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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Analysis of Harmonic Distortion Levels in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study describes harmonic distortion concerns for commercial buildings and presents a method for evaluating these concerns based on typical load characteristics.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Power frequency communication on long feeders and high levels of harmonic distortion  

SciTech Connect

TWACS is a unique Power Frequency Communication (PFC) technology. The power voltage is modulated at the substation bus for outbound communication and inbound communication from a remote transponder is accomplished by drawing precisely controlled current pulses which are detectable at the distribution substation. The propagation characteristics of the TWACS signal and the frequency characteristics of the signal detector make it possible to communicate over very long distribution feeders and provide a high degree of immunity against harmonic distortions of the power system voltage and current.

Mak, S.T.; Maginnis, R.L. [Distribution Control Systems, Inc., Hazelwood, MO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Joint estimation and correction of geometric distortions for EPI functional MRI using harmonic retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses applied spatial variations in the magnetic field to encode spatial position. Therefore, nonuniformities in the main magnetic field can cause image distortions. In order to correct the ...

Nguyen, Hien M.

4

Efficient hybrid shunt active power filter for improvement of power factor and harmonic suppression using MATLAB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power quality management is the main problem that the industry is facing today. This is mainly affected by the generation of harmonics. The growing use of electronic equipment produces a large amount of harmonics in distribution systems because of non-sinusoidal ... Keywords: MATLAB 7.6, harmonic suppression, hybrid filter, power quality, shunt active power filter, total harmonic distortion

Jarupula Somlal

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Electric Power Waveform Distortion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineering issues regarding waveform distortion, harmonics, radio-frequency noise, and similar concerns have existed as long as there has been a power industry. These deal with consequences ranging from heating of transformers and machinery to telephone and radio interference. While waveform distortion has been around for a long time, the sources of harmonics and electromagnetic noise owned by the electricity customer have proliferated in recent years with the widespread usage of such things as switchin...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

6

Distributed Generation Source Stiffness and Its Impact on Voltage Distortion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generators with loads that create high harmonics can cause excessive voltage distortion. This report's objective was to evaluate under controlled laboratory conditions voltage distortion resulting from application of nonlinear load for three different types of rotary generators and one inverter-based generator. Test results also were used to verify the analytical model for predicting voltage distortion from nonlinear load application.

2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

7

PRE-SW Grid-IQ Harmonics Evaluation Module - Prototype  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application provides a user-friendly interface that would be used to perform harmonic analysis such as conducting frequency scans and harmonic distortion analysis by allowing user to select the ...

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

8

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

9

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

10

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

11

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

12

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

13

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

14

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

15

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

16

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

17

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

18

Power Quality Hotline Call-of-the-Month for August 2009: Voltage Harmonics, Part 1: Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Call of the Month discusses what harmonics are and how they're produced. Part 2 will address the equipment concerns related to the presence of high levels of harmonic distortion in a customer's service voltage.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

19

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

20

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

22

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

23

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

24

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

25

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

26

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

27

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

28

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

29

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

30

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

31

LCA Harmonization  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loading... Loading... About Box & Whisker Scatter Data References Publications Definitions definitions LCA Harmonization The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization project systematically reviewed estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from electricity generation technologies published between 1970 and 2010. LCAs consider emissions from all stages in the life cycle of an electricity generation technology, from component manufacturing, to operation of the generation facility to its decommissioning, and including acquisition, processing and transport of any required fuels. For selected technologies, a meta-analytical procedure called "harmonization" was applied to adjust estimates so that they were methodologically more consistent and therefore more comparable. This

32

Watthour meter accuracy under controlled unbalanced harmonic voltage and current conditions  

SciTech Connect

This work presents the results of phase 1 of the project on the accuracy of watthour meters when subjected to closely-duplicated real-world unbalanced harmonic voltage and current conditions. Such real-world conditions involved differences in voltage and current magnitudes as well as differences in the voltage and current total harmonic distortion levels of each phase. Tests were performed on a selected sample of nine three-phase and three single-phase watthour meters. Some results showed that under a particular set of unbalanced waveforms with harmonic conditions of I{sub THD} > 80% and V{sub THD} > 2%, the percentage errors exhibited by these meters ranged from {minus}10.09% to +0.52%.

Domijan, A. Jr.; Embriz-Santander, E.; Gilani, A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Lamer, G.; Stiles, C.; Williams, C.W. Jr. [Florida Power Corp., St. Petersburg, FL (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Harmonics from SVC transformer saturation with direct current offset  

SciTech Connect

Circulation of direct current in transformer windings can cause significant transformer saturation and harmonic generation. This problem may be experienced by static var compensators with anti-parallel thyristor arrangement. This paper presents a technique to analyze the harmonic distortions caused by transformer saturation with direct current offset. The technique is used to investigate the harmonic generation from the transformer of a static var compensator to be installed in the B.C. Hydro system.

Xu, W.; Martinich, T.G.; Sawada, J.H.; Mansour, Y. (British Columbia Hydro, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Harmonic engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high efficiency harmonic engine based on a resonantly reciprocating piston expander that extracts work from heat and pressurizes working fluid in a reciprocating piston compressor. The engine preferably includes harmonic oscillator valves capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into and out of the expander, and also preferably includes a shunt line connecting an expansion chamber of the expander to a buffer chamber of the expander for minimizing pressure variations in the fluidic circuit of the engine. The engine is especially designed to operate with very high temperature input to the expander and very low temperature input to the compressor, to produce very high thermal conversion efficiency.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

Optical distortions in electron/positron storage rings  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the optical distortions in the PEP electron/positron storage ring for various optical configurations using the computer programs DIMAT, HARMON, PATRICIA, and TURTLE. The results are shown graphically by tracing several thousand trajectories from one interaction region to the next using TURTLE and by tracing a few selected rays several hundred turns using the programs DIMAT and PATRICIA. The results show an interesting correlation between the calculated optical cleanliness of a particular lattice configuration and the observed operating characteristics of the machine.

Brown, K.L.; Donald, M.; Servranckx, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Sliding-mode amplitude control techniques for harmonic oscillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates both theoretical and implementation-level aspects of switching- feedback control strategies for the development of voltage-controlled oscillators. We use a modified sliding-mode compensation scheme based on various norms of the system state to achieve amplitude control for wide-tuning range oscillators. The proposed controller provides amplitude control at minimal cost in area and power consumption. Verification of our theory is achieved with the physical realization of an amplitude controlled negative-Gm LC oscillator. A wide-tuning range RF ring oscillator is developed and simulated, showing the effectiveness of our methods for high speed oscillators. The resulting ring oscillator produces an amplitude controlled sinusoidal signal operating at frequencies ranging from 170 MHz to 2.1 GHz. Total harmonic distortion is maintained below 0:8% for an oscillation amplitude of 2 Vpp over the entire tuning range. Phase noise is measured as -105.6 dBc/Hz at 1.135 GHz with a 1 MHz offset.

Marquart, Chad A.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Harmonic voltages and currents on two Greek islands with photovoltaic stations: Study and field measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the harmonic distortion present to the electric grid of two small Greek islands (Arki and Antikythera) where Photovoltaic Stations are installed, to study their inverters harmonic behavior and to present the measurements of the harmonic voltages and currents obtained at field tests on these two islands. It is shown that the harmonics injected by the Photovoltaic Stations to the electric grid are not very high and at most cases they can not cause significant problems to the appliances to he customers. On the other had, a theoretical analysis of the installed inverters technology is also presented, showing that the results from the measurements and those of the presented analysis are quite identical. From both measurements and theoretical analysis remarkable conclusions concerning the problem of harmonics are drawn.

Vokas, G.A.; Machias, A.V. [National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Electric Power Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Globally Optimal Estimation of Nonrigid Image Distortion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image alignment in the presence of non-rigid distortions is a challenging task. Typically, this involves estimating the parameters of a dense deformation field that warps a distorted image back to its undistorted template. Generative approaches based ... Keywords: Combine generative and discriminative approaches, Computer vision, Distortion estimation, Feature correspondence, Global optimum, Image alignment, Image registration, Iterative approach, Motion and tracking, Nonrigid deformation, Physics-based vision, Water distortion

Yuandong Tian; Srinivasa G. Narasimhan

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Harmonizing Above Code Codes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Harmonizing "Above Code" Harmonizing "Above Code" Codes Doug Lewin Executive Director, SPEER 6 Regional Energy Efficiency Organizations SPEER Members Texas grid facing an energy crisis * No new generation coming online * Old, inefficient coal-fired plants going offline * ERCOT CEO Trip Doggett said "We are very concerned about the significant drop in the reserve margin...we will be very tight on capacity next summer and have a repeat of this year's emergency procedures and conservation appeals." Higher codes needed to relieve pressure Building Codes are forcing change * 2012 IECC 30% higher than 2006 IECC * IRC, the "weaker code," will mirror IECC in 2012 * City governments advancing local codes with

40

Inlet distortion generation for a transonic compressor .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A single-stage transonic research compressor and test rig are to be used to obtain data on the effect of inlet flow distortion on compressor (and (more)

Papamarkos, Ioannis.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Harmonic generation at high intensities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic electrons subject to intense laser fields can absorb many photons, leading either to multiphoton ionization or the emission of a single, energetic photon which can be a high multiple of the laser frequency. The latter process, high-order harmonic generation, has been observed experimentally using a range of laser wavelengths and intensities over the past several years. Harmonic generation spectra have a generic form: a steep decline for the low order harmonics, followed by a plateau extending to high harmonic order, and finally an abrupt cutoff beyond which no harmonics are discernible. During the plateau the harmonic production is a very weak function of the process order. Harmonic generation is a promising source of coherent, tunable radiation in the XUV to soft X-ray range which could have a variety of scientific and possibly technological applications. Its conversion from an interesting multiphoton phenomenon to a useful laboratory radiation source requires a complete understanding of both its microscopic and macroscopic aspects. We present some recent results on the response of single atoms at intensities relevant to the short pulse experiments. The calculations employ time-dependent methods, which we briefly review in the next section. Following that we discuss the behavior of the harmonics as a function of laser intensity. Two features are notable: the slow scaling of the harmonic intensities with laser intensity, and the rapid variation in the phase of the individual harmonics with respect to harmonic order. We then give a simple empirical formula that predicts the extent of the plateau for a given ionization potential, wavelength and intensity.

Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.; Kulander, K.C.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Analysis of the electrical harmonic characteristics of a slip recovery variable speed generating system for wind turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

Variable speed electric generating technology can enhance the general use of wind energy in electric utility applications. This enhancement results from two characteristic properties of variable speed wind turbine generators: an improvement in drive train damping characteristics, which results in reduced structural loading on the entire wind turbine system, and an improvement in the overall efficiency by using a more sophisticated electrical generator. Electronic converter systems are the focus of this investigation -- in particular, the properties of a wound-rotor induction generator with the slip recovery system and direct-current link converter. Experience with solid-state converter systems in large wind turbines is extremely limited. This report presents measurements of electrical performances of the slip recovery system and is limited to the terminal characteristics of the system. Variable speed generating systems working effectively in utility applications will require a satisfactory interface between the turbine/generator pair and the utility network. The electrical testing described herein focuses largely on the interface characteristics of the generating system. A MOD-O wind turbine was connected to a very strong system; thus, the voltage distortion was low and the total harmonic distortion in the utility voltage was less than 3% (within the 5% limit required by most utilities). The largest voltage component of a frequency below 60 Hz was 40 dB down from the 60-Hz< component. 8 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs.

Herrera, J.I.; Reddoch, T.W.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

LCA Harmonization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LCA Harmonization LCA Harmonization Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: LCA Harmonization Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Phase: Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: en.openei.org/apps/LCA/ Web Application Link: en.openei.org/apps/LCA/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured References: Background and Reflections on the Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Project[1] National Renewable Energy Laboratory[2] The LCA Harmonization project systematically reviewed estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from electricity generation technologies published between 1970 and 2010. This application (app) allows for customized visualization of summary statistics and the underlying published estimates

44

Patent Harmonization: Creating Uniform Patent Laws  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Patent Harmonization: Creating Uniform Patent Laws. David V. Radack. You may have seen or heard the phrase "patent harmonization" used when discussing...

45

Analysis and Design of New Harmonic Mitigation Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerous approaches have been proposed in order to resolve the problems of current harmonics in electrical distribution systems. The rapid development of power semiconductors along with the revolutionary advances on microprocessors consolidated the motor drives industry and with it a massive proliferation of non-linear loads. It was thought that these very same technological advances would trigger an explosive development of harmonic solutions based on power electronics. Moreover, the introduction of the instantaneous active and reactive power theory or the so-called p, q theory which simplifies and gives more robustness to the control strategies of active filters reinforced this idea. Three decades have passed since the first IGBT was introduced in early 1980s, and active harmonic solutions are not the first choice to solve harmonic pollution in electrical distribution systems, mainly due to the high cost and the perception of low reliability. Given this scenario, in this work two main approaches are explored. First, the combination of an asymmetric 18-pulse rectifier with a reduced KVA active harmonic filter to improve the performance under abnormal utility conditions. Second, an interleaved active harmonic filter using multiple inverters connected in parallel at the ac and dc size, which will allow for higher power ratings and power density increase. The performance issues of the asymmetric 18-pulse rectifier under unbalanced voltage and pre-existing harmonic components are analyzed, as well as the current distortion improvement, achieved when an active power filter is introduced. On the other hand, the high frequency harmonic cancellation when interleaved inverters are used, the circulation of zero-sequence current and the impact of interleaving on dc bus capacitor are analyzed. Finally, some methods to mitigate the low frequency circulating currents based on eliminating the zero-sequence component, and the introduction of common mode inductors to reduce the high frequency circulating current are studied. Without a doubt the search for new cost-effective topologies able to reach broader power levels and voltage ranges will continue emerging giving more alternatives to users. Moreover, extensive research on wide band gap devices such as Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Gallium Nitride (GaN), with which it is possible to reach higher voltage breakdown and at least an order-of-magnitude lower switching losses, makes the future more promising for active solutions.

Aeloiza Matus, Eddy 1972-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Harmonic oscillator and nuclear pseudospin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized relativistic harmonic oscillator for spin 1/2 particles is studied. The Dirac Hamiltonian contains a scalar S and a vector V quadratic potentials in the radial coordinate

Ronai Lisboa; Manuel Malheiro; Antonio S. de Castro; Pedro Alberto; Manuel Fiolhais

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Analyzing harmonic monitoring data using data mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harmonic monitoring has become an important tool for harmonic management in distribution systems. A comprehensive harmonic monitoring program has been designed and implemented on a typical electrical MV distribution system in Australia. The monitoring ... Keywords: classification, clustering, data mining, harmonics, monitoring system, power quality, segmentation

Ali Asheibi; David Stirling; Danny Soetanto

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Harmonic analysis of electrical distribution systems  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data pertaining to research on harmonics of electric power distribution systems. Harmonic data is presented on RMS and average measurements for determination of harmonics in buildings; fluorescent ballast; variable frequency drive; georator geosine harmonic data; uninterruptible power supply; delta-wye transformer; westinghouse suresine; liebert datawave; and active injection mode filter data.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Refractive shape from light field distortion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acquiring transparent, refractive objects is challenging as these kinds of objects can only be observed by analyzing the distortion of reference background patterns. We present a new, single image approach to reconstructing ...

Wetzstein, Gordon

50

Asymmetric Gaussian harmonic steering in second harmonic generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that intracavity second harmonic generation can be a source of asymmetric Gaussian harmonic steering, which is adjustable by tuning the cavity loss rates at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies. Working in the semi-classical regime where the cavity is pumped at less than the self-pulsing intensity, we find that whether quantum steering is available via the standard measurements of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations can depend on which quadrature measurements are inferred from output spectral measurements of the fundamental and the harmonic. Altering the ratios of the cavity loss rates can be used to tune the regions where symmetric steering is or is not available, with the results becoming asymmetric over all frequencies as the cavity damping at the fundamental frequency becomes significantly greater than that at the harmonic. This asymmetry and its functional dependence on frequency is a potential new tool for experimental quantum information science, with possible utility for quantum key distribution. Although we show the effect here for Gaussian measurements of the quadratures, and cannot rule out a return of the steering symmetry for some class of non-Gaussian measurements, we note here that the system obeys Gaussian statistics in the operating regime investigated and Gaussian inference is at least as accurate as any other method for calculating the necessary correlations.

M. K. Olsen

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

51

Noncontacting Laser Scanner for Fuel Assembly Distortion Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distortion of fuel assemblies and bundles due to in-reactor exposure is a problem that has the potential to significantly affect the operations of both BWRs and PWRs. The distortion can take many shapes of axial, lateral and torsional displacements, with common distortions manifested as bows (such as C, S, and W shapes). Such distortion has implications from fuel ...

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fermion Quasi-Spherical Harmonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spherical Harmonics, $Y_\\ell^m(\\theta,\\phi)$, are derived and presented (in a Table) for half-odd-integer values of $\\ell$ and $m$. These functions are eigenfunctions of $L^2$ and $L_z$ written as differential operators in the spherical-polar angles, $\\theta$ and $\\phi$. The Fermion Spherical Harmonics are a new, scalar and angular-coordinate-dependent representation of fermion spin angular momentum. They have $4\\pi$ symmetry in the angle $\\phi$, and hence are not single-valued functions on the Euclidean unit sphere; they are double-valued functions on the sphere, or alternatively are interpreted as having a double-sphere as their domain.

G. Hunter; P. Ecimovic; I. Schlifer; I. M. Walker; D. Beamish; S. Donev; M. Kowalski; S. Arslan; S. Heck

1998-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

53

Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends. 11 figures.

Albrecht, G.F.; Comaskey, B.; Sutton, S.B.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

54

Boron abundance and solar neutrino spectrum distortion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of neutrinos from Boron decay in the flux observed on Earth is attested by the observation of their energy spectrum. Possible distortions of the spectrum investigated in current detectors are often interpreted in terms of evidence in favour or against various schemes of neutrino oscillations. We stress here that a distortion of the spectrum at high energies could also result from an increase in the ratio of neutrinos originating from ($^3$He+p) and $^8$B reactions. While a $^8$B neutrino depletion would contribute to this effect, an increase in the Hep contribution seems also needed to reproduce the preliminary data.

R. Escribano; J. -M. Frere; A. Gevaert; D. Monderen

1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

55

Prony analysis for power system transient harmonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proliferation of nonlinear loads in power systems has increased harmonic pollution and deteriorated power quality. Not required to have prior knowledge of existing harmonics, Prony analysis detects frequencies, magnitudes, phases, and especially damping ...

Li Qi; Lewei Qian; Stephen Woodruff; David Cartes

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The (n+1)-dimensional Harmonic Oscillator - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The (n+1)-dimensional harmonic oscillator equation is of the form: i $\\displaystyle \\phi_{t}^{}$ = $\\displaystyle \

57

NREL: Energy Analysis: Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life cycle assessment (LCA) harmonization helps lenders, utility executives, and lawmakers get the best, most precise information on greenhouse gas emissions from various sources of energy. LCA has been used to estimate and compare GHG emissions from utility-scale power systems for three decades, often with considerable variability in results. Harmonization provides more exact estimates of greenhouse-gas emissions for renewable and conventional electricity generation technologies, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature and reducing uncertainty. Highlights of Recent Studies Chart that compares published and harmonized lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster.

58

Cyclotron emission effect on CMB spectral distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated the role of the cyclotron emission (CE) associated to cosmic magnetic fields (MF) on the evolution of cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral distortions. We computed the photon and energy injection rates by including spontaneous and stimulated emission and absorption. These CE rates have been compared with those of bremsstrahlung (BR) and double Compton scattering (DC), for realistic CMB distorted spectra at various cosmic epochs. For reasonable MF strengths we found that the CE contribution to the evolution of the CMB spectrum is much smaller than the BR and DC contributions. The constraints on the energy exchanges at various redshifts can be then derived, under quite general assumptions, by considering only Compton scattering (CS), BR, and DC, other than the considered dissipation process. Upper limits to the CMB polarization degree induced by CE have been estimated.

Carlo Burigana; Andrea Zizzo

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Thermally induced wave-front distortions in laser windows  

SciTech Connect

A simple analytical expression is given for wave-front distortions and birefringence due to heating in laser windows. (AIP)

Greninger, C.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Harmonization of Federal and International Regulations | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and International Regulations Update of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA). Harmonization of Federal and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Improving Clinical Laboratory Testing through Harmonization ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... involvement in harmonizing this category of clinical laboratory testing procedures. ... patients at risk from non-standardized laboratory test results and ...

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting  

SciTech Connect

The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

R. Allen Miller

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

Theoretical studies of high-order harmonic generation: Effects of symmetry, degeneracy, and orientation  

SciTech Connect

Using a quantum-mechanical three-step model, we present numerical calculations of the high-order harmonic generation from four polyatomic molecules. Ethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) serves as an example where orbital symmetry directly affects the harmonic yield. We treat the case of methane (CH{sub 4}) to address the high-order harmonic generation resulting from a molecule with degenerate orbitals. To this end we illustrate how the single-orbital contributions show up in the total high-order harmonic signal. This example illustrates the importance of adding coherently the amplitude contributions from the individual degenerate orbitals. Finally, we study the high-order harmonic generation from propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) and butane (C{sub 4}H{sub 10}). These two molecules, being extended and far from spherical in structure, produce harmonics with nontrivial orientational dependencies. In particular, propane can be oriented so that very high-frequency harmonics are favored, and thus the molecule contains prospects for the generation of uv attosecond pulses.

Madsen, C. B.; Madsen, L. B. [Lundbeck Foundation Theoretical Center for Quantum System Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

65

Impact of stray capacitance on hvdc harmonics  

SciTech Connect

Recent experience suggests that a new approach is needed to determining harmonic generation from hvdc converters for the purpose of telephone interference evaluation. This paper presents simulation results showing the effect on harmonic generation of stray capacitances inherent to hvdc converters. These simulation results illustrate the basic characteristics of the phenomenon, which agree qualitatively with field experience.

Larsen, E.V.; Sublich, M.; Kapoor, S.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonization of Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on

67

Lattice Distortion Formations by Low Energy Ar+ Bombardment of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensity distribution consists of two maxima, one from the distorted layer ... Deformation Behavior of Nanocrystalline Co Measured by High-energy X-ray...

68

Chemical Consequences of Heme Distortion and the Role of Heme Distortion in Signal Transduction of H-NOX Proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Consequences of Heme Distortion and the Role ofMatthew B. Francis Spring 2010 Chemical Consequences of Hemeby Charles Olea, Jr. Abstract Chemical Consequences of Heme

Olea, Jr., Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Harmonization of Federal and International Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOT/PHMSA DOT/PHMSA Update Michael Conroy U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Radioactive Materials - 2 - HM-230 (1/26/04) Harmonized with 2000 Version of IAEA's 1996 Edition - 3 - Changes to the IAEA Regulations Since 2000 2003 Amendment 2005 Edition 2009 Edition U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Harmonization Rulemaking (HM-250) * Harmonize with 2009 Edition of TS-R-1 * Miscellaneous Other Fixes - Update, clarify, correct, or provide relief from certain regulatory requirements * DOT and NRC will both issue rulemakings - DOT NPRM Issued August 12, 2011 - NRC NPRM coming soon

70

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

71

On distorted probabilities and m-separable fuzzy measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuzzy measures are used in conjunction with fuzzy integrals for aggregation. Their role in the aggregation is to permit the user to express the importance of the information sources (either criteria or experts). Due to the fact that fuzzy measures are ... Keywords: Distorted probabilities, Fuzzy measures, m-Dimensional distorted probabilities, m-Symmetric fuzzy measures

Yasuo Narukawa; Vicen Torra

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet) Cover of the Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation factsheet Download the Fact Sheet The U.S. Department of Energy enlisted NREL to review and "harmonize" life cycle assessments (LCA) of electricity generation technologies. Hundreds of assessments have been published, often with considerable variability in results. These variations in approach, while usually legitimate, hamper comparison across studies and pooling of published results. Learn more about life cycle assessments of energy technologies. By harmonizing this data, NREL seeks to reduce the uncertainty around estimates for environmental impacts of renewables and increase the value of

73

Second Harmonic Resonance for Equatorial Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple, exact analytical conditions for second harmonic resonance between equatorial waves are derived. Such resonance can occur only between two Rossby waves or two westward travelling gravity waves. It is shown that regardless of whether the ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

Praeg, W.F.

1983-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Nonlinear harmonic modeling of phemt devices for increased power amplifier efficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a comprehensive study of how harmonic terminations can greatly increase a power amplifier's efficiency (PAE). To show this improvement, the PHEMT amplifier is biased in the low noise region of operation (L, = 20 mA, Vd, = 3 V) and operated at a frequency of 2.2 GHz. An attempt is made to generate a working model which characterizes the amplifier's performance with and without harmonic termination. Both measured and modeled data are compared in order to verify the model's performance. Once a working model is realized, the designing of an amplifier can be done by simulation without the cumbersome task of taking measurements. The measured data is obtained using an electronic load pull system which is capable of rapid data acquisition. This study shows that when harmonic termination is used, the PAE can improve in some cases by about 15 % depending upon the operating conditions of the device. This improved PA-E can result in longer operational lifetimes of devices such as cellular phones and reduce the size of these units. Longer lifetimes are extremely important especially for space applications where replacement of power supplies is very costly. Power measurements as well as relevant intermodulation distortion measurements are also done for Class A and Class B operation in order to show the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Strassner, Bernd Herbert

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Achieving the Gaussian Rate-Distortion Function by Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "water-filling" solution for the quadratic rate-distortion function of a stationary Gaussian source is given in terms of its power spectrum. This formula naturally lends itself to a frequency domain "test-channel" realization. We provide an alternative time-domain realization for the rate-distortion function, based on linear prediction. This solution has some interesting implications, including the optimality at all distortion levels of pre/post filtered vector-quantized differential pulse code modulation (DPCM), and a duality relationship with decision-feedback equalization (DFE) for inter-symbol interference (ISI) channels.

Zamir, Ram; Erez, Uri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fast distortion measurement using chord-length parameterisation within the vertex-based rate-distortion optimal shape coding framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing vertex-based operational rate-distortion (ORD) optimal shape coding algorithms use the shortest absolute distance (SAD) or alternatively either the distortion band (DB) or tolerance band (TB) as their distortion measuring technique. Each approach however can lead to inaccurate distortion measurements, though these can be avoided by employing the accurate distortion measurement technique for shape coding (ADMSC). From a computational time 2 O N time for DB and TB for both polygon and B-spline based encoding, perspective, an N point contour requires () 2 while SAD and ADMSC incur order O ( N) time for polygonal encoding, but ( N) O complexity for B-spline based encoding, thereby rendering ORD optimal algorithms computationally inefficient. This paper presents a novel distortion measurement strategy based on chord-length parameterisation (DMCLP) of a boundary that incurs order O ( N) complexity for both polygon and B-spline based encoding, while preserving an analogous rate-distortion performance to the original ORD optimal shape coding algorithms, when it is embedded within the ORD framework. I.

Ferdous A. Sohel; Gour C. Karmakar; Laurence S. Dooley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Preliminary mode distortion measurements on the Jefferson Lab IRFEL  

SciTech Connect

We previously reported analytical calculations of mirror distortion in a high power FEL with a near-concentric cavity. Naive assumptions about the FEL power vs. distortion led us to believe that mirror losses were much lower than expected. Recently we have directly measured the mode size and beam quality as a function of power using a resonator with a center wavelength of 5 microns. The resonator mirrors were calcium fluoride. This material exhibits a large amount of distortion for a given power but, due to the negative slope of refractive index v temperature, adds almost no optical phase distortion on the laser output. The mode in the cavity can thus be directly calculated from the measurements at the resonator output. The presence of angular jitter produced results inconsistent with cold cavity expectations. Removing the effects of the angular jitter produces results in reasonable agreement with analytical models assuming mirror losses comparable to the original expectations.

Stephen V. Benson; Joe Gubeli; Michelle D. Shinn

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Effect of Inlet Flow Profile Distortion on Fan Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance tests on fans for utility and industrial applications are based on codes that expect a relatively uniform velocity profile at the fan inlet. Unfortunately, when fans scaled up from the ideal model fans are installed in actual utility and industrial applications, non-uniform or distorted flow patterns often occur at the inlet of the fan. This project sought to determine and, if possible, quantify the effect on fan performance of distorted inlet flow profiles. A second goal was to determine whe...

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole, Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole, Quadrupole, and Sextupole Magnets using POISSON Ro be rt J. La ri<::::R~ i. September 10, 1985 Introduction LS-32 The computer program POISSON was used to calculate the dipole, quadru- pole, and sextupole magnets of the 6 GeV electron storage ring. A trinagular mesh must first be generated by LATTICE. The triangle size is varied over the "universe" at the discretion of the user. This note describes a series of test calculations that were made to help the user decide on the size of the mesh to reduce the harmonic field calculation errors. A conformal transfor- mation of a multipole magnet into a dipole reduces these errors. Dipole Magnet Calculations A triangular mesh used to calculate a "perfect" dipole magnet is shown in

82

High harmonic phase in molecular nitrogen  

SciTech Connect

Electronic structure in atoms and molecules modulates the amplitude and phase of high harmonic generation (HHG). We report measurements of the high harmonic spectral amplitude and phase in N{sub 2}. The phase is measured interferometrically by beating the N{sub 2} harmonics with those of an Ar reference oscillator in a gas mixture. A rapid phase shift of 0.2{pi} is observed in the vicinity of the HHG spectral minimum, where a shift of {pi} had been presumed [J. Itatani et al., Nature 432, 867 (2004)]. We compare the phase measurements to a simulation of the HHG recombination step in N{sub 2} that is based on a simple interference model. The results of the simulation suggest that modifications beyond the simple interference model are needed to explain HHG spectra in molecules.

McFarland, Brian K.

2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

83

Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a squeezed harmonic oscillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the thermodynamic properties of the squeezed vacuum state of a frequency--modulated quantum harmonic oscillator. We analytically relate the squeezing parameter to the irreversible work and the degree of nonadiabaticity of the frequency transformation. We furthermore determine the optimal modulation that leads to maximal squeezing, and discuss its implementation as well as the detection of squeezing in single cold ion traps.

Fernando Galve; Eric Lutz

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

84

A nonlinear approach to harmonic signal modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Periodic signals can be estimated recursively by exploiting the fact that a sine wave passing through a static nonlinear function generates a spectrum of overtones. A real wave with unknown period in cascade with a piecewise linear function is thefefore ... Keywords: Wiener model structure, frequency estimation, harmonic modeling, local convergence, recursive identification

Emad Abd-Elrady

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Approximate Coulomb distortion effects in (e,e'p) reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we apply a well-tested approximation of electron Coulomb distortion effects to the exclusive reaction (e,e'p) in the quasielastic region. We compare the approximate treatment of Coulomb distortion effects to the exact distorted wave Born approximation evaluated by means of partial wave analysis to gauge the quality of our approximate treatment. We show that the approximate M\\"oller potential has a plane-wave-like structure and hence permits the separation of the cross section into five terms which depend on bilinear products of transforms of the transition four current elements. These transforms reduce to Fourier transforms when Coulomb distortion is not present, but become modified with the inclusion of Coulomb distortion. We investigate the application of the approximate formalism to a model of 208Pb(e,e'p) using Dirac-Hartree single particle wave functions for the ground state and relativistic optical model wave functions for the continuum proton. We show that it is still possible to extract, albeit with some approximation, the various structure functions from the experimentally measured data even for heavy nuclei.

K. S. Kim; L. E. Wright

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Selective compensation of voltage harmonics in grid-connected microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Selective compensation of voltage harmonics in grid-connected microgrids Mehdi Savaghebia , Juan is proposed for selective compensation of main voltage harmonics in a grid- connected microgrid. The aim level. Keywords Distributed Generator (DG); microgrid; grid-connected; voltage harmonics compensation. 1

Vasquez, Juan Carlos

87

Analysis of inverter models and harmonic propagation. Part II. Harmonic propagation  

SciTech Connect

Part II of a three part study describes the harmonic propagation in the photovoltaic power system consisting of the solar cell array, the inverter, and the ac side of the inverter up to the infinite bus of the utility. Propagation of the harmonics in the utility system are not addressed. Two main problems are analyzed: power in the converter system and harmonics of the current and voltage waveforms of the single-phase, dependent inverter. Relationships between the different components of the converter power - active, reactive and disturbance - are discussed. All formulas necessary for calculating the power components are given, assuming the harmonics of the current and voltage waveforms are known. The theoretical and experimental investigation of the single-phase, dependent inverter is described. The ac and dc terminal voltage of the inverter are analyzed and their harmonics are obtained. These data determine the harmonic propagation on both the dc and ac sides and may be useful for equipment design. Part I of the study (SAND 7040/1) contains a detailed description of the microcomputer based simulator that represents the output characteristics of the five commercially available types of solar cell arrays under different environmental conditions, and Part III (SAND 7040/3) presents an analysis of the transient and steady-state processes of inverter modules.

Slonim, M.A.; Stanek, E.K.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A Hydrodynamical Approach to CMB mu-distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background provides a unique opportunity to probe primordial perturbations on very small scales by performing large-scale measurements. We discuss in a systematic and pedagogic way all the relevant physical phenomena involved in the production and evolution of the mu-type spectral distortion. Our main results agree with previous estimates (in particular we show that a recently found factor of 3/4 arises from relativistic corrections to the wave energy). We also discuss several subleading corrections such as adiabatic cooling and the effects of bulk viscosity, baryon loading and photon heat conduction. Finally we calculate the transfer function for mu-distortions between the end of the mu-era and now.

Enrico Pajer; Matias Zaldarriaga

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

89

Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Agency/Company /Organization: Local Governments for Sustainability Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Health, GHG inventory, Implementation, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.environmenttools.co.uk/directory/tool/name/harmonized-emissions-an Cost: Free Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Screenshot References: ICLEI-HEAT[1] Related Tools Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) ICCT Roadmap Model ... further results Find Another Tool

90

Regional Cooperation and Harmonization on EESL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Cooperation and Regional Cooperation and Harmonization on EESL LI Tienan Professor Director of Center for Industrial Energy Efficiency (CIEE) Chairman of ISO/TC 257 Energy Savings 国宏美亚(北京)工业节能减排技术促进中心 Center for Industrial Energy Efficiency (CIEE) 国宏美亚(北京)工业节能减排技术促进中心 Center for Industrial Energy Efficiency (CIEE) Roles of EESL Regional EESL Cooperation and Harmonization Focus and Barriers Best Practice: BRESL Project Recommendations Contents 国宏美亚(北京)工业节能减排技术促进中心 Center for Industrial Energy Efficiency (CIEE) 国宏美亚(北京)工业节能减排技术促进中心 Center for Industrial Energy Efficiency (CIEE)

91

Honeycomb optical lattices with harmonic confinement  

SciTech Connect

We consider the fate of the Dirac points in the spectrum of a honeycomb optical lattice in the presence of a harmonic confining potential. By numerically solving the tight binding model, we calculate the density of states and find that the energy dependence can be understood from analytical arguments. In addition, we show that the density of states of the harmonically trapped lattice system can be understood by application of a local density approximation based on the density of states in the homogeneous lattice. The Dirac points are found to survive locally in the trap as evidenced by the local density of states. Furthermore, they give rise to a distinct spatial profile of a noninteracting Fermi gas.

Block, J. Kusk; Nygaard, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Lundbeck Foundation Theoretical Center for Quantum System Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Truncated channel representations for coupled harmonic oscillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coupled quantum harmonic oscillators, studied by many authors using many different techniques over the decades, are frequently used toy-models to study open quantum systems. In this manuscript, we explicitly study the simplest oscillator model -- a pair of initially decoupled quantum harmonic oscillators interacting with a spring-like coupling, where the bath oscillator is initially in a thermal-like state. In particular, we treat the completely positive and trace preserving map on the system as a quantum channel, and study the truncation of the channel by truncating its Kraus set and its output dimension. We thereby derive the truncated transition amplitudes of the corresponding truncated channel. Finally, we give a computable approximation for these truncated transition amplitudes with explicit error bounds, and perform a case study of the oscillators in the off-resonant and weakly-coupled regime numerically. We demonstrate explicitly that the substantial leakage error can be mitigated via quantum error correction.

Yingkai Ouyang; Wee Hao Ng

2013-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

93

Harmon, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harmon, Illinois: Energy Resources Harmon, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.719689°, -89.556564° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.719689,"lon":-89.556564,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

94

Harmon Electric Assn Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harmon Electric Assn Inc Harmon Electric Assn Inc Place Oklahoma Utility Id 8183 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100 Watt HPS Lighting 175 Watt MVL Lighting Co-Generation Rider Commercial Commercial, Single-Phase Commercial Commercial, Three-Phase Commercial Controllable Irrigation, 101HP or more Commercial Controllable Irrigation, 10HP or Less Commercial Controllable Irrigation, 11 to 25 HP Commercial Controllable Irrigation, 26 to 75 HP Commercial Controllable Irrigation, 76 to 100 HP Commercial

95

The evolution of CMB spectral distortions in the early Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) allows constraining episodes of energy release in the early Universe. In this paper we revisit and refine the computations of the cosmological thermalization problem. For this purpose a new code, called CosmoTherm, was developed that allows solving the coupled photon-electron Boltzmann equation in the expanding, isotropic Universe for small spectral distortion in the CMB. We explicitly compute the shape of the spectral distortions caused by energy release due to (i) annihilating dark matter; (ii) decaying relict particles; (iii) dissipation of acoustic waves; and (iv) quasi-instantaneous heating. We also demonstrate that (v) the continuous interaction of CMB photons with adiabatically cooling non-relativistic electrons and baryons causes a negative mu-type CMB spectral distortion of DI_nu/I_nu ~ 10^{-8} in the GHz spectral band. We solve the thermalization problem including improved approximations for the double Compton and Bremsstrahlung emissivities, as well as the latest treatment of the cosmological recombination process. At redshifts z injection because of (ii) and (iv) Pixie should allow to improve existing limits, while the CMB distortions caused by the other processes seem to remain unobservable with the currently proposed sensitivities and spectral bands of Pixie.

J. Chluba; R. A. Sunyaev

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

96

Distortion-aware scalable video streaming to multinetwork clients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of scalable video streaming from a server to multinetwork clients over heterogeneous access networks, with the goal of minimizing the distortion of the received videos. This problem has numerous applications including: 1) mobile ... Keywords: quality optimization, rate control, stream adaptation, video streaming

Nikolaos M. Freris, Cheng-Hsin Hsu, Jatinder Pal Singh, Xiaoqing Zhu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Separation of High Order Harmonics with Fluoride Windows  

SciTech Connect

The lower orders produced in high order harmonic generation can be effciently temporally separated into monochromatic pulses by propagation in a Fluoride window while still preserving their femtosecond pulse duration. We present calculations for MgF2, CaF2, and LiF windows for the third, fifth, and seventh harmonics of 800 nm. We demonstrate the use of this simple and inexpensive technique in a femtosecond pump/probe experiment using the fifth harmonic.

Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Wright, Travis; Hertlein, Marcus; Falcone, Roger; Belkacem, Ali

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

Heat transport in active harmonic chains  

SciTech Connect

We show that a harmonic lattice model with amplifying and attenuating elements, when coupled to two thermal baths, exhibits unique heat transport properties. Some of these novel features include anomalous nonequilibrium steady-state heat currents, negative differential thermal conductance, as well as nonreciprocal heat transport. We find that when these elements are arranged in a PT-symmetric manner, the domain of existence of the nonequilibrium steady state is maximized. We propose an electronic experimental setup based on resistive-inductive-capacitive (RLC) transmission lines, where our predictions can be tested.

Zheng, Mei C.; Ellis, Fred M.; Kottos, Tsampikos; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Geisel, Theo; Prosen, Tomaz [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States); Max-Planck-Institute for Dynamics and Self-organization, Am Fassberg 17, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany) and Institute for Nonlinear Dynamics, Department of Physics, University of Goettingen, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency The United States of America, European Union and Japan Reach Agreement on Guiding Principles for Data Center Energy...

100

CERTS 2012 Program Review - IEEE-IEC Harmonization - Ken Martin...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Harmonization Kenneth Martin martin@electricpowergroup.com June 12-13, 2012 Washington, DC OE Transmission Reliability Peer Review 1 Introduction Synchrophasor measurement...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency, February 2, 2010 Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers...

102

Generation of even harmonics in coupled quantum dots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the spatial-temporal symmetry principle we developed recently, we propose an effective scheme for even-harmonics generation in coupled quantum dots. The relative intensity of odd and even harmonic components in the emission spectrum can be controlled by tuning the dipole couplings among the dots, which can be realized in experiments by careful design of the nanostructures. In particular, pure 2nth harmonics and (2n+1)th harmonics (where n is an integer) can be generated simultaneously with polarizations in two mutual perpendicular directions in our systems. An experimental design of the coupled dots system is presented.

Guo Shifang; Duan Suqing; Yang Ning; Chu Weidong; Zhang Wei [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Effects of Power System Harmonics on Distribution Transformer Insulation Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Floating feeder resonances are one of the new challenges being put forward by the renewable energy based distributed generation (DG) installations. Generally, the harmonic injection (more)

Hamid, Muhammad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Spectral Phase Distribution Retrieval through Coherent Control of Harmonic Generation  

SciTech Connect

The temporal intensity distribution of the third harmonic of a Ti:sapphire laser generated in Xe gas is fully reconstructed from its spectral phase and amplitude distributions. The spectral phases are retrieved by cross correlating the fundamental laser frequency field with that of the third harmonic, in a three laser versus one harmonic photon coupling scheme. The third harmonic spectral amplitude distribution is extracted from its field autocorrelation. The measured pulse duration is found to be in agreement with that expected from lowest order perturbation theory both for unstretched and chirped pulses.

Papalazarou, E.; Charalambidis, D. [Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, PO Box 1527, GR711 10 Heraklion (Crete) (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR71003 Heraklion (Crete) (Greece); Kovacev, M.; Tzallas, P.; Benis, E.P.; Kalpouzos, C. [Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, PO Box 1527, GR711 10 Heraklion (Crete) (Greece); Tsakiris, G. D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

Energy Savings and Efficiency Improvements through Harmonic Mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

harmful harmonics from electrical distribution systems supporting high quantities of computers and other related office equipment. The proliferation of computer and other office...

106

Solving two-mode squeezed harmonic oscillator and $k$th-order harmonic generation in Bargmann-Hilbert spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the two-mode squeezed harmonic oscillator and the $k$th-order harmonic generation within the framework of Bargmann-Hilbert spaces of entire functions. For the displaced, single-mode squeezed and two-mode squeezed harmonic oscillators, we derive the exact, closed-form expressions for their energies and wave functions. For the $k$th-order harmonic generation with $k\\geq 3$, our result indicates that it does not have eigenfunctions and is thus ill-defined in the Bargmann-Hilbert space.

Yao-Zhong Zhang

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Distortion analysis of analog multiplier circuits using two-dimensional integral nonlinear function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents an adaptation to the definition of the Integral Nonlinear Function (INLF) for distortion analysis of analog multipliers. Up to this time distortion in two-input multipliers has been evaluated by applying a constant signal to one of ... Keywords: CMOS multipliers, analog multipliers, distortion

Luciano A. de Lacerda; Edson P. Santana; Cleber Vincius A. de Almeida; Ana Isabela A. Cunha

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Wind Farm Structures' Impact on Harmonic Emission and Grid Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Wind Farm Structures' Impact on Harmonic Emission and Grid Interaction Lukasz Hubert Kocewiak, Jesper Hjerrild, Claus Leth Bak ABSTRACT HE impact of a wind farm's internal structures on harmonic in this paper. The largest wind farms in the world, Horns Rev 2 Offshore Wind Farm and Polish Karnice Onshore

Bak, Claus Leth

109

Motor voltage high harmonics influence to efficient energy usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the effect of non-sinusoidal voltages on the three-phase induction motor is presented in the paper. When the induction motors are supplied by a rectangular shape of the voltage inverter with high levels of harmonic voltage (Uh,i ... Keywords: energy efficiency, harmonics, induction motor, non-sinusoidal voltage, power losses

Miloje M. Kostic; Branka B. Kostic

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Higher order harmonic detection for exploring nonlinear interactions  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear dynamics underpin a vast array of physical phenomena ranging from interfacial motion to jamming transitions. In many cases, decoupling the contributions of competing or co-existing mechanisms to the system response can be achieved through investigation of higher order harmonics. Here, a method using band excitation scanning probe microscopy to investigate higher order harmonics of the electromechanical response, with nanometer scale spatial resolution is presented. The utility of the technique is demonstrated by probing the first three harmonics of strain for a well-known system, a model Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 ferroelectric capacitor. It is shown that the second order harmonic response is correlated with the first harmonic response, whereas the third harmonic is not. Additionally, nanoscale measurements of the second harmonic response with field reveal significant deviations from Rayleigh-type models in the form of a much more complicated field dependence than is observed in the spatially averaged data. These results illustrate the versatility of combining proximal probe techniques with nth harmonic detection methods in exploring and decoupling nonlinear dynamics in a wide variety of nanoscale materials.

Vasudevan, Rama K [ORNL; Okatan, M. B. [University of New South Wales; Rajapaksa, Indrajit [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kim, Yunseok [ORNL; Marincel, Dan [Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan [Pennsylvania State University; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Nagarajan, Valanoor [University of New South Wales; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cerenkov third-harmonic generation in ,,2... nonlinear photonic crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cerenkov third-harmonic generation in ,,2... nonlinear photonic crystal Yan Sheng,1,a Wenjie Wang,1 of Cerenkov emission of a third-harmonic frequency in a two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal, where coherent light called Cerenkov radiation.1 In this process, the mol- ecules of the medium are polarized

Arie, Ady

112

ENERGY DIFFUSION IN HARMONIC SYSTEM WITH CONSERVATIVE NOISE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY DIFFUSION IN HARMONIC SYSTEM WITH CONSERVATIVE NOISE GIADA BASILE AND STEFANO OLLA Abstract. We prove diffusive behaviour of the energy fluctua- tions in a system of harmonic oscillators with a stochastic pertur- bation of the dynamics that conserves energy and momentum. The results concern pinned

113

Spectrum of second-harmonic radiation generated from incoherent light  

SciTech Connect

We report on the development of the theory of second-harmonic generation by an incoherent pump with broad angular and frequency spectra. We show that spatial as well as temporal walk-off effects in a nonlinear crystal result in angular dispersion of the second-harmonic radiation. We demonstrate that the acceptance angle in second-harmonic generation by incoherent light is caused by the width of the pump angular spectrum and the resulting angular dispersion of second-harmonic radiation but does not depend on crystal length. In this case the frequency spectrum of second-harmonic radiation is determined by its angular dispersion and the pump angular spectrum. The theory is supported by an experiment in which a LiIO{sub 3} crystal was pumped by a tungsten halogen lamp.

Stabinis, A.; Pyragaite, V.; Tamosauskas, G.; Piskarskas, A. [Department of Quantum Electronics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Avenue 9, Building 3, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Stability of Jahn-Teller distortion in LaMnO{sub 3} under pressure: An x-ray absorption study  

SciTech Connect

The local environment of manganese atoms in LaMnO{sub 3} under pressure up to 15.3 GPa has been studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. For pressures below 8 GPa, no change is detected within the MnO{sub 6} octahedra. Above this pressure a continuous reduction of the long Mn-O distance takes place, however, the octahedral distortion persists over the whole pressure range. At 15.3 GPa the average Jahn-Teller splitting of the distances is reduced by about one-third, indicating that a total removal of the local Jahn-Teller distortion would occur only for pressures around 30 GPa, where metallization is reported to take place. A hysteresis in the long distance reduction is observed down to ambient pressure, suggesting the coexistence of MnO{sub 6} distorted and undistorted units.

Ramos, Aline Y.; Tolentino, Helio C. N.; Souza-Neto, Narcizo M.; Itie, Jean-Paul; Morales, Liliana; Caneiro, Alberto [Institut Neel, UPR 2940-CNRS, 25 av. des Martyrs, Boite Postale 166, 38042 Grenoble, France and Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-LNLS, P.O. Box 6192, 13084-971, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-LNLS, P.O. Box 6192, 13084-971, Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil and Departamento de Fisica dos Materiais e Mecanica, DFMT-IF-USP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, Boite Postale 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica and Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina)

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 Page 1 Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency Global Taskforce Reaches Agreement on Measurement Protocols for PUE - Continues Discussion of Additional Energy Efficiency Metrics February 28th, 2011 The data center has become an increasingly important part of most business operations in the twenty-first century. With escalating demand and rising energy prices, it is essential for the owners and operators of these mission critical facilities to assess and improve their performance with energy efficiency metrics. However, even with the global presence of many companies, these metrics are often not applied consistently at a global level. To address these inconsistencies, a group of global leaders has been meeting regularly to agree

116

Electricity Regulation in California and Input Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide an analysis of the soft price cap regulation that occurred in Californias electricity market between December 2000 and June 2001. We demonstrate the incentive it created to distort the prices of electricity inputs. After introducing a theoretical model of the incentive, we present empirical data from two important input markets: pollution emissions permits and natural gas. We find substantial evidence that generators manipulated these costs in a way that allowed them to justify bids in excess of the price cap and earn higher rents than they could otherwise. Our analysis suggests that the potential benefits of soft price cap regulation were likely undone by such behavior. 1

Mark R. Jacobsen; Azeem M. Shaikh

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Relativistic high harmonic generation in gas jet targets  

SciTech Connect

We experimentally demonstrate a new regime of high-order harmonic generation by relativistic-irradiance lasers in gas jet targets. Bright harmonics with both odd and even orders, generated by linearly as well as circularly polarized pulses, are emitted in the forward direction, while the base harmonic frequency is downshifted. A 9 TW laser generates harmonics up to 360 eV, within the 'water window' spectral region. With a 120 TW laser producing 40 uJ/sr per harmonic at 120 eV, we demonstrate the photon number scalability. The observed harmonics cannot be explained by previously suggested scenarios. A novel high-order harmonics generation mechanism [T. Zh. Esirkepov et al., AIP Proceedings, this volume], which explains our experimental findings, is based on the phenomena inherent in the relativistic laser - underdense plasma interactions (self-focusing, cavity evacuation, and bow wave generation), mathematical catastrophe theory which explains formation of electron density singularities (cusps), and collective radiation due to nonlinear oscillations of a compact charge.

Pirozhkov, A.S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T.Zh.; and others

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

Harmonic measurements from a group connected generator HVdc converter scheme  

SciTech Connect

A recent CIGRE document published in ELECTRA has described the potential benefits of a direct connection of generators to HVdc converters. While many theoretical contributions have been made, no practical test data has become available so far. This paper reports on harmonic tests carried out at the Benmore end of the New Zealand HVdc link operating as a group connected scheme. It was found that the measured harmonic current levels were well below specified generator ratings. Dynamic simulation accurately predicted the harmonic currents whereas the results of a steady state formulation were less reliable.

Macdonald, S.J.; Enright, W.; Arrillaga, J. [Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand); O`Brien, M.T.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Control | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Control Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Control The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into the harmonization of ZigBee, BACnet-or building automation and control network-and DALI-or digital addressable lighting interface-systems in wireless dimming lighting controls. Four proposed modules will enable "plug-and-play" capabilities for all DALI-compatible controls and BACnet-compatible systems. Project Description This project seeks to develop "plug-and-play" capabilities for lighting as an integrated component of a whole-building control system. Verified Energy, LLC, attempts to demonstrate the benefits of implementing wireless control in dimming applications using plug-and-play principles.

120

Conversion efficiency, scaling and global optimization of high harmonic generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closed form expressions for the high harmonic generation (HHG) conversion efficiency in the plateau and cut-off region are derived showing agreement with previous observations. Application of these results to optimal ...

Falcao-Filho, Edilson L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Femtosecond second-harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium niobate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Femtosecond second-harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium niobate waveguides poled lithium niobate waveguides under large conversion conditions. Strong saturation of the SHG detailed experi- mental data on femtosecond SHG in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguides

Purdue University

122

Ontario Harmonization Getting Ready! Issues for University of Western Ontario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

first province to harmonize! -British Columbia ·12% HST (July 1, 2010) ·Adopted model similar to Ontario supplied by means of · Wire, pipeline or similar conduit · Satellite or other telecommunications facility

Ma, Bin

123

Transient beam loading in the ALS harmonic RF system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSIENT BEAM LOADING IN THE ALS HARMONIC RF SYSTEM * J.as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), with moderately low beamharmonic RF system on the ALS storage ring consisting of 5

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Using Coupled Harmonic Oscillators to Model Some Greenhouse Gas Molecules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Common greenhouse gas molecu les SF 6 NO 2 CH 4 and CO 2 are modeled as harmonic oscillators whose potential and kinetic energies are derived. Using the Euler?Lagrange equation

Clark Kendrick C. Go; Joel T. Maquiling

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Separation of High Order Harmonics with Fluoride Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harmonics with Fluoride Windows T. K. Allison, 1,2? J. vanpropagation in a ?uoride window while still preserving theirfor MgF 2 , CaF 2 , and LiF windows for the third, ?fth, and

Allison, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Design and Operation of First-and Second-Harmonic Coaxial Gyroklystrons for Advanced Accelerator Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design and Operation of First-and Second-Harmonic Coaxial Gyroklystrons for Advanced Accelerator Applications

Castle, M; Granatstein, V L; Hogan, B; Lawson, W; Reiser, M; Xu, X

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Debunching into a bucket of lower harmonic number  

SciTech Connect

The adiabatic debunching of beam from buckets of higher harmonic number into waiting buckets of lower harmonic number is a critical step in the current scheme of operation for Tev I. The optimum choice of rf system parameters for this ''bunch coalescing'' process is not immediately obvious. In this note two examples are presented along with generalizations based upon them and experience with the Tevatron I design which can simplify the selection of appropriate parameters for different conditions.

MacLachlan, J.A.; Griffin, J.E.

1987-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

Absorption of ion Bernstein waves by impurity cyclotron harmonics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the damping of externally-launched ion Bernstein waves by absorption at the cyclotron harmonics of the impurity ions. The inclusion of the non-magnetic energy flux term reduces the damping rate by nearly two orders of magnitude from the previous calculation. Excessive impurity damping can be avoided by launching ion Bernstein waves at a frequency just below the second (or higher) cyclotron harmonic of hydrogen.

Ono, M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Wind LCA Harmonization (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that provides more exact estimates of GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty. This involved a systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems in order to determine the causes of life cycle greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG estimates.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Numerical Modeling Study and Assessment of PWR Fuel Rod and Assembly Distortion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel assembly and rod distortion experienced in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) result in numerous operational challenges to plant operators such as mechanical interference between distorted assembly and control rods, difficulties in unloading and reloading cores during outages, and possibly anomalous fuel performance due to atypical water gaps. Therefore, an improved understanding of the various parameters contributing to distortion is important in order to manage or otherwise eliminate these ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Evaluation of the Distortion of a Hydro Turbine Blade during Heat ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Evaluation of the Distortion of a Hydro Turbine Blade during Heat Treatment Process. Author(s), Jinwu Kang. On-Site Speaker (Planned)...

132

Power Quality for Transmission and Distribution: Harmonics Design and Analytics Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has published numerous guidebooks, reports, and technical briefs on subjects pertaining to harmonics. Overall, the full EPRI library of documents on harmonics is highly comprehensive and spans the entire range of subject matter, from the effects of harmonic voltages and currents on customer and utility equipment to methodologies useful in conducting harmonic studies. Although this large selection of harmonics-related documents exists, the individual documents ...

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

134

Vertical displacement of the storage ring floor due to building distortion in the Photon Factory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Light Source Building of the Photon Factory was found to distort so much as to induce the displacement of magnets in the storage ring. This resulted in drifting of the beam orbit. It was considered that the building was distorted by the variations of thermal stress

Tomotaro Katsura; Yutaka Fujita

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Computer correction of turbulent distortions of image of extended objects on near-Earth paths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm of computer-based correction of images of extended objects distorted by turbulent atmosphere is developed. The method of computer correction is used to correct a distorted image of an extended object on a horizontal 2300-m-long observation path. The angular size of the corrected-image region was 15'. (image processing)

Averin, A P; Morozov, Yu B; Pryanichkov, V S; Tyapin, V V [Federal State Unitary Enterprise 'I.S.Kos'minov State Scientific-Research Test Laser Centre of Russian Federation 'Raduga' (Russian Federation)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position.

Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

138

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

139

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

140

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency, February 2,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency, Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency, February 2, 2010 Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

142

Effect of Structural Modification on Second Harmonic Generation in Collagen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of structural perturbation on second harmonic generation in collagen were investigated. Type I collagen fascicles obtained from rat tails were structurally modified by increasing nonenzymatic cross-linking, by thermal denaturation, by collagenase digestion, or by dehydration. Changes in polarization dependence were observed in the dehydrated samples. Surprisingly, no changes in polarization dependence were observed in highly crosslinked samples, despite significant alterations in packing structure. Complete thermal denaturation and collagenase digestion produced samples with no detectable second harmonic signal. Prior to loss of signal, no change in polarization dependence was observed in partially heated or digested collagen.

Stoller, P C; Reiser, K M; Celliers, P M; Rubenchik, A M

2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

143

Cascaded Cerenkov third-harmonic generation in random quadratic media  

SciTech Connect

We investigate experimentally and theoretically the conical emission of Cerenkov-type third-harmonic generation in strontium barium niobate of random 2D-{chi}{sup (2)} distribution. The azimuthal intensity distribution is explained by the polarization properties of the fundamental and Cerenkov second-harmonic waves, depending on the cascaded origin of the generation process. Moreover, we show the role of the individual domain shape in an additional modulation on the conical emission, controlled by the electrical switching of the spontaneous polarization of the ferroelectric medium.

Ayoub, Mousa; Roedig, Philip; Imbrock, Joerg; Denz, Cornelia [Institute of Applied Physics and Center for Nonlinear Science (CeNoS), Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 2, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Harmonic mean, the Gamma factor and Speed of Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relationship between the harmonic mean and special relativity is concisely elucidated. The arguments in favor and against SRT are explored. It is shown that the ratio of the speed of light to the harmonic mean of the onward and return speeds of light in a moving frame under Newtonian mechanics, when equitably distributed between space and time as a correction, leads to the Lorentz transformation. This correction implies an apparent contraction of objects and time dilation. However, the symmetry of the onward and inverse transformations give a different meaning to the gamma factor

Chandru Iyer

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

145

Third-harmonic generation and multiphoton ionization spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear phenomena, such as multiphoton excitation (MPE) processes leading to ionization and third-harmonic generation (THG) in gases have become the issue of extensive studies over recent years. Studies in rare gases in particular have resulted in several interesting observations in this respect. Thus, it has been established that three-photon resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (MPI) in the vicinity of states which are single photon optically coupled to the ground state may occur in efficient competition with THG. The present work demonstrates several new effects which may appear when third-harmonic radiation is present during MPI.

Fotakis, C.; Stockdale, J.A.D.; Proctor, M.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fault Detection and Diagnostics for Non-Intrusive Monitoring Using Motor Harmonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harmonic analysis of motor current has been used to track the speed of motors for sensorless control. Algorithms exist that track the speed of a motor given a dedicated stator current measurement, for example. Harmonic ...

Orji, Uzoma A.

147

The Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinate Method for Three-Dimensional Atmospheric Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new algorithm for modeling radiative transfer in inhomogeneous three-dimensional media is described. The spherical harmonics discrete ordinate method uses a spherical harmonic angular representation to reduce memory use and time computing the ...

K. Franklin Evans

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Four-Stream Spherical Harmonic Expansion Approximation for Solar Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a four-stream extension of the ?-Eddington approximation by considering the higher-order spherical harmonic expansion in radiative intensity. By using the orthogonality relation of the spherical harmonic functions, the ...

J. Li; V. Ramaswamy

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Harmonic generation of ion waves due to Brillouin backscattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report results of simulations of stimulated Brillouin backscatter in which we see the second spatial harmonic of the ion density fluctuation and compare with linear, fluid theory. We also describe examples of the competition between Raman and Brillouin backscatter. 21 refs., 3 figs.

Estabrook, K.; Kruer, W.L.; Haines, M.G.

1985-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Web-assisted tunneling in the kicked harmonic oscillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that heating of harmonically trapped ions by periodic delta kicks is dramatically enhanced at isolated values of the Lamb-Dicke parameter. At these values, quasienergy eigenstates localized on island structures undergo avoided crossings with extended web-states.

Andr R. R. Carvalho; Andreas Buchleitner

2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

Imaging Collagen Orientation Using Polarization-Modulated Second Harmonic Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use polarization-modulated second harmonic generation to image fiber orientation in collagen tissues, with an axial resolution of about 10 {micro}m and a transverse resolution of up to 1 {micro}m. A linearly polarized ultra-short pulse (200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser beam is modulated using an electro-optic modulator and quarter-wave plate combination and focused onto a translation stage mounted sample using a microscope objective. The generated second harmonic light is collected using a photomultiplier tube and demodulated using phase sensitive detection to obtain signal intensity and fiber orientation information. In order to obtain second harmonic generation images of different types of collagen organization, we analyze several different tissues, including rat-tail tendon, mouse aorta, mouse fibrotic liver, and porcine skin. We can use our technique to image fibrotic tissue in histological sections of damaged liver and to identify burned tissue in porcine skin to a depth of a few hundred microns. Polarization-modulated second harmonic generation potentially could be a useful clinical technique for diagnosing collagen related disease or damage, especially in the skin.

Stoller, P; Celliers, P M; Reiser, K M; Rubenchik, A M

2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Controllability of the coupled spin-half harmonic oscillator system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a control-theoretic analysis of the system consisting of a two-level atom coupled with a quantum harmonic oscillator. We show that by applying external fields with just two resonant frequencies, any desired unitary operator can be generated.

Haidong Yuan; Seth Lloyd

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

153

Elimination of Harmonics in a Multilevel Converter for HEV Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possible solu- tions are found. Keywords­ Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Multilevel Convert- ers, Harmonic Elimination, Resultants I. Introduction Designs for heavy duty hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) that have large electric drives such as tractor trailers, trans- fer trucks, or military vehicles will require advanced

Tolbert, Leon M.

154

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

155

A three-phase converter model for harmonic analysis of HVDC systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An equivalent circuit model is presented to model bridge converters for three-phase HVDC harmonic power flow analysis. The validity and accuracy of the model are verified by comparing simulation results against field test results. The model is interfaced with a multiphase harmonic load flow program to investigate the generation of non-characteristic harmonics from HVDC links and the flow of HVDC harmonics in a real system.

Xu, W.; Drakos, J.E.; Mansour, Y.; Chang, A. (B.C. Hydro, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Enhanced Harmonic Up-Conversion Using a Hybrid HGHG-EEHG Scheme  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a novel harmonic generation scheme which can be used, for a given desired harmonic, to achieve higher bunching factors, weaker chicanes, and/or less final energy spread than can be achieved using Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation. This scheme only requires a single laser with relatively low power, and is a hybrid of High-Gain Harmonic Generation and EEHG. We present a design of this scheme applied to the Next Generation Light Source (NGLS).

Marksteiner, Quinn R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bishofberger, Kip A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlsten, Bruce E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freund, Henry P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yampolsky, Nikolai A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Improvement of the disc harmonic moments descriptor by an exponentially decaying distance transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors propose an improvement of a recent region-based shape descriptor inspired by the 3D spherical harmonics: the Disk Harmonic Moments Descriptor (DHMD). The binary image is weighted by an exponentially decaying distance transform (EDDT) before ... Keywords: content-based image, distance transform, legendre polynomials, region-based shape descriptor, retrieval, salience distance transform, spherical harmonics

Noureddine Ennahnahi; Mohammed Oumsis; Mohammed Meknassi

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Towards unifying multi-resolution and multi-description : a distortion-diversity perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider codec structures that exploit diversity in both source coding and channel coding components. We propose to study source-channel schemes using the tradeoff between end-to-end distortion level and the outage ...

Jing, Sheng, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Topographic Distortion of a Cold Front over the Snake River Plain and Central Idaho Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The topographic distortion of a cold front over the Snake River Plain (SRP) and central Idaho Mountains on 3 December 1998 is described using high-density surface observations from MesoWest, a collection of meteorological networks over the ...

W. James Steenburgh; Thomas R. Blazek

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

162

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

163

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

164

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

165

Calculation of HVDC converter noncharacteristic harmonics using digital time-domain simulation method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, noncharacteristic harmonics of an HVdc converter station are calculated based on the use of digital time-domain simulation methods. An enhanced version of the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) is used for the studies. The noncharacteristic harmonics of interest are (1) the dc side triplen harmonics, and (2) the ac side second harmonic. Impacts of loading conditions, neutral filter, and converter firing angle on the dc side triplen harmonics are discussed. Effects of ac side network parameters, static VAR compensator (SVC), transformer half-cycle saturation, and Geomagnetically Induced Current (GIC) on the ac side second harmonic instability are also presented. This paper concludes that the digital time-domain simulation method provides significant flexibility for accurate prediction of (1) generation mechanism, and (2) adverse impacts of HVdc noncharacteristic harmonics.

Sarshar, A. [Trench Electric, Scarborough, Ontario (Canada); Iravani, M.R.; Li, J. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE HARMONIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect

The detection of multiple mode harmonic kink oscillations in coronal loops enables us to obtain information on coronal density stratification and magnetic field expansion using seismology inversion techniques. The inference is based on the measurement of the period ratio between the fundamental mode and the first overtone and theoretical results for the period ratio under the hypotheses of coronal density stratification and magnetic field expansion of the wave guide. We present a Bayesian analysis of multiple mode harmonic oscillations for the inversion of the density scale height and magnetic flux tube expansion under each of the hypotheses. The two models are then compared using a Bayesian model comparison scheme to assess how plausible each one is given our current state of knowledge.

Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Diaz, A. J., E-mail: iarregui@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Damping the zero-point energy of a harmonic oscillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics of quantum electromagnetism in an absorbing medium is that of a field of damped harmonic oscillators. Yet until recently the damped harmonic oscillator was not treated with the same kind of formalism used to describe quantum electrodynamics in a arbitrary medium. Here we use the techniques of macroscopic QED, based on the Huttner--Barnett reservoir, to describe the quantum mechanics of a damped oscillator. We calculate the thermal and zero-point energy of the oscillator for a range of damping values from zero to infinity. While both the thermal and zero-point energies decrease with damping, the energy stored in the oscillator at fixed temperature increases with damping, an effect that may be experimentally observable. As the results follow from canonical quantization, the uncertainty principle is valid for all damping levels.

T. G Philbin; S. A. R. Horsley

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

168

On the moment of inertia of a quantum harmonic oscillator  

SciTech Connect

An original method for calculating the moment of inertia of the collective rotation of a nucleus on the basis of the cranking model with the harmonic-oscillator Hamiltonian at arbitrary frequencies of rotation and finite temperature is proposed. In the adiabatic limit, an oscillating chemical-potential dependence of the moment of inertia is obtained by means of analytic calculations. The oscillations of the moment of inertia become more pronounced as deformations approach the spherical limit and decrease exponentially with increasing temperature.

Khamzin, A. A., E-mail: airat.khamzin@rambler.ru; Sitdikov, A. S. [Kazan (Volga region) Federal University (Russian Federation)] [Kazan (Volga region) Federal University (Russian Federation); Nikitin, A. S. [Kazan State Power-Engineering University (Russian Federation)] [Kazan State Power-Engineering University (Russian Federation); Roganov, D. A. [Open Corporation Joint-Stock Commercial Investment Bank Tatfondbank (Russian Federation)] [Open Corporation Joint-Stock Commercial Investment Bank Tatfondbank (Russian Federation)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan...

170

Dynamics of Flat Bunches with Second Harmonic RF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the dynamics of longitudinally flat bunches created with a second harmonic cavity in a high energy collider. We study Landau damping in a second harmonic cavity with analytical and numerical methods. The latter include particle tracking and evolution of the phase space density. The results are interpreted in the context of possible application to the LHC. A possible path to a luminosity upgrade at the LHC is through the creation of longitudinally flat bunches. They can increase the luminosity roughly by 40% when the beam intensities are at the beam-beam limit. Lower momentum spread which can reduce backgrounds and make collimation easier as well lower peak fields which can mitigate electron cloud effects are other advantages. Use of a second harmonic rf system is a frequently studied method to create such flat bunches. Here we consider some aspects of longitudinal dynamics of these bunches in the LHC at top energy. First we consider intensity limits set by the loss of Landau damping against rigid dipole oscillations. Next we describe numerical simulations using both particle tracking and evolution of the phase space density. These simulations address the consequences of driving a bunch at a frequency that corresponds to the maximum of the synchrotron frequency.

Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab; Bhat, Chandra; /Fermilab; Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab; Ostiguy, Jean-Francois; /Fermilab

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of "lone pair" electrons: pairs of chemically inert, nonbonding valence electrons in hybrid orbitals that leave noticeable voids in the crystal structure. At the ALS, researchers from the U.K., Ireland, and the U.S. have now obtained definitive experimental evidence that this lone-pair model must be revised. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) have clarified the subtle electronic origins of the prototypical distortions in these crystal structures. The results have important implications for the tantalizing possibility of spintronic or superconducting devices combining ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties.

172

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of "lone pair" electrons: pairs of chemically inert, nonbonding valence electrons in hybrid orbitals that leave noticeable voids in the crystal structure. At the ALS, researchers from the U.K., Ireland, and the U.S. have now obtained definitive experimental evidence that this lone-pair model must be revised. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) have clarified the subtle electronic origins of the prototypical distortions in these crystal structures. The results have important implications for the tantalizing possibility of spintronic or superconducting devices combining ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties.

173

Background and Reflections on the Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite the ever-growing body of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature on electricity generation technologies, inconsistent methods and assumptions hamper comparison across studies and pooling of published results. Synthesis of the body of previous research is necessary to generate robust results to assess and compare environmental performance of different energy technologies for the benefit of policy makers, managers, investors, and citizens. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory initiated the LCA Harmonization Project in an effort to rigorously leverage the numerous individual studies to develop collective insights. The goals of this project were to: (1) understand the range of published results of LCAs of electricity generation technologies, (2) reduce the variability in published results that stem from inconsistent methods and assumptions, and (3) clarify the central tendency of published estimates to make the collective results of LCAs available to decision makers in the near term. The LCA Harmonization Project's initial focus was evaluating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electricity generation technologies. Six articles from this first phase of the project are presented in a special supplemental issue of the Journal of Industrial Ecology on Meta-Analysis of LCA: coal (Whitaker et al. 2012), concentrating solar power (Burkhardt et al. 2012), crystalline silicon photovoltaics (PVs) (Hsu et al. 2012), thin-film PVs (Kim et al. 2012), nuclear (Warner and Heath 2012), and wind (Dolan and Heath 2012). Harmonization is a meta-analytical approach that addresses inconsistency in methods and assumptions of previously published life cycle impact estimates. It has been applied in a rigorous manner to estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from many categories of electricity generation technologies in articles that appear in this special supplemental supplemental issue, reducing the variability and clarifying the central tendency of those estimates in ways useful for decision makers and analysts. Each article took a slightly different approach, demonstrating the flexibility of the harmonization approach. Each article also discusses limitations of the current research, and the state of knowledge and of harmonization, pointing toward a path of extending and improving the meta-analysis of LCAs.

Heath, G. A.; Mann, M. K.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

175

On Optimum End-to-End Distortion in Wideband MIMO Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the impact of frequency diversity on the optimum expected end-to-end distortion (EED) in an outage-free wideband multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) system. We provide the closed-form expression of optimum asymptotic expected EED comprised of the optimum distortion exponent and the multiplicative optimum distortion factor for high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is shown that frequency diversity can improve EED though it has no effect on ergodic capacity. The improvement becomes slight when the frequency diversity order is greater than a certain number. The lower bounds related to infinite frequency diversity are derived. The results for outage-free systems are the bounds for outage-suffering systems and they are instructive for system design.

Chen, Jinhui

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Approximate treatment of electron Coulomb distortion in quasielastic (e,e') reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we address the adequacy of various approximate methods of including Coulomb distortion effects in (e,e') reactions by comparing to an exact treatment using Dirac-Coulomb distorted waves. In particular, we examine approximate methods and analyses of (e,e') reactions developed by Traini et al. using a high energy approximation of the distorted waves and phase shifts due to Lenz and Rosenfelder. This approximation has been used in the separation of longitudinal and transverse structure functions in a number of (e,e') experiments including the newly published 208Pb(e,e') data from Saclay. We find that the assumptions used by Traini and others are not valid for typical (e,e') experiments on medium and heavy nuclei, and hence the extracted structure functions based on this formalism are not reliable. We describe an improved approximation which is also based on the high energy approximation of Lenz and Rosenfelder and the analyses of Knoll and compare our results to the Saclay data. At each step of our analyses we compare our approximate results to the exact distorted wave results and can therefore quantify the errors made by our approximations. We find that for light nuclei, we can get an excellent treatment of Coulomb distortion effects on (e,e') reactions just by using a good approximation to the distorted waves, but for medium and heavy nuclei simple additional ad hoc factors need to be included. We describe an explicit procedure for using our approximate analyses to extract so-called longitudinal and transverse structure functions from (e,e') reactions in the quasielastic region.

K. S. Kim; L. E. Wright; Yanhe Jin; D. W. Kosik

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

178

Vacuum oscillations of solar neutrinos: correlation between spectrum distortion and seasonal variations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long length vacuum oscillations solution of the solar neutrino problem is discussed. We show that there is a strict correlation between a distortion of the neutrino energy spectrum and an amplitude of seasonal variations of the neutrino flux. The slope parameter which characterizes a distortion of the recoil electron energy spectrum in the Super-Kamiokande experiment and the seasonal asymmetry of the signal have been calculated in a wide range of oscillation parameters. The correlation of the slope and asymmetry gives crucial criteria for identification or exclusion of this solution. For the positive slope indicated by preliminary Super-Kamiokande data we predict (40 - 60) % enhancement of the seasonal variations.

S. P. Mikheyev; A. Yu. Smirnov

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions. ...

180

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

182

Mapping the nonlinear optical susceptibility by noncollinear second harmonic generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method, based on noncollinear second harmonic generation, to evaluate the non-zero elements of the nonlinear optical susceptibility. At a fixed incidence angle, the generated signal is investigated by varying the polarization state of both fundamental beams. The resulting polarization charts allows to verify if Kleinman symmetry rules can be applied to a given material or to retrieve the absolute value of the nonlinear optical tensor terms, from a reference measurement. Experimental measurements obtained from Gallium Nitride layers are reported. The proposed method does not require an angular scan thus is useful when the generated signal is strongly affected by sample rotation

Larciprete, M C; Giardina, M; Belardini, A; Centini, M; Sibilia, 1 C; Bertolotti, M; Passaseo, A; Tasco, V

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Power Quality and Harmonic Impacts of Distributed Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PQ TechWatch report series builds on EPRI's broad expertise and power quality testing and evaluation work to provide a vital flow of data, including important information on emerging trends powering ebusinesses and developments in next-generation power quality mitigation and energy storage technologies.This PQ TechWatch aims to present an overview of power quality impacts resulting from operation of DG technologies on the grid. An emphasis on harmonic effects is included here. Concerns in this area a...

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

Non-Markovian quantum Brownian motion of a harmonic oscillator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We apply the density-matrix method to the study of quantum Brownian motion of a harmonic oscillator coupled to a heat bath, a system investigated previously by Caldeira and Leggett using a different method. Unlike the earlier work, in our derivation of the master equation the non-Markovian terms are maintained. Although the same model of interaction is used, discrepancy is found between their results and our equation in the Markovian limit. We also point out that the particular interaction model used by both works cannot lead to the phenomenological generalized Langevin theory of Kubo.

Tang, J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A non-conforming 3D spherical harmonic transport solver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new 3D transport solver for the time-independent Boltzmann transport equation has been developed. This solver is based on the second-order even-parity form of the transport equation. The angular discretization is performed through the expansion of the angular neutron flux in spherical harmonics (PN method). The novelty of this solver is the use of non-conforming finite elements for the spatial discretization. Such elements lead to a discontinuous flux approximation. This interface continuity requirement relaxation property is shared with mixed-dual formulations such as the ones based on Raviart-Thomas finite elements. Encouraging numerical results are presented. (authors)

Van Criekingen, S. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique CEA-Saclay, DEN/DM2S/SERMA/LENR Bat 470, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, Cedex (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Harmonizing Melodies in Real-Time: the Connectionist Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a sequential neural network for harmonizing melodies in real time. It models aspects of human cognition. This neural network succeeds reasonably well, if we take into consideration the constraints imposed by real time processing. The model exploits efficiently the available sequential information. The net contains a sub-net for meter that produces a periodic index of meter, providing the needed metric awareness. The net learns the relations between important notes of the melody and their harmonies and is able to produce harmonies for new melodies in real time, i.e., without knowledge of the future development of the melody.

Dan Gang; Daniel Lehmann; Naftali Wagner

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Harmonic coordinates in the string and membrane equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this note, we first show that the solutions to Cauchy problems for two versions of relativistic string and membrane equations are diffeomorphic. Then we investigate the coordinates transformation presented in D. X. Kong and Q. Zhang [Physica D 238, 902 (2009); see (2.20)] which plays an important role in the study on the dynamics of the motion of string in Minkowski space. This kind of transformed coordinates is harmonic coordinates, and the nonlinear relativistic string equations can be straightforwardly simplified into linear wave equations under this transformation.

He Chunlei; Huang Shoujun [Department of Mathematics, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Unbalance and Harmonic Concerns When Forging Facility Fed From Backup Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the analysis and mitigation suggestions for unbalance and harmonic concerns when forging a facility fed from a backup generator.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 6 Harmonization of Cholesterol Oxidation Product Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 6 Harmonization of Cholesterol Oxidation Product Analysis Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

190

Energy Efficiency Standards and Labels in North America: Opportunities for Harmonization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for harmonization are standby losses, uniform endorsementthe three countries. a) Standby losses: Relevant activities:order on energy efficient standby power devices. The order

Wiel, Stephen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Numerical studies of third-harmonic generation in laser filament in air perturbed by plasma spot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Third-harmonic emission from laser filament intercepted by plasma spot is studied by numerical simulations. Significant enhancement of the third-harmonic generation is obtained due to the disturbance of the additional plasma. The contribution of the pure plasma effect and the possible plasma-enhanced third-order susceptibility on the third-harmonic generation enhancement are compared. It is shown that the plasma induced cancellation of destructive interference [Y. Liu et al., Opt. Commun. 284, 4706 (2011)] of two-colored filament is the dominant mechanism of the enhancement of third-harmonic generation.

Feng Liubin [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Department of Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Lu Xin; Liu Xiaolong; Li Yutong; Chen Liming; Ma Jinglong; Dong Quanli; Wang Weimin [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Xi Tingting [College of Physical Sciences, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas of the Ministry of Education of China and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); He Duanwei [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Department of Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Technical Study Addresses a Key Challenge to Harmonizing U.S...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and U.S. and international standards appear to be closer to harmonization. Technical Contacts: John Wohlgemuth, john.wohlgemuth@nrel.gov; Michael Kempe,...

193

Reynolds and Favre-averaged rapid distortion theory for compressible, ideal-gas turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressible ideal-gas turbulence subjected to homogeneous shear is investigated at the rapid distortion limit. Specific issues addressed are (i) the interaction between kinetic and internal energies and role of pressure-dilatation; (ii) the modifications to pressure-strain correlation and Reynolds stress anisotropy and (iii) the effect of the composition of velocity fluctuations (solenoidal vs. dilatational). Turbulence evolution is found to be strongly influenced by gradient Mach number, the initial solenoidal-to-dilatational ratio of the velocity field and the initial intensity of the thermodynamic fluctuations. The balance between the initial fluctuations in velocity and thermodynamic variables is also found to be very important. Any imbalance in the two fluctuating fields leads to high levels of pressure-dilatation and intense exchange. For a given initial condition, it is found that the interaction via the pressuredilatation term between the momentum and energy equations reaches a peak at an intermediate gradient Mach number. The energy exchange between internal and kinetic modes is negligible at very high or very low Mach number values due to lack of pressure dilatation. When present, the exchange exhibits oscillations even as the sum of the two energies evolves smoothly. The interaction between shear and solenoidal initial velocity field generates dilatational fluctuations; for some intermediate levels of shear Mach number dilatational fluctuations account for 20% of the total fluctuations. Similarly, the interaction between shear and initial dilatation produces solenoidal oscillations. Somewhat surprisingly, the generation of solenoidal fluctuations increases with gradient Mach number. Larger levels of pressure-strain correlation are seen with dilatational rather than solenoidal initial conditions. Anisotropies of solenoidal and dilatational components are investigated individually. The most interesting observation is that solenoidal and dilatational turbulence tend toward a one componential state but the energetic component is different in each case. As in incompressible shear flows, with solenoidal fluctuations, the streamwise (1,1) component of Reynolds stress is dominant. With dilatational fluctuations, the stream-normal (2,2) component is the strongest. Overall, the study yields valuable insight into the linear processes in high Mach number shear flows and identifies important closure modeling issues.

Lavin, Tucker Alan

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

195

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

196

A Rate-Energy-Distortion Analysis for Compressed-Sensing-Enabled Wireless Video Streaming on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Rate-Energy-Distortion Analysis for Compressed-Sensing-Enabled Wireless Video Streaming. The objective of this paper is to conduct an experiment- driven analysis of the energy on Multimedia Sensors Scott Pudlewski, Tommaso Melodia Department of Electrical Engineering State University

Melodia, Tommaso

197

Region-of-interest video coding based on rate and distortion variations for H.263+  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Region-of-interest (ROI) is an essential task that one must undertake in low bit-rate multimedia communications because of the limited bandwidth of the channels and the transcoder between different standards. In this paper, an effective ROI determination ... Keywords: H.263+, Rate control, Rate-distortion, Region-of-interest, Videoconference

Ming-Chieh Chi; Mei-Juan Chen; Chia-Hung Yeh; Jyong-An Jhu

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Interference Suppression Consisting of Pre-distortion Filtering and Selective Transmit Diversity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present and evaluate a pre-distortion (PD) scheme for the downlink of Wideband-code division multiple access (W-CDMA) systems considering a Rake in the receiver in order to exploit multipath diversity. Its performance is compared with ... Keywords: Downlink transmission, Frequency-selective channels, Pre-processing, Selective transmit diversity, W-CDMA

Mrio Marques Silva; Amrico M. Correia; Rui Dinis

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Using quad smoothness to efficiently control capacity-distortion of reversible data hiding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main uses of data hiding is to protect secret messages being transmitted on the Internet. Reversible data hiding can fully recover the original host image after extracting the secret message. It is especially suitable for applications where, ... Keywords: Capacity-distortion control, Difference expansion, Reversible data hiding, Steganography

Chi-Nan Lin; Daniel J. Buehrer; Chin-Chen Chang; Tzu-Chuen Lu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Evolution of Distorted Rotating Black Holes I: Methods and Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a new numerical code to study the evolution of distorted, rotating black holes. We discuss the numerical methods and gauge conditions we developed to evolve such spacetimes. The code has been put through a series of tests, and we report on (a) results of comparisons with codes designed to evolve non-rotating holes, (b) evolution of Kerr spacetimes for which analytic properties are known, and (c) the evolution of distorted rotating holes. The code accurately reproduces results of the previous NCSA non-rotating code and passes convergence tests. New features of the evolution of rotating black holes not seen in non-rotating holes are identified. With this code we can evolve rotating black holes up to about $t=100M$, depending on the resolution and angular momentum. We also describe a new family of black hole initial data sets which represent rotating holes with a wide range of distortion parameters, and distorted non-rotating black holes with odd-parity radiation. Finally, we study the limiting slices for a maximally sliced rotating black hole and find good agreement with theoretical predictions.

Steven R. Brandt; Edward Seidel

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Impact of lattice geometry distortion due to ageing on selected physics parameters of a CANDU reactor  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, results related to a limited scope assessment of the geometry-distortion-induced effects on key reactor physics parameters of a CANDU reactor are discussed. These results were generated by simulations using refined analytical methods and detailed modeling of CANDU reactor core with aged lattice cell geometry. (authors)

Tholammakkil, J. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, P.O. Box 1046, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada); Rahnema, F. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405 (United States); Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Stamm'ler, R. [Studsvik Scandpower AS, P.O. Box 15, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Khotylev, V.; Serghiuta, D. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, P.O. Box 1046, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings  

SciTech Connect

Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting???¢????????s overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions of the Navy-C ring (a classical test shape for heat treatment experiments) for several carbon and low alloy steels in order to generate data necessary to validate the code. The predicted distortions were in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured values. However, the final distortions in the castings were small, making it difficult to determine how accurate the predictions truly are. It is recommended that further validation of the software be performed with the aid of additional experiments with large production steel castings that experience significant heat treatment distortions. It is apparent from this research that the mechanical properties of the bonded sand used for cores and sand molds are key in producing accurate stress simulation results. Because of this, experiments were performed to determine the temperature-dependent elastic modulus of a resin-bonded sand commonly utilized in the steel casting industry. The elastic modulus was seen to vary significantly with heating and cooling rates. Also, the retained room temperature elastic modulus after heating was seen to degrade significantly when the sand was heated above 125???????°C. The elastic modulus curves developed in this work can readily be utilized in casting simulation software. Additional experiments with higher heating rates are recommended to determine the behavior of the elastic modulus in the sand close to the mold-metal interface. The commercial heat treatment residual stress and distortion code, once fully validated, is expected to result in an estimated energy savings of 2.15 trillion BTU???¢????????s/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology.

Christoph Beckermann; Kent Carlson

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

203

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

205

High-order harmonic generation in Xe, Kr, and Ar driven by a 2.1-?m source: High-order harmonic spectroscopy under macroscopic effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally and numerically study the atomic response and pulse propagation effects of high-order harmonics generated in Xe, Kr, and Ar driven by a 2.1-?m infrared femtosecond light source. The light source is an ...

Hong, Kyung-Han

206

Harmonic Amplitudes Calculation Method and Simulation of Diode-bridge Rectifier's Output Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taking the three-phase uncontrolled diode-bridge rectifier of a certain style armored vehicles power supple system as research object, a practical method to calculate the harmonic amplitudes of rectifiers DC-side output current is theoretically ... Keywords: rectifier, harmonic amplitude, switching function, simulation, MATLAB

Wei Wei; Xiaojun Ma; Shuguang Wei; Zhaozhao He

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Study on the Harmonics of Photovoltaic Generation SPWM Inverting Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harmonics are the main polluting source of affecting the power energy quality. In this paper, the causes that SPWM inverter power supply produces the harmonics are analyzed firstly and then a new three-phase ?-band-pass filter is designed to improve ... Keywords: harmonious, solar energy photovoltaic power, inverter, current ripples component

Jianqu Zhu; Feng Wang; Taiqiang Cao

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Adjustable Speed Drive: Harmonic Effects on Induction Motors: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of adjustable speed drives (ASDs) for induction motors in electric power plants has several advantages, but ASDs produce harmonic current and voltage that can result in problems. The Standstill Frequency Response (RFR) program for the personal PC can be used to study these harmonic effects in a wide range of motors.

1995-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

209

Adjustable Speed Drive: Harmonic Effects on Induction Motors: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of adjustable speed drives (ASDs) for induction motors in electric power plants has several advantages, but ASDs produce harmonic current and voltage that can result in problems. The Standstill Frequency Response (RFR) program for the personal PC can be used to study these harmonic effects in a wide range of motors.

1995-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

210

Modeling and experimental validation of internal faults in salient pole synchronous machines including space harmonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering the space harmonics caused by the faulted windings, a simulation model of internal faults in salient pole synchronous machines is proposed in this paper. The model is based on the winding function approach, which makes no assumption for sinusoidal ... Keywords: Internal faults, Space harmonics, Synchronous machines, Winding function

X. Tu; L. -A. Dessaint; M. El Kahel; A. Barry

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Original article: Selective compensation of voltage harmonics in grid-connected microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a novel approach is proposed for selective compensation of main voltage harmonics in a grid-connected microgrid. The aim of compensation is to provide a high voltage quality at the point of common coupling (PCC). PCC voltage quality is ... Keywords: Distributed generator (DG), Grid-connected, Microgrid, Voltage harmonics compensation

Mehdi Savaghebi, Juan C. Vasquez, Alireza Jalilian, Josep M. Guerrero, Tzung-Lin Lee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Computationally fast harmonic balance methods for unsteady aerodynamic predictions of helicopter rotors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A harmonic balance technique for the analysis of unsteady flows about helicopter rotors in forward flight and hover is presented in this paper. The aerodynamics of forward flight are highly nonlinear, with transonic flow on the advancing blade, subsonic ... Keywords: Computational fluid dynamics, Frequency-domain methods, Harmonic balance technique, Helicopter rotors, Unsteady aerodynamics

Kivanc Ekici; Kenneth C. Hall; Earl H. Dowell

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modeling DFIG Using General Vector Representation in the Presence of Harmonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) wind turbine is modeled by using the general vector representation of voltage, current and magnetic flux in the presence of harmonics. The general vector representation provides insights into how ... Keywords: wind turbine, harmonics, general vector form, DFIG

Ziqiao Liu, Ahmed Abu-Hajar, David Wenzhong Gao

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Extraction of voltage harmonics using multi-layer perceptron neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a harmonic extraction algorithm using artificial neural networks for Dynamic Voltage Restorers (DVRs). The suggested algorithm employs a feed forward Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) Neural Network with error back propagation learning ... Keywords: Dynamic Voltage Restorer, Harmonic extraction, Multi Layer Perceptron, Neural Networks

Mehmet Tmay; M. Emin Meral; K. a?atay Bayindir

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Harmonic filters influences regarding the power quality on high frequency electrothermal installation with electromagnetic induction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a study regarding the functioning of a melting/hardening electrothermal installation with electromagnetic induction from the point of view of generated harmonics in the power distribution. The authors made simulations in scope of ... Keywords: electrothermal installation, harmonic, passive filters, static converter

Raluca Rob; Ioan Sora; Caius Panoiu; Manuela Panoiu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Multiple Cerenkov second-harmonic waves in a two-dimensional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple Cerenkov second-harmonic waves in a two-dimensional nonlinear photonic structure Wenjie fundamental beams. We show that this phenomenon is caused by the nonlinear Cerenkov radiation emitted due verify the effects of reciprocal vectors on the Cerenkov-type second-harmonic generation in nonlinear

Arie, Ady

217

Harmonic generation and wave mixing in nonlinear metamaterials and photonic crystals (Invited paper)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic concepts and phenomenology of wave mixing and harmonic generation are reviewed in context of the recent advances in the enhanced nonlinear activity in metamaterials and photonic crystals. The effects of dispersion, field confinement and phase ... Keywords: bandgap, dispersion, harmonic generation, nonlinear metamaterial, pulses

O. Shramkova; A. Schuchinsky

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Intense multimicrojoule high-order harmonics generated from neutral atoms of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We studied high-order harmonic generation from plasma that contains an abundance of indium oxide nanoparticles. We found that harmonics from nanoparticle-containing plasma are considerably more intense than from plasma produced on the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} bulk target, with high-order harmonic energy ranging from 6 {mu}J (for the ninth harmonic) to 1 {mu}J (for the 17th harmonic) in the former case. The harmonic cutoff from nanoparticles was at the 21st order, which is lower than that observed using indium oxide solid target. By comparing the harmonic spectra obtained from solid and nanoparticle indium oxide targets, we concluded that intense harmonics in the latter case are dominantly generated from neutral atoms of the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles.

Elouga Bom, L. B.; Abdul-Hadi, J.; Vidal, F.; Ozaki, T. [Centre Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Ganeev, R. A. [Centre Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Scientific Association Akadempribor, Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, Tashkent 100125 (Uzbekistan)

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

219

Harmonization of Road Signs for Electric Vehicle Charging Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Avenue Louise 200 Box 113 1050 Brussels Belgium 1 Avenue Louise 200 Box 113 1050 Brussels Belgium 1 32.2.647.3218 Mobile 32.473.284.603 jseisler@cleanfuelsconsulting.org www.cleanfuelsconsulting.org Harmonization of Road Signs for Electric Vehicle Charging Stations Prepared for: Argonne National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy November 2012 Avenue Louise 200 Box 113 1050 Brussels Belgium 2 32.2.647.3218 Mobile 32.473.284.603 jseisler@cleanfuelsconsulting.org www.cleanfuelsconsulting.org This page is intentionally blank. Avenue Louise 200 Box 113 1050 Brussels Belgium 3 32.2.647.3218 Mobile 32.473.284.603 jseisler@cleanfuelsconsulting.org www.cleanfuelsconsulting.org TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ............................................................................................................. 5

220

Combinatorial aspects of total positivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I study combinatorial aspects of an emerging field known as total positivity. The classical theory of total positivity concerns matrices in which all minors are nonnegative. While this theory was pioneered ...

Williams, Lauren Kiyomi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Distortions of Experimental Muon Arrival Time Distributions of Extensive Air Showers by the Observation Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Event-by-event measured arrival time distributions of Extensive Air Shower (EAS) muons are affected and distorted by various interrelated effects which originate from the time resolution of the timing detectors, from fluctuations of the reference time and the number (multiplicity) of detected muons spanning the arrival time distribution of the individual EAS events. The origin of these effects is discussed, and different correction procedures, which involve detailed simulations, are proposed and illustrated. The discussed distortions are relevant for relatively small observation distances (R < 200 m) from the EAS core. Their significance decreases with increasing observation distance and increasing primary energies. Local arrival time distributions which refer to the observed arrival time of the first local muon prove to be less sensitive to the mass of the primary. This feature points to the necessity of arrival time measurements with additional information on the curvature of the EAS disk.

R. Haeusler; A. F. Badea; H. Rebel; I. M. Brancus; J. Oehlschlaeger

2001-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

222

Coulomb Distortion Effects for (e,e'p) Reactions at High Electron Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a significant improvement of an approximate method of including electron Coulomb distortion in electron induced reactions at momentum transfers greater than the inverse of the size of the target nucleus. In particular, we have found a new parametrization for the elastic electron scattering phase shifts that works well at all electron energies greater than 300 $MeV$. As an illustration, we apply the improved approximation to the $(e,e'p)$ reaction from medium and heavy nuclei. We use a relativistic ``single particle'' model for $(e,e'p)$ as as applied to $^{208}Pb(e,e'p)$ and to recently measured data at CEBAF on $^{16}O(e,e'p)$ to investigate Coulomb distortion effects while examining the physics of the reaction.

K. S. Kim; L. E. Wright

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

223

Total correlations and mutual information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In quantum information theory it is generally accepted that quantum mutual information is an information-theoretic measure of total correlations of a bipartite quantum state. We argue that there exist quantum states for which quantum mutual information cannot be considered as a measure of total correlations. Moreover, for these states we propose a different way of quantifying total correlations.

Zbigniew Walczak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Cherenkov high-order harmonic generation by multistep cascading in {chi}{sup (2)} nonlinear photonic crystal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a scheme for efficient Cherenkov high-order harmonic generation. Second to fifth order harmonic wave are observed in a single periodically poled ferroelectric crystal in our experiment. The noncollinear high-order harmonic generation is produced via enhanced Cherenkov second harmonic cascaded with successive multistep sum-frequency generation with simultaneously longitudinal phase-matching. The emission angle and power dependencies are analyzed in detail experimentally, which coincide with theoretical predictions.

An Ning; Ren Huaijin [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); State Key Laboratory on Fiber Optic Local Area Communication Networks and Advanced Optical Communication Systems, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zheng Yuanlin [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Deng Xuewei [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Chen Xianfeng [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); State Key Laboratory on Fiber Optic Local Area Communication Networks and Advanced Optical Communication Systems, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

225

Coulomb Distortion Effects for Electron or Positron Induced $(e,e')$ Reactions in the Quasielastic Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to recent experimental studies we investigate Coulomb distortion effects on $(e,e')$ reactions from medium and heavy nuclei for the case of electrons and positrons. We extend our previously reported full DWBA treatment of Coulomb distortions to the case of positrons for the $^{208}Pb(e,e')$ reaction in the quasielastic region for a particular nuclear model. In addition, we use previously reported successful approaches to treating Coulomb corrections in an approximate way to calculate the Coulomb distortion effects for $(e,e')$ reactions for both electrons and positrons for the case of a simple nuclear model for quasielastic knock-out of nucleons. With these results in hand we develop a simple {\\em ad-hoc} approximation for use in analyzing experiments, and discuss methods of extracting the ``longitudinal structure function" which enters into evaluation of the Coulomb sum rule. These techniques are generally valid for lepton induced reactions on nuclei with momentum transfers greater than approximately 300 $MeV/c$.

K. S. Kim; L. E. Wright; D. A. Resler

2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

227

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

228

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

229

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

230

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

231

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

232

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

233

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

234

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

235

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

236

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

237

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

238

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

239

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

240

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

242

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

243

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

244

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

245

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

246

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

247

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

248

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

249

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

250

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

251

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

252

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

253

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

254

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

255

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

256

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

257

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

258

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

259

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

260

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

262

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

263

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

264

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

265

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

266

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

267

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

268

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

269

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

270

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

271

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

272

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,000 to 79,999 80,000 or More Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

273

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators U.S. Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Energy Information...

274

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.7...

275

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC4.7...

276

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC8.7...

277

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East North Central West North Central Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

278

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

279

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

280

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump... 53.5...

282

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

283

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

284

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

m... 3.2 0.2 Q 0.1 Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 14.9 11.1 3.9 Cordless...

285

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

m... 3.2 0.9 0.7 Q Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 19.3 13.2 6.1 Cordless...

286

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q 0.5 Q Q Monitor is Turned Off... 0.5 N Q Q Q Q N Q Use of Internet Have Access to Internet Yes... 66.9...

287

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Four Most Populated States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four...

288

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

289

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

290

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer......

291

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 25.8 2.8 5.8 5.5 3.8 7.9 1.4 5.1 Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan Used All Summer... 18.7 4.2 4.9 4.1 2.1 3.4 2.4 6.3...

292

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Characteristics Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC5.4 Space Heating...

293

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.1 0.5 Q 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

294

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.3 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.7 0.5 Q Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

295

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.8 0.3 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

296

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.1 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.4 Q 0.2 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

297

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.4 0.4 0.4 0.7 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

298

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

299

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 34.3 1.2 0.9 2.2 2.9 5.4 7.0 8.2 6.6 Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated... 29.5 1.5 0.9 2.3 2.7 4.1...

300

Results of the harmonics measurement program at the John F. Long photovoltaic house  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic (PV) systems used in single-family dwellings require an inverter to act as an interface between the direct-current (dc) power output of the PV unit and the alternating-current (ac) power needed by house loads. A type of inverter known as line-commutated injects harmonic currents on the ac side and requires large amounts of reactive power. Large numbers of such PV installations could lead to unacceptable levels of harmonic voltages on the utility system, and the need to increase the utility's delivery of reactive power could result in significant cost increases. The harmonics and power-factor effects are examined for a single PV installation using a line-commutated inverter. The data were obtained during a five-day measurement program conducted at the John F. Long House, which is a prototype residential PV installation located in Phoenix, Arizona. The magnitude and phase of various currents and voltages from the fundamental to the 13th harmonic were recorded both with and without the operation of the PV system. The inverter can be looked upon as an ideal current source that injects definable amounts of current at any particular harmonic frequency; the harmonic currents that were normally conducted by the house loads underwent very little change as a result of currents injected by the inverter; the harmonic voltages seen by the house loads were slightly altered due to the passage of the inverter harmonic currents through system impedances, but no effect on the voltage harmonics was observed at the distribution transformer primary; and the inverter's reactive power demands more than doubled the maximum demand that would be expected for a normal home. Sufficient information was obtained to provide for a conservative modeling of a representative PV system to be used in a computer program designed to evaluate the effects of larger concentrations of PV systems.

Campen, G.L.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

302

Electro-optic harmonic conversion to switch a laser beam out of a cavity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a switch to permit a laser beam to escape a laser cavity through the use of an externally applied electric field across a harmonic conversion crystal. Amplification takes place in the laser cavity, and then the laser beam is switched out by the laser light being harmonically converted with dichroic or polarization sensitive elements present to alter the optical path of the harmonically converted laser light. Modulation of the laser beam can also be accomplished by varying the external electric field.

Haas, Roger A. (Pleasanton, CA); Henesian, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Surface harmonics method equations for solving the time-dependent neutron transport problems and their verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finite-difference time-dependent equations of Surface Harmonics method have been obtained for plane geometry. Verification of these equations has been carried out by calculations of tasks from 'Benchmark Problem Book ANL-7416'. The capacity and efficiency of the Surface Harmonics method have been demonstrated by solution of the time-dependent neutron transport equation in diffusion approximation. The results of studies showed that implementation of Surface Harmonics method for full-scale calculations will lead to a significant progress in the efficient solution of the time-dependent neutron transport problems in nuclear reactors. (authors)

Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A. [National Research Center, Kurchatov Inst., Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Isotope effects in the harmonic response from hydrogenlike muonic atoms in strong laser fields  

SciTech Connect

High-order harmonic generation from hydrogenlike muonic atoms exposed to ultraintense high-frequency laser fields is studied. Systems of low nuclear-charge number Z are considered where a nonrelativistic description applies. By comparing the radiative response for different isotopes, we demonstrate characteristic signatures of the finite nuclear mass and size in the harmonic spectra. In particular, for Z>1, an effective muon charge appears in the Schroedinger equation for the relative particle motion, which influences the position of the harmonic cutoff. Cutoff energies in the million-electron-volt domain can be achieved, offering prospects for the generation of ultrashort coherent {gamma}-ray pulses.

Shahbaz, Atif; Mueller, Carsten [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Buervenich, Thomas J. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

China Total Cloud Amount Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Total Cloud Amount Over China DOI: 10.3334CDIACcli.008 data Data image Graphics Investigator Dale P. Kaiser Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental...

306

Design and analysis of a scanning beam interference lithography system for patterning gratings with nanometer-level distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the design and analysis of a system for patterning large-area gratings with nanometer level phase distortions. The novel patterning method, termed scanning beam interference lithography (SBIL), uses ...

Konkola, Paul Thomas, 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Path Integral Approach to the Calculation of Reaction Rates for a Reaction Coordinate Coupled to a Dual Harmonic Bath  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new method for the numerical calculation of canonical reaction rate constants in complex molecular systems, which is based on a path integral formulation of the flux-flux correlation function. Central is the partitioning of the total system into a relevant part coupled to a dual bath. The latter consists of two parts: First, a set of strongly coupled harmonic modes, describing, for example, intramolecular degrees of freedom. They are treated on the basis of a reaction surface Hamiltonian approach. Second, a set of bath modes mimicking an unspecific environment modeled by means of a continuous spectral density. After deriving a set of general equations expressing the canonical rate constant in terms of appropriate influence functionals, several approximations are introduced to provide an efficient numerical implementation. Results for an initial application to the H-transfer in 6-Aminofulvene-1-aldimine are discussed.

Yang, Yonggang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Network-Adaptive Video Communication Using Packet Path Diversity and Rate-Distortion Optimized Reference Picture Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present error-resilient Internet video transmission using path diversity and rate-distortion optimized reference picture selection. Under this scheme, the optimal packet dependency is determined adapting to network characteristics and ... Keywords: Path diversity, error-resilient video coding, low-latency, network-adaptive video coding, rate-distortion optimization, reference picture selection, source-channel coding, video streaming

Yi J. Liang; Eric Setton; Bernd Girod

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

310

Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Image-based spectral distortion correction for photon-counting x-ray detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using an image-based method to correct for distortions induced by various artifacts in the x-ray spectrum recorded with photon-counting detectors for their application in breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: The polyenergetic incident spectrum was simulated with the tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) code and carefully calibrated to match the x-ray tube in this study. Experiments were performed on a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) photon-counting detector with five energy thresholds. Energy bins were adjusted to evenly distribute the recorded counts above the noise floor. BR12 phantoms of various thicknesses were used for calibration. A nonlinear function was selected to fit the count correlation between the simulated and the measured spectra in the calibration process. To evaluate the proposed spectral distortion correction method, an empirical fitting derived from the calibration process was applied on the raw images recorded for polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm. Both the corrected counts and the effective attenuation coefficient were compared to the simulated values for each of the five energy bins. The feasibility of applying the proposed method to quantitative material decomposition was tested using a dual-energy imaging technique with a three-material phantom that consisted of water, lipid, and protein. The performance of the spectral distortion correction method was quantified using the relative root-mean-square (RMS) error with respect to the expected values from simulations or areal analysis of the decomposition phantom. Results: The implementation of the proposed method reduced the relative RMS error of the output counts in the five energy bins with respect to the simulated incident counts from 23.0%, 33.0%, and 54.0% to 1.2%, 1.8%, and 7.7% for 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm PMMA phantoms, respectively. The accuracy of the effective attenuation coefficient of PMMA estimate was also improved with the proposed spectral distortion correction. Finally, the relative RMS error of water, lipid, and protein decompositions in dual-energy imaging was significantly reduced from 53.4% to 6.8% after correction was applied. Conclusions: The study demonstrated that dramatic distortions in the recorded raw image yielded from a photon-counting detector could be expected, which presents great challenges for applying the quantitative material decomposition method in spectral CT. The proposed semi-empirical correction method can effectively reduce these errors caused by various artifacts, including pulse pileup and charge sharing effects. Furthermore, rather than detector-specific simulation packages, the method requires a relatively simple calibration process and knowledge about the incident spectrum. Therefore, it may be used as a generalized procedure for the spectral distortion correction of different photon-counting detectors in clinical breast CT systems.

Ding Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

313

Thermalization in harmonic particle chains with velocity flips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new mathematical tool for the study of transport properties of models for lattice vibrations in crystalline solids. By replication of dynamical degrees of freedom, we aim at a new dynamical system where the "local" dynamics can be isolated and solved independently from the "global" evolution. The replication procedure is very generic but not unique as it depends on how the original dynamics are split between the local and global dynamics. As an explicit example, we apply the scheme to study thermalization of the pinned harmonic chain with velocity flips. We improve on the previous results about this system by showing that after a relatively short time period the average kinetic temperature profile satisfies the dynamic Fourier's law in a local microscopic sense without assuming that the initial data is close to a local equilibrium state. The bounds derived here prove that the above thermalization period is at most of the order L^(2/3), where L denotes the number of particles in the chain. In particular, even before the diffusive time scale Fourier's law becomes a valid approximation of the evolution of the kinetic temperature profile. As a second application of the dynamic replica method, we also briefly discuss replacing the velocity flips by an anharmonic onsite potential.

Jani Lukkarinen

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

Time-frequency analysis and Harmonic Gaussian Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method for time-frequency analysis is given. The approach utilizes properties of Gaussian distribution, properties of Hermite polynomials and Fourier analysis. We begin by the definitions of a set of functions called harmonic Gaussian functions. Then these functions are used to define a set of transformations,noted T_n, which associate to a function {\\psi},of the time variable t, a set of functions {\\Psi}_n which depend on time, frequency and frequency (or time) standard deviation. Some properties of the transformations T_n and the functions {\\Psi}_n are given. It is proved in particular that the square of the modulus of each function {\\Psi}_n can be interpreted as a representation of the energy distribution of the signal, represented by the function {\\psi}, in the time-frequency plane for a given value of the frequency (or time) standard deviation. It is also shown that the function {\\psi}, can be recovered from the functions{\\Psi}_n.

Tokiniaina Ranaivoson; Raoelina Andriambololona; Rakotoson Hanitriarivo

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

315

Energy transport by acoustic modes of harmonic lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the large scale evolution of a scalar lattice excitation which satisfies a discrete wave-equation in three dimensions. We assume that the dispersion relation associated to the elastic coupling constants of the wave-equation is acoustic, i.e., it has a singularity of the type |k| near the vanishing wave vector, k=0. To derive equations that describe the macroscopic energy transport we introduce the Wigner transform and change variables so that the spatial and temporal scales are of the order of epsilon. In the continuum limit, which is achieved by sending the parameter epsilon to 0, the Wigner transform disintegrates into three different limit objects: the transform of the weak limit, the H-measure and the Wigner-measure. We demonstrate that these three limit objects satisfy a set of decoupled transport equations: a wave-equation for the weak limit of the rescaled initial data, a dispersive transport equation for the regular limiting Wigner measure, and a geometric optics transport equation for the H-measure limit of the initial data concentrating to k=0. A simple consequence of our result is the complete characterization of energy transport in harmonic lattices with acoustic dispersion relations.

Lisa Harris; Jani Lukkarinen; Stefan Teufel; Florian Theil

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

316

Spherical Harmonic Solutions to the 3D Kobayashi Benchmark Suite  

SciTech Connect

Spherical harmonic solutions of order 5, 9 and 21 on spatial grids containing up to 3.3 million cells are presented for the Kobayashi benchmark suite. This suite of three problems with simple geometry of pure absorber with large void region was proposed by Professor Kobayashi at an OECD/NEA meeting in 1996. Each of the three problems contains a source, a void and a shield region. Problem 1 can best be described as a box in a box problem, where a source region is surrounded by a square void region which itself is embedded in a square shield region. Problems 2 and 3 represent a shield with a void duct. Problem 2 having a straight and problem 3 a dog leg shaped duct. A pure absorber and a 50% scattering case are considered for each of the three problems. The solutions have been obtained with Ardra, a scalable, parallel neutron transport code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Ardra code takes advantage of a two-level parallelization strategy, which combines message passing between processing nodes and thread based parallelism amongst processors on each node. All calculations were performed on the IBM ASCI Blue-Pacific computer at LLNL.

Brown, P.N.; Chang, B.; Hanebutte, U.R.

1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

High-efficiency second-harmonic generation in doubly-resonant ?[superscript (2)] microring resonators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By directly simulating Maxwells equations via the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we numerically demonstrate the possibility of achieving high-efficiency second harmonic generation (SHG) in a structure ...

Bi, Zhuan-Fang

318

Frequency-tunable second-harmonic submillimeter-wave gyrotron oscillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports the design and experimental demonstration of frequency-tunable submillimeter-wave gyrotrons operating in continuous wave (CW) at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. An unprecedented ...

Sousa, Antonio C. Torrezan de (Antonio Carlos Torrezan de)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Optimal Estimation of Spherical Harmonic Components from a Sample with Spatially Nonuniform Covariance Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optimal estimation technique is presented to estimate spherical harmonic coefficients. This technique is based on the minimization of the mean square error. This optimal estimation technique consists of computing optimal weights for a given ...

Kwang-Y. Kim; Gerald R. North; Samuel S. Shen

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

Heath, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A continuous-wave second harmonic gyrotron oscillator at 460 GHz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the short pulse and CW operation of a 460 GHz gyrotron oscillator both at the fundamental (near 230 GHz) and second harmonic (near 460 GHz) of electron cyclotron resonance. During operation in a complete CW regime ...

Hornstein, Melissa K. (Melissa Kristen), 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The Harmonic Constant Datum Method: Options for Overcoming Datum Discontinuities at MixedDiurnal Tidal Transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The harmonic constant datum (HCD) method is a computationally efficient way of estimating tidal datums relative to mean sea level, without the need to compute long time series. However, datum discontinuities can occur between mixed and diurnal ...

Harold O. Mofjeld; Angie J. Venturato; Frank I. Gonzlez; Vasily V. Titov; Jean C. Newman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fast Spherical Harmonic Transform Routine FLTSS Applied to the Shallow Water Test Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast spherical harmonic transform algorithm proposed by Suda and Takami is evaluated in the solutions of the shallow water equation test set defined by Williamson et al. through replacing the Legendre transforms of the NCAR spectral transform ...

Reiji Suda

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Relativistic second-harmonic generation of a laser from underdense plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high intensity laser obliquely incident on a vacuum-plasma interface produces second-harmonic radiation in the reflected component. The efficiency of second-harmonic generation increases with the angle of incidence, up to critical angle of incidence (our model is not valid beyond critical angle of incidence). The efficiency also depends on electron density, showing a maximum at {omega}{sub p}{sup 2}/{omega}{sup 2} congruent with 0.7, where {omega}{sub p} and {omega} are relativistic plasma frequency and laser frequency, respectively. The efficiency of second-harmonic generation increases sharply with laser intensity in the nonrelativistic regime and saturates at higher intensities. The intensity of the second harmonic is proportional to square of the laser intensity at low pump laser intensities and tends to proportional to laser intensity in the strong relativistic regime.

Singh, K.P.; Gupta, D.N.; Yadav, Sushila; Tripathi, V.K. [Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering, Kettering University, Flint, Michigan 48504 (United States); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Photovoltaic power converter system with a controller configured to actively compensate load harmonics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photovoltaic power converter system including a controller configured to reduce load harmonics is provided. The system comprises a photovoltaic array and an inverter electrically coupled to the array to generate an output current for energizing a load connected to the inverter and to a mains grid supply voltage. The system further comprises a controller including a first circuit coupled to receive a load current to measure a harmonic current in the load current. The controller includes a second circuit to generate a fundamental reference drawn by the load. The controller further includes a third circuit for combining the measured harmonic current and the fundamental reference to generate a command output signal for generating the output current for energizing the load connected to the inverter. The photovoltaic system may be configured to compensate harmonic currents that may be drawn by the load.

de Rooij, Michael Andrew (Clifton Park, NY); Steigerwald, Robert Louis (Burnt Hills, NY); Delgado, Eladio Clemente (Burnt Hills, NY)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

326

EFFECT OF ORBIT DISTORTIONS LAND BETATRON TUNE ON THE RHIC POLARIZED BEAM.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polarized protons have been stored and accelerated in RHIC from G{sub {gamma}} = 46.5 to 60 during Run2000 with only one Siberian snake installed. We simulated with the spin tracking code Spink the behavior of polarized protons, in particular the effect of closed orbit distortions and betatron tune variation on the spin dynamics. According to simulation results, closed orbit and tune effects will be translated into requirements for the tune and orbit correction systems for the RHIC polarized proton Run2001, when both Siberian snakes will be available.

LUCCIO,A.U.; PILAT,F.; PTITSYN,V.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

327

Measurement and modeling of mirror distortion in a high power FEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mirror heating in a high power FEL can alter the optical mode and affect the gain of the laser. This can lead to a large reduction of the laser power from ideal values. Measurements of the power and mode size in the Jefferson Lab IR Demo laser have shown clear evidence of mirror distortion at high average power leading (up to 17 kW incident on the mirrors and over 40 W absorbed per mirror). The measurements and comparisons with modeling will be presented. Both steady state and transient analyses and measurements are considered.

Benson, S.; Neil, G.; Michelle D. Shinn

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of a Commercial Device for Measurement of Residential Transients and Harmonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes laboratory testing to evaluate the technical performance of the Microsurge Stetzer meter, a commercially available device for measuring electrical transients and harmonics on residential circuits. This device has been developed to measure low-level unwanted signals (higher-frequency harmonics and transients) introduced onto 50/60 Hz household mains through normal operation of appliances within the home and through other environmental signals and transients usually present on ...

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Well-posed initial-boundary value problem for the harmonic Einstein equations using energy estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent work, we used pseudo-differential theory to establish conditions that the initial-boundary value problem for second order systems of wave equations be strongly well-posed in a generalized sense. The applications included the harmonic version of the Einstein equations. Here we show that these results can also be obtained via standard energy estimates, thus establishing strong well-posedness of the harmonic Einstein problem in the classical sense.

H. -O. Kreiss; O. Reula; O. Sarbach; J. Winicour

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

330

First Harmonic (2f) Characterisation of Resonant Frequency and Q-Factor of Micromechanical Transducers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the response to the first harmonic component (2f) of the electrostatic force in single terminal driven electrostatic comb-drive and parallel-plate drive was used as a signal to extract device parameters, namely, the Q-factor and ... Keywords: Lorentzian curve-fitting, electrostatic drive, experimental modal analysis, first harmonic (2f), lock-in technique, resonance curve area (RCA)

V. J. Logeeswaran; F. E. H. Tay; M. L. Chan; F. S. Chau; Y. C. Liang

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

High-order-harmonic generation in gas with a flat-top laser beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present experimental and numerical results on high-order-harmonic generation with a flat-top laser beam. We show that a simple binary tunable phase plate, made of two concentric glass plates, can produce a flat-top profile at the focus of a Gaussian infrared beam. Both experiments and numerical calculations show that there is a scaling law between the harmonic generation efficiency and the increase of the generation volume.

Boutu, W.; Auguste, T.; Binazon, L.; Gobert, O.; Carre, B. [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, CEA-Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Boyko, O.; Valentin, C. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, UMR 7639 ENSTA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, FR-91761 Palaiseau (France); Sola, I.; Constant, E.; Mevel, E. [Universite de Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS UMR 5107, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), FR-33400 Talence (France); Balcou, Ph. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, UMR 7639 ENSTA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, FR-91761 Palaiseau (France); Universite de Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS UMR 5107, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), FR-33400 Talence (France); Merdji, H. [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, CEA-Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); PULSE Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pump/XUV probe time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TRARPES) utilizing high-harmonic generation from a noble gas. Femtosecond temporal resolution for each selected harmonic is achieved by using a time-delay-compensated monochromator (TCM). The source has been used to obtain photoemission spectra from insulators (UO{sub 2}) and ultrafast pump/probe processes in semiconductors (GaAs).

Dakovski, Georgi L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yinwan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Harmonic mode competition in a terahertz gyrotron backward-wave oscillator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron cyclotron maser interactions at terahertz (THz) frequencies require a high-order-mode structure to reduce the wall loss to a tolerable level. To generate THz radiation, it is also essential to employ cyclotron harmonic resonances to reduce the required magnetic field strength to a value within the capability of the superconducting magnets. However, much weaker harmonic interactions in a high-order-mode structure lead to serious mode competition problems. The current paper addresses harmonic mode competition in the gyrotron backward wave oscillator (gyro-BWO). We begin with a comparative study of the mode formation and oscillation thresholds in the gyro-BWO and gyromonotron. Differences in linear features result in far fewer 'windows' for harmonic operation of the gyro-BWO. Nonlinear consequences of these differences are examined in particle simulations of the multimode competition processes in the gyro-BWO, which shed light on the competition criteria between modes of different as well as the same cyclotron harmonic numbers. The viability of a harmonic gyro-BWO is assessed on the basis of the results obtained.

Kao, S. H.; Chiu, C. C.; Chang, P. C.; Wu, K. L.; Chu, K. R. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Multidimensional high harmonic spectroscopy: A semi-classical perspective on measuring multielectron rearrangement upon ionization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High harmonic spectroscopy has the potential to combine attosecond temporal with sub-Angstrom spatial resolution of the early nuclear and multielectron dynamics in molecules. It involves strong field ionization of the molecule by the IR laser field followed by time-delayed recombination of the removed electron with the molecular ion. The time-delay is controlled on the attosecond time scale by the oscillation of the IR field and is mapped into the harmonic number, providing a movie of molecular dynamics between ionization and recombination. One of the challenges in the analysis of high harmonic signal stems from the fact that the complex dynamics of both ionization and recombination with their multiple observables are entangled in the harmonic signal. Disentangling this information requires multidimensional approach, capable of mapping ionization and recombination dynamics into different independent parameters. We suggest multidimensional high harmonic spectroscopy as a tool for characterizing of ionization and recombination processes separately allowing for simultaneous detection of both the ionization delays and sub-cycle ionization rates. Our method extends the capability of the two dimensional (2D) set-up suggested recently by Shafir et al on reconstructing ionization delays, while keeping the reconstruction procedure as simple as in the original proposal. The scheme is based on the optimization of the high harmonic signal in orthogonally polarized strong fundamental and relatively weak multicolour control fields.

Valeria Serbinenko; Olga Smirnova

2013-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

335

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports...

336

Standard test method for measurement of roll wave optical distortion in heat-treated flat glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method is applicable to the determination of the peak-to-valley depth and peak-to-peak distances of the out-of-plane deformation referred to as roll wave which occurs in flat, heat-treated architectural glass substrates processed in a heat processing continuous or oscillating conveyance oven. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This test method does not address other flatness issues like edge kink, ream, pocket distortion, bow, or other distortions outside of roll wave as defined in this test method. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Lack of a Jahn-Teller Distortion in La1-xSrxCoO3 Determined by EXAFS and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lack of a Jahn-Teller Distortion in Lack of a Jahn-Teller Distortion in La1-xSrxCoO3 Determined by EXAFS and Neutron PDF Studies The transition metal oxides exhibit a wide range of interesting properties, of which superconductivity in the copper oxides and colossal magnetoresistance in the manganese oxides are perhaps the best known. However, the strange magnetic behavior of several cobalt oxides is another example of these unusual properties, although not yet as intensively studied. The cobaltite system La1-xSrxCoO3 (LSCO) has a rich temperature-concentration phase diagram with anti-ferromagnetism and insulating behavior at low Sr concentrations, and ferromagnetism and metallic behavior at higher concentrations. The magnetism for the end compound LaCoO3 (LCO) is particularly unusual; it has no Co spin magnetic moment at low T (and is diamagnetic). As T increases from 4K, the magnetic susceptibility increases dramatically up to roughly 100K, and then decreases as T is increased to 300K. This behavior has been attributed to Co+3 having several different spin configurations. Initially only two were considered, a low spin state (LS, S=0) that is not magnetic and a high spin state (HS, S=2) that is strongly magnetic. In the '90s a third, intermediate spin configuration (IS, S=1) was proposed by Potze, et al. and Korotin, et al; this configuration should result in a distortion of the CoO6 octahedra (called a Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion). In the late '90s, Louca et al. reported neutron PDF results indicating a distorted Co-O environment, comparable to the Mn-O distortions observed in the similar manganite systems La1-yCayMnO3 (LCMO) and La1-zSrzMnO3 (LSMO). However, to date, these neutron PDF data for the cobaltites are the only structural results that support a JT distortion. While some recent experimental results are argued to be consistent with a large Co-O JT distortion and its associated IS state, many others appear to be inconsistent with such an interpretation. Our group at UC Santa Cruz, therefore took a closer look at the possibility of a JT distortion of the CoO6 octahedra, using a combination of the EXAFS and neutron PDF techniques; here we focus on the Co K-edge EXAFS results, for data collected at SSRL.

338

The Efficacy of Profile Matching as a Means of Controlling for the Effects of Response Distortion on Personality Measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Researchers and practitioners continue to be concerned about the magnitude, extent, and effects of response distortion when self-report personality measures are used in high-stakes testing. One method for mitigating response distortion that has not received much empirical attention is profile matching. Profile matching assesses the fit between test-takers predictor profiles and a standard profile which represents an ideal or high performing employees profile. Since profile matching assesses fit, it can capture nonlinear effects. Furthermore, high predictor scores are not necessarily associated with higher criterion scores. Testtakers who distort their responses by choosing inaccurately extreme response options may improve their chances of being hired if a linear model is used, but this approach is unlikely to be effective if a profile matching strategy is used as long as the standard profile is unknown to the test-takers. As such, the primary objective of the present study was to examine the extent to which profile matching may alleviate concerns about response distortion. A secondary objective was to examine characteristics of the standard profile that are associated with the efficacy of this approach. The present study compared the effects of response distortion on personality test scores, and their criterion-related validity in predicting tenure, based on a linear composite and a profile fit score. The present study used data from 996 applicants who completed a personality test in a high-stakes testing context. Missing data were imputed for a subset of applicants who did not complete two response distortion scales. As such, the results provided an initial proof-of-concept of the effectiveness of profile matching as a personnel decision-making strategy using a blend of real and simulated data. The results suggest that profile fit scores are less related to response distortion and display higher criterion-related validity than linear composite scores. However, the difference in criterion-related validity could not be attributed to response distortion. The results further suggest that the amount of scatter in the standard profile is negatively associated with the profile fit scores susceptibility to response distortion and positively related to criterion-related validity.

Glaze, Ryan 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Compact Totally Disconnected Moufang Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\Delta$ be a spherical building each of whose irreducible components is infinite, has rank at least 2 and satisfies the Moufang condition. We show that $\\Delta$ can be given the structure of a topological building that is compact and totally disconnected precisely when $\\Delta$ is the building at infinity of a locally finite affine building.

Grundhofer, T; Van Maldeghem, H; Weiss, R M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. Total 135,676 127,682 120,936 133,646 119,888 93,672 1936-2012 PAD District 1 78,197 73,348 69,886 88,999 79,188 59,594 1981-2012...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Correlation energies in distorted 3d-t{sub 2g} perovskite oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an effective low-energy Hamiltonian derived from the first-principles electronic structure calculations for the narrow t{sub 2g} bands of YTiO{sub 3}, LaTiO{sub 3}, YVO{sub 3}, and LaVO{sub 3}, we evaluate the contributions of the correlation energy E{sub c} to the stability of different magnetic structures that can be realized in these distorted perovskite oxides. We consider two approximations for E{sub c} that are based on regular perturbation theory expansion around a nondegenerate Hartree-Fock ground state. One is the second order of perturbation theory, which allows comparing the effects of local and nonlocal correlations. The other is the local t-matrix approach, which allows treating some higher-order contributions to E{sub c}. The correlation effects systematically improve the agreement with the experimental data and additionally stabilize the experimentally observed G- and C-type antifer-romagnetic (AFM) structures in YVO{sub 3} and LaVO{sub 3}, although the absolute magnitude of the stabilization energy is sensitive to the level of approximations and is somewhat smaller in the t-matrix method. The nonlocal correlations additionally stabilize the ferromagnetic ground state in YTiO{sub 3} and the C-type AFM ground state in LaVO{sub 3}. Among two inequivalent transition-metal sites in the monoclinic structure, the local correlations are stronger at the sites with the least distorted environment. Limitations of the regular perturbation-theory expansion for LaTiO{sub 3} are also discussed.

Solovyev, I. V. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Computational Materials Science Center (CMSC) (Japan)], E-mail: solovyev.igor@nims.go.jp

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Correlation Energies in Distorted 3d-t2g Perovskite Oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an effective low-energy Hamiltonian derived from the first-principles electronic structure calculations for the narrow t2g bands of YTiO3, LaTiO3, YVO3, and LaVO3, we evaluate the contributions of the correlation energy (EC) to the stability of different magnetic structures, which can be realized in these distorted perovskite oxides. We consider two approximations for EC, which are based on the regular perturbation theory expansion around a nondegenerate Hartree-Fock ground state. One is the second order of perturbation theory, which allows us to compare the effects of local and nonlocal correlations. Another one is the local t-matrix approach, which allows us to treat some higher-order contributions to EC. The correlation effects systematically improve the agreement with the experimental data and additionally stabilize the experimentally observed G- and C-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) structures in YVO3 and LaVO3, though the absolute magnitude of the stabilization energy is sensitive to the level of approximations and somewhat smaller in the t-matrix method. The nonlocal correlations additionally stabilize the ferromagnetic ground state in YTiO3 and the C-type AFM ground state in LaVO3. Amongst two inequivalent transition-metal sites in the monoclinic structure, the local correlations are stronger at the sites with the least distorted environment. Limitations of the regular perturbation-theory expansion for LaTiO3 are also discussed. PACS: 71.10.-w; 71.15.Nc; 71.28.+d; 75.25.+z 1.

I. V. Solovyev

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Control of high-order harmonics for attoscience using a static-electric-field pattern  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum control in high-order-harmonic generation is considered theoretically by using a spatial distribution of static electric fields along the propagation direction of the driving field. It is shown that the trajectories of the electrons during its acceleration by the laser field in the high-harmonics-generation process can be controlled by periodically distributed static electric fields, which conveniently shape the driving laser field during propagation. Applying this mechanism, a quasi-phase-matching scheme that leads to filtered enhanced high harmonics is achieved. The harmonics in the plateau region are enhanced due to periodical phase variations in the long quantum trajectories as a consequence of the faster change experienced by the intensity-dependent phase along the longer electron trajectories. This effect should be observed in all quasi-phase-matching schemes based on perturbation of the microscopic quantum phase. The richness of adding a static-electric-field spatial pattern in the interaction region suggests a general scheme for feedback loop control in high-order-harmonic generation.

Serrat, Carles [UPC-Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Colom 11, E-08222 Terrassa (Barcelona) (Spain)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

345

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

346

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

347

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

348

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

349

run 873 - 7 September 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - 26 GeV, Orbit distortions due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

run 873 - 7 September 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - 26 GeV, Orbit distortions due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion

Gourber, J P

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Run 888 - 28 October 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - GeV, Orbit distortion due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion - part 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Run 888 - 28 October 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - GeV, Orbit distortion due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion - part 2

Brand, K

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Modeling of large aperture third harmonic frequency conversion of high power Nd:glass laser systems  

SciTech Connect

To provide high-energy, high-power beams at short wavelengths for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments, we routinely convert the 1.053-{mu}m output of the Nova, Nd:phosphate-glass, laser system to its third-harmonic wavelength. We describe performance and conversion efficiency modeling of the 3 {times} 3 arrays potassium-dihydrogen-phosphate crystal plates used for type II/type II phase-matched harmonic conversion of Nova 0.74-m diameter beams, and an alternate type I/type II phase-matching configuration that improves the third-harmonic conversion efficiency. These arrays provide energy conversion of up to 65% and intensity conversion to 70%. 19 refs., 11 figs.

Henesian, M.A.; Wegner, P.J.; Speck, D.R.; Bibeau, C.; Ehrlich, R.B.; Laumann, C.W.; Lawson, J.K.; Weiland, T.L.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Harmonic and Sideband Structure of the Kilohertz Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in Sco X-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer to search for harmonics and sidebands of the two simultaneous kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in Sco X-1. We do not detect any of these harmonics or sidebands, with 95% confidence upper limits to their power between ~ 1% and ~ 10% of the power of the upper kHz QPO. The oscillations produced at these frequencies may be attenuated in a scattering corona around the neutron star. We find that upper limits to the unattenuated power of some of the strongest theoretically predicted harmonics and sidebands are as low as ~ 2% of the unattenuated power of the high-frequency QPO in Sco X-1.

Mariano Mendez; Michiel van der Klis

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

353

Dynamic Analysis of Wind Turbine Planetary Gears Using an Extended Harmonic Balance Approach: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dynamics of wind turbine planetary gears with gravity effects are investigated using an extended harmonic balance method that extends established harmonic balance formulations to include simultaneous internal and external excitations. The extended harmonic balance method with arc-length continuation and Floquet theory is applied to a lumped-parameter planetary gear model including gravity, fluctuating mesh stiffness, bearing clearance, and nonlinear tooth contact to obtain the planetary gear dynamic response. The calculated responses compare well with time domain integrated mathematical models and experimental results. Gravity is a fundamental vibration source in wind turbine planetary gears and plays an important role in system dynamics, causing hardening effects induced by tooth wedging and bearing-raceway contacts. Bearing clearance significantly reduces the lowest resonant frequencies of translational modes. Gravity and bearing clearance together lowers the speed at which tooth wedging occurs lower than the resonant frequency.

Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; Parker, R. G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Optimisation of An HHG-Seeded Harmonic Cascade FEL Design for the NLS Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization studies of an HHG-seeded harmonic cascade FEL design for the UK's proposed New Light Source (NLS) facility are presented. Three separate FELs are planned to meet the requirements for continuous coverage of the photon energy range 50-1000 eV with variable polarization, 20 fs pulse widths and good temporal coherence. The design uses an HHG seed source tuneable from 50-100 eV to provide direct FEL seeding in this range, and one or two stage harmonic cascades to reach the higher photon energies. Studies have been carried out to optimize a harmonic cascade FEL operating at 1 keV; topics investigated include modulator configuration, seed power level and ef- fects of the HHG seed structure. FEL simulations using realistic electron beam distributions are presented and tolerance to increased emittance has been considered.

Dunning, David; /Daresbury; Thompson, Neil; /Daresbury; Bartolini, Riccardo; /Oxford U., JAI; Geng, Huiping; /SLAC; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC; McNeil, Brian; /Strathclyde U.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

355

Nonlinear harmonic generation and devices in doubly-resonant Kerr cavities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describea theoretical analysis of the nonlinear dynamics of third-harmonic generation ($\\omega\\to3\\omega$) via Kerr ($\\chithree$) nonlinearities in a resonant cavity with resonances at both $\\omega$ and $3\\omega$. Such a doubly resonant cavity greatly reduces the required power for efficient harmonic generation, by a factor of $\\sim V/Q^2$ where $V$ is the modal volume and $Q$ is the lifetime, and can even exhibit 100% harmonic conversion efficiency at a critical input power. However, we show that it also exhibits a rich variety of nonlinear dynamics, such as multistable solutions and long-period limit cycles.We describe how to compensate for self/cross-phase modulation (which otherwise shifts the cavity frequencies out of resonance), and how to excite the different stable solutions (and especially the high-efficiency solutions) by specially modulated input pulses.

Hashemi, Hila; Joannopoulos, J D; Soljači?, Marin; Johnson, Steven G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

High-order harmonic generation with Rydberg atoms by using an intense few-cycle pulse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate that high-order harmonic generation (HHG) with both high cutoff frequency and high conversion efficiency can be realized by using a Rydberg atom in a few-cycle laser pulse. This is because a Rydberg state has a large electron orbital radius and small binding energy; therefore an electron in the Rydberg state can be ionized easily and accelerated directly toward the core under the interaction of a few-cycle laser pulse, leading to emission of harmonic photons. In this case, the tunneling process of the electron is not involved and, hence, the conversion efficiency and the cutoff frequency of harmonic generation can be higher than that predicted by the conventional three-step model.

Zhai Zhen; Fu Panming; Wang Bingbing [Laboratory of Optical Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Zhu Qiren [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Chen Jing [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yan Zongchao [Department of Physics, University of New Brunswick, P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Application of Elliott's SU(3) model to the triaxially deformed harmonic oscillators  

SciTech Connect

We have introduced new bosons corresponding to the integral ratio of three frequencies for a harmonic oscillator potential, by means of a non-linear transformation which realizes the SU(3) group as a dynamical symmetry group, and which leaves the anisotropic harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian invariant. The classification of the single-particle levels based on this covering group predicts magic numbers depending on the deformation parameters {delta} and {gamma}. The special cases with tan {gamma} = 1/{radical}(3)({gamma} = 30 deg.) and {radical}(3)/5({gamma}{approx}19 deg.) are discussed.

Sugawara-Tanabe, Kazuko [Otsuma Women's University, Tama, Tokyo 206-8540 (Japan); Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

358

A method for reducing harmonics in output voltages of a double-connected inverter  

SciTech Connect

A new method for reducing harmonics involved in output voltages of the double-connected inverter is proposed. By adding four auxiliary switching devices and an interphase transformer with secondary winding to the conventional 12-step inverter, output voltages of the proposed circuit can be almost the same waveforms as a conventional 36-step inverter. In this paper, circuit performances and output voltage waveforms are discussed, and the optimum parameters are derived. Then, effects on harmonic reductions can be clarified by theoretical and experimental results, and ratings of system components are investigated.

Masukawa, Shigeo; Iida, Shoji (Tokyo Denki Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Flow Distortion by a Solent Sonic Anemometer: Wind Tunnel Calibration and Its Assessment for Flux Measurements over Forest and Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Main flow distortion effects caused by the sonic probe (i.e., deflection and attenuation/amplification of the wind vector) as a function of the azimuth angle of the incoming flow were examined by means of wind tunnel measurements at four ...

A. Grelle; A. Lindroth

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Spectral restoration from low signal-to-noise, distorted NMR signals: application to hyphenated capillary electrophoresis-NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectral restoration from low signal-to-noise, distorted NMR signals: application to hyphenated capillary electrophoresis-NMR Yu Li,a,b Michael E. Lacey,b,c Jonathan V. Sweedler,b,c and Andrew G. Webba; revised 11 February 2003 Abstract In capillary electrophoresis separations coupled to NMR signal detection

Andrews, Anne M.

362

Modeling and simulation of a single phase photovoltaic inverter and investigation of switching strategies for harmonic minimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to build an EMTDC model of a single phase photovoltaic inverter and to investigate switching strategies for harmonic minimisation. For the simulation of this model, the PSCAD/EMTDC software package was used and the waveforms ... Keywords: EMTDC model, harmonic minimization, single-phase photovoltaic inverter

St. Kourtesi; L. Ekonomou; A. Nakulas; G. P. Fotis; E. Zoulias

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 45, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009 1465 Cerenkov-Type Second-Harmonic Generation in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 45, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009 1465 Cerenkov-Type Second the Cerenkov-type second-harmonic gen- eration in several different two-dimensional nonlinear photonic observe either single or double Cerenkov-like second-harmonic rings. We discuss the properties

Arie, Ady

364

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

365

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

366

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

The effects of supply harmonics on the performance of compact fluorescent lamps  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a performance evaluation of ten compact fluorescent lighting systems operated with sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform conditions. The lamps were either provided with an electronic ballast, a magnetic core ballast or a magnetic core ballast with a power factor correction circuit. The test results show that the electrical performance of the compact fluorescent lamps for both sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform operation is related to the different types of ballast used. The cost of operation of these compact fluorescent lamps was calculated and compared to the cost of a conventional 60 W incandescent lamp.

Arseneau, R.; Ouellette, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

369

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Effect of two-phase natural circulation distortion on tube failure in steam boilers  

SciTech Connect

Two different cases of evaporator tube ruptures in power station boilers due to natural circulation distortion are presented. The first case discussed concerns a 110-MW/sub e/ unit boiler with bottom evaporation tubing inclined at 15/sup 0/ to the horizontal. At the high heat fluxes present in the furnace, subcooled boiling occurs in inclined tubes. For these inclinations an insufficient flow rate causes local heat transfer deficiencies due to vapor-water separation. The introduction of internally finned tubes eliminates local heat transfer deficiencies and prevents further tube failures. The second case is that of circulation interruption due to blowdown during start-up. The water level in the drum of this second 110-MW/sub e/ unit boiler was controlled by inlet header blowdown during start-up. Thus, natural circulation was interrupted, causing local overheating of evaporator tubing. The event was identified by an increase of the tube rupture frequency. After changing the blowdown procedure, the interruptions of natural circulation were avoided and the tube failure frequency decreased substantially.

Afgan, N.; Radovanovic, P.; Brajuskovic, B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Social-Psychological harmonic oscillators in the self-regulation of organizations and systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose ab initio the existence of social-psychological harmonic oscillators (SPHO) acting computationally in the minds of an intelligent audience that a self-regulated collective exploits to solve problems, resolve complex issues, or entertain ... Keywords: conservation of information, incomplete information, interdependence

William F. Lawless; Donald A. Sofge

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A Multilevel Active Front-End Rectifier With Current Harmonic Compensation Capability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transformation. By controlling id and iq at the rectifier input side, the active and reactive power absorbed-q transformation requires a more complex hardware and software implementation. The power circuit topology-end rectifier that can absorb current harmonics generated by nonlinear loads connected to the same power

Rudnick, Hugh

373

A new spherical harmonics scheme for multi-dimensional radiation transport I. Static matter configurations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work by McClarren and Hauck (2010) [31] suggests that the filtered spherical harmonics method represents an efficient, robust, and accurate method for radiation transport, at least in the two-dimensional (2D) case. We extend their work to the ... Keywords: Asymptotic diffusion limit, Discontinuous Galerkin, PN-method, Radiation transport

David Radice, Ernazar Abdikamalov, Luciano Rezzolla, Christian D. Ott

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Harmonic Generation at Lower Electron Energies for a Hard X-ray FEL  

SciTech Connect

There are several schemes currently being investigated to pre-bunch the electron beam and step the coherent bunching up to higher harmonics, all which require modulator sections which introduce additional energy modulation. X-ray FELs operate in a regime where the FEL parameter, {rho} is equal to or less than the effective energy spread introduced from the emittance in the electron beam. Because of this large effective energy spread, the energy modulation introduced from harmonic generation schemes would seriously degrade FEL performance. This problem can be mitigated by incorporating the harmonic generation scheme at a lower electron kinetic energy than the energy at the final undulator. This will help because the effective energy spread from emittance is reduced at lower energies, and can be further reduced by making the beam transversely large. Then the beam can be squeezed down slowly enough in the subsequent accelerator sections so that geometric debunching is mitigated. The beam size inside the dispersive chicanes and in the accelerator sections must be carefully optimized to avoid debunching, and each subharmonic modulator section must generate enough energy modulation to overcome the SASE noise without significantly increasing the gain length in the final undulator. Here we show analytical results that demonstrate the feasibility of this harmonic pre-bunching scheme.

Marksteiner, Quinn R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Spectral analysis of non-commutative harmonic oscillators: the lowest eigenvalue and no crossing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lowest eigenvalue of non-commutative harmonic oscillators $Q$ is studied. It is shown that $Q$ can be decomposed into four self-adjoint operators, and all the eigenvalues of each operator are simple. We show that the lowest eigenvalue $E$ of $Q$ is simple. Furthermore a Jacobi matrix representation of $Q$ is given and spectrum of $Q$ is considered numerically.

Fumio Hiroshima; Itaru Sasaki

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

A Harmonic-Fourier Spectral Limited-Area Model with an External Wind Lateral Boundary Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In comparison to the Tatsumis spectral method, the harmonic-Fourier spectral method has two major advantages. 1) The semi-implicit scheme is quite efficient because the solutions of the Poisson and Helmholtz equations are readily derived. 2) The ...

Qiu-shi Chen; Le-sheng Bai; David H. Bromwich

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

High-order harmonics from bow wave caustics driven by a high-intensity laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new mechanism of high-order harmonic generation during an interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with underdense plasma. A tightly focused laser pulse creates a cavity in plasma pushing electrons aside and exciting the wake wave and the bow wave. At the joint of the cavity wall and the bow wave boundary, an annular spike of electron density is formed. This spike surrounds the cavity and moves together with the laser pulse. Collective motion of electrons in the spike driven by the laser field generates high-order harmonics. A strong localization of the electron spike, its robustness to oscillations imposed by the laser field and, consequently, its ability to produce high-order harmonics is explained by catastrophe theory. The proposed mechanism explains the experimental observations of high-order harmonics with the 9 TW J-KAREN laser (JAEA, Japan) and the 120 TW Astra Gemini laser (CLF RAL, UK) [A. S. Pirozhkov, et al., arXiv:1004.4514 (2010); A. S. Pirozhkov et al, AIP Proceedings, this volume]. The theory is corroborated by high-resolution two-and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

Pirozhkov, A.S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T.Zh. [Advanced Beam Technology Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); and others

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

378

SMI 2011: Full Paper: Interactive 3D caricature from harmonic exaggeration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common variant of caricature relies on exaggerating characteristics of a shape that differs from a reference template, usually the distinctive traits of a human portrait. This work introduces a caricature tool that interactively emphasizes the differences ... Keywords: Caricature, GPU, Interactive, Manifold harmonics, Modeling

Thomas Lewiner; Thales Vieira; Dimas Martnez; Adelailson Peixoto; Vincius Mello; Luiz Velho

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Continuous vs. discrete models for the quantum harmonic oscillator and the hydrogen atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kravchuk and Meixner polynomials of discrete variable are introduced for the discrete models of the harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom. Starting from Rodrigues formula we construct raising and lowering operators, commutation and anticommutation relations. The physical properties of discrete models are figured out through the equivalence with the continuous models obtained by limit process.

M. Lorente

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fabrication of band-gap structures in planar nonlinear waveguides for second harmonic generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work presented here deals with the design and fabrication of the linear grating on a LiNbO3 planar waveguide to obtain an efficient second harmonic generation operating in Cerenkov configuration. The lithium niobate is a nonlinear material ... Keywords: e-beam lithography, nonlinear optics

V. Foglietti; E. Cianci; D. Pezzetta; C. Sibilia; M. Marangoni; R. Osellame; R. Ramponi

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Transient and harmonic voltages associated with automated capacitor switching on distribution systems  

SciTech Connect

One of the functions proposed for distribution automation systems is automated capacitor switching to control power factor and voltage profile on feeder circuits. This is one of the functions being implemented as part of the Athens Automation and Control Experiment on the Athens Utilities Board (AUB) in Athens, Tennessee. A concern with automated capacitor switching is the increase in harmonic and transient voltages due to different capacitor configurations on the distribution system. A study was performed to evaluate the impact of the automated capacitor switching on the AUB distribution system. The study has identified problem areas, methods for determining the problem areas, and possible solutions. The substation capacitor banks were found to be the dominant factor in both the transient and harmonic responses of the distribution system. The harmonic response of the system is dominated by the parallel inductance/capacitance of the circuit comprised of the substation capacitor and equivalent source reactance at the substation. The transient analyses indicated that when the substation capacitor is energized, magnified transient voltages can occur at switched-in feeder capacitors. An evaluation of the effect of automated capacitor switching is necessary to properly design the automated capacitor switching schemes and the required arrester protection for any harmonic and/or transient overvoltage contingency.

Rizy, D.T.; Gunther, E.W.; Mc Granaghan, M.F.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Transient and harmonic voltages associated with automated capacitor switching on distribution systems  

SciTech Connect

One of the functions proposed for distribution system automation is automated capacitor switching to control power factor and voltage profile on feeder circuits. This is one of the functions being implemented as part of the Athens Automation and Control Experiment on the Athens Utilities Board (AUB) in Athens, Tennessee. A concern with automated capacitor switching is the increase in harmonic and transient voltages due to different capacitor configurations on the distribution system. A study was performed to evaluate the impact of the automated capacitor switching on the AUB distribution system. The study has identified problem areas, methods for determining the problem areas and possible solutions. The substation capacitor banks were found to be the dominant factor in both the transient and harmonic responses of the distribution system. The harmonic response of the system is dominated by the parallel inductance/capacitance of the circuit comprised of the substation capacitor and equivent source reactance at the substation. The transient analyses found that when the substation capacitor is energized, magnified transient voltages can occur at switched in feeder capacitors. An evaluation of the effect of automated capacitor switching is necessary to properly design tha automated capacitor switching schemes and the required arrester protection for any harmonic and/or transient overvoltage contingency.

Rizy, D.T.; Gunther, E.W.; McGranaghan, M.F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Wave absorption at the second harmonic of the electron-cyclotron frequency in a tokamak plasma  

SciTech Connect

Wave absorption in the ISX-B tokamak (Phys. Rev. Lett. 44, 647 (1980)) at the second harmonic (..omega.. = 2..omega../sub c/e) of the electron-cyclotron frequency is reported. Measurements of the absorption of a wave polarized in the extraordinary mode and propagating perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field are in agreement with computations.

McDermott, F.S.; Bekefi, G.; England, A.C.; Attenberger, S.E.; Batchelor, D.B.; Edmonds, P.H.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Kindsfather, R.R.; Lazarus, E.A.; Murakami, M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Three-halves harmonic emission from a laser filament in a plasma channel  

SciTech Connect

A self-trapped laser filament is susceptible to decay-producing radially localized Langmuir waves. A nonlinear interaction of the pump wave with the density oscillation at the Langmuir frequency gives rise to three-halves harmonic emissions. Using a basis-function expansion technique, the emitted power in the backward direction is obtained. It decreases with the increasing size of the filament.

Mishra, G.; Talukdar, I.; Tripathi, V.; Tripathi, V.K. (Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics)

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

High conversion efficiency pumped-cavity second harmonic generation of a diode laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate the feasibility of producing a compact, efficient blue laser source, pumped-cavity second harmonic generation of diode lasers was explored. It is desirable to have such lasers to increase optical disk storage density, for color displays and for under-the-sea green-blue optical signal transmission. Based on assumed cavity losses, a cavity was designed and numerical analysis predicted an overall conversion efficiency to the second harmonic wavelength of 76% from a 75 mW diode laser. The diode laser used in these experiments had a single longitudinal and a single transverse mode output at 860 nm. The best conversion efficiency obtained (26%) was less than optimum due to the 2.5% single-pass linear losses associated with the cavity. However, calculations based on these higher losses are in good agreement with the experimentally determined values. In additions, a factor of 1.65 increase in the second harmonic output power is anticipated by reducing the input mirror reflectivity to better impedance-match the cavity. With this relatively low second harmonic conversion, the power to light conversion is 7.8%.

Keicher, D.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Studies of azimuthal anisotropy harmonics in ultra-central PbPb collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Azimuthal dihadron correlations of charged particles have been measured in PbPb collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV by the CMS collaboration, using data from the 2011 LHC heavy-ion run. The data set includes a sample of ultra-central (0-0.2% centrality) PbPb events collected using a trigger based on total transverse energy in the hadron forward calorimeters and the total multiplicity of pixel clusters in the silicon pixel tracker. A total of about 1.8 million ultra-central events were recorded, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 120 inverse microbarns. The observed correlations in ultra-central PbPb events are expected to be particularly sensitive to initial-state fluctuations. The single-particle anisotropy Fourier harmonics, from v[2] to v[6], are extracted as a function of particle transverse momentum. At higher transverse momentum, the v[2] harmonic becomes significantly smaller than the higher-order v[n] (n greater than or equal to 3). The pt-averaged v[2] and v[3] are found to be equal within 2%, while higher-order v[n] decrease as n increases. The breakdown of factorization of dihadron correlations into single-particle azimuthal anisotropies is observed. This effect is found to be most prominent in the ultra-central PbPb collisions, where the initial-state fluctuations play a dominant role. A comparison of the factorization data to hydrodynamic predictions with event-by-event fluctuating initial conditions is also presented.

CMS Collaboration

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

387

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Published scientific literature contains many studies estimating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of residential and utility-scale solar photovoltaics (PVs). Despite the volume of published work, variability in results hinders generalized conclusions. Most variance between studies can be attributed to differences in methods and assumptions. To clarify the published results for use in decision making and other analyses, we conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies, harmonizing key performance characteristics to produce more comparable and consistently derived results. Screening 397 life cycle assessments (LCAs) relevant to PVs yielded 13 studies on crystalline silicon (c-Si) that met minimum standards of quality, transparency, and relevance. Prior to harmonization, the median of 42 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from those 13 LCAs was 57 grams carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with an interquartile range (IQR) of 44 to 73. After harmonizing key performance characteristics, irradiation of 1,700 kilowatt-hours per square meter per year (kWh/m{sup 2}/yr); system lifetime of 30 years; module efficiency of 13.2% or 14.0%, depending on module type; and a performance ratio of 0.75 or 0.80, depending on installation, the median estimate decreased to 45 and the IQR tightened to 39 to 49. The median estimate and variability were reduced compared to published estimates mainly because of higher average assumptions for irradiation and system lifetime. For the sample of studies evaluated, harmonization effectively reduced variability, providing a clearer synopsis of the life cycle GHG emissions from c-Si PVs. The literature used in this harmonization neither covers all possible c-Si installations nor represents the distribution of deployed or manufactured c-Si PVs.

Hsu, D. D.; O'Donoughue, P.; Fthenakis, V.; Heath, G. A.; Kim, H. C.; Sawyer, P.; Choi, J. K.; Turney, D. E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

VII Hotine-Marussi Symposium on Theoretical Geodesy, 6-10 July 2009, Rome, Italy. Performance analysis of isotropic spherical harmonic spectral windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of isotropic spherical harmonic spectral windows B. Devaraju and N. Sneeuw Institute of Geodesy isotropic spherical harmonic spectral windows in the spa- tial domain. The parameters are devised in order to answer the following question: If an isotropic spherical harmonic window is applied in the spectral

Stuttgart, Universität

389

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

390

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

391

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

392

Map Data: Total Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total Production Map Data: Total Production totalprod2009final.csv More Documents & Publications Map Data: Renewable Production Map Data: State Consumption...

393

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

394

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

395

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

396

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

397

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

398

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

399

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

400

Analysis of periodically-forced turbulence in the rapid distortion limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid Distortion Theory is used to perform calculations of unsteadily-forced initially isotropic turbulence so that the physics of such flows can be better understood. The results of these calculations show that there are three distinct regimes of physical behavior for the kind of turbulence that we are considering: (1) turbulence that is forced at a relatively low frequency in which the kinetic energy settles down to a constant value at later times, (2) turbulence that is forced at a slightly higher frequency in which the kinetic energy value oscillates for a time, but then increases dramatically, and (3) turbulence that is forced at a relatively high frequency in which the kinetic energy evolution exhibits a periodic behavior. To better understand the role of the rapid pressure-strain correlation, these results are also compared to Inertial Model results for the same set of forcing frequencies. The results of this comparison show that the rapid pressure plays a key role in determining the stability characteristics of unsteadily-forced turbulence. The evolution equation for kinetic energy is then used to propose a model that describes the behavior approximately in terms of a time lag between applied mean strain and the Reynolds stress. This model suggests that the different responses under the different frequencies of forcing correspond to different stress-strain time lags. Overall, then the results indicate that rapid pressure serves to create a time lag between applied stress and strain, and it is the extent of this time lag that causes turbulence to respond differently under various frequencies of forcing.

O'Neil, Joshua Robert

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Rhombohedrally Distorted ?-Au5-xZn8+y Phases in the Au-Zn System  

SciTech Connect

The region of the AuZn phase diagram encompassing ?-brass-type phases has been studied experimentally from 45 to 85 atom % Zn. The ? phases were obtained directly from the pure elements by heating to 680 C in evacuated silica tubes, followed by annealing at 300 C. Powder X-ray and single-crystal diffraction studies show that ?-Au5Zn8 phases adopt a rhombohedrally distorted Cr5Al8 structure type rather than the cubic Cu5Zn8 type. The refined compositions from two single crystals extracted from the Zn- and Au-rich loadings are Au4.27(3)Zn8.26(3)?0.47 (I) and Au4.58(3)Zn8.12(3)?0.3 (II), respectively (? = vacancy). These (I and II) refinements indicated both nonstatistical mixing of Au and Zn atoms as well as partially ordered vacancy distributions. The structures of these ? phases were solved in the acentric space group R3m (No. 160, Z = 6), and the observed lattice parameters from powder patterns were found to be a = 13.1029(6) and 13.1345(8) and c = 8.0410(4) and 8.1103(6) for crystals I and II, respectively. According to single-crystal refinements, the vacancies were found on the outer tetrahedron (OT) and octahedron (OH) of the 26-atom cluster. Single-crystal structural refinement clearly showed that the vacancy content per unit cell increases with increasing Zn, or valence-electron concentration. Electronic structure calculations, using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method with the atomic-sphere approximation (TB-LMTO-ASA) method, indicated the presence of a well-pronounced pseudogap at the Fermi level for Au5Zn8 as the representative composition, an outcome that is consistent with the HumeRothery interpretation of ? brass.

Thimmaiah, Srinivasa [Ames Laboratory; Miller, Gordon J. [Ames Laboratory

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

402

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

403

Modeling of Synergy Between 4th and 6th Harmonic Absorptions of Fast Waves on Injected Beams in DIII-D Tokamak  

SciTech Connect

In recent moderate to high harmonic fast wave heating and current drive experiments in DIII-D, a synergy effect was observed when the 6{sup th} harmonic 90 MHz fast wave power is applied to the plasma preheated by neutral beams and the 4{sup th} harmonic 60 MHz fast wave. In this paper, we investigate how the synergy can occur using ORBIT-RF coupled with AORSA. Preliminary simulations suggest that damping of 4{sup th} harmonic FW on beam ions accelerates them above the injection energy, which may allow significant damping of 6{sup th} harmonic FW on beam ion tails to produce synergy.

Choi, M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Chan, V. S. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Muscatello, C. M. [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California, 92697 (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

A feasibility study of low-order harmonics expansion applied to loading pattern search  

SciTech Connect

Despite significant progress in core loading pattern search methods over years, there still remains the issue of large computing workload and the need for improving the speed of evaluating loading pattern candidates during the search process. This paper focuses on improving the computing speed for loading pattern evaluation, rather than the method of searching for the patterns. A low order harmonics expansion method for flux distribution representation is proposed for fast LP evaluation application. The novel feature of the method is the separation of the short range local perturbation effect from the long range global tilt effect. The latter effect can be captured by low order harmonics expansion. Demonstration examples are presented to show that even for extremely large perturbations induced by fuel shuffling the proposed method can accurately calculate the flux distribution for the LP with very minimal computation. (authors)

Shaohong, Z.; Dong, L.; Tao, W. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai, 200030 (China); Chao, Y. A. [Westinghouse Electric Company, P. O. Box 355, Pittsburgh, PA 15230-0355 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency (February 2, 2010)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency The United States of America, European Union and Japan Reach Agreement on Guiding Principles for Data Center Energy Efficiency Metrics February 2, 2010 As business demands and energy costs for data centers rise, owners and operators have focused on the energy efficiency of the data center as a whole, frequently using energy efficiency metrics. However, the metrics are not always applied clearly and consistently at a global level. To address these inconsistencies, a group of global leaders met on February 2, 2010 to agree on data center energy efficiency measurements, metrics, and reporting conventions. Organizations represented were the U.S. Department of Energy's Save Now and Federal Energy Management Programs,

406

Investigations of Low and Moderate Harmonic Fast Wave Physics on CDX-U  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Third harmonic hydrogen cyclotron fast wave heating studies are planned in the near term on CDX-U to investigate the potential for bulk ion heating. In preparation for these studies, the available radio-frequency power in CDX-U has been increased to 0.5 MW. The operating frequency of the CDX-U radio-frequency transmitter was lowered to operate in the range of 8-10 MHz, providing access to the ion harmonic range 2* {approx} 4* in hydrogen. A similar regime is accessible for the 30 MHz radio-frequency system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), at 0.6 Tesla in hydrogen. Preliminary computational studies over the plasma regimes of interest for NSTX and CDX-U indicate the possibility of strong localized absorption on bulk ion species.

J. Spaleta; R. Majeski; C.K. Phillips; R.J. Dumont; R. Kaita; V. Soukhanovskii; L. Zakharov

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

407

Multiple layer optical memory system using second-harmonic-generation readout  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel optical read and write information storage system is described which comprises a radiation source such as a laser for writing and illumination, the radiation source being capable of radiating a preselected first frequency; a storage medium including at least one layer of material for receiving radiation from the radiation source and capable of being surface modified in response to said radiation source when operated in a writing mode and capable of generating a pattern of radiation of the second harmonic of the preselected frequency when illuminated by the radiation source at the preselected frequency corresponding to the surface modifications on the storage medium; and a detector to receive the pattern of second harmonic frequency generated.

Boyd, Gary T. (Woodbury, MN); Shen, Yuen-Ron (Berkeley, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Two particle correlation measurements with respect to higher harmonic event planes at PHENIX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of two particle azimuthal correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions provide information of the possible interplay between hard-scattered partons and the hot-dense medium. Toward an understanding of parton-medium coupling, it is indispensable to obtain correlations where contributions from higher harmonic flow($v_n$) are rejected. It is also important to produce correlation measurements where the trigger particle is selected relative to second and third order event planes. This enables us to explore path-length dependence of parton energy loss and the influence of the medium on the jets. We present the latest PHENIX results of correlations in which contributions from higher harmonic flow have been subtracted, as well as second and third order event plane-dependent correlations in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV.

Takahito Todoroki for the PHENIX Collaboration

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

409

Second harmonic nano-particles for femtosecond coherent control on the nanoscale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a complete toolkit for coherent control experiments on the nano-scale. By exploiting the second harmonic emission from single (150 nm) nonlinear nano-particles, we show that ultrafast femtosecond laser pulses can be compressed and controlled in time with unprecedented spatial accuracy. The method is tested on various nano-particles of different sizes, shapes and materials, both dielectric BaTiO3, Fe(IO3)3) and metallic (Au) thus demonstrating its robustness and versatility.

Accanto, Nicol; Piatkowski, Lukasz; Castro-Lopez, Marta; Pastorelli, Francesco; Brinks, Daan; van Hulst, Niek F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A frequency scanning method for the identification of harmonic instabilities in HVDC systems  

SciTech Connect

A Frequency Scanning Method is introduced in the paper to obtain a more accurate frequency characteristic for identifying harmonic instability in HVdc systems. An example of the application is used to identify the resonance frequencies in the CIGRE benchmark model. The paper shows that the Benchmark model is not tuned to the resonance frequency that it was designed for. Using the scanning method, the resonance frequency of the benchmark model may be shifted to demonstrate a simulation of core-saturation type instability.

Jiang, X.; Gole, A.M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Three-dimensional N=4 supersymmetry in harmonic N=3 superspace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the map of three-dimensional N=4 superfields to N=3 harmonic superspace. The left and right representations of the N=4 superconformal group are constructed on N=3 analytic superfields. These representations are convenient for the description of N=4 superconformal couplings of the Abelian gauge superfields with hypermultiplets. We analyze the N=4 invariance in the non-Abelian N=3 Yang-Mills theory.

B. M. Zupnik

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

High harmonic attosecond pulse train amplification in a free electron laser  

SciTech Connect

It is shown using three-dimensional simulations that the temporal structure of an attosecond pulse train, such as that generated via high harmonic generation in noble gases, may be retained in a free electron laser amplifier through to saturation using a mode-locked optical klystron configuration. At wavelengths of {approx}12 nm, a train of attosecond pulses of widths {approx}300 as with peak powers in excess of 1 GW are predicted.

McNeil, B.W.; Sheehy, B.; Thompson, N.R.; Dunning, D.J.

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

413

Quasi-phase matching and quantum control of high harmonic generation in waveguides using counterpropagating beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

All-optical quasi-phase matching (QPM) uses a train of counterpropagating pulses to enhance high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a hollow waveguide. A pump pulse enters one end of the waveguide, and causes HHG in the waveguide. The counterpropagation pulses enter the other end of the waveguide and interact with the pump pulses to cause QPM within the waveguide, enhancing the HHG.

Zhang, Xiaoshi (Superior, CO); Lytle, Amy L. (Boulder, CO); Cohen, Oren (Boulder, CO); Kapteyn, Henry C. (Boulder, CO); Murnane, Margaret M. (Boulder, CO)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

414

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

DoublingAdding Method for Delta-Four-Stream Spherical Harmonic Expansion Approximation in Radiative Transfer Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though the single-layer solutions have been found for the ?-four-stream spherical harmonic expansion method (SHM) in radiative transfer, there is lack of a corresponding doublingadding method (4SDA), which enables the calculation of radiative ...

Feng Zhang; Jiangnan Li

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Methods, systems and apparatus for approximation of peak summed fundamental and third harmonic voltages in a multi-phase machine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, system and apparatus are provided for quickly approximating a peak summed magnitude (A) of a phase voltage (Vph) waveform in a multi-phase system that implements third harmonic injection.

Ransom, Ray M. (Big Bear City, CA); Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel (Torrance, CA); Kinoshita, Michael H. (Redondo Beach, CA)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Electron Dynamics of Silicon Surface States: Second-Harmonic Hole Burning on Si(111)7x7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States: Second-Harmonic Hole Burning on Si(111) 7 7 John A.transient spectral hole burning. Spectral holes induced by atransient spectral hole burning, i.e. , the surface-speci?c

McGuire, John A.; Raschke, Markus B.; Shen, Yuen-Ron

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Lattice Monte Carlo calculations for unitary fermions in a harmonic trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a lattice Monte Carlo approach developed for studying large numbers of strongly interacting nonrelativistic fermions and apply it to a dilute gas of unitary fermions confined to a harmonic trap. In place of importance sampling, our approach makes use of high statistics, an improved action, and recently proposed statistical techniques. We show how improvement of the lattice action can remove discretization and finite volume errors systematically. For N=3 unitary fermions in a box, our errors in the energy scale as the inverse lattice volume, and we reproduce a previous high-precision benchmark calculation to within our 0.3% uncertainty; as additional benchmarks we reproduce precision calculations of N=3,...,6 unitary fermions in a harmonic trap to within our {approx}1% uncertainty. We then use this action to determine the ground-state energies of up to 70 unpolarized fermions trapped in a harmonic potential on a lattice as large as 64{sup 3}x72. In contrast to variational calculations, we find evidence for persistent deviations from the thermodynamic limit for the range of N considered.

Endres, Michael G.; Kaplan, David B.; Lee, Jong-Wan; Nicholson, Amy N. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Theoretical Research Division, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1550 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Significance to Quantum Computing of the Classical Harmonic Nature of Energy Eigenstates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since a pure quantum system is incapable of faithfully simulating the solutions of the Schroedinger equation that actually pertains to itself, it is proposed that quantum computing technology (as opposed to cryptographic technology) not be based on pure quantum systems such as qubits but instead on physical systems which by their nature faithfully simulate the solutions of Schroedinger equations. Every Schroedinger equation is within a unitary transformation of being a set of mutually independent classical simple harmonic oscillator equations. Thus classical simple harmonic oscillators, or "chobits", are the mathematically fundamental building blocks for all Schroedinger equations. In addition, classical harmonic oscillators are, as a practical matter, far easier to deal with than any pure quantum system -- e.g., their phases and absolute amplitudes are readily physically accessible, they have little predilection for environmental decoherence, and they abound as cavity electromagnetic standing-wave modes. We study in mathematical detail the use of chobits to compute discrete quantum Fourier transforms, including gates, chobit counts, and chobit operation counts. The results suggest that thirty chobits and under a thousand chobit phase operations could generate discrete quantum Fourier transforms of a billion terms. Chobits can be technologically realized as semiconductor dynatron-type electronic oscillator circuits, which ought to be amenable to very considerable miniaturization.

Steven Kenneth Kauffmann

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

Power Quality Mitigation Technology Demonstration at Industrial Customer Sites: Industrial and Utility Harmonic Mitigation Guideline s and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However the restructuring of the electric power industry shakes out, the commercial/industrial customer's need for quality power will increase; and customer service will remain a key to retaining current accounts and attracting new customers. The need for demonstrating new harmonics mitigation technologies will thus be an important factor for the wire side of the business as well as for energy service companies. This report provides guidelines for implementing harmonics mitigation demonstration projects ...

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Filamentation-induced third-harmonic generation in air via plasma-enhanced third-order susceptibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study, both experimentally and theoretically, the underlying physics of third-harmonic generation in air by a filamented infrared femtosecond laser pulse propagating through a thin plasma channel. It is shown that the recently observed more than two-order-of-magnitude increase of the efficiency of third-harmonic generation occurs due to the plasma-enhanced third-order susceptibility. An estimate of the effective value of this susceptibility is given.

Suntsov, S.; Abdollahpour, D.; Tzortzakis, S. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, 71110, Heraklion (Greece); Papazoglou, D. G. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, 71110, Heraklion (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, 71003, Heraklion (Greece)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Analysis of system wide distortion in an integrated power system utilizing a high voltage DC bus and silicon carbide power devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigates the distortion on the electrical distribution system for a high voltage DC Integrated Power System (IPS). The analysis was concentrated on the power supplied to a propulsion motor driven by an ...

Fallier, William F. (William Frederick)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand total social cost of highway transportation Subtotal:of alternative transportation investments. A social-costtransportation option that has These costs will be inefficiently incurred if people do not fully lower total social costs.

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 2,550,203 FY2009 39,646,446 FY2010 64,874,187 FY2011 66,253,207 FY2012...

426

Opportunities for regional harmonization of appliance standards and l abeling program  

SciTech Connect

The South Asian Regional Initiative for Energy (SARI/Energy) calls for a series of activities to promote Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) of end use appliances in the region. In pursuit of this goal, the project supports several seminars and meetings that bring together policymakers and stakeholders from throughout the region. The purpose of these gatherings is to encourage a dialogue among participants as to the benefits and barriers associated with EES&L programs. In addition, it is the role of the program organizers to provide participants with the technical details necessary to make progress towards effective efficiency programs. One component of the initiative is to encourage the harmonization (alignment) of existing program components, and the pursuit of new programs coordinated at the regional level. In support of this goal, the report provides information aimed at motivating and enabling cooperative activities which will provide concrete benefits to programs in each country, whether well developed, or still in the initial planning stage. It should be emphasized that the underlying objective of the harmonization component of the SARI/Energy project is to increase the potential for success of EES&L programs of all countries involved, and to reduce burdens on manufacturers, exporters and importers in each country. Harmonization ''for it's own sake'' is not desirable, nor is it suggested that policymakers should bring their programs in line with international norms if doing so would present a disadvantage to their own efficiency programs, or to commercial interests within their country. If there is no such disadvantage, however, the program encourages alignment of policies and provides a forum at which this alignment can be pursued. The report covers several main topics, with varying emphasis. First, a general discussion of the motivation for an explicit policy of regional harmonization is given. Next, the current status of existing programs in the region are discussed in some detail. The section that follows covers the harmonization of efficiency test procedures. Special attention is given to this component of an EES&L program because it is the most critical element in terms of harmonization--having incompatible test procedures between trade partners can greatly impact the effectiveness of a program, and it can also unduly impact trade. Currently, policymakers in India and Sri Lanka are collaborating with the goal of aligning refrigerator test procedures used in their respective programs. For this reason, the section on test procedures of refrigerators goes into a significant amount of technical detail, in order to provide the clearest possible articulation of issues to be resolved in bringing the procedures into alignment. Following the discussion of test procedures, the report contains a section each on harmonization of efficiency rating levels, development of label designs, and enforcement issues. The report is organized such that the sections covering current programs and test procedures are subdivided by target appliance. These sections are further divided by country, where applicable. Each section is concluded with recommendations.

McNeil, Michael A.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fractionally total colouring Gn,p  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the fractional total chromatic number of G"n","p as p varies from 0 to 1. We also present an algorithm that computes the fractional total chromatic number of a random graph in polynomial expected time. Keywords: Fractional total colouring, Graph colouring, Random graphs

Conor Meagher; Bruce Reed

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

429

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

430

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

431

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

432

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

433

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

434

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

435

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

436

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

437

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

438

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

439

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

440

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

442

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

443

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

444

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

445

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

446

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

447

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

448

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

449

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

450

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

451

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

452

iHarmonizer: improving the disk efficiency of I/O-intensive multithreaded codes  

SciTech Connect

Challenged by serious power and thermal constraints, and limited by available instruction-level parallelism, processor designs have evolved to multi-core architectures. These architectures, many augmented with native simultaneous multithreading, are driving software developers to use multithreaded programs to exploit thread-level parallelism. While multithreading is well-known to introduce concerns of data dependency and CPU load balance, less known is that the uncertainty of relative progress of thread execution can cause patterns of I/O requests, issued by different threads, to be effectively random and so significantly degrade hard-disk efficiency. This effect can severely offset the performance gains from parallel execution, especially for I/O-intensive programs. Retaining the benefits of multithreading while not reducing I/O efficiency is an urgent and challenging problem. We propose a user-level scheme, iHarmonizer, to streamline the servicing of I/O requests from multiple threads in OpenMP programs. Specifically, we use the compiler to insert code into OpenMP programs so that data usage can be transmitted at run time to a supporting run-time library; this library in turn prefetches data in a disk-friendly way and coordinates threads execution according to the availability of their requested data. Transparently to the programmer, iHarmonizer makes a multithreaded program I/O efficient while maintaining the benefits of parallelism. Our experiments show that iHarmonizer can significantly speed up the execution of a representative set of I/O-intensive scientific benchmarks.

Davis, Marion Kei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yizhe [WAYNE STATE UNIV.; Jiang, Song [WAYNE STATE UNIV.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Study of second harmonic generation by high power laser beam in magneto plasma  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the problem of nonlinear generation of second harmonic of a high power laser pulse propagating in magnetized plasma. The propagation of strong laser beam is proposed in the direction perpendicular to a relatively weak static magnetic field. The laser pulse is taken to be linearly polarized, with the orientation of its electric field that corresponds to an ordinary electromagnetic wave. Besides the standard ponderomotive nonlinearity, the appropriate wave equation also contains the nonlinearity that arises from the relativistic electron jitter velocities. During its propagation, the laser beam gets filamented on account of relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities present in the plasma. The generated plasma wave gets coupled into the filamentary structures of the pump beam. Due to the expected presence of the beam filamentation, the work has been carried out by considering modified paraxial approximation (i.e., beyond the standard paraxial approximation of a very broad beam). It is found that the power of the plasma wave is significantly affected by the magnetic field strength in the presence of both relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities. It is investigated that the second harmonic generation is also considerably modified by altering the strength of magnetic field. To see the effect of static magnetic field on the harmonic generation, a key parameter, i.e., the ratio of the cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c}=eB{sub 0}/mc over the laser frequency {omega}{sub 0} has been used, where c is the velocity of light, m and e are the mass and charge of the electron and B{sub 0} is the externally applied magnetic field.

Sharma, Prerana [Ujjain Engineering College, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh 465010 (India); Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Gravitational lens magnification by Abell 1689: Distortion of the background galaxy luminosity function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational lensing magnifies the luminosity of galaxies behind the lens. We use this effect to constrain the total mass in the cluster Abell 1689 by comparing the lensed luminosities of background galaxies with the luminosity function of an undistorted field. Since galaxies are assumed to be a random sampling of luminosity space, this method is not limited by clustering noise. We use photometric redshift information to estimate galaxy distance and intrinsic luminosity. Knowing the redshift distribution of the background population allows us to lift the mass/background degeneracy common to lensing analysis. In this paper we use 9 filters observed over 12 hours with the Calar Alto 3.5m telescope to determine the redshifts of 1000 galaxies in the field of Abell 1689. Using a complete sample of 151 background galaxies we measure the cluster mass profile. We find that the total projected mass interior to 0.25h^(-1)Mpc is (0.48 +/- 0.16) * 10^(15)h^(-1) solar masses, where our error budget includes uncertainties from the photometric redshift determination, the uncertainty in the off-set calibration and finite sampling. This result is in good agreement with that found by number count and shear-based methods and provides a new and independent method to determine cluster masses.

S. Dye; A. N. Taylor; E. M. Thommes; K. Meisenheimer; C. Wolf; J. A. Peacock

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Method and apparatus for reducing the harmonic currents in alternating-current distribution networks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and method reduce the harmonic content of AC line and neutral line currents in polyphase AC source distribution networks. The apparatus and method employ a polyphase Zig-Zag transformer connected between the AC source distribution network and a load. The apparatus and method also employs a mechanism for increasing the source neutral impedance of the AC source distribution network. This mechanism can consist of a choke installed in the neutral line between the AC source and the Zig-Zag transformer.

Beverly, Leon H. (Lockport, IL); Hance, Richard D. (Elburn, IL); Kristalinski, Alexandr L. (Naperville, IL); Visser, Age T. (Geneva, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Method and apparatus for reducing the harmonic currents in alternating-current distribution networks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and method reduce the harmonic content of AC line and neutral line currents in polyphase AC source distribution networks. The apparatus and method employ a polyphase Zig-Zag transformer connected between the AC source distribution network and a load. The apparatus and method also employs a mechanism for increasing the source neutral impedance of the AC source distribution network. This mechanism can consist of a choke installed in the neutral line between the AC source and the Zig-Zag transformer. 23 figs.

Beverly, L.H.; Hance, R.D.; Kristalinski, A.L.; Visser, A.T.

1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

458

Chaos, ergodic convergence, and fractal instability for a thermostated canonical harmonic oscillator  

SciTech Connect

The authors thermostat a qp harmonic oscillator using the two additional control variables {zeta} and {xi} to simulate Gibbs' canonical distribution. In contrast to the motion of purely Hamiltonian systems, the thermostated oscillator motion is completely ergodic, covering the full four-dimensional {l_brace}q,p,{zeta},{xi}{r_brace} phase space. The local Lyapunov spectrum (instantaneous growth rates of a comoving corotating phase-space hypersphere) exhibits singularities like those found earlier for Hamiltonian chaos, reinforcing the notion that chaos requires kinetic -- as opposed to statistical -- study, both at and away from equilibrium. The exponent singularities appear to have a fractal character.

Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.; Isbister, Dennis J.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Common Information Model (CIM)-MultiSpeak Harmonization 2nd Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CIMMultiSpeak harmonization effort sought to identify the degree of correlation that exists between the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Common Information Model (CIM), which is based on IEC standards 61968, 61970, and 62325, and the MultiSpeak v4.1.5 standard for electric system interoperability. The initial effort focused on mapping attributes from the IEC 61968-9 profiles to equivalent profiles that were created for MultiSpeak v4.1.5. A proof-of-concept interoperability ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

460

Condensation of two-dimensional harmonically confined bosons with Bessel-type interactions  

SciTech Connect

We study the ground-state configurations of few interacting bosons confined in two dimensions by anisotropic harmonic potentials. By means of variational calculations, including correlation effects, we show that the arrangement of bosons strongly depends on the strength of the repulsive interaction and the anisotropy of the confinement. We compute the condensate fraction of the system and found that by increasing the anisotropy of the potential a weaker interaction suffices to destroy the condensate and favors the emergence of a crystal-like structure.

Mese, A. I.; Aktas, S.; Okan, S. E. [Department of Physics, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Capuzzi, P. [Instituto de Fisica de Buenos Aires, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Akdeniz, Z. [Piri Reis University, 34940 Tuzla, Istanbul (Turkey)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total harmonic distortion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Unified Representation of Quantum Mechanics on One-dimensional Harmonic Oscillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A quantum state corresponds to a specific wave function. We adopt a new mathematical method [1] to improve Dirac's ladder operator method. A set of orthonormal wave functions will be used to associate the operator with the square matrix corresponding to it. These allow us to determine the matrix elements by using the operator relations without having to know the specific wave functions. As a result, we can get the direct results of matrix mechanics and wave mechanics on one-dimensional Harmonic oscillator and their descriptions will be also unified.

Yongqin Wang

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Interbasis expansions for the isotropic 3D harmonic oscillator and bivariate Krawtchouk polynomials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An explicit expression for the general bivariate Krawtchouk polynomials is obtained in terms of the standard Krawtchouk and dual Hahn polynomials. The bivariate Krawtchouk polynomials occur as matrix elements of the unitary reducible representations of SO(3) on the energy eigenspaces of the 3-dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator and the explicit formula is obtained from the decomposition of these representations into their irreducible components. The decomposition entails expanding the Cartesian basis states in the spherical bases that span irreducible SO(3) representations. The overlap coefficients are obtained from the Clebsch-Gordan problem for the su(1,1) Lie algebra.

Vincent X. Genest; Luc Vinet; Alexei Zhedanov

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

463

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of a Commercially Available Harmonic Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions tests were conducted to analyze common and differential noise, harmonics, and current draw characteristics in the electrical systems of a typical household. A test setup was constructed to simulate the circuits of this typical household in order to determine how the STETZERiZER Filters might affect the electric currents and voltages these circuits. Testing was performed in a frequency range of 3 kHz - 150 kHz to measure the effect of these filters on power draw and power quality, as ...

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

464

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

465

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

466

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

467

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

468

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

469

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

470

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

471

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

472

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

473

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

474

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

475

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

476

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

477

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

478

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

479

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

480

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

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481

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

482

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

483

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

484

Total Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions,...

485

Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series...

486

Total Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series...

487

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

488

Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Former ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Former Corporation/Refiner Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (bbl/cd)a New Corporation/Refiner Date of Sale Table 14. Refinery Sales During 2005

489

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","10312013"...

490

Calculation of HVDC-converter harmonics in frequency domain with regard to asymmetries and comparison with time domain simulations  

SciTech Connect

In order to study the effects of large HVDC converters to the feeding ac networks, it is of importance to explain and to calculate harmonic phenomena which are a result of converter operation. During commissioning of real HVDC converters it could be seen, that harmonics resulting from unsymmetries in the system voltages or from unsymmetries in converter operation led to significant difficulties concerning the system design. For this reason, not only the effects of characteristic but also the effects of noncharacteristic converter harmonics must be taken into account. The aim is to describe the steady state harmonic behavior of the converter. The harmonic spectra are not determined by time domain analysis but instead the solution is found by frequency domain calculations. This can result in reduced calculation time in comparison to conventional fourier analysis of the time functions. The converter is interpreted as an amplitude modulator with voltage and current converter functions which describe the coupling of the dc circuit and the ac network through the converter. To verify the theory, comparison of frequency domain with time domain calculations were carried out.

Rittiger, J. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Kulicke, B. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

A Proof-of-Principle Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser Experiment at SLAC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs), new methods have been developed to extend capabilities at short wavelengths beyond Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). In particular, seeding of a FEL allows for temporal control of the radiation pulse and increases the peak brightness by orders of magnitude. Most recently, Gennady Stupakov and colleagues at SLAC proposed a new technique: Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG). Here a laser microbunches the beam in an undulator and the beam is sheared in a chicane. This process is repeated with a second laser, undulator and chicane. The interplay between these allows a seeding of the X-ray laser up to the 100th harmonic of the first laser. After introducing the physics of FELs and the EEHG seeding technique, we describe contributions to the experimental effort. We will present detailed studies of the experiment including the choice of parameters and their optimization, the emittance effect, spontaneous emission in the undulators, the second laser phase effect, and measurements of the jitter between RF stations. Finally, the status and preliminary results of the Echo-7 experiment will be outlined.

Pernet, Pierre-Louis; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne /SLAC

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

492

The phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III: a quasi-harmonic study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III is studied by a quasi-harmonic approximation. The results of this approach are compared to phase diagrams previously derived by thermodynamic integration using path integral and classical simulations, as well as to experimental data. The studied models are based on both flexible (q-TIP4P/F) and rigid (TIP4P/2005, TIP4PQ/2005) descriptions of the water molecule. Many aspects of the simulated phase diagrams are reasonably reproduced by the quasi-harmonic approximation. Advantages of this simple approach are that it is free from the statistical errors inherent to computer simulations, both classical and quantum limits are easily accessible, and the error of the approximation is expected to decrease in the zero temperature limit. We find that the calculated phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III depends strongly on the hydrogen disorder of ice III, at least for cell sizes typically used in phase coexistence simulations. Either ice II (in the classical limit) or ice III (in t...

Ramirez, R; Herrero, C P; 10.1063/1.4757064

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Inter- and Intra-Observer Variability in Prostate Definition With Tissue Harmonic and Brightness Mode Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare the relative utility of tissue harmonic (H) and brightness (B) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate by studying interobserver and intraobserver variation in prostate delineation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage disease were randomly selected. TRUS images of prostates were acquired using B and H modes. The prostates on all images were contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and five equally trained observers. The observers were blinded to information regarding patient and imaging mode. The volumes of prostate glands and areas of midgland slices were calculated. Volumes contoured were compared among the observers and between observer group and RO. Contours on one patient were repeated five times by four observers to evaluate the intraobserver variability. Results: A one-sample Student t-test showed the volumes outlined by five observers are in agreement (p > 0.05) with the RO. Paired Student t-test showed prostate volumes (p = 0.008) and midgland areas (p = 0.006) with H mode were significantly smaller than that with B mode. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant interobserver variability (p =}35 cc), B mode provided more consistent estimates. Conclusions: H mode provided superior inter- and intraobserver agreement in prostate volume definition for small to medium prostates. In large glands, H mode does not exhibit any additional advantage. Although harmonic imaging has not proven advantageous for all cases, its utilization seems to be judicious for small prostates.

Sandhu, Gurpreet Kaur, E-mail: Gurpreet.Sandhu2@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Dunscombe, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Meyer, Tyler [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Pavamani, Simon [Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India); Khan, Rao [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

$?(\\hat{x},\\hat{p})-$deformation of the harmonic oscillator in a $2D-$phase space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work addresses a ${\\theta}(\\hat{x},\\hat{p})-$deformation of the harmonic oscillator in a $2D-$phase space. Specifically, it concerns a quantum mechanics of the harmonic oscillator based on a noncanonical commutation relation depending on the phase space coordinates. A reformulation of this deformation is considered in terms of a $q-$deformation allowing to easily deduce the energy spectrum of the induced deformed harmonic oscillator. Then, it is proved that the deformed position and momentum operators admit a one-parameter family of self-adjoint extensions. These operators engender new families of deformed Hermite polynomials generalizing usual $q-$ Hermite polynomials. Relevant matrix elements are computed. Finally, a $su(2)-$algebra representation of the considered deformation is investigated and discussed.

M. N. Hounkonnou; D. Ousmane Samary; E. Baloitcha; S. Arjika

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z