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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

NREL: Technology Transfer - Wind Technology Center Installing ...  

Wind Technology Center Installing a Dynamic Duo August 25, 2009. Generating 20 percent of the nation's electricity from clean wind resources will ...

2

Offshore Wind Turbines and Their Installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Offshore winds tend to be higher, more constant and not disturbed by rough terrain, so there is a large potential for utilizing wind energy near to the sea. Compared with the wind energy converters onland, wind turbine components offshore will subject ... Keywords: renewable energy, wind power generation, offshore wind turbines, offshore installation

Liwei Li; Jianxing Ren

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Environmental Assessment Kotzebue Wind Installation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment \ Kotzebue Wind Installation Project Kotzebue, Alaska U. S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 16 17 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado May 1998 Environmental Assessment Kotzebue Wind Installation Project Kotzebue, Alaska U. S . Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado May 1998 Finding of No Significant Impact Environmental Assessment Kotzebue Wind Installation Project Kotzebue, Alaska F'INDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT for KOTZEBUE WIND INSTALLATION PROJECT KOTZEBUE, ALASKA AGENCY: Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE is proposing to provide financial .assistance to the Kotzebue Electric Association to expand its existing wind installation near Kotzebue, Alaska.

4

Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.gwec.net/index.php?id=131 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/spain-installed-wind-capacity-website Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs This website presents an overview of total installed wind energy capacity in Spain per year from 2000 to 2010. The page also presents the main market developments from 2010; a policy summary; a discussion of the revision in feed-in tariffs in 2010; and a future market outlook. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Spain_Installed_Wind_Capacity_Website&oldid=514562"

5

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

6

Changes related to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers" New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Jump to:...

7

Installer Issues: Integrating Distributed Wind into Local Communities (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A presentation for the WindPower 2006 Conference in Pittsburgh, PA, regarding the issues facing installer of small wind electric systems.

Green, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry trends · Evolution of wind pricing · Installed wind project costs · Wind turbine transaction turbines and projects over 50 kW in size · Data sources include AWEA, EIA, FERC, SEC, etc. (see full report PercentofAnnualCapacityAdditions 0 20 40 60 80 100 TotalAnnualCapacityAdditions(GW) Wind Other Renewable Gas

9

Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System July 2, 2012 - 8:22pm Addthis Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System What does this mean for me? When installing a wind system, the location of the system, the energy budget for the site, the size of the system, and the height of the tower are important elements to consider. Deciding whether to connect the system to the electric grid or not is also an important decision. If you went through the planning steps to evaluate whether a small wind electric system will work at your location, you will already have a general idea about: The amount of wind at your site The zoning requirements and covenants in your area The economics, payback, and incentives of installing a wind system

10

NREL: Wind Research - White Earth Nation Installs Turbines: A...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

White Earth Nation Installs Turbines: A Wind Powering America Success Story February 11, 2013 Almost 8 years after taking the initial steps to harness the wind, the White Earth...

11

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: U.S. Installed Wind Capacity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Education Education Printable Version Bookmark and Share Learn About Wind About Wind Power Locating Wind Power Getting Wind Power Installed Wind Capacity Wind for Schools Project Collegiate Wind Competition School Project Locations Education & Training Programs Curricula & Teaching Materials Resources Installed Wind Capacity This page has maps of the United States that show installed wind capacity by state and its progression. This map shows the installed wind capacity in megawatts. As of September 30, 2012, 51,630 MW have been installed. Alaska, 16 MW; Hawaii, 112 MW; Washington, 2,699 MW; Oregon, 3,153 MW; California, 4,570 MW; Nevada, 152; Idaho, 675 MW; Utah, 325 MW; Arizona, 238 MW; Montana, 395 MW; Wyoming, 1,410 MW; Colorado, 1,805 MW; New Mexico, 778 MW; North Dakota, 1,469 MW; South Dakota, 784 MW; Nebraska, 337 MW; Kansas, 1,877 MW; Oklahoma, 2,400 MW; Texas, 10,929 MW; Minnesota, 2,717 MW; Iowa, 4,536 MW; Missouri, 459 MW; Wisconsin, 636 MW; Illinois, 3,055 MW; Tennessee, 29 MW; Michigan, 515 MW; Indiana, 1,343 MW; Ohio, 420 MW; West Virginia, 583 MW; Pennsylvania, 1,029 MW; Maryland, 120 MW; Delaware, 2 MW; New Jersey, 9 MW; New York, 1,418 MW; Vermont, 46 MW; New Hampshire, 125 MW; Massachusetts, 64 MW; Rhode Island, 3 MW; Maine, 397 MW.

12

Solar, Wind, Hydropower: Home Renewable Energy Installations | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar, Wind, Hydropower: Home Renewable Energy Installations Solar, Wind, Hydropower: Home Renewable Energy Installations Solar, Wind, Hydropower: Home Renewable Energy Installations April 17, 2013 - 1:44pm Addthis This Lakewood, Colorado home was built in 1956. Brent and Mo Nelson upgraded the home with multiple solar technologies including; daylighting, passive solar and active solar. They also have an 80 gallon solar hot water heater. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Lakewood, Colorado home was built in 1956. Brent and Mo Nelson upgraded the home with multiple solar technologies including; daylighting, passive solar and active solar. They also have an 80 gallon solar hot water heater. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Homeowner Andrea Mitchel, with installer Joe Guasti, proudly shows off small wind turbine installed in Oak Hills, CA. | Photo by Karin Sinclair, National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

13

Wind Gains ground, hitting 33 GW of installed capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. currently has 33 GW of installed wind capacity. Wind continues to gain ground, accounting for 42 percent of new capacity additions in the US in 2008.Globally, there are now 146 GW of wind capacity with an impressive and sustained growth trajectory that promises to dominate new generation capacities in many developing countries. The U.S., however, lags many European countries, with wind providing roughly 2 percent of electricity generation.

NONE

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Pages that link to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers" New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Jump to:...

15

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices. . . . . 14 Installed Project Costs Are On the Rise,of Decline. . 15 Project Cost Increases Are a Function ofin installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Jump to: navigation, search Logo: New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Name New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Place Hudson, Massachusetts Zip 01749 Sector Renewable energy, Services, Solar, Wind energy Product Solar Panel and Wind Turbine Installation Year founded 2006 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 978-567-9463 Website http://www.NewEnglandBreeze.co Coordinates 42.3917598°, -71.5661769° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3917598,"lon":-71.5661769,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

17

NREL: Technology Transfer - White Earth Nation Installs Turbines: A Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

White Earth Nation Installs Turbines: A Wind Powering America Success Story White Earth Nation Installs Turbines: A Wind Powering America Success Story February 11, 2013 Almost 8 years after taking the initial steps to harness the wind, the White Earth Nation recently completed the installation of two small wind turbines that will help offset energy costs for Minnesota's largest and most populous Native American reservation. Mike Triplett, economic development planner with the White Earth Development Office, believes that the project represents a unique opportunity for tribal entities in the United States. He noted that tribes don't qualify for tax-based incentives. "And as for working with investors, we never found that to be a viable option," Triplett said. "So we've relied heavily on grants." Funded through nearly $1.8 million in congressional appropriations along

18

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Drive Wind Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with SiemensAnnual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Environmental assessment: Kotzebue Wind Installation Project, Kotzebue, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE is proposing to provide financial assistance to the Kotzebue Electric Association to expand its existing wind installation near Kotzebue, Alaska. Like many rural Alaska towns, Kotzebue uses diesel-powered generators to produce its electricity, the high cost of which is currently subsidized by the Alaska State government. In an effort to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce dependence on diesel fuel, and reduce air pollutants, the DOE is proposing to fund an experimental wind installation to test commercially available wind turbines under Arctic conditions. The results would provide valuable information to other Alaska communities experiencing similar dependence on diesel-powered generators. The environmental assessment for the proposed wind installation assessed impacts to biological resources, land use, electromagnetic interference, coastal zone, air quality, cultural resources, and noise. It was determined that the project does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 Title Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006 Title Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006...

22

Alstom 3-MW Wind Turbine Installed at NWTC (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 3-MW Alstom wind turbine was installed at NREL's NWTC in October 2010. Test data will be used to validate advanced turbine design and analysis tools. NREL signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Alstom in 2010 to conduct certification testing on the company's 3-MW ECO 100 wind turbine and to validate models of Alstom's unique drivetrain concept. The turbine was installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in October 2010 and engineers began certification testing in 2011. Tests to be conducted by NREL include a power quality test to finalize the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) requirements for type certification of the 60-Hz unit. The successful outcome of this test will enable Alstom to begin commercial production of ECO 100 in the United States. NREL also will obtain additional measurements of power performance, acoustic noise, and system frequency to complement the 50 Hz results previously completed in Europe. After NREL completes the certification testing on the ECO 100, it will conduct long-term testing to validate gearbox performance to gain a better understanding of the machine's unique ALSTOM PURE TORQUE{trademark} drivetrain concept. In conventional wind turbines, the rotor is supported by the shaft-bearing gearbox assembly. Rotor loads are partially transmitted to the gearbox and may reduce gearbox reliability. In the ALSTOM PURE TORQUE concept, the rotor is supported by a cast frame running through the hub, which transfers bending loads directly to the tower. Torque is transmitted to the shaft through an elastic coupling at the front of the hub. According to Alstom, this system will increase wind turbine reliability and reduce operation and maintenance costs by isolating the gearbox from rotor loads. Gearbox reliability has challenged the wind energy industry for more than two decades. Gearbox failures require expensive and time-consuming replacement, significantly increasing the cost of wind plant operation while reducing the plant's power output and revenue. To solve gearbox reliability issues, NREL launched a Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) in 2006 and brought together the world's leading turbine manufacturers, consultants, and experts from more than 30 companies and organizations. GRC's goal was to validate the typical design process-from wind turbine system loads to bearing ratings-through a comprehensive dynamometer and field-test program. Design analyses will form a basis for improving reliability of future designs and retrofit packages. Through its study of Alstom's Eco 100 gearbox, NREL can compare its GRC model gearbox with Alstom's and add the results to the GRC database, which is helping to advance more reliable wind turbine technology.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% inAre Significant. . . . . . . 9 Wind Power Prices Are Up in

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Small Wind Guidebook/Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information

25

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Project Performance and Capital Costs Drive Wind Power Prices . . . . .14 Installed Project Costs Are On the Rise, After a Long Period of Decline. .15 Project Cost Increases Are a Function of Turbine Prices . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Wind Project

26

Wind industry installs almost 5,300 MW of capacity in December ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Approximately 40% of the total 2012 wind capacity additions (12,620 MW) came online in December, just before the scheduled expiration of the wind production tax ...

27

NREL: Technology Deployment - NREL Helps U.S. Virgin Islands Install Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Helps U.S. Virgin Islands Install Wind Testing Equipment NREL Helps U.S. Virgin Islands Install Wind Testing Equipment Photo of wind turbines being erected. NREL's analysis and technical expertise is helping the U.S. Virgin Islands find ways to reduce fossil fuel use by 60% through the development of utility-scale wind opportunities. January 10, 2013 With the help of NREL, the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) recently marked a major milestone on the way toward its goal of a 60% reduction in fossil fuel use by 2025. In December, NREL experts assisted with the installation of wind anemometer towers and sonic detection and ranging (SODAR) equipment on the islands of St. Thomas and St. Croix to collect data that will be used for the development of a utility-scale wind project in the territory. The installation represents how the USVI is moving forward with NREL's

28

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

basis. Text Box 1. Offshore Wind Development Activities Inis some interest in offshore wind in several parts of theGeorgia TOTAL Proposed Offshore Wind Capacity 735 MW 650 MW

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

30

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

31

Certification for Small Wind Turbine Installers: What's the Hang Up?; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Several programs have been implemented to support the advancement of a professional, mature small wind industry and to ensure that this industry moves forward in a sustainable direction. The development of a standard for small wind turbine systems and the creation of the Small Wind Certification Council support small wind technology that is reliable and safe. Consumers and incentive programs will ultimately rely on certification to differentiate among systems sold in the U.S. market. Certification of small wind installers is yet another component deemed necessary for this industry to expand. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, under the guidance and funding support of the U.S. Department of Energy, supported the development of small wind system installer certification provided via the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners. However, the small wind community is not supportive of the installer certification. There are currently only nine certified installers in the U.S. pool. This paper provides an overview of the installer certification program and why more small wind turbine installers are not pursuing this certification.

Oteri, F.; Sinclair, K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Certification for Small Wind Turbine Installers: What's the Hang Up?; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several programs have been implemented to support the advancement of a professional, mature small wind industry and to ensure that this industry moves forward in a sustainable direction. The development of a standard for small wind turbine systems and the creation of the Small Wind Certification Council support small wind technology that is reliable and safe. Consumers and incentive programs will ultimately rely on certification to differentiate among systems sold in the U.S. market. Certification of small wind installers is yet another component deemed necessary for this industry to expand. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, under the guidance and funding support of the U.S. Department of Energy, supported the development of small wind system installer certification provided via the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners. However, the small wind community is not supportive of the installer certification. There are currently only nine certified installers in the U.S. pool. This paper provides an overview of the installer certification program and why more small wind turbine installers are not pursuing this certification.

Oteri, F.; Sinclair, K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transaction prices · Wind project performance · O&M cost trends · Integration/transmission/policy · Coming up is Reasonably Broad #12;10 Interest in Offshore Wind Continues in the U.S., but No Such Projects Are Yet Online · All wind projects installed in the U.S. to date are land-based · Some interest exists in offshore wind

34

Design of control system for hydraulic lifting platform with jack-up wind-power installation vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jack-up wind-power installation vessel is the most important tool in construction of wind farm. And the control system for hydraulic lifting platform is the key point of jack-up wind-power installation vessel. Therefore the design of the control system ... Keywords: hydraulic control, hydraulic lifting platform, programmable logic controller, wind-power

Xuejin Yang; Dingfang Chen; Mingwang Dong; Taotao Li

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

OpenEI/PageKeyword Wind Installations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

36

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine prices. Installed project costs are found to exhibitpressure on total project costs and wind power prices. Windinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

  Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 7% in 006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9

38

Hull Wind II: A Case Study of the Development of a Second Large Wind Turbine Installation in the Town of Hull, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hull Wind II: A Case Study of the Development of a Second Large Wind Turbine Installation of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts * Hull Municipal Light and Water, Hull, Massachusetts American Wind Energy community: since 2001 the town's municipal light plant (HMLP) has owned and operated "Hull Wind I

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

39

Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Strategies to Reduce the Cost of Offshore Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, installation, operation, and maintenance (IO&M) costs contribute approximately 30% to the LCOE of offshore wind plants. To reduce LCOE while ensuring safety, this paper identifies principal cost drivers associated with IO&M and quantifies their impacts on LCOE. The paper identifies technology improvement opportunities and provides a basis for evaluating innovative engineering and scientific concepts developed subsequently to the study. Through the completion of a case study, an optimum IO&M strategy for a hypothetical offshore wind project is identified.

Maples, B.; Saur, G.; Hand, M.; van de Pieterman, R.; Obdam, T.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

In 2001 Massachusetts' first modern wind turbine was installed in at Windmill Point, at the tip of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, within 100 ft of the site of a 40 kW turbine (since removed) which was installed approximately 20 yearsIn 2001 Massachusetts' first modern wind turbine was installed in at Windmill Point, at the tip Laboratory and the Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources. The 660 kW turbine is close to the high school

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Western Wind, and Midwest Wind Energy. Table 4. Merger andHorizon) Noble Power CPV Wind Catamount Western Wind EnergyCoastal Wind Energy LLC Tierra Energy, LLC Renewable

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from Major Wind Integration Studies Completed 2003-a mini- mum) show that wind integration costs are generallyA number of additional wind integration analyses are planned

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

result, these prices do not represent wind energy generationprices presumably reflect only the value of energy, whereas wind

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Byers Auto Group: A Case Study Into The Economics, Zoning, and Overall Process of Installing Small Wind Turbines at Two Automotive Dealerships in Ohio  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides the talking points about a case study on the installation of a $600,000 small wind project, the installation process, estimated annual energy production and percentage of energy needs met by the turbines.

Oteri, F.; Sinclair, K.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Byers Auto Group: A Case Study Into The Economics, Zoning, and Overall Process of Installing Small Wind Turbines at Two Automotive Dealerships in Ohio (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides the talking points about a case study on the installation of a $600,000 small wind project, the installation process, estimated annual energy production and percentage of energy needs met by the turbines.

Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

2 Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Capital Costs Drive Wind Power Prices . . . . .20 Installed Project Costs Continued to Rise in 2007, After. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Project Cost Increases Are a Function of Turbine Prices, and Turbine Prices Have Increased . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Operations and Maintenance Costs Are Affected by the Age and Size of the Project, Among Other

47

Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FUPWG Meeting FUPWG Meeting NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Robi Robichaud November 18, 2009 Topics Introduction Review of the Current Wind Market Drivers for Wind Development Siting g Issues Wind Resource Assessment Wind Characteristics Wind Power Potential Basic Wind Turbine Theory Basic Wind Turbine Theory Types of Wind Turbines Facts About Wind Siting Facts About Wind Siting Wind Performance 1. United States: MW 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 3 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 5 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 7 1 9 8 8 1 9 8 9 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 1 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 3 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 5 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 7 1 9 9 8 1 9 9 9 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 2 0 0 6 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 8 Current Status of the Wind Industry Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity

48

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not represent wind energy generation costs, and generationXcel-UWIG We Energies Wind Capacity Penetration Cost ($/MWh)Wind Energy Program is currently funding additional efforts to better understand the drivers for O&M costs and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Equilibrium pricing in electricity markets with wind power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Estimates from the World Wind Energy Association assert that world total wind power installed capacity climbed from 18 Gigawatt (GW) to 152 GW from (more)

Rubin, Ofir David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Equilibrium pricing in electricity markets with wind power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Estimates from the World Wind Energy Association assert that world total wind power installed capacity climbed from 18 Gigawatt (GW) to 152 GW from 2000 (more)

Rubin, Ofir David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on key trends in the U.S. wind power market, with an emphasis on the latest year, and presents a wealth of data, some of which has not historically been mined by wind power analysts.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Power Rankings: The Top 20 States Cumulative Capacity (end of 2006, MW) Texas California Iowa Minnesota Washington Oklahoma

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

DOE/EA-1584: Final Environmental Assessment for Sand Point Wind Installation Project, Sand Point, Alaska (September 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sand Point Wind Installation Project Sand Point, Alaska DOE/EA -1584 U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 September 2009 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 1 1.1 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES....................................................................................................... 1 1.2 BACKGROUND .................................................................................................... 1 1.3 PURPOSE AND NEED.......................................................................................... 2 1.4 PUBLIC SCOPING AND CONSULTATION.......................................................

54

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% in 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9 Utility Interest in Wind Asset Ownership Strengthens; Community Wind Grows Modestly . . . . . . . . . . . .

55

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Surged by 46% in 2007, with 5,329 MW Added and $9 Billion Invested . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Wind Power Contributed 35% of All New U.S. Electric Generating Capacity in 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Continued to Lead the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Texas Easily Exceeded Other States in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . .6 Data from Interconnection Queues Demonstrate that an Enormous Amount of Wind Capacity Is Under Development . . . . . . . . . .9 GE Wind Remained the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, but a Growing Number of Other Manufacturers Are Capturing Market Share .

56

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

businesses to use renewable and energy efficient systems.incentives, state renewable energy standards and incentives,Wind Force Atlantic Renewable Energy Corp. SeaWest Zilkha (

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Wind industry installs almost 5,300 MW of capacity in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual ... Search EIA.gov. ... Wind plant developers reported throughout 2012 increasing amounts of new capacity scheduled ...

58

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Power Price Source: FERC 2006 and 2004 State of the12 projects 691 MW Source: FERC 2006 "State of the Market"the strong competi- Source: FERC 2006 "State of the Market"

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003-2006 Date Study Xcel-UWIG We Energies Wind Capacitybeen a considerable 2004 Xcel-MNDOC na na amount of analysisconcerns about whether the 2006 Xcel-PSCo na electrical grid

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Production as % of Electricity Consumption (approximate, end of 2006) Denmark Spain Portugal Germany Indiawind capacity additions (Table 1), with roughly 16% of the worldwide market (Figure 2). Germany, India,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentives, state renewable energy standards and incentives,State renewable energy funds (in existence in more than 15 states), state tax incentives,state renewable energy funds provide support for wind projects, as do a variety of state tax incentives.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

63

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report--the first in what is envisioned to be an ongoing annual series--attempts to fill this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2006.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Abstract--The offshore wind farm with installed back-to-back power converter in wind turbines is studied. As an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is studied. As an example the Burbo Bank offshore wind farm with Siemens Wind Power wind turbines is taken are compared with measurement data from the Burbo Bank offshore wind farm. The delimitations of both power manufacturers such as General Electric (GE) Energy, Siemens Wind Power, Vestas Wind Systems or Gamesa use back

Bak, Claus Leth

65

Execution of Agreements to Install Additional Wind Turbines at the Wyoming Windpower Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

560 560 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 179 / Wednesday, September 16, 1998 / Notices Summary The total number of students involved in the validity studies, above that which has already been requested in the pilot VNT collection, is 3,318 with a total burden of 7310.5 hours. Total school staff burden for these validity studies is 399 hours. II. Request for Comments The National Assessment Governing Board solicits comments to: (a) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the Governing Board, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) Evaluate the accuracy of the Governing Board's estimates of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (c) Enhance the quality, utility and

66

NREL: Wind Research - News Release Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 09 September 14, 2009 IEA Wind Energy 2008 Annual Report Now Available for Free Download The IEA Annual Report for 2008 provides the latest information on wind industries in 20 International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind member countries. August 26, 2009 NWTC Installs Multimegawatt Research Turbines NREL's National Wind Technology Center installed the first of two multimegawatt wind turbines last week to be used for research to advance wind turbine performance and reliability. February 3, 2009 U.S. Wind Industry Takes Global Lead The U.S. wind energy industry broke another global record in 2008 by installing 8,358 megawatts (MW) of new capacity, bringing our nation's total wind energy capacity to 25,170 MW. The United States now claims the largest wind energy capacity in the world, taking the lead from Germany.

67

DOE/NREL Inner Mongolia PV/Wind Hybrid Systems Pilot Project: A Post-Installation Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report assesses the Inner Mongolia Pilot Project, which disseminates wind-solar hybrid systems to a rural and remote population.

Stroup, K. K.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Abstract--This paper introduces the power quality issues of wind power installations in a historic perspective, as the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbines exceeded 50 ­ 100 kW in the Manuscript received December 5, 2006. This work was supported in a historic perspective, as the development from a few small wind turbines connected directly to the low turbines and wind farms are described according to national and international standards, and measurements

69

The Wind Energy Outlook Scenarios 1 India Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ?Status of wind energy in India ????????????????????6 Wind energy in India????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????7 Wind power resource assessment?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????6 Wind power installations by state?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????8

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on DomesticUniversity. American Wind Energy Association (AWEA). 2012a.D.C. : American Wind Energy Association. American Wind

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Wind power is a rapidly growing con-tributor to worldwide energy supplies and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the U.S., represent- ing nearly one-third of the total installed wind energy capacity in the country for wind turbine siting and wind source prediction. Ironically, PPM has hired 3TIER to provide wind energy and operates wind farms in Ireland, Scotland, England, Wales and the United States. With the recent extension

72

Prediction of the Proton-to-Total Turbulent Heating in the Solar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper employs a recent turbulent heating prescription to predict the ratio of proton-to-total heating due to the kinetic dissipation of Alfvenic turbulence as a function of heliocentric distance. Comparing to a recent empirical estimate for this turbulent heating ratio in the high-speed solar wind, the prediction shows good agreement with the empirical estimate for R >~ 0.8 AU, but predicts less ion heating than the empirical estimate at smaller heliocentric radii. At these smaller radii, the turbulent heating prescription, calculated in the gyrokinetic limit, fails because the turbulent cascade is predicted to reach the proton cyclotron frequency before Landau damping terminates the cascade. These findings suggest that the turbulent cascade can reach the proton cyclotron frequency at R ~ 0.8 AU, this turbulent heating prescription contains all of the necessary physical mechanisms needed to reproduce the empirically estimated proton-to-total heating ratio.

Howes, G G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine costs, wind project costs, and wind power prices inas 75%-80% of total project costs, higher turbine pricesled to higher installed project costs. Among a sample of 36

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

PREDICTION OF THE PROTON-TO-TOTAL TURBULENT HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND  

SciTech Connect

This paper employs a recent turbulent heating prescription to predict the ratio of proton-to-total heating due to the kinetic dissipation of Alfvenic turbulence as a function of heliocentric distance. Comparing to a recent empirical estimate for this turbulent heating ratio in the high-speed solar wind, the prediction shows good agreement with the empirical estimate for R {approx}> 0.8 AU, but predicts less ion heating than the empirical estimate at smaller heliocentric radii. At these smaller radii, the turbulent heating prescription, calculated in the gyrokinetic limit, fails because the turbulent cascade is predicted to reach the proton cyclotron frequency before Landau damping terminates the cascade. These findings suggest that the turbulent cascade can reach the proton cyclotron frequency at R {approx}< 0.8 AU, leading to a higher level of proton heating than predicted by the turbulent heating prescription in the gyrokinetic limit. At larger heliocentric radii, R {approx}> 0.8 AU, this turbulent heating prescription contains all of the necessary physical mechanisms needed to reproduce the empirically estimated proton-to-total heating ratio.

Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

challenging. Installed Project Costs Continued to Rise inin installed wind project costs, wind turbine transactionand uncertain offshore project costs, and public acceptance

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROGRAM 2 Presentation Overview * Introduction to 2009 edition of U.S. wind energy market report * Wind installation trends * Wind industry trends * Price, cost, and...

77

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

downward pressure on project costs and wind power prices.installed wind power project costs, wind turbine transactionand uncertain offshore project costs, and public acceptance

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Analysis of Wind Generation System by Real-Time Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the demand of green energy, the number of wind turbines installed has been increased drastically worldwide. Comparing with the traditional utility generation systems, the dynamic characteristic and response of wind farms are totally different. ... Keywords: Doubly-fed induction generator, real-time simulation, PC cluster-based real-time simulator, wind farm

H. C. Su; G. W. Chang; H. M. Huang; K. K. Jen; G. C. Chung; G. Z. Wu

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

80

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

82

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

83

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

84

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

85

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

86

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

87

Military installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has reviewed the use of U.S. coal at DOD installations in West Germany. DOD reported that between April 1, 1988, and December 31, 1988, it had between 306,000 and 419,000 tons of U.S. coal stored in Germany. About two-thirds of that was anthracite coal. GAO visited six coal-handling locations that accounted for 72 to 79 percent of the total U.S. coal between April and December 1988. This report could not verify the official inventory records at five locations - two Air Force and three Army - for several reasons, including a lack of required physical inventories of coal for recent years. DOD's coal consumption data for fiscal year 1988 appeared to be accurate since it matched the data reported on source documents maintained at the installations and their commands. According to reported DOD coal inventory and consumption data, as of September 30, 1988, DOD had enough anthracite coal on hand to satisfy projected demands through at least fiscal year 1993, given that no additional heating plant conversions other than those already approved occur and no additional shipments of coal occur. DOD said that as of September 30, 1988, it facilities in Germany had enough anthracite coal on hand to last a minimum of five years.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

89

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

90

ERCOT's Dynamic Model of Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By the end of 2003, the total installed wind farm capacity in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) system was approximately 1 gigawatt (GW) and the total in the United States was about 5 GW. As the number of wind turbines installed throughout the United States increases, there is a greater need for dynamic wind turbine generator models that can properly model entire power systems for different types of analysis. This paper describes the ERCOT dynamic models and simulations of a simple network with different types of wind turbine models currently available.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Conto, J.; Donoho, K.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

2008 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report Ryan Wiser and Mark Bolinger Lawrence Berkeley National.S. wind energy market report · Wind installation trends · Wind industry trends · Price, cost, and performance trends ­ Power sales prices ­ Installed wind project costs ­ Wind turbine transaction prices

92

Guidelines for solar energy installations  

SciTech Connect

Guidelines for solar energy installations are presented. The guideline is published in code form so that it can be used directly as the text of an ordinance to regulate the installation of solar systems. An index contains cross references to sections of existing model codes that are applicable to solar installations. Wind energy systems, passive solar space conditioning systems, photovoltaic systems, and systems involving mechanical compression of refrigerants are not included.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

94

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

95

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

96

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

97

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

98

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

99

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

100

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

102

Wind for Schools Portal | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Wind for Schools Portal Description: Project to inspire students in the United States by educating and installing wind turbines. Wind Wind for Schools Portal Syndicate content...

103

Distributed Wind Case Study: Cross Island Farms, Wellesley Island, New York (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Wind Case Study: Cross Island Farms, Wellesley Island, New York Distributed Wind Case Study: Cross Island Farms, Wellesley Island, New York www.nrel.gov Baker and Belding installed a 10-kW Bergey Excel wind turbine in August 2011. Photo from Cross Island Farms, NREL/PIX 19923 Funding Summary * Total cost of wind turbine, including first developer: $82,000 * Total cost of wind turbine, excluding first developer: $73,000 * Total cost of solar: $40,000 * Propane generator: $8,000; including equipment, installation, and propane: $13,000 * USDA REAP grant: $20,506 (~25% of

104

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

105

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

106

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

107

Definition: Offshore Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition: Offshore Wind Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Offshore Wind Wind turbine installations built near-shore or further offshore on coastlines for...

108

Wind Energy Permitting Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Permitting Standards Wind Energy Permitting Standards < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial InstallerContractor Savings Category Wind Buying & Making...

109

California Wind Energy Forecasting Program Description and Status - 2000: California Energy Commission--EPRI Wind Energy Forecasting Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modern era of wind power began in the early 1980s when the first large installations of modern wind turbines were installed in California. The industry has grown rapidly in recent years and, at the end of 1999, the total installed wind capacity was 13.4 gigawatts (GW) worldwide and 2.5 GW in the U.S., of which about 1.6 GW is operating in California. Deregulation of the California electricity markets in 1998 created a challenge for the California investor-owned utilitiies and the owners and operators...

2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

110

Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, four turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. The results of the testing provide the manufacturers with reports that can be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine mounted on an 18-m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROGRAM 2 Presentation Overview * Introduction to current edition of U.S. wind energy market report * Wind Energy Market Trends - Installation trends - Industry trends - Cost...

112

Global wind energy market report. Wind energy industry grows at steady pace, adds over 8,000 MW in 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative global wind energy generating capacity topped 39,000 megawatts (MW) by the end of 2003. New equipment totally over 8,000 MW in capacity was installed worldwide during the year. The report, updated annually, provides information on the status of the wind energy market throughout the world and gives details on various regions. A listing of new and cumulative installed capacity by country and by region is included as an appendix.

anon.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

installed capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

installed capacity installed capacity Dataset Summary Description Estimates for each of the 50 states and the entire United States show Source Wind Powering America Date Released February 04th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated April 13th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords annual generation installed capacity usa wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Wind potential data (xls, 102.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government. Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments

114

ERCOT's Dynamic Model of Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

By the end of 2003, the total installed wind farm capacity in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) system was approximately 1 gigawatt (GW) and the total in the United States was about 5 GW. As the number of wind turbines installed throughout the United States increases, there is a greater need for dynamic wind turbine generator models that can properly model entire power systems for different types of analysis. This paper describes the ERCOT dynamic models and simulations of a simple network with different types of wind turbine models currently available.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Conto, J.; Donoho, K.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy technology. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report Appendix: Sources of Data Presented in this Report Installation Trends

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy technology. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report Appendix: Sources of Data Presented in this Report Installation Trends

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pool. David, A. 2011. U.S. Wind Turbine Trade in a Changing3-MW Alstom ECO 100 wind turbine installed at the National2011 U.S. Small Wind Turbine Market Report. Washington,

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AWEA). 2010b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Survey,html David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Tradewhich new large-scale wind turbines were installed in 2009 (

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Associates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. LittlePool. David, A. 2011. U.S. Wind Turbine Trade in a Changing2011. David, A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other utility-scale (>100 kW) wind turbines installed in thesales of small wind turbines, 100 kW and less in size, intoSales of Small Wind Turbines (? 100 kW) into the United

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other utility-scale (>100 kW) wind turbines installed in thesales of small wind turbines, 100 kW and less in size, intoSales of Small Wind Turbines (? 100 kW) into the United

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Political Economy of Wind Power in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a national wind turbine industry: experiences fromthe worlds largest manufacturer of wind turbines. 1 Inthe worlds installed wind turbines were erected in China,

Swanson, Ryan Landon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Review of Wind Project Financing Structures in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mark Bolinger. 2007. Wind Project Financing Structures: A2008. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost,James. 2005. Invenergy Wind Finance Company Portfolio

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Wicomico County- Wind Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Establishes zoning regulations for the installation and construction of small wind energy systems in Wicomico County for private landowners, subject to reasonable restrictions.

125

Washington County- Wind Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This ordinance establishes regulations to facilitate the installation and construction of Small Wind Energy Systems in Washington County for private landowners, subject to reasonable restrictions...

126

Modeling Sensitivities to the 20% Wind Scenario Report with the WinDS Model  

SciTech Connect

In May 2008, DOE published '20% Wind Energy by 2030', a report which describes the costs and benefits of producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology. The total electricity system cost resulting from this scenario was modestly higher than a scenario in which no additional wind was installed after 2006. NREL's Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model was used to support this analysis. With its 358 regions, explicit treatment of transmission expansion, onshore siting considerations, shallow- and deep-water wind resources, 2030 outlook, explicit financing assumptions, endogenous learning, and stochastic treatment of wind resource variability, WinDS is unique in the level of detail it can bring to this analysis. For the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 analysis, the group chose various model structures (such as the ability to wheel power within an interconnect), and the wind industry agreed on a variety of model inputs (such as the cost of transmission or new wind turbines). For this paper, the analysis examined the sensitivity of the results to variations in those input values and model structure choices. These included wind cost and performance improvements over time, seasonal/diurnal wind resource variations, transmission access and costs, siting costs, conventional fuel cost trajectories, and conventional capital costs.

Blair, N.; Hand, M.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Modeling Sensitivities to the 20% Wind Scenario Report with the WinDS Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In May 2008, DOE published '20% Wind Energy by 2030', a report which describes the costs and benefits of producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology. The total electricity system cost resulting from this scenario was modestly higher than a scenario in which no additional wind was installed after 2006. NREL's Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model was used to support this analysis. With its 358 regions, explicit treatment of transmission expansion, onshore siting considerations, shallow- and deep-water wind resources, 2030 outlook, explicit financing assumptions, endogenous learning, and stochastic treatment of wind resource variability, WinDS is unique in the level of detail it can bring to this analysis. For the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 analysis, the group chose various model structures (such as the ability to wheel power within an interconnect), and the wind industry agreed on a variety of model inputs (such as the cost of transmission or new wind turbines). For this paper, the analysis examined the sensitivity of the results to variations in those input values and model structure choices. These included wind cost and performance improvements over time, seasonal/diurnal wind resource variations, transmission access and costs, siting costs, conventional fuel cost trajectories, and conventional capital costs.

Blair, N.; Hand, M.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Economics  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Cost Components Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England How does wind compare to the cost of other electricity options? Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Wind Power Economics Long-Term Cost Trends Since the first major installations of commercial-scale wind turbines in the 1980s, the cost of energy from wind power projects has decreased substantially due to larger turbine generators, towers, and rotor lengths; scale economies associated with larger projects; improvements in manufacturing efficiency, and technological advances in turbine generator and blade design. These technological advances have allowed for higher generating capacities per turbine and more efficient capture of wind, especially at lower wind speeds.

129

New England Wind Forum: Large Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Small Wind Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Large Wind When establishing wind farms, wind energy developers generally approach landowners where they want to build. Interest in wind farms is frequently spurred by external pressures such as tax and other financial incentives and legislative mandates. Since each situation is influenced by local policies and permitting, we can only provide general guidance to help you learn about the process of installing wind turbines. Publications Wind Project Development Process Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities: A Handbook. (August 2002). National Wind Coordinating Collaborative. Landowner Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. (August 2003). "State Wind Working Group Handbook." pp. 130-133.

130

Wind Energy's New Role in Supplying the World's Energy: What Role Will Structural Health Monitoring Play?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy installations are leading all other forms of new energy installations in the United States and Europe. In Europe, large wind plants are supplying as much as 25% of Denmark's energy needs and 8% of the electric needs for Germany and Spain, who have more ambitious goals on the horizon. Although wind energy only produces about 2% of the current electricity demand in the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy, in collaboration with wind industry experts, has drafted a plan that would bring the U.S. installed wind capacity up to 20% of the nation's total electrical supply. To meet these expectations, wind energy must be extremely reliable. Structural health monitoring will play a critical role in making this goal successful.

Butterfield, S.; Sheng, S.; Oyague, F.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Wind energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Wind) (Redirected from Wind) Jump to: navigation, search Wind energy is a form of solar energy.[1] Wind energy (or wind power) describes the process by which wind is used to generate electricity. Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical power. A generator can convert mechanical power into electricity[2]. Mechanical power can also be utilized directly for specific tasks such as pumping water. The US DOE developed a short wind power animation that provides an overview of how a wind turbine works and describes the wind resources in the United States. Contents 1 Wind Energy Basics 1.1 Equation for Wind Power 2 DOE Wind Programs and Information 3 Worldwide Installed Capacity 3.1 United States Installed Capacity 4 Wind Farm Development 4.1 Land Requirements

132

American Wind Manufacturing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

manufacturer of wind turbines -- delivered and installed turbine components for the Power County Wind Farm, shown here, in Idaho. Image: Nordex USA, Inc. Date taken: Mon,...

133

Wind for Schools (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

Baring-Gould, I.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Wind for Schools (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

Baring-Gould, I.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

1. Sector Description Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power is todays most rapidly growing renewable power source. In the United States, new wind farms were the second-largest source of new power generation in 2005, after new natural gas power plants. In 2005, 2,431 megawatts (MW) of new capacity were installed in 22 states, increasing total wind generating capacity by more than a third to 9,149 MW, or enough to power 2.3 million average American households. Wind energy is a clean, domestic, renewable resource. It often displaces electricity that would otherwise have been produced by natural gas, thus helping to reduce gas demand and limit gas price hikes (DOE 2006a). It also can serve as a partial replacement for the electricity produced by the aging U.S. coal-fired power plant fleet. In the future, surplus wind power can be used for desalination and hydrogen production, and may be stored as hydrogen for use in fuel cells or gas turbines to generate electricity, leveling supply when winds are variable. Last February, the President said that wind energy could provide as much as 20 % of our electricity demands, up from less than 1 % today. Dozens of states have passed renewable portfolio standards setting goals similar to that stated by the President, giving broad-based public support for development of wind resources.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Development Small Wind Turbine Development A photo of Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine in front of a home. PIX14936 Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine. A photo of the Endurance wind turbine. PIX15006 The Endurance wind turbine. A photo of the Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. PIX07301 The Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. NREL supports continued market expansion of small wind turbines by funding manufacturers through competitive solicitations (i.e., subcontracts and/or grants) to refine prototype systems leading to commercialization. Learn more about the turbine development projects below. Skystream NREL installed and tested an early prototype of this turbine at the

137

Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Porject - Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEAs wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

138

Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II  

SciTech Connect

The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEAs wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Wind Turbine Productivity Improvement Guidelines Development Status and Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the end of 1999, the installed nameplate wind generation totaled about 2.5 GW in the U.S. and 14.5 GW worldwide. Even with the new modern turbine technology, many wind plants do not achieve the original projected annual wind energy generation target on which the project feasibility analysis was based. The reasons for lower than projected energy generation vary, but there are many common themes, including inaccurate wind resource assessments, higher than expected energy losses, and higher than expected...

2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

140

How to Build a Small Wind Energy Business: Lessons from California; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper highlights the experience of one small wind turbine installer in California that installed more than 1 MW of small wind capacity in 6 years.

Sinclair, K.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Pierre's Prototype for Wind and Solar - Capitol Lake Plaza | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pierre's Prototype for Wind and Solar - Capitol Lake Plaza Pierre's Prototype for Wind and Solar - Capitol Lake Plaza Pierre's Prototype for Wind and Solar - Capitol Lake Plaza June 3, 2010 - 3:22pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell What are the key facts? 80 photovoltaic (PV) solar energy system and two vertical wind turbines will produce up to 40 percent of the building's total energy usage Capitol Lake Plaza sits centrally on Pierre, S.D.'s government plaza. Originally built in 1974, the building has been undergoing major energy renovations since being purchased by the state two years ago. Two major components of the renovation are about to appear at the building's highest point: solar panels and wind turbines are being installed on the roof. The 80 photovoltaic (PV) solar energy system and two vertical wind turbines will produce up to 40 percent of the building's total energy usage, says

142

New England Wind Forum: New England Wind Projects  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Wind Projects This page shows the location of installed and planned New England wind projects. Find windfarms, community-scale wind projects, customer-sited wind projects, small wind projects, and offshore wind projects. Read more information about how to use the Google Map and how to add your wind project to the map. Text version New England Wind Energy Projects Connecticut, East Canaan Wind Connecticut, Klug Farm Connecticut, Phoenix Press Connecticut, Wind Colebrook (South and North)

143

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. Annual Report on US Wind Power Installation, Cost,Feed Sequestration Site Wind Power Figure ES-1. AdvancedFeed Sequestration Site Wind Power Figure 1. Advanced-Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Learn About Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

About Wind Power Locating Wind Power Getting Wind Power Installed Wind Capacity Wind for Schools Project Collegiate Wind Competition School Project Locations Education & Training Programs Curricula & Teaching Materials Resources Learn About Wind Learn about how wind energy generates power; where the best wind resources are; how you can own, host, partner with, and support wind power; and how and where wind energy has increased over the past decade. What Is Wind Power? Learn about how wind energy generates power, about wind turbine sizes and how wind turbines work, and how wind energy can be used. Also read examples of financial and business decisions. Where Is Wind Power? Go to maps to see the wind resource for utility-, community-, and residential-scale wind development. Or, see how much energy wind projects

145

NREL: Wind Research - Wind for Schools Project Enters 2013 with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Schools Project Enters 2013 with 124 Turbine Installations and Lessons to Share: A Wind Powering America Success Story January 28, 2013 On January 14-15, 2013, Wind Powering...

146

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 percent)). Cumulative wind turbine capacity installed inper capita income of wind turbine development (measured inour sample, cumulative wind turbine capacity on a per person

J., Brown

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

NIST Net installation instructions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Xaw3d, and neXtaw; Build and install the nistnet module, API library, and user interface make make install; Try things out ...

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

148

PETSc: Documentation: Installation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Installation Home Download Features Documentation Manual pages and Users Manual Citing PETSc Tutorials Installation AMS Changes Bug Reporting Code Management FAQ License Linear...

149

Wind Energy Sales Tax Exemption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Wind-energy conversion systems used as electric-power sources are exempt from Minnesota's sales tax. Materials used to manufacture, install, construct, repair or replace wind-energy systems also...

150

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Research Small Wind Turbine Research The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Small Wind Project's objectives are to reduce barriers to wind energy expansion, stabilize the market, and expand the number of small wind turbine systems installed in the United States. "Small wind turbine" refers to a turbine smaller than or equal to 100 kilowatts (kW). "Distributed wind" includes small and midsize turbines (100 kW through 1 megawatt [MW]). Since 1996, NREL's small wind turbine research has provided turbine testing, turbine development, and prototype refinement leading to more commercially available small wind turbines. Work is conducted under the following areas. You can also learn more about state and federal policies

151

U.S. Continues to Lead the World in Wind Power Growth | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31, 2007 - 1:25pm 31, 2007 - 1:25pm Addthis DOE Report Shows Growing U.S. Wind Power Market WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released its first Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006, which provides a detailed and comprehensive overview of development and trends in the U.S. wind power market. Most notably, the Report concludes that U.S. wind power capacity increased by 27 percent in 2006; and that the U.S. had the fastest growing wind power capacity in the world in 2005 and 2006. More than 61 percent of the U.S.'s total wind capacity - over 7,300 Megawatts (MW) - has been installed since President Bush took office in 2001. "As we work to implement President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative by increasing the use of home-grown, clean, affordable and renewable energy,

152

TMCC WIND RESOURCE ASSESSMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

North Dakota has an outstanding resource--providing more available wind for development than any other state. According to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) studies, North Dakota alone has enough energy from good wind areas, those of wind power Class 4 and higher, to supply 36% of the 1990 electricity consumption of the entire lower 48 states. At present, no more than a handful of wind turbines in the 60- to 100-kilowatt (kW) range are operating in the state. The first two utility-scale turbines were installed in North Dakota as part of a green pricing program, one in early 2002 and the second in July 2002. Both turbines are 900-kW wind turbines. Two more wind turbines are scheduled for installation by another utility later in 2002. Several reasons are evident for the lack of wind development. One primary reason is that North Dakota has more lignite coal than any other state. A number of relatively new minemouth power plants are operating in the state, resulting in an abundance of low-cost electricity. In 1998, North Dakota generated approximately 8.2 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity, largely from coal-fired plants. Sales to North Dakota consumers totaled only 4.5 million MWh. In addition, the average retail cost of electricity in North Dakota was 5.7 cents per kWh in 1998. As a result of this surplus and the relatively low retail cost of service, North Dakota is a net exporter of electricity, selling approximately 50% to 60% of the electricity produced in North Dakota to markets outside the state. Keeping in mind that new electrical generation will be considered an export commodity to be sold outside the state, the transmission grid that serves to export electricity from North Dakota is at or close to its ability to serve new capacity. The markets for these resources are outside the state, and transmission access to the markets is a necessary condition for any large project. At the present time, technical assessments of the transmission network indicate that the ability to add and carry wind capacity outside of the state is limited. Identifying markets, securing long-term contracts, and obtaining a transmission path to export the power are all major steps that must be taken to develop new projects in North Dakota.

Turtle Mountain Community College

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Mariah Windspire Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, five turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. NWTC testing results provide manufacturers with reports that may be used to meet part of small wind turbine certification requirements. The test equipment includes a Mariah Windspire wind turbine mounted on a monopole tower. L&E Machine manufactured the turbine in the United States. The inverter was manufactured separately by Technology Driven Products in the United States. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Mariah Power.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Gone with the Wind - The Potential Tragedy of the Common Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of almost 1,471 MW of offshore wind farms were in operationFuture Prospects for Offshore Wind in Europe, TilE EUROPIEANof the many advantaged of offshore wind installations, see

Lifshitz-Goldberg, Yaei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Wind power today  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication highlights initiatives of the US DOE`s Wind Energy Program. 1997 yearly activities are also very briefly summarized. The first article describes a 6-megawatt wind power plant installed in Vermont. Another article summarizes technical advances in wind turbine technology, and describes next-generation utility and small wind turbines in the planning stages. A village power project in Alaska using three 50-kilowatt turbines is described. Very brief summaries of the Federal Wind Energy Program and the National Wind Technology Center are also included in the publication.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

County Wind Ordinance Standards (California) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

detailing the number of local wind ordinances adopted after January 1, 2011; the number of applications to install wind turbines that were received and approved by those...

158

Solar and Wind Contractor Licensing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating Program Information Louisiana Program Type SolarWind Contractor Licensing All solar and wind energy installations must be performed by a contractor duly licensed by and...

159

NREL: Wind Research - XZERES Acquires Southwest Windpower's Skystream...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Most of the turbines installed at Wind for Schools host schools are Skystream models, and this announcement answers questions for many of Wind Powering America's stakeholders...

160

Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States, new large-scale wind turbines were installed in 18The average size of wind turbines installed in the Uniteddominant manufacturer of wind turbines supplying the U.S.

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andState of the U.S. Wind Power Market Intro Sidebar: The U.S.Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Farms  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Farms Wind Farms When establishing wind farms, wind energy developers generally approach landowners where they want to build. Interest in wind farms is frequently spurred by external pressures such as tax and other financial incentives and legislative mandates. Since each situation is influenced by local policies and permitting, we can only provide general guidance to help you learn about the process of installing wind turbines. Publications Wind Project Development Process Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities: A Handbook. (August 2002). National Wind Coordinating Collaborative. Landowner Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. (August 2003). "State Wind Working Group Handbook." pp. 130-133. Software Wind Energy Finance Calculator Tool for financial analysis of

163

County Wind Ordinance Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

[http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/09-10/bill/asm/ab_0001-0050/ab_45_bill_200... Assembly Bill 45] of 2009 authorized counties to adopt ordinances to provide for the installation of small wind systems ...

164

Benefits of the IEA Wind Co-operation Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy is changing the generation mix 1. Wind energy development brings national benefits 2. IEA Wind activities support national programs by sharing information and joint research resultsWind energy is part of the global economy 1. Worldwide, new wind energy installations in 2010 represented an investment of 47.3 billion (65 billion USD) 2. More than 500,000 people are currently employed in the wind industry Source: GWEC1995

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind Resource Potential Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind Resource Potential The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative provides 90-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the total offshore wind potential that would be possible from developing the available offshore areas. The offshore wind resource maps can be used as a guide to identify regions for commercial wind development. A map of the United States showing offshore wind resource. Washington offshore wind map. Oregon offshore wind map. California offshore wind map. Texas offshore wind map. Minnesota offshore wind map. Lousiana offshore wind map. Wisconsin offshore wind map. Michigan offshore wind map. Michigan offshore wind map. Illinois offshore wind map. Indiana offshore wind map. Ohio offshore wind map. Georgia offshore wind map. South Carolina offshore wind map. North Carolina offshore wind map. Virginia offshore wind map. Maryland offshore wind map. Pennsylvania offshore wind map. Delaware offshore wind map. New Jersey offshore wind map. New York offshore wind map. Maine offshore wind map. Massachusetts offshore wind map. Rhode Island offshore wind map. Connecticut offshore wind map. Hawaii offshore wind map. Delaware offshore wind map. New Hampshire offshore wind map.

166

America's Wind Testing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Testing Facilities Wind Testing Facilities America's Wind Testing Facilities Addthis National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 1 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado The first of 4 towers is lifted as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-15 13:53 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 2 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado Workers use a giant crane for lifting the blade assembly as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-22 12:06 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston 3 of 7 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston

167

Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ polarization difference is used to restrict the application of the geophysical retrieval algorithms which are developed to handle specific atmospheric absorptive situations. An improved semi-empirical sea surface emissivity model is integrated into this refined D-matrix procedure that is being developed for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Radiometer (AMSR). The purpose of this work is to test the refined geophysical parameter retrieval methods using data from the Special Sensor Microwave / Imager (SSM/I). When comparing the statistical performance of the TIWV, WS, and CLW retrieval methods presented to the statistical performance of published retrieval methods for each geophysical parameter, the retrieval methods developed for this study perform only slightly better. However, it is demonstrated that the new retrieval methods are more physically valid than the comparison retrieval methods. The utilization of the polarization difference of the 85 GHZ channels to restrict the application of specifically-derived retrieval algorithms proves to be a valuable and reliable geophysical parameter retrieval tool.

Manning, Norman Willis William

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, four turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests that were performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power quality tests. Test results provide manufacturers with reports that can be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes an ARE 442 wind turbine mounted on a 100-ft free-standing lattice tower. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Abundant Renewable Energy.

van Dam, J.; Baker, D.; Jager, D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Kivalina wind generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project reported was to construct a system to harness the winds of an Arctic site to generate electricity that would power a greenhouse where fruit and vegetables could be raised for local consumption. The installation of the tower and an Enertech 4K wind generator are described. (LEW)

Aldrich, D.

1984-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

Executive Committee for the Implementing Agreement for Co-operation in the Research, Development, and Deployment of Wind Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISBN 0-9786383-4-4MESSAGE from the CHAIR Welcome to the 2009 IEA Wind Annual Report where we document the state of the wind industry and the results of cooperative research, development, and deployment efforts of our member governments and organizations. This was a record-setting year for wind energy in the IEA Wind member countries, which installed more than 20 gigawatts (GW) of new wind capacity. This growth led to a total of 111 GW of wind generating capacity, with more than 2 GW operating offshore. Wind energy supplied 2.5 % of the collective electricity needs of the member countries and provided additional economic benefits including more than 287,000 jobs and 37,000 million euro of economic activity. Following the IEA Wind 2009 to 2013 Strategic Plan, we are making significant progress on wind technology research to improve performance and reliability at competitive costs and to increase acceptance. We completed research in tasks addressing offshore wind technology deployment and the integration of wind and hydropower systems. Members began a new research task to improve the accuracy of computer codes and models used to estimate structural loads for offshore wind turbines. Technical expert meetings were held on: radar, radio, and links with wind turbines; sound propagation models and validation; and remote wind speed sensing techniques. Members agreed to continue research on power systems with large amounts of wind energy for another threeyear

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11 kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11 kW wind turbine mounted on an 18 m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark, although the company is based in Scotland. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Photovoltaic Installations at Williams College Ruth Aronoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thumb that 10 Watts of power fit into every square foot of roof space (or 0.1 square meters). This means of the total array, panels cost between $7.50 and $10 per Watt of power installed; smaller systems cost slightly more to install per Watt, while larger systems cost less since they are bought in bulk

Aalberts, Daniel P.

173

CCPExecutiveSummary Storing Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCPExecutiveSummary July 2011 Storing Wind for a Rainy Day W: www.uea.ac.uk/ccp T: +44 (0)1603 593715 A: UEA, Norwich, NR4 7TJ Storing Wind for a Rainy Day: What kind of electricity does Denmark export? BACKGROUND The last decade has seen a remarkable increase in the number of wind installations

Feigon, Brooke

174

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other utility-scale (>100 kW) wind turbines installed in thesales of small wind turbines 100 kW and less in size intoThe 100 kW cut-off between small and large wind turbines

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hurricane Katrina Wind Investigation Report  

SciTech Connect

This investigation of roof damage caused by Hurricane Katrina is a joint effort of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, Inc. (RICOWI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy (ORNL/DOE). The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) was initiated in 1996. Hurricane damage that met the criteria of a major windstorm event did not materialize until Hurricanes Charley and Ivan occurred in August 2004. Hurricane Katrina presented a third opportunity for a wind damage investigation in August 29, 2005. The major objectives of the WIP are as follows: (1) to investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind events; (2) to factually describe roofing assembly performance and modes of failure; and (3) to formally report results of the investigations and damage modes for substantial wind speeds The goal of the WIP is to perform unbiased, detailed investigations by credible personnel from the roofing industry, the insurance industry, and academia. Data from these investigations will, it is hoped, lead to overall improvement in roofing products, systems, roofing application, and durability and a reduction in losses, which may lead to lower overall costs to the public. This report documents the results of an extensive and well-planned investigative effort. The following program changes were implemented as a result of the lessons learned during the Hurricane Charley and Ivan investigations: (1) A logistics team was deployed to damage areas immediately following landfall; (2) Aerial surveillance--imperative to target wind damage areas--was conducted; (3) Investigation teams were in place within 8 days; (4) Teams collected more detailed data; and (5) Teams took improved photographs and completed more detailed photo logs. Participating associations reviewed the results and lessons learned from the previous investigations and many have taken the following actions: (1) Moved forward with recommendations for new installation procedures; (2) Updated and improved application guidelines and manuals from associations and manufacturers; (3) Launched certified product installer programs; and (4) Submitted building code changes to improve product installation. Estimated wind speeds at the damage locations came from simulated hurricane models prepared by Applied Research Associates of Raleigh, North Carolina. A dynamic hurricane wind field model was calibrated to actual wind speeds measured at 12 inland and offshore stations. The maximum estimated peak gust wind speeds in Katrina were in the 120-130 mph range. Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Grand Isle, Louisiana, and traveled almost due north across the city of New Orleans. Hurricane winds hammered the coastline from Houma, Louisiana, to Pensacola, Florida. The severe flooding problems in New Orleans made it almost impossible for the investigating teams to function inside the city. Thus the WIP investigations were all conducted in areas east of the city. The six teams covered the coastal areas from Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, on the west to Pascagoula, Mississippi, on the east. Six teams involving a total of 25 persons documented damage to both low slope and steep slope roofing systems. The teams collected specific information on each building examined, including type of structure (use or occupancy), wall construction, roof type, roof slope, building dimensions, roof deck, insulation, construction, and method of roof attachment. In addition, the teams noted terrain exposure and the estimated wind speeds at the building site from the Katrina wind speed map. With each team member assigned a specific duty, they described the damage in detail and illustrated important features with numerous color photos. Where possible, the points of damage initiation were identified and damage propagation described. Because the wind speeds in Katrina at landfall, where the investigations took place, were less than code-specified design speeds, one would expect roof damage to be minimal. One team speculated that damage to all roofs in the area they examined was les

Desjarlais, A. O.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Wind for Schools: Fostering the Human Talent Supply Chain for a 20% Wind Energy Future (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by: 1) Developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses. 2) Installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools. 3) Implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school.

Baring-Gould, I.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reflectivity software installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... First download and unpack the reflectometry source tree. You may need to build and install Tcl/Tk, BLT, TkTable, BWidget and TkCon. ...

178

DOE Report Tracks Maturation of U.S. Wind Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Growth of the U.S. Wind Industry The U.S. Department ofAnnual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andkey trends in the U.S. wind industry, in many cases using

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate the cost of wind energy and compare it withMW installed worldwide. 6 Wind energy costs in India areof levelized cost were estimated (See Figure 7: Wind Energy

Phadke, Amol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Review of Wind Project Financing Structures in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andand Cumulative Growth in U.S. Wind Power Capacity CumulativeAbstract The rapid pace of wind power development in the

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DOE Report Tracks Maturation of U.S. Wind Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andNational Laboratory The wind power industry is in an era ofof developments in the U.S. wind power market, with a

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Alaska/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alaska/Wind Resources Alaska/Wind Resources < Alaska Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Alaska Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

183

Wyoming/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming/Wind Resources Wyoming/Wind Resources < Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Wyoming Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

184

Nevada/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada/Wind Resources Nevada/Wind Resources < Nevada Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Nevada Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

185

Kansas/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Wind Resources Kansas/Wind Resources < Kansas Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Kansas Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

186

Washington/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington/Wind Resources Washington/Wind Resources < Washington Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Washington Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

187

Louisiana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Wind Resources Louisiana/Wind Resources < Louisiana Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Louisiana Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

188

Oregon/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon/Wind Resources Oregon/Wind Resources < Oregon Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Oregon Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

189

Kentucky/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Wind Resources Kentucky/Wind Resources < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Kentucky Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

190

Nebraska/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Wind Resources Nebraska/Wind Resources < Nebraska Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Nebraska Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

191

Alabama/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama/Wind Resources Alabama/Wind Resources < Alabama Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Alabama Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

192

Florida/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida/Wind Resources Florida/Wind Resources < Florida Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Florida Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

193

Vermont/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Wind Resources Vermont/Wind Resources < Vermont Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Vermont Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

194

Wisconsin/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin/Wind Resources Wisconsin/Wind Resources < Wisconsin Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Wisconsin Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

195

Idaho/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho/Wind Resources Idaho/Wind Resources < Idaho Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Idaho Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

196

Missouri/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Wind Resources Missouri/Wind Resources < Missouri Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Missouri Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

197

Iowa/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa/Wind Resources Iowa/Wind Resources < Iowa Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Iowa Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

198

Maryland/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Wind Resources Maryland/Wind Resources < Maryland Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Maryland Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

199

Massachusetts/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Wind Resources Massachusetts/Wind Resources < Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Massachusetts Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

200

Minnesota/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota/Wind Resources Minnesota/Wind Resources < Minnesota Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Minnesota Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pennsylvania/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Wind Resources Pennsylvania/Wind Resources < Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Pennsylvania Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

202

Hawaii/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii/Wind Resources Hawaii/Wind Resources < Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Hawaii Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

203

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trend: 2007 Office of Renewable Energycost of the additional capacity required to make the capacity contributions per unit of energy produced by wind

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ashe County- Wind Energy System Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2007 Ashe County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in unincorporated areas of the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a...

205

Survey of Wind Integration Study Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide installed wind generation capacity increased by 25% during 2006 and reached almost 74,000 MW worldwide by the end of the year. This rapid growth is forecasted to continue for several years and result in large regional concentrations of wind generation capacity. An increasing amount of this wind energy is expected to come from offshore wind plants, especially in Europe. Because wind generation is an intermittent resource, and can not be dispatched, wind energy will affect the operation of th...

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

206

Solar and Wind Easements & Rights Laws  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nevada's general statutes provide owners of solar and wind energy systems protection against restrictions that would otherwise prevent them from installing these systems on their property. NRS ...

207

Diurnal and seasonal variations of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature over western Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry has installed a total of 46,919 megawatts (MW) of capac- ity, making it second in the world behind, University at Albany, State University of New York, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222, USA e energy is among the world's fastest growing sources of energy. Through the end of 2011, the US wind

Zhou, Liming

208

Obtaining data for wind farm development and management: the EO-WINDFARM project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). That sector has a mean growth rate of 30% for the last two years. The total installed wind power capacity of development of these EO-based services are evoked. Introduction The Kyoto objectives are stated into the White sources for producing electricity. For Europe, the part of renewable energy sources in electricity

209

Wind Powering America Podcasts, Wind Powering America (WPA)  

SciTech Connect

Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters produce a series of radio interviews featuring experts discussing wind energy topics. The interviews are aimed at a rural stakeholder audience and are available as podcasts. On the Wind Powering America website, you can access past interviews on topics such as: Keys to Local Wind Energy Development Success, What to Know about Installing a Wind Energy System on Your Farm, and Wind Energy Development Can Revitalize Rural America. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource for podcast episodes.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Ohio/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Ohio/Wind Resources < Ohio Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Ohio Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

211

Small Wind Guidebook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms

212

Montana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Montana/Wind Resources < Montana Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Montana Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

213

HVAC Installed Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HVAC Installed Performance HVAC Installed Performance ESI, Tim Hanes Context * The building envelope has historically been the focus in residential homes. * The largest consumer of energy in residential homes is typically the HVAC system. * Testing the performance of the HVAC system has not been pursued to its full potential. Technical Approach * Currently very little performance testing is being done to the HVAC system. * The only way to know if a HVAC system is operating correctly is to measure the Btu/h. * This should be done at the equipment and at the the system. Recommended Guidance * Training of HVAC technicians, installers, and salespeople is a must. * If only the technician is trained than implementing the change will not happen. * Public awareness of proper installation and its

214

HVAC Installed Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question HVAC proper installation energy savings: over-promising or under-delivering?"

215

OpenEI Community - Wind  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind for Schools Wind for Schools Portal http://en.openei.org/community/group/wind-schools-portal

Description: Project to inspire students in the United States by educating and installing wind turbines. Wind Wind for Schools Portal Mon, 23 Sep 2013 20:01:10 +0000 Rmckeel 751 at http://en.openei.org/community Renewable Energy RFPs http://en.openei.org/community/group/renewable-energy-rfps
Description: Find renewable energy financial opportunities. We post solicitations for renewable energy generation, renewable energy certificates, and green power as a courtesy to our web site visitors. Unless otherwise noted, these requests

216

Wind characteristics for agricultural wind energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy utilization in agriculture can provide a potentially significant savings in fuel oil consumption and ultimately a cost savings to the farmer. A knowledge of the wind characteristics within a region and at a location can contribute greatly to a more efficient and cost-effective use of this resource. Current research indicates that the important wind characteristics include mean annual wind speed and the frequency distribution of the wind, seasonal and diurnal variations in wind speed and direction, and the turbulent and gustiness characteristics of the wind. Further research is underway to provide a better definition of the total wind resource available, improved methods for siting WECS and an improved understanding of the environment to which the WECS respond.

Renne, D. S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Summary World Wind Energy Data (from World on the Edge) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Earth Policy Institute. This wind energy dataset includes the following cumulative installed wind power capacity datasets: World (1980 - 2009); Top ten countries (1980 -...

218

Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms

219

Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations

220

The Christmas Island Wind Profiler: A Prototype VHF Wind-Profiling Radar for the Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After a decade of development, VHF wind profilers are being used for atmospheric research at several locations in the tropical Pacific. A prototype 50-MHz wind profiler was installed on Christmas Island in 1985 and has operated continuously since ...

K. S. Gage; J. R. Mcafee; W. L. Ecklund; D. A. Carter; C. R. Williams; P. E. Johnston; A. C. Riddle

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test is being conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, four turbines are being tested at the NWTC as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a grid connected ARE 442 wind turbine mounted on a 30.5 meter (100 ft) lattice tower manufactured by Abundant Renewable Energy. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Abundant Renewable Energy.

van Dam, J.; Baker, D.; Jager, D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Wisconsin Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resources Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Wisconsin Wind Resources WisconsinMap.jpg Retrieved from

223

NREL's Wind Powering America Team Helps Indiana Develop Wind Resources (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

How does a state advance, in just five years, from having no installed wind capacity to having more than 1000 megawatts (MW) of installed capacity? The Wind Powering America (WPA) initiative, based at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), employs a state-focused approach that has helped accelerate wind energy deployment in many states. One such state is Indiana, which is now home to the largest wind plant east of the Mississippi.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upward pressure on wind project costs and, by extension,turbine pricing, wind project costs, and wind power prices,pricing, installed project costs, and wind power prices, and

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Model-based fault detection and isolation of a liquid-cooled frequency converter on a wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rapid development of wind energy technologies and growth of installed wind turbine capacity in the world, the reliability of the wind turbine becomes an important issue for wind turbine manufactures, owners, and operators. The reliability of ...

Peng Li, Peter Fogh Odgaard, Jakob Stoustrup, Alexander Larsen, Kim Mrk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

1981 Active-Solar-Installations Survey  

SciTech Connect

The survey gathered data on active residential and commercial solar systems installed during calendar year 1981 and a listing of firms involved in various aspects of the industry. The mail and telephone followup survey results are presented in 21 tables for combined national and state data. The total number of installations reported nationwide during 1981 was 122,907. Almost 95% of all reported installations were made in the single-family residential sector. The fewest quantity of installations (1.2%) was reported in the commercial sector. The remaining 4% was reported in the multifamily residential sector. Water heaters represented the largest number of systems installed in single-family, multifamily, and commercial buildings. The average size of water-heating systems in single-family homes was 61 square feet with an average cost of $3,235. Pool heaters represented the second largest number of systems installed in single-family and multifamily homes and represented 16.4% of the total installations. The average size of pool heaters in single-family homes was 376 square feet with an average cost of $3,455.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Wind for Schools: Developing Educational Programs to Train a New Workforce and the Next Generation of Wind Energy Experts (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by: Developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools; and implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school.

Flowers, L.; Baring-Gould, I.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Wind Development on the Rosebud  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rosebud Sioux Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation Wind Development on the Rosebud Akicita Cikala 750 Kw turbine Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm, 30Mw North Antelope Highlands Wind Farm, 190Mw Met towers installed in 2003 Met tower installed in 2001 Met tower installed in 1999 Met towers installed in 2009 Akicita Cikala Turbine Neg Micon 750kw Commissioned March 2003 Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm 2003 Dept. of Energy Grant DOE Funding $448,551.00 DISGEN Cost share/in-kind $78,750.00 RST/TUC Cost share/in-kind $27,272.00 Participants in Development RST Resource Development Office, Ken Haukaas, Coordinator RST Tribal Utilities Commission, Tony Rogers, Director RST Natural Resource Office, Stephanie Middlebrooks, Wildlife Biologist Distribute Generation Inc., Dale Osborn, President, Belvin Pete, Project

229

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in average turbine hub height and rotor diameter have beenInformation on turbine hub heights and rotor diameters werehub height and rotor diameter of wind turbines installed in

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Wind powering America: South Dakota  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet contains a description of South Dakota's wind energy resources, and the state's financial incentives that support the installation of renewable energy systems. The fact sheet includes a list of contacts for those interested in obtaining more information.

NREL

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

231

The EPRI/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1992, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program (TVP). This paper provides an overview of the TVP, its purpose and goals, and the participating utility projects. Improved technology has significantly reduced the cost of energy from wind turbines since the early 1980s. In 1992, turbines were producing electricity for about $0.07--$0.09/kilowatt-hour (kWh) (at 7 m/s [16 mph sites]), compared with more than $0.30/kWh in 1980. Further technology improvements were expected to lower the cost of energy from wind turbines to $0.05/kWh. More than 17,000 wind turbines, totaling more than 1,500 MW capacity, were installed in the US, primarily in California and Hawaii. The better wind plants had availabilities above 95%, capacity factors exceeding 30%, and operation and maintenance costs of $0.01/kWh. However, despite improving technology, EPRI and DOE recognized that utility use of wind turbines was still largely limited to turbines installed in California and Hawaii during the 1980s. Wind resource assessments showed that other regions of the US, particularly the Midwest, had abundant wind resources. EPRI and DOE sought to provide a bridge from utility-grade turbine development programs under way to commercial purchases of the wind turbines. The TVP was developed to allow utilities to build and operate enough candidate turbines to gain statistically significant operating and maintenance data.

Calvert, S.; Goldman, P. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); DeMeo, E.; McGowin, C. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Smith, B.; Tromly, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

New England Wind Forum: Historic Wind Development in New England: More New  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

More New England Wind Farms More New England Wind Farms Since Crotched Mountain, six additional wind farms have been installed to date in New England. The performance of New England wind farms has generally mirrored the performance of wind farms elsewhere, i.e., a slow start followed by rapid improvement. Original wind farm on Equinox Mountain, circa 1982. Photo courtesy of Endless Energy Corporation. Click on the image to view a larger version. Original wind farm on Equinox Mountain, circa 1982. Equinox Mountain, VT The four WTG turbines installed in 1981 and 1982 at Equinox Mountain, VT, comprised one of the first wind farm installations in the United States. These early turbines, which suffered mechanical issues (including blade throws), were subsequently removed, but Equinox Mountain continued to receive attention as a wind power site (see below).

233

Small Wind Guidebook/What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need?

234

Small Wind Guidebook/Is There Enough Wind on My Site | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

There Enough Wind on My Site There Enough Wind on My Site < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Is There Enough Wind on My Site?

235

Small Wind Guidebook/What Do Wind Systems Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

What Do Wind Systems Cost What Do Wind Systems Cost < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information What Do Wind Systems Cost?

236

Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts was also performed. Key cost components included the material and construction costs of the buoy; material and installation costs of the tethers, mooring lines, and anchor technologies; costs of transporting and installing the system at the chosen site; and the cost of mounting the wind turbine to the platform. The two systems were evaluated based on their static and dynamic performance and the total system installed cost. Both systems demonstrated acceptable motions, and have estimated costs of $1.4-$1.8 million, not including the cost of the wind turbine, the power electronics, or the electrical transmission.

Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts was also performed. Key cost components included the material and construction costs of the buoy; material and installation costs of the tethers, mooring lines, and anchor technologies; costs of transporting and installing the system at the chosen site; and the cost of mounting the wind turbine to the platform. The two systems were evaluated based on their static and dynamic performance and the total system installed cost. Both systems demonstrated acceptable motions, and have estimated costs of $1.4-$1.8 million, not including the cost of the wind turbine, the power electronics, or the electrical transmission.

Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Wind Energy Forecasting Technology Update: 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide installed wind generation capacity increased by 25 and reached almost 60,000 MW worldwide during 2005. As wind capacity continues to grow and large regional concentrations of wind generation emerge, utilities and regional transmission organizations will increasingly need accurate same-day and next-day forecasts of wind energy generation to dispatch system generation and transmission resource and anticipate rapid changes of wind generation.

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

239

Wind Energy Forecasting Technology Update: 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide installed wind generation capacity increased by 25 and reached almost 60,000 MW worldwide during 2005. As wind capacity continues to grow and large regional concentrations of wind generation emerge, utilities and regional transmission organizations will increasingly need accurate same-day and next-day forecasts of wind energy generation to dispatch system generation and transmission resource and anticipate rapid changes of wind generation. The project objective is to summarize the results o...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Maine coast winds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Maine Coast Winds Project was proposed for four possible turbine locations. Significant progress has been made at the prime location, with a lease-power purchase contract for ten years for the installation of turbine equipment having been obtained. Most of the site planning and permitting have been completed. It is expect that the turbine will be installed in early May. The other three locations are less suitable for the project, and new locations are being considered.

Avery, Richard

2000-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Impacts of Satellite-Observed Winds and Total Precipitable Water on WRF Short-Range Forecasts over the Indian Region during the 2006 Summer Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assimilation experiments have been performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR) scheme to assess the impacts of NASAs Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) near-surface winds, ...

V. Rakesh; Randhir Singh; P. K. Pal; P. C. Joshi

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Category:Small Wind Guidebook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidebook Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Book of this Category Pages in category "Small Wind Guidebook" The following 119 pages are in this category, out of 119 total. A Alabama/Wind Resources Alabama/Wind Resources/Full Version Alaska/Wind Resources Alaska/Wind Resources/Full Version Arizona/Wind Resources Arizona/Wind Resources/Full Version Arkansas/Wind Resources Arkansas/Wind Resources/Full Version C California/Wind Resources California/Wind Resources/Full Version Colorado/Wind Resources Colorado/Wind Resources/Full Version Connecticut/Wind Resources Connecticut/Wind Resources/Full Version D Delaware/Wind Resources Delaware/Wind Resources/Full Version F Florida/Wind Resources Florida/Wind Resources/Full Version G Georgia/Wind Resources Georgia/Wind Resources/Full Version

245

Texas/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Texas/Wind Resources < Texas Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Texas Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

246

Illinois/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Illinois/Wind Resources < Illinois Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Illinois Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

247

Arizona/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Arizona/Wind Resources < Arizona Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Arizona Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

248

California/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » California/Wind Resources < California Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> California Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

249

Connecticut/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Connecticut/Wind Resources < Connecticut Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Connecticut Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

250

Georgia/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Georgia/Wind Resources < Georgia Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Georgia Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

251

Delaware/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Delaware/Wind Resources < Delaware Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Delaware Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

252

Colorado/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Colorado/Wind Resources < Colorado Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Colorado Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

253

Arkansas/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Arkansas/Wind Resources < Arkansas Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Arkansas Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

254

Utah/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Utah/Wind Resources < Utah Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Utah Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate?

255

Oklahoma/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Oklahoma/Wind Resources < Oklahoma Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Oklahoma Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

256

Michigan/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Michigan/Wind Resources < Michigan Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Michigan Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

257

Indiana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Indiana/Wind Resources < Indiana Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Indiana Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

258

Maine/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Maine/Wind Resources < Maine Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Maine Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

259

Mississippi/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Mississippi/Wind Resources < Mississippi Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Mississippi Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

260

Tennessee/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Tennessee/Wind Resources < Tennessee Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Tennessee Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Virginia/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Virginia/Wind Resources < Virginia Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Virginia Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

262

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends November 23, 2011 - 1:43pm Addthis Wind turbine prices in the United States have declined, on average, by nearly one-third since 2008, after doubling from 2002 through 2008. Over this entire period, the average nameplate capacity rating, hub height, and rotor swept area of turbines installed in the United States have increased significantly, while other design improvements have also boosted turbine energy production. In combination, these various trends have had a significant-and sometimes surprising-impact on the levelized cost of energy delivered by wind projects. This webinar will feature three related presentations that explore these

263

Property:InstalledCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InstalledCapacity InstalledCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name InstalledCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Installed Capacity (MW) or also known as Total Generator Nameplate Capacity (Rated Power) Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

264

Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

265

Curating performance installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we will examine the use of the digital screen display as a primary form of accessing information within the museum context. We will argue that this mode of dissemination, achieved primarily through a Graphic User Interface (GUI) though ... Keywords: GUI, becoming, being, content, dissemination, exhibition, experience, form, information, installation, interactivity, interpretation, materiality, museum, nothing, objecthood, performance, performative, re-enactment, screen, technology, trajectory

Daniel Felstead; Kate Bailey

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Offshore Wind Turbines: Some Technical Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Offshore Wind Turbines: Some Technical Challenges Prof. Guy Houlsby FREng Oxford University House engineers concerned with installation of offshore wind turbines. The author is Professor of Civil solved, a DTI and EPSRC-sponsored research programme on foundations for wind turbines will be briefly

Houlsby, Guy T.

267

Wind Energy Update  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Energy Update Wind Powering America January 2012 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Evolution of Commercial Wind Technology NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Small (≤100 kW) Homes Farms Remote Applications (e.g. water pumping, telecom sites, icemaking) Midscale (100-1000 kW) Village Power Hybrid Systems Distributed Power Large, Land-based (1-3 MW) Utility-scale wind farms Large Distributed Power Sizes and Applications Large, Offshore (3-7 MW) Utility-scale wind farms, shallow coastal waters No U.S. installations NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Capacity & Cost Trends As of January 2012 (AWEA) 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 40000 45000 50000 $- $200 $400 $600 $800 $1,000 $1,200

268

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Energy Analysis Department Community Wind Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Energy Technologies Division · Energy Analysis Department Community Wind Power projects * standard US commercial wind development #12;Environmental Energy Technologies Division · Energy % Community- Owned Community- Owned Wind Capacity (MW) Total Wind Capacity (MW) #12;Environmental Energy

269

Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andExpectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market IntroSidebar: The U.S. wind industry experienced unprecedented

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andWind Power Development in the United States: Current94720 Abstract: The U.S. wind power industry is in an era of

Wiser, Ryan H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications  

SciTech Connect

At the end of 2012, U.S. wind turbines in distributed applications reached a 10-year cumulative installed capacity of more than 812 MW from more than 69,000 units across all 50 states. In 2012 alone, nearly 3,800 wind turbines totaling 175 MW of distributed wind capacity were documented in 40 states and in the U.S. Virgin Islands, with 138 MW using utility-scale turbines (i.e., greater than 1 MW in size), 19 MW using mid-size turbines (i.e., 101 kW to 1 MW in size), and 18.4 MW using small turbines (i.e., up to 100 kW in size). Distributed wind is defined in terms of technology application based on a wind projects location relative to end-use and power-distribution infrastructure, rather than on technology size or project size. Distributed wind systems are either connected on the customer side of the meter (to meet the onsite load) or directly to distribution or micro grids (to support grid operations or offset large loads nearby). Estimated capacity-weighted average costs for 2012 U.S. distributed wind installations was $2,540/kW for utility-scale wind turbines, $2,810/kW for mid-sized wind turbines, and $6,960/kW for newly manufactured (domestic and imported) small wind turbines. An emerging trend observed in 2012 was an increased use of refurbished turbines. The estimated capacity-weighted average cost of refurbished small wind turbines installed in 2012 was $4,080/kW. As a result of multiple projects using utility-scale turbines, Iowa deployed the most new overall distributed wind capacity, 37 MW, in 2012. Nevada deployed the most small wind capacity in 2012, with nearly 8 MW of small wind turbines installed in distributed applications. In the case of mid-size turbines, Ohio led all states in 2012 with 4.9 MW installed in distributed applications. State and federal policies and incentives continued to play a substantial role in the development of distributed wind projects. In 2012, U.S. Treasury Section 1603 payments and grants and loans from the U.S. Department of Agricultures Rural Energy for America Program were the main sources of federal funding for distributed wind projects. State and local funding varied across the country, from rebates to loans, tax credits, and other incentives. Reducing utility bills and hedging against potentially rising electricity rates remain drivers of distributed wind installations. In 2012, other drivers included taking advantage of the expiring U.S. Treasury Section 1603 program and a prosperous year for farmers. While 2012 saw a large addition of distributed wind capacity, considerable barriers and challenges remain, such as a weak domestic economy, inconsistent state incentives, and very competitive solar photovoltaic and natural gas prices. The industry remains committed to improving the distributed wind marketplace by advancing the third-party certification process and introducing alternative financing models, such as third-party power purchase agreements and lease-to-own agreements more typical in the solar photovoltaic market. Continued growth is expected in 2013.

Orrell, Alice C.; Flowers, L. T.; Gagne, M. N.; Pro, B. H.; Rhoads-Weaver, H. E.; Jenkins, J. O.; Sahl, K. M.; Baranowski, R. E.

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

272

Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of its support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites. 9 refs., 10 figs.,

Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Morris, V.R.; Tomich, S.D.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

2010 Smart Meter Installations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Manufacturing Facilities Wind Manufacturing Facilities Testing America's Wind Turbines Testing America's Wind Turbines U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams...

274

SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities July 17, 2012 - 4:51pm Addthis National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 1 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado The first of 4 towers is lifted as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-15 13:53 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 2 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado Workers use a giant crane for lifting the blade assembly as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-22 12:06 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston

275

SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

America's Wind Testing Facilities America's Wind Testing Facilities SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities July 17, 2012 - 4:51pm Addthis National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 1 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado The first of 4 towers is lifted as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-15 13:53 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 2 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado Workers use a giant crane for lifting the blade assembly as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-22 12:06 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston

276

West Virginia/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Virginia/Wind Resources West Virginia/Wind Resources < West Virginia Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> West Virginia Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

277

North Dakota/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Dakota/Wind Resources North Dakota/Wind Resources < North Dakota Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> North Dakota Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

278

South Dakota/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Dakota/Wind Resources South Dakota/Wind Resources < South Dakota Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> South Dakota Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

279

New Jersey/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Jersey/Wind Resources New Jersey/Wind Resources < New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> New Jersey Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

280

Rhode Island/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island/Wind Resources Rhode Island/Wind Resources < Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Rhode Island Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

South Carolina/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Carolina/Wind Resources South Carolina/Wind Resources < South Carolina Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> South Carolina Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

282

New York/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York/Wind Resources New York/Wind Resources < New York Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> New York Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

283

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Where Is Wind Power?  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Where Is Wind Power? Where Is Wind Power? Wind Powering America offers maps to help you visualize the wind resource at a local level and to show how much wind power has been installed in the United States. How much wind power is on my land? Go to the wind resource maps. Go to the wind resource maps. Go to the wind resource maps. If you want to know how much wind power is in a particular area, these wind resource maps can give you a visual indication of the average wind speeds to a local level such as a neighborhood. These maps have been developed using the same mathematical models that are used by weather forecasters and are even used to estimate the wind energy potential-or how much wind energy could potentially be produced at the state level, if wind power were developed there.

284

Low pressure turbine installation  

SciTech Connect

Low-pressure turbine installation is described comprising a casing, at least two groups of turbine stages mounted in said casing, each turbine stage having blades so arranged that a flow of steam passes through the respective turbine stages in contraflow manner, partition means in said casing for separating the opposed final stages of said turbine stages from each other, and steam exhausting means opened in the side walls of said casing in a direction substantially perpendicular to the axis of said turbine, said steam exhausting means being connected to condensers.

Iizuka, N.; Hisano, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Otawara, Y.

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

Non-Residential Solar and Wind Tax Credit (Personal) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Personal) Personal) Non-Residential Solar and Wind Tax Credit (Personal) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Buying & Making Electricity Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate 25,000 for any one building in the same year and 50,000 per business in total credits in any year Program Info Start Date 1/1/2006 State Arizona Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 10% of installed cost Provider Arizona Commerce Authority Arizona's tax credit for solar and wind installations in commercial and

286

Non-Residential Solar and Wind Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Non-Residential Solar and Wind Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Buying & Making Electricity Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate $25,000 for any one building in the same year and $50,000 per business in total credits in any year Program Info Start Date 1/1/2006 State Arizona Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 10% of installed cost Provider Arizona Commerce Authority Arizona's tax credit for solar and wind installations in commercial and

287

DOE Report Tracks Maturation of U.S. Wind Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recent past. Installed Project Costs Are Driving Wind PowerThough most of this project cost increase is attributable totheir way into installed project costs in 2006. First, the

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NREL: Education Programs - Wind for Schools Project Enters 2013...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind for Schools Project Enters 2013 with 124 Turbine Installations March 29, 2013 This past winter, NREL hosted the Sixth Annual Wind for Schools Summit. Forty-six attendees...

289

NREL: Technology Deployment - Wind for Schools Project Enters...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind for Schools Project Enters 2013 with 124 Turbine Installations March 29, 2013 This past winter, NREL hosted the Sixth Annual Wind for Schools Summit. Forty-six attendees...

290

NREL: Education Programs - Wind for Schools Project Enters 2013...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enters 2013 with 124 Turbine Installations and Lessons to Share: A Wind Powering America Success Story January 28, 2013 On January 14-15, 2013, Wind Powering America hosted its...

291

Lessons Learned: Milwaukees Wind Turbine Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy Community and Renewable Energy Success Stories webinar series titled Wind Energy in Urban Environments. This presentation describes a mid-size wind turbine installation near downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

292

Property:Incentive/WindResMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name IncentiveWindResMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed residential wind capacity in kW that is eligible for a rebate. Ex: The maximum...

293

Property:Incentive/WindComMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name IncentiveWindComMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed commercial wind capacity in kW that is eligible for a rebate. This also applies...

294

Property:Incentive/WindResDolKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name IncentiveWindResDolKW Property Type String Description The amount per kW of installed capacity of a residential wind system disbursed as an upfront incentive. Ex:...

295

Property:Incentive/WindComDolKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name IncentiveWindComDolKW Property Type String Description The amount per kW of installed capacity of a commercial wind system disbursed as an upfront incentive. Ex: OR's...

296

New England Wind Forum: Historic Wind Development in New England:  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Transition to Modern Wind Turbines Transition to Modern Wind Turbines Cold weather operation of the 550-kW Zond Z-40 FS wind turbines at the 6-MW Green Mountain Power wind plant. PIX05593. Cold weather operation of the 550-kW Zond Z-40 FS wind turbines at the 6-MW Green Mountain Power wind plant. Green Mountain Power also installed New England's seventh wind farm, with eleven 550-kW turbines manufactured by Zond Corporation (now owned by GE Wind), in Searsburg, VT, in 1996. Although installation was completed late in 1996, the turbines produced no power during their first winter due to mechanical failures with blade bolts and gearboxes. After mud season in 1997, all gearboxes were replaced, and the Searsburg wind farm went on line in June 1997. It is a local attraction that has received a significant amount of positive attention from visitors and the media. Green Mountain Power reports that the wind farm continues to perform reasonably well, with availability in the 85% to 95% range.

297

Small Wind Guidebook/Is Wind Energy Practical for Me | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Practical for Me Practical for Me < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Is Wind Energy Practical for Me?

298

Solar and Wind Equipment Certification | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar and Wind Equipment Certification Solar and Wind Equipment Certification Solar and Wind Equipment Certification < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Equipment Certification Provider Arizona Solar Energy Industries Association Collectors, heat exchangers and storage units of solar energy systems -- and the installation of these systems -- sold or installed in Arizona must have a warranty of at least two years. The remaining components of the system and their installation must have a warranty of at least one year.

299

Lillgrund Wind Farm Modelling and Reactive Power Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The installation of wind power plant has significantly increased since several years due to the recent necessity of creating renewable and clean energy sources. (more)

Boulanger, Isabelle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Large Wind Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large Wind Technology Large Wind Technology Large Wind Technology The Wind Program works with industry partners to increase the performance and reliability of large wind technologies while lowering the cost of wind energy. The program's research efforts have helped to increase the average capacity factor (a measure of power plant productivity) from 22% for wind turbines installed before 1998 to 35% for turbines installed between 2004 and 2007. Wind energy costs have been reduced from over 55 cents (current dollars) per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in 1980 to under six cents/kWh today. To ensure future industry growth, the technology must continue to evolve, building on earlier successes to further improve reliability, increase capacity factors, and reduce costs. This page describes the goal of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wind power resource assessment in complex urban environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in availability of small-scale wind turbines for dense urban environments highlight the need for detailed wind installation of a small wind turbine. The procedure of resource assessment includes estimation of the average wind power available for energy production on campus and identification of optimal location for turbine

302

Lessons Learned: Milwaukees Wind Turbine Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Milwaukee: City of Milwaukee: Wind Turbine Project Matt Howard, Environmental Sustainability Director Project Best Practices * Transparency and information * Find the most appropriate site - both wind profile and building load * Stay away from neighborhoods and iconic civic sites * No surprises for locally elected officials * Active public engagement * Know the facts; kill the myths; control the narrative * Tie to local economic development * Cost-benefit analysis, budgeting, payback, over and over and over... Project Basics * Proposal to site ONE, small-scale wind turbine on City-owned building on Port Authority property * 2323 S. Lincoln Memorial Dr., Port Administration Building * Turbine will power ALL of Port Admin. Bldg's needs * Best estimate of total cost of installation/operation: $550,000-$600,000

303

Windows Installation Notes for EXPGUI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These notes describe how GSAS & EXPGUI are installed using separate distribution files for GSAS, EXPGUI and Tcl/Tk. ...

304

A New Wind Turbine Control Method to Smooth Power Generation. Modelling and Comparison to Wind Turbine Frequency Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Following the significant increase of world wide installed wind power during the first decade of the 21st century, transmission system operators are faced with new (more)

Solberg, Olov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Capps et al. Wind Power Sensitivity to Turbine Characteristics Sensitivity of Southern California Wind Power to Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

functions. However, for the installation of a single or small cluster of turbines, a wind developer may find phase of a wind project includes monitoring and evaluating the local wind resource, determining possible turbine locations, and estimating the economic feasibility of a wind project. It may also include

Hall, Alex

306

Survey of Wind Power Integration Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide installed wind generation capacity increased by 25% and reached almost 60,000 MW worldwide and 9150 MW in the United States during 2005, and the high growth rate is forecast to continue for several years. Wind generation is an intermittent resource and can't be dispatched. Therefore, large blocks of wind generation concentrated in a region can affect the operation of the electricity grid with regard to ancillary service requirements and cost. Because the numerous wind power integration stud...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures. The Engineering ... section. I. Extreme Winds: ... II. Wind Effects on Buildings. Database ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

Mountain Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Wind Mountain Wind Jump to: navigation, search Mountain Wind is a wind farm located in Uinta County, Wyoming. It consists of 67 turbines and has a total capacity of 140.7 MW. It is owned by Edison Mission Group.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Fort Bridger, its approximate coordinates are 41.318716°, -110.386418°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.res-americas.com/wind-farms/operational-/mountain-wind-i-wind-farm.aspx Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mountain_Wind&oldid=132229" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

309

Wind for Schools: Developing Educational Programs to Train the Next Generation of Wind Energy Experts (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the world moves toward a vision of expanded wind energy, the industry is faced with the challenges of obtaining a skilled workforce and addressing local wind development concerns. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Program works to address these issues. The program installs small wind turbines at community "host" schools while developing wind application centers at higher education institutions. Teacher training with interactive and interschool curricula is implemented at each host school, while students at the universities assist in implementing the host school systems while participating in other wind course work. This poster provides an overview of the program's objectives, goals, approach, and results.

Baring-Gould, I.; Flowers, L.; Kelly, M.; Miles, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

New Mexico/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Mexico/Wind Resources < New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> New Mexico Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine?

311

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

New England Wind Forum: Selling Wind Power  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Selling Wind Power Selling Wind Power Markets are either well-developed or developing for each of the 'products' produced by wind generators. These include electricity products and generation attributes. Electricity Electricity can be used in two ways: on-site (interconnected behind a retail customer's meter) of for sales of electricity over the electric grid. On-site generation can displace a portion of a customer's purchases of electricity from the grid. In addition, net metering rules are in place at the state level that in some cases allow generation in excess of on-site load to be sold back to the local utility (see state pages for net metering specifics). For sales over the electricity grid, the Independent System Operator of New England (ISO New England) creates and manages a wholesale market for electric energy, capacity, and ancillary services within the New England Power Pool (NEPOOL). Wind generators may sell their electric energy and capacity in spot markets organized by the ISO, or they may contract with wholesale buyers to sell these products for any term to buyers operating in the ISO New England marketplace. Wind generators do not generally produce other marketable ancillary services. The ISO has rules specific to the operation of wind generators reflecting operations, scheduling, calculation of installed capacity credit, and so forth.

314

Wind Resource Map: Mexico | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resource Map: Mexico Wind Resource Map: Mexico Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wind Resource Map: Mexico Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.altestore.com/howto/Reference-Materials/Wind-Resource-Map-Mexico/a Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/wind-resource-map-mexico,http://clean Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This is on-shore wind resource map for rural power applications in Mexico. The map can be used to aid in appropriate siting of wind power installations. Please note that the wind speed classes are taken at 30 m (100 feet [ft]), instead of the usual 10 m (33 ft). Each wind power class should span two power densities. For example, Wind Power Class = 3

315

Wind in Education | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Education in Education Jump to: navigation, search Photo from Remy Luerssen Pangle, NREL 18543 U.S. Department of Energy's Wind for Schools Project Launched in 2005, Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project supported Wind Application Centers at higher education institutions in 11 states. Students assisted in the assessment, design, and installation of small wind systems at host k-12 schools, acting as wind energy consultants. Students also participated in class work and other engineering projects in the wind energy field, preparing them to enter the wind workforce once they graduate. Teacher training and hands-on curricula were implemented at each host school to bring the wind turbine into the classroom through interactive and inter-school wind-related research tasks.[1] Project

316

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Puerto Rico - Solar and Wind Contractor Certification | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Puerto Rico - Solar and Wind Contractor Certification Puerto Rico - Solar and Wind Contractor Certification Puerto Rico - Solar and Wind Contractor Certification < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info Program Type Solar/Wind Contractor Licensing Provider Energy Affairs Administration In October 2008, the Energy Affairs Administration (EAA) of Puerto Rico adopted regulations for the certification of photovoltaic (PV) systems and installers in response to the passing of Act No. 248, which required that PV systems be certified and installed by certified installers in order to be eligible for the newly established tax credits (that have since been repealed). With the passing of this regulation, only certified installers may install photovoltaic (PV) systems in Puerto Rico. In January 2010,

318

Big Spring Wind Power Project Third- Through Fifth-Year Operating Experience: 2001-2004: U.S. Department of Energy-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the third-, fourth-, and fifth-year operating experience at the 34-MW Big Spring Wind Power Plant near Big Spring, Texas. The project consists of 42 Vestas V47 wind turbines installed on 65-m (213-ft) towers and four Vestas V66 wind turbines installed on 80-m (262-ft) towers. Lessons learned in the project will be valuable to other utilities and wind power developers planning similar wind power projects.

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

319

Big Spring Wind Power Project Second-Year Operating Experience: 2000-2001: U.S. Department of Energy - EPRI Wind Turbine Verificatio n Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes second-year operating experience at the 34 MW Big Spring Wind Power Plant near Big Spring, Texas. The project consists of 42 Vestas V47 wind turbines installed on 65-meter (213-foot) towers and 4 Vestas V66 wind turbines installed on 80-meter (262-foot) towers. The lessons learned in the project will be valuable to other utilities and wind power developers planning similar wind power projects.

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

320

Puerto Rico wind energy resource assessment project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Puerto Rico Office of Energy initiated a Wind Energy Resource Assessment Project in September 1982 to gather reliable, quantitative data on the wind resource of Puerto Rico for making decisions on the deployment of single, small wind energy conversion systems throughout the Island and on the viability of installing wind turbine clusters and windfarms interconnected with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority grid. The project consists of four main activities: the collection and analysis of existing wind energy data for the Island, the installation and monitoring of five wind measurement stations, the development of a software model to incorporate and analyze these wind measurement data, simulate wind turbine performance, and assess the cost-benefit of conceptual wind energy conversion systems, and the completion of studies to identify institutional factors and industry financial incentives that would affect the deployment of wind energy conversion systems in Puerto Rico. The Wind Energy System Performance Model consists of three separate models; the Wind Resource Assessment Model, the Wind Turbine Performance Model and the Wind System Cost Model. The turbine performance model and the system cost model are interactive so that data such as turbine output power and a load demand profile can be passed between them to facilitate sensitivity studies. All the individual models are user-friendly to allow easy parameter input. They can be run separately or in sequence.

Scott, R.D.; Borgo, P.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wind Energy Ordinances (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Due to increasing energy demands in the United States and more installed wind projects, rural communities and local governments with limited or no experience with wind energy now have the opportunity to become involved in this industry. Communities with good wind resources may be approached by entities with plans to develop the resource. Although these opportunities can create new revenue in the form of construction jobs and land lease payments, they also create a new responsibility on the part of local governments to create ordinances to regulate wind turbine installations. Ordinances are laws, often found within municipal codes that provide various degrees of control to local governments. These laws cover issues such as zoning, traffic, consumer protection, and building codes. Wind energy ordinances reflect local needs and wants regarding wind turbines within county or city lines and aid the development of safe facilities that will be embraced by the community. Since 2008 when the National Renewable Energy Laboratory released a report on existing wind energy ordinances, many more ordinances have been established throughout the United States, and this trend is likely to continue in the near future as the wind energy industry grows. This fact sheet provides an overview of elements found in typical wind energy ordinances to educate state and local government officials, as well as policy makers.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 2007-2010. Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of$/W) Total Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of$/W) Total Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of

Darghouth, Naim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Wind Powering the Government  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are more than half a million Federal buildings with electric bills totaling about $3.5 billion per year. The Wind Powering America Initiative challenges the Federal government to reduce its use of energy produced by fossil fuels by obtaining at least 5% of its electricity from wind by 2010. As part of the current efforts to achieve the initiative's goal, NREL's Technical Information Services published Wind Powering the Government, a brochure that encourages the use of wind energy on Federal properties and the purchase of green power or green tags by Federal property managers.

Pitchford, P.

2000-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

Table F28: Wind Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F28: Wind Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total

325

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Accelerating Offshore Wind Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Offshore Wind Development Accelerating Offshore Wind Development Accelerating Offshore Wind Development December 12, 2012 - 2:15pm Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? The 2012 investments support innovative offshore installations for commercial deployment by 2017. The 2011 grants were targeted at projects that aim to either improve the technology used for offshore wind generation or remove the market barriers to offshore wind generation. View the Full Map Today the Energy Department announced investments in seven offshore wind demonstration projects. These projects are part of a broader effort to launch an offshore wind industry in the United States, and support innovative offshore installations for commercial deployment by 2017.

327

Wind Energy & Manufacturing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy & Manufacturing Wind Energy & Manufacturing Jump to: navigation, search Blades manufactured at Gamesa's factory in Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, await delivery for development of wind farms across the country in the United States. Photo from Gamesa, NREL 16001 Wind power creates new high-paying jobs in a wide variety of industries. This includes direct jobs installing, operating, and maintaining wind turbines, as well as jobs at manufacturing facilities that produce wind turbines, blades, electronic components, gearboxes, generators, towers, and other equipment. Indirect jobs in the industries that support these activities are also created.[1] In 2012, 72% of the wind turbine equipment (including towers, blades, and gears) installed in the United States during the year was made in

328

Wind Energy Ordinances | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Ordinances Wind Energy Ordinances Jump to: navigation, search Photo from First Wind, NREL 17545 Due to increasing energy demands in the United States and more installed wind projects, rural communities and local governments with limited or no experience with wind energy now have the opportunity to become involved in this industry. Communities with good wind resources may be approached by entities with plans to develop the resource. Although these opportunities can create new revenue in the form of construction jobs and land lease payments, they also create a new responsibility on the part of local governments to create ordinances to regulate wind turbine installations. Ordinances are laws, often found within municipal codes that provide various degrees of control to local governments. These laws cover issues

329

Wind Power in China | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in China in China Jump to: navigation, search This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Contents 1 Summary 2 Estimate Potential 3 Current Projects 4 China Manufacturers 4.1 Wind Companies in Wind Power in China 5 China's Wind Goals 6 References Summary Installed wind capacity: approximately 30 GW by end of 2010 (est), added 13.8 GW in 2009 Installed wind capacity doubled each year, Min Deqing China_2050_Wind_Technology_Roadmap Estimate Potential Offshore wind energy generation potential in China estimate to be 11,000 terawatt-hours (TWh) similar to that of the North Sea in western Europe.[1][2] Current Projects 7 large projects or "megabases" (2010) [3] Inner Mongolia approximately 4.3 GW capacity in 2010 (66 projects; 40 more planned)[4] 1.25 GW offshore project in Guangdong

330

INL Wind Farm Project Description Document  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The INL Wind Farm project proposes to install a 20 MW to 40 MW wind farm on government property, consisting of approximately ten to twenty full-sized (80-meter hub height) towers with 2 MW turbines, and access roads. This includes identifying the optimal turbine locations, building access roads, and pouring the tower foundations in preparation for turbine installation. The project successfully identified a location on INL lands with commercially viable wind resources (i.e., greater than 11 mph sustained winds) for a 20 to 40 MW wind farm. Additionally, the proposed Wind Farm was evaluated against other General Plant Projects, General Purpose Capital Equipment projects, and Line Item Construction Projects at the INL to show the relative importance of the proposed Wind Farm project.

Gary Siefert

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Build a Durable Market for Wind Power in the United StatesLearning Curves for Wind Power. Energy Policy, 30: 1181-Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof March 22, 2010 - 6:10pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this project do? The new fully functioning roof and solar energy production plant will save the tribe about $20,000 a year. The Delaware Nation, a federally-recognized tribe of about 1,400 people in Anadarko, Okla., will install solar panel roofs on two tribal government buildings as part of a larger effort to become more sustainable and bring new jobs to an area struggling with high unemployment. "It's the start of a green initiative," says Theda McPheron-Keel, president of Wind Hollow Foundation, a nonprofit organization aimed at helping American Indians improve their lives. "It provides economic

333

Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof March 22, 2010 - 6:10pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this project do? The new fully functioning roof and solar energy production plant will save the tribe about $20,000 a year. The Delaware Nation, a federally-recognized tribe of about 1,400 people in Anadarko, Okla., will install solar panel roofs on two tribal government buildings as part of a larger effort to become more sustainable and bring new jobs to an area struggling with high unemployment. "It's the start of a green initiative," says Theda McPheron-Keel, president of Wind Hollow Foundation, a nonprofit organization aimed at helping American Indians improve their lives. "It provides economic

334

7th International Workshop on Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power and on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Farms Models for HLI analysis of power systems with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

export? BACKGROUND The last decade has seen a remarkable increase in the number of wind installations. In Europe, Denmark is amongst the leading countries in wind generation in terms of installed capacity the consequences and challenges of high rates of wind generation from both a technical and economic perspective

Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

335

HTAR Client Configuration and Installation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Configuration and Installation Configuration and Installation HTAR Configuration and Installation HTAR is an archival utility similar to gnu-tar that allows for the archiving and extraction of local files into and out of HPSS. Configuration Instructions This distribution has default configuration settings which will work for most environments. If you want to use the default values (recommended) you can skip to the section labeled INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS. In certain environments, for example if your installation is on a machine which has more than one network interface, you may want to change some of these default settings. To help with this, an interactive Configure script is provided. To use it do $ ./Configure prior to installing. Configure will provide a description of the options

336

Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information

337

Small Wind Guidebook/State Information Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information Portal Information Portal < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal

338

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: How Do I Get Wind Power?  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Education Education Printable Version Bookmark and Share Learn About Wind About Wind Power Locating Wind Power Getting Wind Power Installed Wind Capacity Wind for Schools Project Collegiate Wind Competition School Project Locations Education & Training Programs Curricula & Teaching Materials Resources How do I get Wind Power? Learn how you can own, partner with, host, and support wind power. Construct A Wind Project On Your Own Land There are wind turbines designed for everyone from residential homeowners to utilities, and from private to corporate use. Small wind turbines can be bought with cash, and commercial-scale projects can be financed. To learn more about small projects, such as those for a home or ranch or business that are less than or equal to 100 kilowatts (kW), see the small wind

339

Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority (Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority (Virginia) Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority (Virginia) Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Virginia Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority The Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority is a public body, established for the purposes of facilitating, coordinating, and supporting the development, either by the Authority or by other qualified entities, of the offshore wind energy industry, offshore wind energy projects, and

340

Wind Spires as an Alternative Energy Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discloses the design and development of an innovative wind tower system having an axisymmetric wind deflecting structure with a plurality of symmetrically mounted rooftop size wind turbines near the axisymmetric structure. The purpose of the wind deflecting structure is to increase the ambient wind speed that in turn results in an overall increase in the power capacity of the wind turbines. Two working prototypes were constructed and installed in the summer of 2009 and 2012 respectively. The system installed in the Summer of 2009 has a cylindrical wind deflecting structure, while the tower installed in 2012 has a spiral-shape wind deflecting structure. Each tower has 4 turbines, each rated at 1.65 KW Name-Plate-Rating. Before fabricating the full-size prototypes, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses and scaled-down table-top models were used to predict the performance of the full-scale models. The performance results obtained from the full-size prototypes validated the results obtained from the computational models and those of the scaled-down models. The second prototype (spiral configuration) showed at a wind speed of 11 miles per hour (4.9 m/s) the power output of the system could reach 1,288 watt, when a typical turbine installation, with no wind deflecting structure, could produce only 200 watt by the same turbines at the same wind speed. At a wind speed of 18 miles per hour (8 m/sec), the spiral prototype produces 6,143 watt, while the power generated by the same turbines would be 1,412 watt in the absence of a wind deflecting structure under the same wind speed. Four US patents were allowed, and are in print, as the results of this project (US 7,540,706, US 7,679,209, US 7,845,904, and US 8,002,516).

Majid Rashidi, Ph.D., P.E.

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ASHRAE Installs New Officers, Directors DENVER ASHRAE has installed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE Installs New Officers, Directors DENVER ­ ASHRAE has installed new officers and directors for 2013-14 at its Annual Meeting held here June 22-26. The ASHRAE Presidential Address is viewable on You is William P. "Bill" Bahnfleth, Ph.D., P.E., Fellow ASHRAE, ASME Fellow, a professor of Architectural

Maroncelli, Mark

342

20% Wind Energy - Diversifying Our Energy Portfolio and Addressing Climate Change (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This brochure describes the R&D efforts needed for wind energy to meet 20% of the U.S. electrical demand by 2030. In May 2008, DOE published its report, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, which presents an in-depth analysis of the potential for wind energy in the United States and outlines a potential scenario to boost wind electric generation from its current production of 16.8 gigawatts (GW) to 304 GW by 2030. According to the report, achieving 20% wind energy by 2030 could help address climate change by reducing electric sector carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 825 million metric tons (20% of the electric utility sector CO2 emissions if no new wind is installed by 2030), and it will enhance our nation's energy security by diversifying our electricity portfolio as wind energy is an indigenous energy source with stable prices not subject to fuel volatility. According to the report, increasing our nation's wind generation could also boost local rural economies and contribute to significant growth in manufacturing and the industry supply chain. Rural economies will benefit from a substantial increase in land use payments, tax benefits and the number of well-paying jobs created by the wind energy manufacturing, construction, and maintenance industries. Although the initial capital costs of implementing the 20% wind scenario would be higher than other generation sources, according to the report, wind energy offers lower ongoing energy costs than conventional generation power plants for operations, maintenance, and fuel. The 20% scenario could require an incremental investment of as little as $43 billion (net present value) more than a base-case no new wind scenario. This would represent less than 0.06 cent (6 one-hundredths of 1 cent) per kilowatt-hour of total generation by 2030, or roughly 50 cents per month per household. The report concludes that while achieving the 20% wind scenario is technically achievable, it will require enhanced transmission infrastructure, streamlined siting and permitting regimes, improved reliability and operability of wind systems, and increased U.S. wind manufacturing capacity. To meet these challenges, the DOE Wind Energy Program will continue to work with industry partners to increase wind energy system reliability and operability and improve manufacturing processes. The program also conducts research to address transmission and grid integration issues, to better understand wind resources, to mitigate siting and environmental issues, to provide information to industry stakeholders and policy makers, and to educate the future generations.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

20% Wind Energy - Diversifying Our Energy Portfolio and Addressing Climate Change (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure describes the R&D efforts needed for wind energy to meet 20% of the U.S. electrical demand by 2030. In May 2008, DOE published its report, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, which presents an in-depth analysis of the potential for wind energy in the United States and outlines a potential scenario to boost wind electric generation from its current production of 16.8 gigawatts (GW) to 304 GW by 2030. According to the report, achieving 20% wind energy by 2030 could help address climate change by reducing electric sector carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 825 million metric tons (20% of the electric utility sector CO2 emissions if no new wind is installed by 2030), and it will enhance our nation's energy security by diversifying our electricity portfolio as wind energy is an indigenous energy source with stable prices not subject to fuel volatility. According to the report, increasing our nation's wind generation could also boost local rural economies and contribute to significant growth in manufacturing and the industry supply chain. Rural economies will benefit from a substantial increase in land use payments, tax benefits and the number of well-paying jobs created by the wind energy manufacturing, construction, and maintenance industries. Although the initial capital costs of implementing the 20% wind scenario would be higher than other generation sources, according to the report, wind energy offers lower ongoing energy costs than conventional generation power plants for operations, maintenance, and fuel. The 20% scenario could require an incremental investment of as little as $43 billion (net present value) more than a base-case no new wind scenario. This would represent less than 0.06 cent (6 one-hundredths of 1 cent) per kilowatt-hour of total generation by 2030, or roughly 50 cents per month per household. The report concludes that while achieving the 20% wind scenario is technically achievable, it will require enhanced transmission infrastructure, streamlined siting and permitting regimes, improved reliability and operability of wind systems, and increased U.S. wind manufacturing capacity. To meet these challenges, the DOE Wind Energy Program will continue to work with industry partners to increase wind energy system reliability and operability and improve manufacturing processes. The program also conducts research to address transmission and grid integration issues, to better understand wind resources, to mitigate siting and environmental issues, to provide information to industry stakeholders and policy makers, and to educate the future generations.

Not Available

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Definition: Offshore Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Offshore Wind Offshore Wind (Redirected from Offshore Wind) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Offshore Wind Wind turbine installations built near-shore or further offshore on coastlines for commercial electricity generation.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition View on Reegle Reegle Definition No reegle definition available Related Terms wind turbine, wind farm, near-shore, offshore References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Offshore_wind_power Retrie LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Offshore_Wind&oldid=586583" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

345

Requirements for Wind Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements for Wind Development Requirements for Wind Development Requirements for Wind Development < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards In 2010, Oklahoma passed HB 2973, known as The Oklahoma Wind Energy Development Act. The bill becomes effective January 1, 2011. The Act provides sets rules for owners of wind energy facilities related to decommissioning, payments, and insurance. * Within one year of abandonment of a project, equipment from wind energy facilities must be removed and the land must be returned to its condition prior to the facility construction, except for roads. * After 15 years of operation, wind energy facility owners must file an

346

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Turbine Ordinances  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Bookmark and Share Publications Success Stories Webinars Podcasts Videos Stakeholder Interviews Lessons Learned Wind Working Groups Economic Impact Studies Wind Turbine Ordinances Wind Turbine Ordinances This page lists 135 state and local wind turbine ordinances. State and local governments and policymakers can use this collection of example wind turbine ordinances when drafting a new wind energy ordinance in a town or county without existing ordinances. Due to increasing energy demands in the United States and more installed wind projects, rural communities and local governments with limited or no experience with wind energy now have the opportunity to become involved in this industry. Communities with good wind resources may be approached by

347

Energy Department Launches SunShot Prize Competition to Install...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the start of a new competition to make it faster, easier, and cheaper to install rooftop solar energy systems. The SunShot Prize makes a total of 10 million in cash...

348

EERE: Wind  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy funds R&D to develop wind energy. Learn about the DOE Wind Program, how to use wind energy and get financial incentives, and access...

349

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2012) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary since energy production depends non-linearly on wind speed (U ), and wind speed observa- tions for the assessment of future long-term wind supply A. M. R. Bakker1 , B. J. J. M. Van den Hurk1 and J. P. Coelingh2 1

Haak, Hein

350

Wind for Schools: A National Data and Curricula Development Activity for Schools (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America?s Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by: 1) Developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses. 2) Installing small wind turbines at community 'host' schools. 3) Implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school.

Baring-Gould, I.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Wind resource assessment and wind energy system cost analysis: Fort Huachuca, Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this joint DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project is to determine whether wind turbines can reduce costs by providing power to US military facilities in high wind areas. In support of this objective, one year of data on the wind resources at several Fort Huachuca sites was collected. The wind resource data were analyzed and used as input to an economic study for a wind energy installation at Fort Huachuca. The results of this wind energy feasibility study are presented in the report.

Olsen, T.L. [Tim Olsen Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); McKenna, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Task analysis for solar installers  

SciTech Connect

The process focused on the sequential identification and field validation of the tasks actually performed. This method provides an accurate picture of what happens on the roof. Forty-six solar firms were identified as the population; 29 (63%) participated in the validation project. We identified 8 duty areas and 46 tasks. The overall response rate for the occupational task list is 100% except for tasks under the duty of constructing solar collectors. Only eight of the twenty-nine respondents (28%) indicated that solar installers fabricate collectors. This shows that solar installers do not manufacture collectors and only perform tasks directly related to installation. Additional findings from our study indicate that instructional materials designed for solar installers need to be standardized and made task-specific. The tasks identified in this research should form the foundation for a competency-based curriculum for solar water heater installers.

Harrison, J.; LaHart, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Heavy Section Ductile Iron Castings for Use in Wind Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, wind power still accounts for less than 2% of total energy production in the US. One hurdle to producing larger capacity wind turbine generators lies in...

354

Modeling and analysis of wind farm impacts on power systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The wind energy industry has undergone a dramatic transformation during the last decade. The total operating wind power capacity in the world has increased greatly. (more)

Zhou, Fengquan, 1969-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to address the research question using post-project construction, county-level data, and econometric evaluation methods. Wind energy is expanding rapidly in the United States: Over the last 4 years, wind power has contributed approximately 35 percent of all new electric power capacity. Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local economic development impacts from the installation are projected, including land lease and property tax payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. Wind energy represented 2.3 percent of the U.S. electricity supply in 2010, but studies show that penetrations of at least 20 percent are feasible. Several studies have used input-output models to predict direct, indirect, and induced economic development impacts. These analyses have often been completed prior to project construction. Available studies have not yet investigated the economic development impacts of wind development at the county level using post-construction econometric evaluation methods. Analysis of county-level impacts is limited. However, previous county-level analyses have estimated operation-period employment at 0.2 to 0.6 jobs per megawatt (MW) of power installed and earnings at $9,000/MW to $50,000/MW. We find statistically significant evidence of positive impacts of wind development on county-level per capita income from the OLS and spatial lag models when they are applied to the full set of wind and non-wind counties. The total impact on annual per capita income of wind turbine development (measured in MW per capita) in the spatial lag model was $21,604 per MW. This estimate is within the range of values estimated in the literature using input-output models. OLS results for the wind-only counties and matched samples are similar in magnitude, but are not statistically significant at the 10-percent level. We find a statistically significant impact of wind development on employment in the OLS analysis for wind counties only, but not in the other models. Our estimates of employment impacts are not precise enough to assess the validity of employment impacts from input-output models applied in advance of wind energy project construction. The analysis provides empirical evidence of positive income effects at the county level from cumulative wind turbine development, consistent with the range of impacts estimated using input-output models. Employment impacts are less clear.

J., Brown; B., Hoen; E., Lantz; J., Pender; R., Wiser

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

356

WebCAT: Installation Instructions for Windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... WebCAT. Note: Windows ME does not ship with a webserver; Apache can be installed. Download and Install, Download ...

357

The Ecological Society of America wwwwww..ffrroonnttiieerrssiinneeccoollooggyy..oorrgg Wind energy has become an increasingly important  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existing wind energy facili- ties in the US include turbines with installed capacity rang- ing from 600 kW 000 MW, or the equivalent 48 000 1.5 MW wind turbines. This is enough, according REVIEWS REVIEWS to 2 MW per turbine. Wind turbines up to about 3 MW of installed capacity for onshore applications

Wilmers, Chris

358

EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to authorize the expenditure of federal funds by Cloud County Community College (CCCC) for a wind energy project. CCCC has installed three wind turbines and proposes to install a fourth turbine on their campus in Concordia, Kansas, for use in their wind energy training curriculum and to provide electricity for their campus.

359

Planning maritime logistics concepts for offshore wind farms: a newly developed decision support system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind industry is facing new, great challenges due to the planned construction of thousands of offshore wind turbines in the North and Baltic Sea. With increasing distances from the coast and rising sizes of the plants the industry has to face the ... Keywords: assembly, installation, installation vessel, logistics concepts, logistics strategies, maritime supply chain, offshore wind, production, simulation

Kerstin Lange; Andr Rinne; Hans-Dietrich Haasis

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project; Volume 1, Issue 2 -- December 2006  

SciTech Connect

The New England Wind Forum electronic newsletter summarizes the latest news in wind energy development activity, markets, education, and policy in the New England region. It also features an interview with a key figure influencing New England's wind energy development. Volume 1, Issue 2 features an interview with John MacLeod of Hull Municipal Light Plant. Hull 2, a 1.8-MW Vestas turbine installed in the Town of Hull in Massachusetts in 2006, is the largest wind turbine in New England and the first U.S. installation on a capped landfill.

Grace, R. C.; Gifford, J.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project; Volume 1, Issue 2 -- December 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The New England Wind Forum electronic newsletter summarizes the latest news in wind energy development activity, markets, education, and policy in the New England region. It also features an interview with a key figure influencing New England's wind energy development. Volume 1, Issue 2 features an interview with John MacLeod of Hull Municipal Light Plant. Hull 2, a 1.8-MW Vestas turbine installed in the Town of Hull in Massachusetts in 2006, is the largest wind turbine in New England and the first U.S. installation on a capped landfill.

Grace, R. C.; Gifford, J.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, and  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Rural Rural Communities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Agricultural & Rural Farm Bill Outreach Articles Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, & Businesses Wind Farms Resources & Tools Native Americans Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, and Businesses Wind Powering America produced Small Wind Electric Systems Consumer's Guides to help homeowners, ranchers, and small businesses decide if wind energy will work for them. A Small Wind Guidebook is available for each state and answers these questions. Is wind energy practical for me? What size wind turbine do I need? What are the basic parts of a small wind electric system? What do wind systems cost? Where can I find installation and maintenance support? How much energy will my system generate? Is there enough wind on my site?

363

New Hampshire/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Hampshire/Wind Resources < New Hampshire Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> New Hampshire Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

364

Small Wind Guidebook/Introduction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction Introduction < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across

365

North Carolina/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » North Carolina/Wind Resources < North Carolina Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> North Carolina Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

366

Category:Small Wind Guidebook Pages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidebook Pages Guidebook Pages Jump to: navigation, search This is the category containing the Small Wind Guidebook pages. Pages in category "Small Wind Guidebook Pages" The following 16 pages are in this category, out of 16 total. S Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Go Off-Grid Small Wind Guidebook/First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient Small Wind Guidebook/For More Information Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine S cont. Small Wind Guidebook/How Much Energy Will My System Generate Small Wind Guidebook/Image Library Small Wind Guidebook/Introduction Small Wind Guidebook/Is There Enough Wind on My Site Small Wind Guidebook/Is Wind Energy Practical for Me

367

Offshore Wind Energy Market Overview (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes the current international market conditions regarding offshore wind, including the breakdown of installation costs, how to reduce costs, and the physical siting considerations considered when planning offshore wind construction. The presentation offers several examples of international existing and planned offshore wind farm sites and compares existing international offshore resources with U.S. resources. The presentation covers future offshore wind trends and cites some challenges that the United States must overcome before it will be able to fully develop offshore wind sites.

Baring-Gould, I.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Main Coast Winds - Final Scientific Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Maine Coast Wind Project was developed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of small, distributed wind systems on coastal sites in Maine. The restructuring of Maine's electric grid to support net metering allowed for the installation of small wind installations across the state (up to 100kW). The study performed adds insight to the difficulties of developing cost-effective distributed systems in coastal environments. The technical hurdles encountered with the chosen wind turbine, combined with the lower than expected wind speeds, did not provide a cost-effective return to make a distributed wind program economically feasible. While the turbine was accepted within the community, the low availability has been a negative.

Jason Huckaby; Harley Lee

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

NREL: Education Programs - Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies August 26, 2013 The Wind for Schools project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Powering America initiative. Since 2005, DOE provided funding for Wind Applications Centers in 11 Wind for Schools states, introducing teachers, students, and communities to wind energy applications and benefits. This Wind for Schools funding supported the project; it was not used to purchase turbines and equipment. Individual school champions emerged to find local funding mechanisms to purchase and install their turbines. On October 1, 2013, DOE will no longer fund the project; therefore, we feel that it is important to document the funding sources utilized by these states to purchase and install Wind for Schools project turbines. (1) By

370

New England Wind Forum: Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England Figure 1: Installed Wind Project Costs by Region: 2003 through 2006 Projects Only New England's high land values, smaller land parcels, varied terrain, and more moderate wind speeds make for projects of smaller scale and higher unit cost than those likely to be built in Texas or the Great Plains states. Click on the graph to view a larger version. New England's high land values, smaller land parcels, varied terrain, and more moderate wind speeds make for projects of smaller scale and higher unit cost than those likely to be built in Texas or the Great Plains states. View a larger version of the graph. Figure 2: 2006 Project Capacity Factors by Region: 2002 through 2005 Projects Only The chart depicts project capacity factor by region. Click on the graph to view a larger version.

371

Repowering Wind Projects in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbines installed throughout the United States in the 1980s and early 1990s are reaching the end of their useful lives. Owners and developers are faced with the decision to repower, refurbish, or decommission these older wind projects. This report presents an overview of wind repowering experience in Europe and the United States, including the identification of repowered projects, a summary of legislation affecting repowering in Europe, and an analysis of drivers and barriers for repowering ...

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

372

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

County Wind Ordinance Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

County Wind Ordinance Standards County Wind Ordinance Standards County Wind Ordinance Standards < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Local Government Residential Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider California Energy Commission [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/09-10/bill/asm/ab_0001-0050/ab_45_bill_200... Assembly Bill 45] of 2009 authorized counties to adopt ordinances to provide for the installation of small wind systems (50 kW or smaller) outside urbanized areas but within the county's jurisdiction. The bill also addressed specific aspects of a typical wind ordinance and established the limiting factors by which a county's wind ordinance can be no more restrictive. Counties may freely make more lenient ordinances, but AB 45

374

Establishing a Comprehensive Wind Energy Program  

SciTech Connect

This project was directed at establishing a comprehensive wind energy program in Indiana, including both educational and research components. A graduate/undergraduate course ME-514 - Fundamentals of Wind Energy has been established and offered and an interactive prediction of VAWT performance developed. Vertical axis wind turbines for education and research have been acquired, instrumented and installed on the roof top of a building on the Calumet campus and at West Lafayette (Kepner Lab). Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations have been performed to simulate these urban wind environments. Also, modal dynamic testing of the West Lafayette VAWT has been performed and a novel horizontal axis design initiated. The 50-meter meteorological tower data obtained at the Purdue Beck Agricultural Research Center have been analyzed and the Purdue Reconfigurable Micro Wind Farm established and simulations directed at the investigation of wind farm configurations initiated. The virtual wind turbine and wind turbine farm simulation in the Visualization Lab has been initiated.

Fleeter, Sanford [Purdue University

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Solar/Wind Contractor Licensing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar/Wind Contractor Licensing Solar/Wind Contractor Licensing < Solar Jump to: navigation, search Some states have established a licensing process for solar-energy contractors and/or wind-energy contractors. These requirements are designed to ensure that contractors have the necessary knowledge and experience to install systems properly. Solar licenses typically take the form of either a separate, specialized solar contractor's license, or a specialty classification under a general electrical or plumbing license. [1] Solar/Wind Contractor Licensing Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 24) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Energy System Contracting (Virginia) Solar/Wind Contractor Licensing Virginia Installer/Contractor Photovoltaics No

376

Net Zero Energy Installations (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

A net zero energy installation (NZEI) is one that produces as much energy from on-site renewable sources as it consumes. NZEI assessment provides a systematic approach to energy projects.

Booth, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Solar Installation Labor Market Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential economic benefits of the growing renewable energy sector have led to increased federal, state, and local investments in solar industries, including federal grants for expanded workforce training for U.S. solar installers. However, there remain gaps in the data required to understand the size and composition of the workforce needed to meet the demand for solar power. Through primary research on the U.S. solar installation employer base, this report seeks to address that gap, improving policymakers and other solar stakeholders understanding of both the evolving needs of these employers and the economic opportunity associated with solar market development. Included are labor market data covering current U.S. employment, expected industry growth, and employer skill preferences for solar installation-related occupations. This study offers an in-depth look at the solar installation sectors. A study published by the Solar Foundation in October 2011 provides a census of labor data across the entire solar value chain.

Friedman, B.; Jordan, P.; Carrese, J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Development of Wind Turbines Prototyping Software Under Matlab/Simulink  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

204 1 Development of Wind Turbines Prototyping Software Under Matlab/Simulink® Through present the development of a wind turbine prototyping software under Matlab/Simulink® through and the end of 1999, around 75% of all new grid-connected wind turbines worldwide were installed in Europe [3

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

379

Planning and control of logistics for offshore wind farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Construction and utilization of offshore wind farms will increase within the next years. So far the first German offshore wind farm was constructed and put into operation by "Alpha Ventus". Experiences illustrate that bad weather conditions are the main ... Keywords: MILP, installation scheduling, maritime logistics, offshore wind farm, supply chain

Bernd Scholz-Reiter; Michael Ltjen; Jens Heger; Anne Schweizer

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Resolving Difficult Issues Of Wind Power Micrositing In Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micrositing of wind turbines in complex terrain is tricky game, and many of the current siting methods and tools, while useful and improving, remain inadequate to the task in extreme terrain. As a consequence, there are numerous wind turbine installations that are buffeted by damaging turbulence or are faced with suboptimal wind energy performance.

Terrain Session Resource; Russell G. Derickson A; Michael Mcdiarmid B; Brad C. Cochran C; Jon A. Peterka D; Russell G. Derickson A; Michael Mcdiarmid B; Brad C. Cochran C; Jon A. Peterka D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Small Wind Turbine Applications: Current Practice in Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous small wind turbines are being used by homeowners in Colorado. Some of these installations are quite recent while others date back to the federal tax-credit era of the early 1980s. Through visits with small wind turbine owners in Colorado, I have developed case studies of six small wind energy applications focusing on the wind turbine technology, wind turbine siting, the power systems and electric loads, regulatory issues, and motivations about wind energy. These case studies offer a glimpse into the current state-of-the-art of small-scale wind energy and provide some insight into issues affecting development of a wider market.

Green, J.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Wind powering America: South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet contains a description of South Dakota's wind energy resources, and the state's financial incentives that support the installation of renewable energy systems. The fact sheet includes a list of contacts for those interested in obtaining more information.

NREL

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Category:State Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:State Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Category containing State Wind Resources Pages in category "State Wind Resources" The following 100 pages are in this category, out of 100 total. A Alabama/Wind Resources Alabama/Wind Resources/Full Version Alaska/Wind Resources Alaska/Wind Resources/Full Version Arizona/Wind Resources Arizona/Wind Resources/Full Version Arkansas/Wind Resources Arkansas/Wind Resources/Full Version C California/Wind Resources California/Wind Resources/Full Version Colorado/Wind Resources Colorado/Wind Resources/Full Version

384

Category:Wind Farms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farms Jump to: navigation, search This category contains fully-operational wind farms. Pages in category "Wind Farms" The following 5 pages are in this category, out of 5 total. F...

385

Small Wind Guidebook/Image Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Image Library Image Library < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information *Capacity-10 kilowatts *Turbine manufacturer-Bergey Windpower Company

386

Small Wind Guidebook/For More Information | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Small Wind Guidebook/For More Information < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site?

387

An investigation of wind loads on solar collectors. Appendix II - net pressure coefficients. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A wind-tunnel study of a series of model solar-collector installations (flat-plate collectors) immersed in a thick turbulent shear layer was undertaken in order to determine design wind loads on such installations. Wind tunnel measurements were made of the mean and fluctuating pressures on a model of a single flat-plate collector which was a component of different multi-panel installations. The pressures were spatially integrated over the top and bottom of the single collector separately.

Tieleman, H.W.; Akins, R.E.; Sparks, P.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Lessons Learned at the Iowa and Nebraska Public Power Wind Projects: U.S. Department of Energy - EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Prog ram, American Public Power Association DEED Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes lessons learned during project development and initial operation of three wind projects owned by public utilities in Iowa and Nebraska. Two are distributed wind generation projects installed in the fall of 1998 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy - EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP) in Algona, Iowa, and Springview, Nebraska. The third is Waverly Light and Power's (WLP) Wind Energy Deployment Project installed in early 1999 as part of the 259-turbine Storm Lake Wind Po...

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs February 22, 2010 - 12:10pm Addthis Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Joshua DeLung A quick Web search reveals that many sources consider Portland, Ore., to be one of the most green-minded cities in the United States. But large upfront costs have been a barrier for citizens looking to install solar power systems in the past. Now, a neighborhood solar initiative is helping communities organize to get solar discounts, meaning the city could become

390

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs February 22, 2010 - 12:10pm Addthis Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Joshua DeLung A quick Web search reveals that many sources consider Portland, Ore., to be one of the most green-minded cities in the United States. But large upfront costs have been a barrier for citizens looking to install solar power systems in the past. Now, a neighborhood solar initiative is helping communities organize to get solar discounts, meaning the city could become

391

Wind Powering America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the June 1999 Windpower Conference, the Secretary of Energy launched the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Wind Powering America (WPA) initiative. The goals of the initiative are to meet 5% of the nation's energy needs with wind energy by 2020 (i.e., 80,000 megawatts installed), to double the number of states that have more than 20 megawatts (MW) of wind capacity to 16 by 2005 and triple it to 24 by 2010, and to increase wind's contribution to Federal electricity use to 5% by 2010. To achieve the Federal government's goal, DOE would take the leadership position and work with its Federal partners. Subsequently, the Secretary accelerated the DOE 5% commitment to 2005. Achieving the 80,000 MW goal would result in approximately $60 billion investment and $1.5 billion of economic development in our rural areas (where the wind resources are the greatest). The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on DOE's strategy for achieving its goals and the activities it has undertaken since the initiative was announced.

Flowers, L. (NREL); Dougherty, P. J. (DOE)

2001-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Solar Installation Labor Market Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Installation Labor Installation Labor Market Analysis Barry Friedman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Philip Jordan Green LMI Consulting John Carrese San Francisco Bay Area Center of Excellence Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49339 December 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Solar Installation Labor Market Analysis Barry Friedman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Philip Jordan Green LMI Consulting John Carrese San Francisco Bay Area Center of Excellence

393

Overcoming Technical and Market Barriers for Distributed Wind Applications: Reaching the Mainstream; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes how the distributed wind industry must overcome hurdles including system costs and interconnection and installation restrictions to reach its mainstream market potential.

Rhoads-Weaver, H.; Forsyth, T.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Funding School Wind Projects  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Funding School Wind Projects Funding School Wind Projects Securing funding for school wind installations can be challenging in today's economy. Although the DOE's Wind for Schools project ended on September 30, 2013, the following examples of methods used to fund Wind for Schools projects may be applicable for funding other wind turbine installations at schools. Photo of children in front of a school. PIX17945 Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning presented a $16,000 check for the Wind for Schools project at the Pleasanton High School on September 15, 2010. Pleasanton is one of several Nebraska schools receiving money from a SEP environmental grant fund funded by fines from polluters. Federal Funds In addition to funding provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, many Wind for Schools projects have received federal grants. The United States

395

Cray to Install Cascade System at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cray to Install Cascade System at NERSC Cray to Install Cascade System at NERSC June 27, 2012 by Richard Gerber (0 Comments) Cray will install a next-generation supercomputer...

396

Scatter and Doppler Effect of Wind Power Plants to Land Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind power plant installations at different scales are in an increasing pattern starting from year 2000. A curiosity has been raised about 4-5 years ago for if wind turbines interfere with radars. The interference occurs when wind turbines reflect radar ... Keywords: clutter, Doppler, radar, scatter, turbine, wind

Derya Sozen; Mesut Kartal

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sources. Wind energy is anticipated to be a major contributor to this target with an installed capacity (see [1]). Such large-scale integration of wind energy raises several challenges in operating #12;References [1] A report by the European Wind Energy Association EWEA. Pure power wind energy

398

Utilization of Wind Energy in the Galapagos Kurt Kornbluth, Ryohei Hinokuma, and Zach MacCaffrey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Wind Energy in the Galapagos Kurt Kornbluth, Ryohei Hinokuma, and Zach Mac to utilize the excess wind energy ·Cover at least 50 % (currently 41%) of load with newly installed wind turbines Problems · Mismatch between demand and wind generation · No Storage - All of the excess energy

California at Davis, University of

399

New England Wind Forum: Historic Wind Development in New England: Wrap Up  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wrap Up Wrap Up Remote Power in Isolated Electric Systems Additional installations of earlier-generation wind turbines occurred at Cuttyhunk Island, MA (a 200-kW WTG turbine operated as part of a wind-diesel installation), and Block Island, RI, which hosted one of the first four 200-kW MOD-OA units developed under the Department of Energy's large wind research program. Small Wind Turbine Manufacturing Vermont was a hotbed for early small-machine manufacturers. North Wind (now Northern Power Systems) and Enertech won two of the first contracts awarded by the Department of Energy wind research program for small-machine design. NPS still survives as a successful business today, while Enertech was succeeded by Atlantic Orient, which in turn has taken on new life in Canada as Entegrity. (Other companies, such as Astral Wilcon and Pinson Energy in Massachusetts, are no longer in business.)

400

PJM Interconnection Interview on Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Vol. 9, No. 5 - December 5, 2007 Vol. 9, No. 5 - December 5, 2007 PJM on wind Wind power is growing rapidly in the United States and in Pennsylvania where 8 wind farms that total 259 megawatts now operate. Those wind farms already generate enough power for about 80,000 homes. Another 4,714 megawatts are in various stages of development within Pennsylvania, which would create enough power for an additional 1.4 mil- lion homes. Just in the Keystone state, wind power is creating thousands of jobs. Across the nation, wind power provides hundreds of millions of dollars of tax payments and rental fees to land- owners, and displaces more and more electricity that would otherwise be made by burning coal, oil, or natural gas. Wind farms create zero air pollution; require no destructive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA: Wind  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technical information and data on the wind energy industry from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

402

United States Wind Resource Potential Chart  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

18,000 18,000 Rated Capacity Above Indicated CF (GW) United States - Wind Resource Potential Cumulative Rated Capacity vs. Gross Capacity Factor (CF) 80 m The estimates show the potential gigawatts of rated capacity that could be installed on land above a given gross capacity factor (without losses) at 80-m and 100-m heights above ground. Areas greater than 30% at 80 m are generally considered to have suitable wind resource for potential wind development with today's advanced wind turbine technology. AWS Truewind, LLC developed the wind resource data for windNavigator® (http://navigator.awstruewind.com) with a spatial resolution of 200 m. NREL filtered the wind potential estimates to

403

Microsoft Word - 080530Wind.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jennifer Scoggins, (202) 586-4940 Thursday, May 29, 2008 U.S. Continues to Lead the World in Wind Power Growth DOE Report Shows Rapidly Growing U.S. Wind Power Market WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released the 2007 edition of its Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends, which provides a comprehensive overview of developments in the rapidly evolving U.S. wind power market. Notably, the report finds that U.S. wind power capacity increased by 46 percent in 2007, with $9 billion invested in U.S. wind plants in 2007 alone, making the U.S. the fastest-growing wind power market in the world for the third straight

404

American Wind Manufacturing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Wind Manufacturing American Wind Manufacturing American Wind Manufacturing Addthis 1 of 9 Nordex USA -- a global manufacturer of wind turbines -- delivered and installed turbine components for the Power County Wind Farm, shown here, in Idaho. Image: Nordex USA, Inc. Date taken: 2012-03-05 14:38 2 of 9 Power County Wind Farm - Power County, Idaho. Image: Nordex USA, Inc. Date taken: 2012-03-07 16:16 3 of 9 Power County Wind Farm - Power County, Idaho. Image: Nordex USA, Inc. Date taken: 2012-03-05 17:14 4 of 9 Nordex USA manufacturing facility - Jonesboro, Arkansas. Image: Nordex USA, Inc. Date taken: 2011-05-02 13:55 5 of 9 Nordex USA flagship manufacturing facility in Jonesboro, Arkansas. Image: Nordex USA, Inc. Date taken: 2011-05-02 14:11 6 of 9 Nordex USA flagship manufacturing facility in Jonesboro, Arkansas.

405

Solar and Wind Rights | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Wind Rights and Wind Rights Solar and Wind Rights < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Solar/Wind Access Policy Provider Public Service Commission of Wisconsin Wisconsin has several laws that protect a resident's right to install and operate a solar or wind energy system. These laws cover zoning restrictions by local governments, private land use restrictions, and system owner rights to unobstructed access to resources. Wisconsin permitting rules and model policy for small wind can be found [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=WI16R&re=1&ee=1

406

Wind Energy Act (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Act (Maine) Wind Energy Act (Maine) Wind Energy Act (Maine) < Back Eligibility Developer Utility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Solar/Wind Access Policy Siting and Permitting The Maine Wind Energy Act is a summary of legislative findings that indicate the state's strong interest in promoting the development of wind energy and establish the state's desire to ease the regulatory process for

407

Role of wind power in electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

Current estimates suggest that the cost of wind-generated power is likely to be competitive with conventionally generated power in the near future in regions of the United States with favorable winds and high costs for conventionally generated electricity. These preliminary estimates indicate costs of $500 to 700 per installed kW for mass-produced wind turbines. This assessment regarding competitiveness includes effects of reduced reliability of wind power compared to conventional sources. Utilities employing wind power are likely to purchase more peaking capacity and less baseload capacity than they would have otherwise to provide the lowest-cost reserve power. This reserve power is needed mainly when wind outages coincide with peak loads. The monetary savings associated with this shift contribute substantially to the value of wind energy to a utility.

Davitian, H

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Renewable Energy Assessment Methodology for Japanese OCONUS Army Installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 2005, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been asked by Installation Management Command (IMCOM) to conduct strategic assessments at selected US Army installations of the potential use of renewable energy resources, including solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste, and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). IMCOM has the same economic, security, and legal drivers to develop alternative, renewable energy resources overseas as it has for installations located in the US. The approach for continental US (CONUS) studies has been to use known, US-based renewable resource characterizations and information sources coupled with local, site-specific sources and interviews. However, the extent to which this sort of data might be available for outside the continental US (OCONUS) sites was unknown. An assessment at Camp Zama, Japan was completed as a trial to test the applicability of the CONUS methodology at OCONUS installations. It was found that, with some help from Camp Zama personnel in translating and locating a few Japanese sources, there was relatively little difficulty in finding sources that should provide a solid basis for conducting an assessment of comparable depth to those conducted for US installations. Project implementation will likely be more of a challenge, but the feasibility analysis will be able to use the same basic steps, with some adjusted inputs, as PNNLs established renewable resource assessment methodology.

Solana, Amy E.; Horner, Jacob A.; Russo, Bryan J.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kora, Angela R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Hand, James R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand ResponseConference on Building Commissioning: April 22 24, 2008al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Brand Font Installation Guide Windows XP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brand Font Installation Guide Windows XP Before starting ­ make sure to the specific font folder ­ when Windows detects installable font files, they will show

Stuart, Steven J.

411

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine foundations (Patrick and Henderson) was commissioned to design a foundation. More detailHull Wind II: A Case Study of the Development of a Second Large Wind Turbine Installation", the largest wind turbine (660 kW) yet installed in the state. That project proved to be so popular that HMLP

412

Analytical expressions for maximum wind turbine average power in a Rayleigh wind regime  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Average or expectation values for annual power of a wind turbine in a Rayleigh wind regime are calculated and plotted as a function of cut-out wind speed. This wind speed is expressed in multiples of the annual average wind speed at the turbine installation site. To provide a common basis for comparison of all real and imagined turbines, the Rayleigh-Betz wind machine is postulated. This machine is an ideal wind machine operating with the ideal Betz power coefficient of 0.593 in a Rayleigh probability wind regime. All other average annual powers are expressed in fractions of that power. Cases considered include: (1) an ideal machine with finite power and finite cutout speed, (2) real machines operating in variable speed mode at their maximum power coefficient, and (3) real machines operating at constant speed.

Carlin, P.W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT) Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: dsat.cadmusgroup.com/Default.aspx Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/distributed-wind-site-analysis-tool-d Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance The Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT) is a powerful online tool for conducting detailed site assessments for single turbine projects, from residential to community scale. The tool offers users the ability to analyse potential wind turbine installment projects based on the type of turbine being installed, the terrain of the installment site, and the

414

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Economics: Past, Present, Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends November 23, 2011 - 1:43pm Addthis Wind turbine prices in the United States have declined, on average, by nearly one-third since 2008, after doubling from 2002 through 2008. Over this entire period, the average nameplate capacity rating, hub height, and rotor swept area of turbines installed in the United States have increased significantly, while other design improvements have also boosted turbine energy production. In combination, these various trends have had a significant-and sometimes surprising-impact on the levelized cost of energy delivered by wind projects. This webinar will feature three related presentations that explore these

415

An investigation of wind loads on solar collectors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A wind-tunnel study of a series of model solar-collector installations (flat-plate collectors) immersed in a thick turbulent shear layer was undertaken in order to determine design wind loads on such installations. Wind tunnel measurements were made of the mean and fluctuating pressures on a model of a single flat-plate collector which was a component of different multi-panel installations. The pressures were spatially integrated over the top and bottom surface of the single collector separately.

Tieleman, H.W.; Akins, R.E.; Sparks, P.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding September 24, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis A wind turbine is installed at the Crow Lake Wind project, just east of Chamberlain, S.D. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative A wind turbine is installed at the Crow Lake Wind project, just east of Chamberlain, S.D. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative The Crow Lake Wind project is the largest cooperative-owned wind project in the United States. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative The Crow Lake Wind project is the largest cooperative-owned wind project in the United States. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power

417

Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding September 24, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis A wind turbine is installed at the Crow Lake Wind project, just east of Chamberlain, S.D. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative A wind turbine is installed at the Crow Lake Wind project, just east of Chamberlain, S.D. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative The Crow Lake Wind project is the largest cooperative-owned wind project in the United States. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative The Crow Lake Wind project is the largest cooperative-owned wind project in the United States. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power

418

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Economic Development  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Development Development This page provides software applications and publications to help individuals, developers, local governments, and utilities make decisions about wind power. Projecting costs and benefits of new installations, including the economic development impacts created, is a key element in looking at potential wind applications. Communities, states, regions, jobs (i.e., construction, operations and maintenance), the tax base, tax revenues, and others can be positively affected. These benefits are in addition to the impacts for the owner or developer. Wind, A Montana County's Plan to Reverse a Declining Tax Base and Expand Economic Opportunities Thumbnail of the Cascade County Wind Power brochure. Cascade County, Montana, Commissioner Peggy Beltrone, initiated an

419

Advanced Wind Turbine Technology Assessment 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind power is one of the fastest growing generation resources in the United States and elsewhere in the world. As of December 2009, installed wind capacity was over 35 GW in the United States and over 160 GW worldwide; and it is forecast to nearly triple to 100 GW in the United States and to 450 GW worldwide by 2014. The worldwide potential for new wind project development remains enormous. The industry expects wind to become a significant component of future power generation portfolios, both to reduce d...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

New England Wind Forum: Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy Wind farm proponents seek to identify locations with the greatest wind resource and the smallest population. This approach mitigates human interaction and impact whenever possible. Uninhabited areas are scarce in New England, however. Due to the region's population density, many of the region's windy locations - which include coastal areas and high elevations - are in view of nearby communities or valued for their natural beauty or recreational value. As a result, the importance of public acceptance is magnified in determining the viability of wind power installations. Further complicating public acceptance of wind power installations is the local nature of wind project impacts compared to wind power's substantial benefits. All forms of energy have impacts on their surroundings, and our society requires power plants to satisfy its demand for electricity. On a regional and broader scale, wind power's benefits are considerable, and surveys show that the majority of the population supports wind power when compared to the alternatives. In light of these benefits and the broad public support, some communities focus on the question of "compared to what?" and then embrace wind power proposals.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Wind Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

wind-blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable wind-blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry http://energy.gov/eere/articles/two-facilities-one-goal-advancing-america-s-wind-industry wind-industry" class="title-link">Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry

422

Commercial Scale Wind Incentive Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Scale Wind Incentive Program Commercial Scale Wind Incentive Program Commercial Scale Wind Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Project Development Assistance: $40,000 Program Info State Oregon Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies Provider Energy Trust of Oregon Energy Trust of Oregon's Commercial Scale Wind offering provides resources and cash incentives to help communities, businesses land owners, and government entities install wind turbine systems up to 20 megawatts (MW) in capacity. Projects may consist of a single turbine or a small group of turbines. A variety of ownership models are allowed. Incentive programs

423

Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Aeronautics All wind measurement equipment associated with the development or study of wind-powered electric generation, whether owned or leased, shall be

424

Radar-cross-section reduction of wind turbines. part 1.  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, increasing deployment of large wind-turbine farms has become an issue of growing concern for the radar community. The large radar cross section (RCS) presented by wind turbines interferes with radar operation, and the Doppler shift caused by blade rotation causes problems identifying and tracking moving targets. Each new wind-turbine farm installation must be carefully evaluated for potential disruption of radar operation for air defense, air traffic control, weather sensing, and other applications. Several approaches currently exist to minimize conflict between wind-turbine farms and radar installations, including procedural adjustments, radar upgrades, and proper choice of low-impact wind-farm sites, but each has problems with limited effectiveness or prohibitive cost. An alternative approach, heretofore not technically feasible, is to reduce the RCS of wind turbines to the extent that they can be installed near existing radar installations. This report summarizes efforts to reduce wind-turbine RCS, with a particular emphasis on the blades. The report begins with a survey of the wind-turbine RCS-reduction literature to establish a baseline for comparison. The following topics are then addressed: electromagnetic model development and validation, novel material development, integration into wind-turbine fabrication processes, integrated-absorber design, and wind-turbine RCS modeling. Related topics of interest, including alternative mitigation techniques (procedural, at-the-radar, etc.), an introduction to RCS and electromagnetic scattering, and RCS-reduction modeling techniques, can be found in a previous report.

Brock, Billy C.; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob J.; Paquette, Joshua A.; Calkins, David A.; Miller, William K.; Allen, Steven E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Patitz, Ward E.

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

425

Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields. Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a theoretical study of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays. Local pressure distributions and total aerodynamic forces on the arrays are shown. Design loads are presented to cover the conditions of array angles relative to the ground from 20/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/, variable array spacings, a ground clearance gap up to 1.2 m (4 ft) and array slant heights of 2.4 m (8 ft) and 4.8 m (16 ft). Several means of alleviating the wind loads on the arrays are detailed. The expected reduction of the steady state wind velocity with the use of fences as a load alleviation device are indicated to be in excess of a factor of three for some conditions. This yields steady state wind load reductions as much as a factor of ten compared to the load incurred if no fence is used to protect the arrays. This steady state wind load reduction is offset by the increase in turbulence due to the fence but still an overall load reduction of 2.5 can be realized. Other load alleviation devices suggested are the installation of air gaps in the arrays, blocking the flow under the arrays and rounding the edges of the array. Included is an outline of a wind tunnel test plan to supplement the theoretical study and to evaluate the load alleviation devices.

Miller, R.; Zimmerman, D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Impacts from Deployment Barriers on the United States Wind Power Industry: Overview & Preliminary Findings (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regardless of cost and performance some wind projects are unable to proceed to commissioning as a result of deployment barriers. Principal deployment barriers in the industry today include: wildlife, public acceptance, access to transmission, and radar. To date, methods for understanding these non-technical barriers have failed to accurately characterize the costs imposed by deployment barriers and the degree of impact to the industry. Analytical challenges include limited data and modeling capabilities. Changes in policy and regulation, among other factors, also add complexity to analysis of impacts from deployment barriers. This presentation details preliminary results from new NREL analysis focused on quantifying the impact of deployment barriers on the wind resource of the United States, the installed cost of wind projects, and the total electric power system cost of a 20% wind energy future. In terms of impacts to wind project costs and developable land, preliminary findings suggest that deployment barriers are secondary to market drivers such as demand. Nevertheless, impacts to wind project costs are on the order of $100/kW and a substantial share of the potentially developable windy land in the United States is indeed affected by deployment barriers.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Heimiller, D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Wind | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Wind Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more energy from the utility grid than it produces using renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, or geothermal installations (and sometimes these renewable energy resources actually feed energy back to the utility grid).

428

Generator Bushing Installation and Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a comprehensive guide to generator high-voltage bushing (HVB) installation and maintenance.

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

429

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance Eligibility...

430

Wind Farm Recommendation Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On April 21, 2011, an Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Land Use Committee meeting was convened to develop a wind farm recommendation for the Executive Council and a list of proposed actions for proceeding with the recommendation. In terms of land use, the INL Land Use Committee unanimously agrees that Site 6 is the preferred location of the alternatives presented for an INL wind farm. However, further studies and resolution to questions raised (stated in this report) by the INL Land Use Committee are needed for the preferred location. Studies include, but are not limited to, wind viability (6 months), bats (2 years), and the visual impact of the wind farm. In addition, cultural resource surveys and consultation (1 month) and the National Environmental Policy Act process (9 to 12 months) need to be completed. Furthermore, there is no documented evidence of developers expressing interest in constructing a small wind farm on INL, nor a specific list of expectations or concessions for which a developer might expect INL to cover the cost. To date, INL assumes the National Environmental Policy Act activities will be paid for by the Department of Energy and INL (the environmental assessment has only received partial funding). However, other concessions also may be expected by developers such as roads, fencing, power line installation, tie-ins to substations, annual maintenance, snow removal, access control, down-time, and remediation. These types of concessions have not been documented, as a request, from a developer and INL has not identified the short and long-term cost liabilities for such concessions should a developer expect INL to cover these costs. INL has not identified a go-no-go funding level or the priority this Wind Farm Project might have with respect to other nuclear-related projects, should the wind farm remain an unfunded mandate. The Land Use Committee recommends Legal be consulted to determine what, if any, liabilities exist with the Wind Farm Project and INLs rights and responsibilities in regards to access to the wind farm once constructed. An expression of interest is expected to go out soon to developers. However, with the potential of 2 years of study remaining for Site 6, the expectation of obtaining meaningful interest from developers should be questioned.

John Reisenauer

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Process Improvement at Army Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compliance with environmental law is becoming significantly expensive. In the past for convenience of management, compliance and pollution prevention were considered independently from production. Environmental law was introduced to optimize production methods to reduce pollution. Energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) that enhance pollution prevention have been compiled through research at many installations, including United States Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Executive Orders require the Army to reduce the use of energy and related environmental impacts by promoting renewable energy technologies. These new energy and environmental directives usually exceed the performance capabilities of DODs currently installed industrial technologies. The majority of DOD industrial activities utilize 40 year-old technologies and facilities. The objective of this project was to conduct a Level II process optimization audit on a munitions manufacturing operation at an Army base to optimize capacity, and energy and environmental performance. This paper reports the outcome and offers insights into process optimization.

Northrup, J.; Smith, E. D.; Lin, M.; Baird, J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Turbines...

433

Engineering innovation to reduce wind power COE  

SciTech Connect

There are enough wind resources in the US to provide 10 times the electric power we currently use, however wind power only accounts for 2% of our total electricity production. One of the main limitations to wind use is cost. Wind power currently costs 5-to-8 cents per kilowatt-hour, which is more than twice the cost of electricity generated by burning coal. Our Intelligent Wind Turbine LDRD Project is applying LANL's leading-edge engineering expertise in modeling and simulation, experimental validation, and advanced sensing technologies to challenges faced in the design and operation of modern wind turbines.

Ammerman, Curtt Nelson [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

434

Engineering innovation to reduce wind power COE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are enough wind resources in the US to provide 10 times the electric power we currently use, however wind power only accounts for 2% of our total electricity production. One of the main limitations to wind use is cost. Wind power currently costs 5-to-8 cents per kilowatt-hour, which is more than twice the cost of electricity generated by burning coal. Our Intelligent Wind Turbine LDRD Project is applying LANL's leading-edge engineering expertise in modeling and simulation, experimental validation, and advanced sensing technologies to challenges faced in the design and operation of modern wind turbines.

Ammerman, Curtt Nelson [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

NREL: Wind Research - Large Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Large Wind Turbine Research NREL's utility scale wind system research addresses performance and...

436

Wind Energy Ordinances (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

With increasing energy demands in the With increasing energy demands in the United States and more installed wind projects, rural communities and local governments with limited or no experi- ence with wind energy are now becom- ing involved. Communities with good wind resources are increasingly likely to be approached by entities with plans to develop wind projects. These opportunities can create new revenue in the form of construction jobs and land lease payments. They also create a new responsibility on the part of local governments to regulate wind turbine installations through ordinances. Ordinances, often found within munici- pal codes, provide various degrees of control to local governments. These laws cover issues such as zoning, traffic, con- sumer protection, and building codes.

437

New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project, Newsletter #5 -- January 2010, Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

5 - January 2010 5 - January 2010 Two 600-kW wind turbines were installed on Deer Island in August 2009 next to the wastewater treatment facility's anaerobic digesters. Due to their proximity to Logan Airport, these generators were installed on unusually short 32-meter towers. WIND AND HYDROPOWER TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM continued on page 2 > Kathryn Craddock, Sustainable Energy Advantage, LLC/PIX16710 Wind Projects Sprout Throughout New England NEWF is pleased to provide you with its fifth edition of the electronic NEWF newsletter. This newsletter provides updates on a broad range of project proposals and policy initiatives across New England during the funding hiatus...consider it a "catch-up" double issue. In past newsletters, we've relied on wind farm photo-simulations, photos of early construction

438

Wind Turbines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines.

439

New England Wind Forum: Historic Wind Development in New England: An  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Industry in Transition An Industry in Transition Most early wind farm development in the United States took place in California because the state granted a 25% income tax credit for wind energy investment, utilities signed contracts for power at attractive prices, state-funded wind measurement studies documented good wind resources, and because the state government, utilities, and local investors encouraged development. From 1980 through 1985, the principal market for wind turbines was tax-motivated individuals. Changes in federal tax law, including expiration of the energy tax credit in 1985 and passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, removed the major tax incentives for investing in wind energy. Because energy tax credits were eliminated and deductions for losses from passive investments had been reduced, the number of new wind turbines installed dropped sharply over this period. Oil prices declined during the same period, so many manufacturers and developers went out of business or were consolidated into larger operations.

440

Wind Powering America Podcasts (Postcards), Wind Powering America (WPA), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Photo from iStock/ 6495435 Photo from iStock/ 6495435 Wind Powering America Podcasts Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters produce a series of radio interviews featuring experts discussing wind energy topics. The interviews are aimed at a rural stakeholder audience and are available as podcasts. On the Wind Powering America website, you can access past interviews on topics such as: * Keys to Local Wind Energy Development Success * What to Know about Installing a Wind Energy System on Your Farm * Wind Energy Development Can Revitalize Rural America. Printed with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste. DOE/GO-102012-3585 · April 2012 windpoweringamerica.gov/podcasts_agricultural.asp

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Wind Program: Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Outreach Outreach Printable Version Bookmark and Share The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program is designed to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Highlights Resources Wind Resource Maps State Activities What activities are happening in my state? AK AL AR AZ CA CO CT DC DE FL GA HI IA ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MI MN MO MS MT NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VA VT WA WI WV WY Installed wind capacity maps. Features A image of a house with a residential-scale small wind turbine. Small Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, and Businesses Stakeholder Engagement & Outreach Projects

442

Offshore Wind Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Offshore Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search The Middelgrunden Wind Farm was established as a collaboration between Middelgrunden Wind Turbine Cooperative and Copenhagen Energy, each installing 10 2-MW Bonus wind turbines. The farm is located off the coast of Denmark, east of the northern tip of Amager. Photo from H.C. Sorensen, NREL 17856 Offshore wind energy is a clean, domestic, renewable resource that can help the United States meet its critical energy, environmental, and economic challenges. By generating electricity from offshore wind turbines, the nation can reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, diversify its energy supply, provide cost-competitive electricity to key coastal regions, and help revitalize key sectors of its economy, including manufacturing.

443

Non-Residential Solar & Wind Tax Credit (Corporate)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Arizonas tax credit for solar and wind installations in commercial and industrial applications was established in June 2006 ([http://www.azleg.gov/legtext/47leg/2r/bills/hb2429s.pdf HB 2429]). In...

444

Non-Residential Solar & Wind Tax Credit (Personal)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Arizonas tax credit for solar and wind installations in commercial and industrial applications was established in June 2006 ([http://www.azleg.gov/legtext/47leg/2r/bills/hb2429s.pdf HB 2429]). In...

445

Excise Tax Deduction for Solar- or Wind-Powered Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In Massachusetts, businesses may deduct from net income, for state excise tax purposes, expenditures paid or incurred from the installation of any "solar or wind powered climatic control unit and...

446

TurbSim: Reliability-based wind turbine simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbine farms are an effective generator of electricity in windy parts of the world, with prices progressing to levels competitive with other sources. Choosing the correct turbine for a given installation requires significant engineering and the ...

Joseph T. Foley; Timothy G. Gutowski

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Installation and Performance to Installation and Performance to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Lowering Barriers Fostering Growth Installation and Performance Photo of a group of men moving a rectangular solar panel. Energy Secretary Steven Chu watches members of the Solar Instructor

448

NY/NJ distributed wind power field verification project. Quarterly report for the period November - December 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the Significant Accomplishments for this quarter. The accomplishments are: (1) began preparations for host site installations; and (2) data acquisition system installation at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, CO.

Putnam, Robert Jr.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels June 28, 2010 - 5:14pm Addthis Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno On the street level in Reno, it may be easy to forget that every time the breeze blows off the Truckee River and past the 17-story City Hall, the town is quietly saving money. But the $11,000 the city is expected to save each year from wind power will be a friendly reminder. Installed in early June, the two 1.5-kilowatt wind

450

Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels June 28, 2010 - 5:14pm Addthis Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno On the street level in Reno, it may be easy to forget that every time the breeze blows off the Truckee River and past the 17-story City Hall, the town is quietly saving money. But the $11,000 the city is expected to save each year from wind power will be a friendly reminder. Installed in early June, the two 1.5-kilowatt wind

451

Wind Powering America: Wind Events  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

calendar.asp Lists upcoming wind calendar.asp Lists upcoming wind power-related events. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America: Wind Events http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/calendar.asp Pennsylvania Wind for Schools Educator Workshop https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=1352684 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4068 Wed, 4 Dec 2013 00:00:00 MST 2014 Joint Action Workshop http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=3996 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=3996 Mon, 21 Oct 2013 00:00:00 MST AWEA Wind Project Operations and Maintenance and Safety Seminar http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4009 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4009 Mon, 21

452

Wind Farm Growth Through the Years | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Farm Growth Through the Years Wind Farm Growth Through the Years Wind Farm Growth Through the Years August 6, 2013 - 8:32am Addthis 1975 Start Slow Stop Year Wind Farms Homes Powered Added Current Year 815 Wind Farms Online. Enough to Power 15 M Homes Data provided by the EIA. The number of homes powered is estimated through conversion factors provided by the EIA. Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Integration Specialist As we publish the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report, we are excited to break down some recent EIA data not included in the report that shows significant wind farm growth across the nation. 2012 was a big year for wind energy. In total, 143 wind farms either came on line or added capacity in 2012, bringing the total number to 815. This brought the country's total wind capacity to more than 60 GW, enough energy to power about 15

453

Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: October 31, 2002--January 31, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbinesrepresents the fourth installment in a series of volumes documenting the ongoing work of th University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Low-Speed Airfoil Tests Program. This particular volume deals with airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines, which operate at low Reynolds numbers.

Selig, M. S.; McGranahan, B. D.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures. Description/Summary: The Building and Fire Research Laboratory has an ...

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

455

Analysis and Comparison of Low Voltage Ride Through Capability of Wind Power Generators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??When the wind power accounted for a total generating capacity reaches a certain percentage, wind turbine's ability to maintain operation during a fault will affect (more)

Wu, Tung-Sheng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

457

Analysis of MIT campus wind resources for future wind turbine installation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As our nation's continuing dependence on fossil energy and the problems that result from that dependence grow more apparent, we must look to alternative sources of energy to power the country. As a global scientific and ...

Hack, Brian E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

AIR LEAKAGE OF NEWLY INSTALLED RESIDENTIAL WINDOWS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through Sash/Frame Cracks . Window Operation Types . . . . .Window Operation Types . . . . .Air Leakage of Installed Windows Scattergram of Field

Weidt, John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Wind Powering America: New England Wind Forum  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

About the New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share The New England Wind Forum was conceived in 2005 as a platform to provide a single, comprehensive and objective source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind-energy-related issues pertaining to New England. The New England Wind Forum provides information to wind energy stakeholders through Web site features, periodic newsletters, and outreach activities. The New England Wind Forum covers the most frequently discussed wind energy topics.

460

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total installed wind" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Manzanita Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit. Manzanita has explored the wind resource potential on tribal land and developed a business plan by means of this wind energy feasibility project, which enables Manzanita to make informed decisions when considering the benefits and risks of encouraging large-scale wind power development on their lands. Technical consultant to the project has been SeaWest Consulting, LLC, an established wind power consulting company. The technical scope of the project covered the full range of feasibility assessment activities from site selection through completion of a business plan for implementation. The primary objectives of this feasibility study were to: (1) document the quality and suitability of the Manzanita Reservation as a site for installation and long-term operation of a commercially viable utility-scale wind power project; and, (2) develop a comprehensive and financeable business plan.

Trisha Frank

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

462

Ris-R-1118(EN) Power Control for Wind Tur-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storage or with an AC/DC converter and battery storage. The AC/DC converter can either be an "add-on" type installations, the cost of the power control is paid back as added wind power capacity value and saved grid reinforcement costs. Different systems for controlling the power output from a wind farm connected to a weak

463

Designing plant layouts with toxic releases based on wind statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model to optimize the process plant layout problem is formulated in this paper. The model includes statistical information related to the wind in the site where the plant will be installed. This information is typically collected and stored in databases ... Keywords: Monte Carlo method, dispersion models, layout, uncertainty, wind effect

Richart Vzquez-Romn; Jin-Han Lee; Seungho Jung; M. Sam Mannan

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

AT GUANTANAMO BAY: A HYBRID WIND-DIESEL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory and are actively developing what will be the world's largest wind-diesel hybrid electric plant. The pending installation of four 950-kW wind turbines to supplement the 22.8 MW diesel electricity plant diesel fuel usage in the base, while not adversely affecting the power grid or the diesels. The reduced

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

465

Property:Incentive/WindResPercMax | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WindResPercMax WindResPercMax Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/WindResPercMax Property Type String Description The maximum % of the installed cost of a residential wind system that the rebate may offset. Use this for (1.) rebates calculated in terms of % of capital cost as well as (2.) rebates structured in terms of $/kW or $/kWh that also have a maximum % of costs that can be offset by the rebate. Ex: (1.) DE's rebate is 50% of the project cost; (2.) WI's residential wind incentive is based on annual expected performance, up to 25% of installed cost. Format: 25% [1] References ↑ DSIRE Pages using the property "Incentive/WindResPercMax" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AEP Ohio - Renewable Energy Technology Program (Ohio) + 50% +

466

Solar and Wind Contractor Licensing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar and Wind Contractor Licensing Solar and Wind Contractor Licensing Solar and Wind Contractor Licensing < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Solar/Wind Contractor Licensing Provider Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection (DCP) is authorized to issue licenses for solar-thermal work, solar-electric work and wind-electric work. "Solar thermal work" is defined as "the installation, erection, repair, replacement, alteration, or maintenance of active, passive and hybrid solar systems that directly convert ambient energy into heat or convey, store or distribute such ambient energy." Solar electricity

467

Wind power manufacturing and supply chain summit USA.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area of wind turbine component manufacturing represents a business opportunity in the wind energy industry. Modern wind turbines can provide large amounts of electricity, cleanly and reliably, at prices competitive with any other new electricity source. Over the next twenty years, the US market for wind power is expected to continue to grow, as is the domestic content of installed turbines, driving demand for American-made components. Between 2005 and 2009, components manufactured domestically grew eight-fold to reach 50 percent of the value of new wind turbines installed in the U.S. in 2009. While that growth is impressive, the industry expects domestic content to continue to grow, creating new opportunit