpy course similar to another energy-efficient lighting technology – compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Recognizing the significant potential energy-efficient lighting has to reduce U.S. energy consumption, Congress mandated in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) develop Solid State Lighting (SSL) through a Next Generation Lighting Initiative. DOE’s first step was to analyze the market introduction of compact fluorescent lighting to determine what lessons could be learned to smooth the introduction of SSL in the United States (Sandahl et al. 2006). This paper summarizes applicable lessons learned from the market introduction of CFLs and describe how DOE and others are applying those lessons to speed the development and market introduction of energy-efficient LED lighting for general illumination applications. A description of the current state of LED technology and compares LEDs to incandescent, fluorescent, and halogen lights is also provided.

  11. Connected Lighting Systems Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a lot of buzz today about the Internet of Things and the convergence of intelligent controllable light sources, communication networks, sensors, and data exchange in future lighting...

  12. CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS MEETING

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a lot of buzz today about the Internet of Things and the convergence of intelligent controllable light sources, communication networks, sensors, and data exchange in future lighting...

  13. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting Technology Demonstration Program. In this project, eight 100W (nominal) high-pressure sodium cobra head fixtures were replaced with a like number of LED street light luminaires manufactured by Leotek, Inc. The Leotek product achieved an estimated payback in the Lija Loop installation of about 20 years for replacement scenarios and a much shorter 7.6 years for new installations. Much of the associated energy savings (55%) supporting these payback periods, however, were achieved by reducing average horizontal photopic illuminance a similar amount (53%). Examined from a different perspective, the measured performance suggests that the Leotek product is at approximate parity with the HPS cobra head in terms of average delivered photopic illumination for a given power consumption. HPS comprises the second most efficacious street lighting technology available, exceeded only by low pressure sodium (LPS). LPS technology is not considered suitable for most street lighting applications due to its monochromatic spectral output and poor color rendering ability; therefore, this LED product is performing at an efficiency level comparable to its primary competition in this application.

  14. 2015 Annual Merit Review, Vehicle Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... to seen a Tier 1 inverter partner or been advised on how ... Angelo Yializis, Sigma Technologies International. A total ... This may need adjustment of thermal resistance map and ...

  15. Renewable Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy Technology Basics Renewable Energy Technology Basics Renewable energy technologies produce sustainable, clean energy from sources such as the sun, the wind, plants, and water. According to the Energy Information Administration, in 2007, renewable sources of energy accounted for about 7% of total energy consumption and 9.4% of total electricity generation in the United States. Renewable energy technologies have the potential to strengthen our nation's energy security, improve

  16. Outdoor Lighting Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE offers a variety of resources to guide municipalities, utilities, and others in their evaluation of LED street lighting products.

  17. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determine the Feasibility of Installing Energy Efficient Lighting In this part of the exercise, you will plan a new approach to lighting your school library. This new plan will use less energy, cost less, and result in less greenhouse gas. Your plan will also include bottom line calculations and decision factors such as: identifying the costs and payback for buying and installing new lighting equipment and making a determination about whether or not the new, more efficient lighting will provide

  18. Commercial / Industrial Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Commercial Program Development Commercial Current Promotions Industrial Federal Agriculture Commercial & Industrial Lighting Efficiency Program The Commercial & Industrial...

  19. 2009 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review 2009 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review The 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting was held May 18-22, 2009 in Arlington, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Hydrogen Program and the Vehicle Technologies Office: a total of 304 individual activities were reviewed for Vehicle Technologies, by a total of 142 reviewers. A total of

  20. 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review The 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting was held June 7-11, 2010 in Washington, DC. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Hydrogen Program and the Vehicle Technologies Office: a total of 271 individual activities were reviewed for Vehicle Technologies, by a total of 110 reviewers. A total of

  1. 2011 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review 2011 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review The 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting was held May 9-13, 2011 in Crystal City, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Hydrogen Program and the Vehicle Technologies Office: a total of 298 individual activities were reviewed for Vehicle Technologies, by a total of 115 reviewers. A total of

  2. 2012 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review 2012 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review The 2012 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting was held May 14-18, 2012 in Crystal City, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Hydrogen Program and the Vehicle Technologies Office: a total of 309 individual activities were reviewed for Vehicle Technologies, by a total of 189 reviewers. A total

  3. Total-derivative supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Uekusa, Nobuhiro

    2010-05-15

    On an interval compactification in supersymmetric theory, boundary conditions for bulk fields must be treated carefully. If they are taken arbitrarily following the requirement that a theory is supersymmetric, the conditions could give redundant constraints on the theory. We construct a supersymmetric action integral on an interval by introducing brane interactions with which total-derivative terms under the supersymmetry transformation become zero due to a cancellation. The variational principle leads equations of motion and also boundary conditions for bulk fields, which determine boundary values of bulk fields. By estimating mass spectrum, spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in this simple setup can be realized in a new framework. This supersymmetry breaking does not induce a massless R axion, which is favorable for phenomenology. It is worth noting that fermions in hyper-multiplet, gauge bosons, and the fifth-dimensional component of gauge bosons can have zero-modes (while the other components are all massive as Kaluza-Klein modes), which fits the gauge-Higgs unification scenarios.

  4. Solid-State Lighting-Lighting Facts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid-State Lighting-Lighting Facts Presenter: Marc Ledbetter, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The LED Lighting Facts program provides credible, verified performance ...

  5. Light emitting device comprising phosphorescent materials for white light generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Dapkus, P. Daniel

    2014-07-22

    The present invention relates to phosphors for energy downconversion of high energy light to generate a broadband light spectrum, which emit light of different emission wavelengths.

  6. Light-storing photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Junying; Pan Feng; Hao Weichang; Ge Qi; Wang Tianmian

    2004-12-06

    Light-storing photocatalyst was prepared by coating light-storing phosphor and TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst in sequence on ceramic. The light-storing photocatalyst can store light irradiation and emit slowly. Consequently, the photocatalyst remains active when the irradiation source is cut off. Rhodamine B (RhB) can be decomposed efficiently by this photocatalyst in the dark after it absorbs light irradiation. This photocatalyst is photoreactive in an outdoor environment or can save energy by supplying irradiation intermittently for the photocatalyst.

  7. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  8. Technology Opportunities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intellectual Property » Technology Opportunities Technology Opportunities We deliver innovation through an integrated portfolio of R&D work across our key national security sponsoring agencies, enhanced by the ideas developed through our strategic internal investments. Contact Business Development Team Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-9090 Email Periodically, the Laboratory notifies the public of technologies and capabilities that may be of interest. These technologies may

  9. Technology Partnering

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on Technology Transfer and Related Technology Partnering Activities at the National Laboratories and Other Facilities Fiscal Years 2009-2013 Report to Congress May 2015 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Message from the Secretary The Report on Technology Transfer and Related Partnering Activities at the National Laboratories and Other Facilities for Fiscal Year 2009-2013 is prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Technology Transfer and Commercialization Act of

  10. Available Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    application. Search Our Technologies submit Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Biotechnology Biotechnology Chemistry Chemistry Energy Energy High Performance Computing:...

  11. Licensing Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Licensing Technology Licensing Technology The primary function of Los Alamos Licensing Program is to move Los Alamos technology to the marketplace for the benefit of the U.S. economy. Our intellectual property may be licensed for commercial use, research applications, and U.S. government use. Contact thumbnail of Marcus Lucero Head of Licensing Marcus Lucero Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-6569 Email Although Los Alamos's primary mission is national security, our technologies

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office - Materials Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Engineering- Long Fiber Injection Moldings * USAMP : Validation of Front Bumper Crash Models of Polymer Composites - Light Metals * PNNL : Mechanistic-based Ductility ...

  13. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" ...

  14. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" ...

  15. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement : Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy that comes from some continuous range of directions, at wavelengths ...

  16. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing...

  17. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

  18. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  19. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

  20. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

  1. Private Companies, Local Government, and Utilities to Work with Energy Department to Upgrade Interior Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today announced over 65 organizations are participating in the Better Buildings Alliance's Interior Lighting Campaign (ILC) and committing to drive greater energy efficiency through new interior lighting technologies.

  2. Dayton Power and Light- Business and Government Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dayton Power and Light's (DP&L) non-residential electricity customers are eligible for a wide range of energy efficient technology rebates. Rebates are available for lighting, heating and...

  3. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Lighting Design Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of ...

  4. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Follow Us followontwitter.png followonfacebook.png Lighting Blogs Buying the Perfect Energy-Efficient Light Bulb in 5 Easy Steps Big Savings on Outdoor Lighting ...

  5. Epoch Energy Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 311201 Sector: Solar Product: Distributor of PV outdoor lights and solar thermal water heating systems. References: Epoch Energy Technology Co Ltd1 This article is a...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies ...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies ...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Use of Low Cetane...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Temperature Combustion Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Sandia Optical Hydrogen-fueled Engine

  9. New Director to lead Technology Development and Commercialization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LLC, a startup company commercializing a breakthrough air cooling technology developed at Sandia National Laboratories for applications in LED lighting and power electronics. ...

  10. Beijing Sunpu Solar PV Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China Zip: 100083 Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturers of PV-powered street lights, inverters and other solar PV systems. References: Beijing Sunpu Solar PV Technology Co Ltd1...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Lightweight Materials activity (LM) focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty ...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Combustion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced combustion concepts - enabling systems and solutions for high efficiency light duty...

  13. Sunovia Energy Technologies Inc formerly Sun Energy Solar Inc...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Developing PV encapsulates, next generation solar cells, solar power storage, and LED lightings. References: Sunovia Energy Technologies Inc (formerly Sun Energy Solar...

  14. Fact #805: November 25, 2013 Vehicle Technology Penetration ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 37 75% 99% 78% 38 99% 83% Source: Environmental Protection Agency, Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 through 2012, ...

  15. Fact #658: January 17, 2011 Increasing Use of Vehicle Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Source: Environmental Protection Agency, Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Through 2010. Supporting Information Leases as a ...

  16. Ramping-up Investments in Advanced Vehicle Technologies | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    From state-of-the-art electric drive batteries to light-weight vehicles, these projects ... Advanced cells and design technology for electric drive batteries: Twelve projects to ...

  17. High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

    2008-03-31

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown. In 2003, a large area, OLED based illumination source was demonstrated that could provide light with a quality, quantity, and efficiency on par with what can be achieved with traditional light sources. The demonstration source was made by tiling together 16 separate 6-inch x 6-inch blue-emitting OLEDs. The efficiency, total lumen output, and lifetime of the OLED based illumination source were the same as what would be achieved with an 80 watt incandescent bulb. The devices had an average efficacy of 15 LPW and used solution-processed OLEDs. The individual 6-inch x 6-inch devices incorporated three technology strategies developed specifically for OLED lighting -- downconversion for white light generation, scattering for outcoupling efficiency enhancement, and a scalable monolithic series architecture to enable large area devices. The downconversion approach consists of optically coupling a blue-emitting OLED to a set of luminescent layers. The layers are chosen to absorb the blue OLED emission and then luminescence with high efficiency at longer wavelengths. The composition and number of layers are chosen so that the unabsorbed blue emission and the longer wavelength re-emission combine to make white light. A downconversion approach has the advantage of allowing a wide variety of colors to be made from a limited set of blue emitters. In addition, one does not have to carefully tune the emission wavelength of the individual electro-luminescent species within the OLED device in order to achieve white light. The downconversion architecture used to develop the 15LPW large area light source consisted of a polymer-based blue-emitting OLED and three downconversion layers. Two of the layers utilized perylene based dyes from BASF AG of Germany with high quantum efficiency (>98%) and one of the layers consisted of inorganic phosphor particles (Y(Gd)AG:Ce) with a quantum efficiency of {approx}85%. By independently varying the optical density of the downconversion layers, the overall emission spectrum could be adjusted to maximize performance for lighting (e.g. blackbody temperature, color rendering and luminous efficacy) while keeping the properties of the underlying blue OLED constant. The success of the downconversion approach is ultimately based upon the ability to produce efficient emission in the blue. Table 1 presents a comparison of the current performance of the conjugated polymer, dye-doped polymer, and dendrimer approaches to making a solution-processed blue OLED as 2006. Also given is the published state of the art performance of a vapor-deposited blue OLED. One can see that all the approaches to a blue OLED give approximately the same external quantum efficiency at 500 cd/m{sup 2}. However, due to its low operating voltage, the fluorescent conjugated polymer approach yields a superior power efficiency at the same brightness.

  18. Transformations in Lighting: The Seventh Annual Solid-State Lighting R&D Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than 350 researchers, manufacturers, and other industry insiders and observers gathered in Raleigh, N.C., February 2–4, 2010, to participate in the "Transformations in Lighting" Solid-State Lighting R&D Workshop, hosted by DOE. The workshop was the seventh annual DOE meeting to accelerate SSL technology advances and guide market introduction of quality SSL products, and it brought together a diverse gathering of participants to share insights, ideas, and updates.

  19. Wisconsin Business Sheds Light on Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Business Sheds Light on Lighting Wisconsin Business Sheds Light on Lighting April 29, 2010 - 4:59pm Addthis When this photograph was taken, the upper floors of ...

  20. Testimonials - Partnerships in Solid-State Lighting - Cree, Inc...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Opto Electronics Technology, Cree, Inc." and footage of a man in a showcase room. ... Footage of a man in lab opening a consule full of lights in a lab, followed by a variety ...