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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

"Table A28. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region" Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region" " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" " "," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

2

"Table A36. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

3

"Table A37. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 7. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" " "," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

4

"Table A24. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 4. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groupsc and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:","0.6 ",0.6,1.3,1.3,0.7,1.2,1.2,1.5,1.1

5

Energy Expenditures | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Expenditures Expenditures Dataset Summary Description The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates. Source EIA Date Released June 30th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Energy Consumption Energy Expenditures energy prices energy production SEDS State energy data States US Data text/csv icon Complete SEDS dataset as csv (may be too big for Excel) (csv, 40.6 MiB)

6

Table ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States Year Primary Energy Electric Power Sector h,j Retail Electricity Total Energy g,h,i Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i,j Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Exports Imports Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f,g Prices in Dollars per Million Btu 1970 0.45 0.36 0.38 1.27 0.93 0.59 1.16 0.73 1.43 2.85 0.42 1.38 1.71 0.18 1.29 1.08 0.32 4.98 1.65 1975 1.65 0.90 1.03 2.37 3.47 1.18 2.60 2.05 2.96 4.65 1.93 2.94 3.35 0.24 1.50 2.19 0.97 8.61 3.33 1980 2.10 1.38 1.46 2.54 3.19 2.86 6.70 6.36 5.64 9.84 3.88 7.04 7.40 0.43 2.26 4.57 1.77 13.95 6.89 1985 2.03 1.67 1.69 2.76 2.99 4.61 7.22 5.91 6.63 9.01 4.30 R 7.62 R 7.64 0.71 2.47 4.93 1.91 19.05

7

BODY COMPOSITION -ENERGY EXPENDITURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BODY COMPOSITION - ENERGY EXPENDITURE Validation of dual, X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for body for BW, BMC and FC were significantly correlated with scale BW (r== 0.999), chemical calcium (r=0.992) and chemical fat (r= 0.971).Regression analy- sis showed that BW was accurately mea- sured, but FC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

OpenEI - Energy Expenditures  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Energy Data State Energy Data System (SEDS) Complete Dataset through 2009 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/883 The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates.

License
Type of

9

Energy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of accelerometry. An average smart phone contains an inertial sensor and today we hardly leave our home without itEnergy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application Bozidara Cvetkovi´c1,2 , Simon Kozina1,2 , Bostjan://www.mps.si Abstract. The paper presents two prototypes for the estimation of hu- man energy expenditure during normal

Lu?trek, Mitja

10

Table A39. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam" 9. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ," Electricity",," Steam" ,,,,,"RSE" ,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.3,2,1.6,1.2

11

Residential Energy Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) Dataset Summary Description Provides total and average household expenditures on energy for water heating in the United States in 2005. The data was collected as part of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). RECS is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the United States. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the data. Source EIA Date Released September 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated January 01st, 2009 (6 years ago) Keywords Energy Expenditures Residential Water Heating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Total.Expenditures.for_.Water_.Heating_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 70.1 KiB)

12

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2005 Average Household Expenditures as Percent of Annual Income, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Average Annual Expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

13

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Other expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

14

State energy price and expenditure report 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1994. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1994, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in October 1996. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources. Documentation is included describing the development of price estimates, data sources, and calculation methods. 316 tabs.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

State energy price and expenditure report 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1980, and 1985 through 1992. Data for all years, 1970 through 1992, are available on personal computer diskettes.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

State energy price and expenditure report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1991. Data for all years, 1970 through 1991, are available on personal computer diskettes. Documentation in Appendix A describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1990, published in September 1992.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

18

State energy price and expenditure report, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1995. Data for all years are available on a CD-ROM and via Internet. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1995, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in December 1997. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

State energy price and expenditure report 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates for the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the United States. The estimates are provided by energy source (e.g., petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity) and by major consuming or economic sector. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1988 published in September 1990. Changes from the last report are summarized in a section of the documentation. Energy price and expenditure estimates are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1989. Documentation follows the tables and describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures, and the documentation for those estimates, are from the State Energy Data Report, Consumption Estimates, 1960--1989 (SEDR), published in May 1991. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, adjusted to remove process fuel and intermediate product consumption. All expenditures are consumer expenditures, that is, they represent estimates of money directly spent by consumers to purchase energy, generally including taxes. 11 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

State energy price and expenditure report 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 states and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The five economic sectors used in SEPER correspond to those used in SEDR and are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Documentation in appendices describe how the price estimates are developed, provide conversion factors for measures used in the energy analysis, and include a glossary. 65 tabs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 FY 2007 Federal Buildings Energy Prices and Expenditures, by Fuel Type ($2010) Fuel Type Electricity (1) Natural Gas Fuel Oil Coal Purchased Steam LPG/Propane Other Average Total Note(s): Source(s): 17.05 6028.63 Prices and expenditures are for Goal-Subject buildings. 1) $0.0776/kWh. 2) Energy used in Goal-Subject buildings in FY 2007 accounted for 33.8% of the total Federal energy bill. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table A-4, p. 93 for prices and expenditures, and Table A-9, p. 97 for total energy expenditures; EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. 24.30 318.35 17.06 43.87 16.19 36.64 9.37 1138.21 15.25 419.30 3.62 62.87 Average Fuel Prices Total Expenditures ($/million BTU) ($ million) (2) 23.68

22

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

23

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 2005 Household Energy Expenditures, by Vintage ($2010) | Year | Prior to 1950 887 | 22% 1950 to 1969 771 | 22% 1970 to 1979 736 | 16% 1980 to 1989 741 | 16% 1990 to 1999 752 | 16% 2000 to 2005 777 | 9% | Average 780 | Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1.24 2,003 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 for 2005 expenditures; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators.

24

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

25

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

26

Primate energy expenditure and life history Herman Pontzera,b,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primate energy expenditure and life history Herman Pontzera,b,1 , David A. Raichlenc , Adam D life histories reflect low total energy expenditure (TEE) (kilocalo- ries per day) relative to other), or allocation within the energy budget could change over evolutionary time to fuel changes in life history

Pontzer, Herman

27

Towards Human Energy Expenditure Estimation Using Smart Phone Inertial Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reliably estimate energy expenditure (EE). Direct calorimetry [5] measures the heat produced by human bodyTowards Human Energy Expenditure Estimation Using Smart Phone Inertial Sensors Bozidara Cvetkovi´c1 human energy expenditure during sport and normal daily ac- tivities. The paper presents technical

Lu?trek, Mitja

28

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

29

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

30

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

31

The Energy Expenditure of Rats Bearing Walker Carcinoma 256  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the law of conservation of energy holds true for the animal body...010 0.010 0.100 731 The Energy Expenditure of Rats Bearing...product which is difficult to mix. Samples to be burned were...nitro.. Mmir@iiet al. "Energy Expenditure of Tumorous Rats...

G. B. Mider; L. D. Fenninger; F. L. Haven; and J. J. Morton

1951-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

"Table A38. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas" 8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,," Electricity",," Steam" ,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

33

"Table A46. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" 6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" " Gas by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries," 1991 " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,,"-","-----------","-","-----------","-","------------","-","RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Transmission","Other","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Pipelines","Supplier(d)","Factors"

34

"Table A48. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" 8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" " Gas by Type of Supplier, Census Region, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,"-","-----------","-","-----------","-","------------","-----------","RSE" " ","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Transmission","Other","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Pipelines","Supplier(d)","Factors"," "

35

Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Million U.S. Dollars. NAICS Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal and Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 10,111 5,328 130 431 3,391 150 442 29 210 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 2,130 932 2 12 673 Q 294 0 158 311221 Wet Corn Milling 1,002 352 1 5 296 1 239 0 107 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 367 105 7 18 87 1 118 29 2 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1,408 698 17 Q 579 18 7 0 18 3115 Dairy Products 1,186 695 20 40 412 8 1 0 10 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - alterarions energy expenditure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

causes greater energy expenditure... but also weighted to match the mass of the walking boots. We estimated metabolic energy expenditure, joint... fixation with walking boots...

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity energy expenditure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

causes greater energy expenditure... but also weighted to match the mass of the walking boots. We estimated metabolic energy expenditure, joint... fixation with walking boots...

38

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2005 Households and Energy Expenditures, by Income Level ($2010) Energy Expenditures by Household Income Households (millions) Household Less than $10,000 9.9 9% $10,000 to $14,999 8.5 8% $15,000 to $19,999 8.4 8% $20,000 to $29,999 15.1 14% $30,000 to $39,999 13.6 12% $40,000 to $49,999 11.0 10% $50,000 to $74,999 19.8 18% $75,000 to $99,999 10.6 10% $100,000 or more 14.2 13% Total 111.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 7% 1) See Table 2.3.15 for more on energy burdens. 2) A household is defined as a family, an individual, or a group of up to nine unrelated individuals occupying the same housing unit. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part 2; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators. 2,431 847 3% 2,774 909 3% 1,995

39

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

40

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Expenditures > Publication and Tables and Expenditures > Publication and Tables 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Publication and Tables Figure ES1. Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Sources, 1992 Separater Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader . If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Separater Bar Full Report - Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures, 1992 (file size 1.07 MB) pages: 214 Selected Sections Main Text - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader (file size 193,634 bytes) pages: 28, includes the following: Contacts Contents Executive Summary Introduction Background

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41

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures March 2012 3.3.3 Commercial Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 148.6 37.0 17.0 202.6 148.9 37.2 17.1 203.2 145.9 36.2 16.7 198.9 147.5 36.8 16.9 201.2 143.8 35.1 16.4 195.2 145.0 35.5 16.6 197.0 141.1 34.0 16.0 191.1 142.5 34.6 16.2 193.3 136.9 32.1 15.7 184.8 139.1 33.0 15.9 188.0 133.5 31.0 15.4 179.9 135.0 31.6 15.6 182.2 131.0 29.7 15.1 175.8 131.9 30.3 15.3 177.5 128.1 28.7 14.5 171.3 130.0 29.3 15.0 174.4 129.4 29.7 15.4 174.5 127.7 29.2 13.8 170.7 134.8 29.9 14.5 179.2 134.5 28.5 16.9 180.0 141.1

42

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 44.3 10.3 7.7 18.6 0.0 16.0 79.0 27.4% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 40.6 40.6 14.1% Water Heating 17.6 1.2 1.2 2.3 17.7 37.6 13.0% Lighting 15.5 15.5 5.4% Refrigeration (4) 17.0 17.0 5.9% Electronics (5) 14.2 14.2 4.9% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 3.9% Cooking 3.2 0.8 0.8 4.8 8.9 3.1% Computers 8.7 8.7 3.0% Other (7) 0.0 7.7 7.7 47.9 55.7 19.3% Total 66.0 11.5 17.5 29.6 0.0 193.0 288.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.8 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($14.1 billion) and freezers ($2.9 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($14.2 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

43

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 38.7 11.2 8.0 19.8 0.0 14.3 72.9 28.9% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 35.4 35.4 14.0% Water Heating (4) 14.3 2.1 2.0 4.0 14.2 32.6 12.9% Lighting 22.6 22.6 9.0% Refrigeration (5) 14.9 14.9 5.9% Electronics (6) 17.8 17.8 7.1% Cooking 2.4 0.8 0.8 6.0 9.2 3.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.7 11.3 4.5% Computers 5.6 5.6 2.2% Other (8) 0.0 4.4 4.4 6.7 11.1 4.4% Adjust to SEDS (9) 13.6 13.6 5.4% Total 56.1 13.3 15.2 29.0 0.0 166.8 251.8 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.5 0.5 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes residential recreational water heating ($1.4 billion). 5) Includes refrigerators ($15.3 billion) and freezers ($4.4 billion). 6) Includes color televisions ($11.0

44

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 39.7 11.5 7.8 19.9 0.0 15.0 74.5 28.6% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 36.2 36.2 13.9% Water Heating 16.0 1.4 1.3 2.7 17.1 35.9 13.8% Lighting 15.2 15.2 5.8% Refrigeration (4) 15.5 15.5 6.0% Electronics (5) 12.0 12.0 4.6% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 4.1% Cooking 2.7 0.8 0.8 4.3 7.8 3.0% Computers 7.7 7.7 2.9% Other (7) 0.0 6.4 6.4 38.7 45.0 17.3% Total 59.1 12.9 16.3 29.8 0.0 171.3 260.3 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.7 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.7 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($12 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

45

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 35.0 13.0 8.1 21.6 0.0 14.0 70.6 29.2% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 33.8 33.8 14.0% Water Heating 13.5 1.9 1.5 3.4 15.8 32.7 13.5% Lighting 17.6 17.6 7.3% Refrigeration (4) 15.0 15.0 6.2% Electronics (5) 10.9 10.9 4.5% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.6 10.8 11.4 4.7% Cooking 2.2 0.9 0.9 3.8 6.8 2.8% Computers 6.3 6.3 2.6% Other (7) 0.0 5.2 5.2 31.3 36.5 15.1% Total 51.3 14.9 15.7 31.1 0.0 159.3 241.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.3 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($1.1 billion), natural gas

46

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 2035 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 63.4 13.0 1.6 7.7 0.8 23.1 0.2 20.6 107.2 20.9% Water Heating 23.8 2.2 1.2 3.4 35.8 63.0 12.3% Space Cooling 0.4 55.7 56.1 10.9% Lighting 47.8 47.8 9.3% Electronics (4) 27.2 27.2 5.3% Refrigeration (5) 27.0 27.0 5.3% Computers 14.8 14.8 2.9% Cooking 5.8 0.8 0.8 5.4 12.1 2.3% Wet Clean (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 2.2% Ventilation (7) 2.4 2.4 0.5% Other (8) 9.3 0.4 12.6 2.0 15.0 88.8 113.2 22.0% Adjust to SEDS (9) 4.6 5.3 5.3 21.7 31.6 6.2% Total 108.2 21.0 1.6 22.3 2.8 47.6 0.2 357.8 513.8 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.8 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($2.0 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.8 billion). 4) Includes color televisions ($14.2 billion). 5) Includes refrigerators ($24.1 billion) and freezers ($3.0

47

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 28.4 28.4 16.3% Space Heating 14.6 2.9 1.3 0.1 4.3 0.1 4.7 23.7 13.6% Ventilation 15.1 15.1 8.6% Space Cooling 0.3 14.2 14.5 8.3% Refrigeration 9.9 9.9 5.7% Electronics 8.8 8.8 5.1% Water Heating 4.1 0.7 0.7 2.5 7.3 4.2% Computers 5.3 5.3 3.0% Cooking 1.7 0.6 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.9 0.3 3.7 1.4 5.4 22.8 31.1 17.8% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.8 4.5 4.5 17.7 28.1 16.1% Total 29.3 8.4 1.3 3.7 1.5 14.9 0.1 130.0 174.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.4 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

48

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 35.4 35.4 19.7% Space Heating 15.0 2.9 0.9 0.1 3.9 0.1 8.5 27.5 15.3% Space Cooling 0.4 25.0 25.3 14.1% Ventilation 15.9 15.9 8.9% Refrigeration 11.6 11.6 6.5% Water Heating 4.0 0.6 0.6 2.7 7.3 4.1% Electronics 7.8 7.8 4.3% Computers 6.3 6.3 3.5% Cooking 1.6 0.7 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.7 0.3 3.3 1.2 4.8 20.4 28.0 15.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 6.2 5.2 5.2 0.6 12.0 6.7% Total 29.9 9.0 0.9 3.3 1.3 14.5 0.1 134.8 179.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

49

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2010 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 53.7 14.2 0.9 8.0 0.6 23.7 0.1 23.2 100.8 23.4% Space Cooling 0.4 61.3 61.7 14.3% Lighting 59.3 59.3 13.8% Water Heating 18.3 2.6 2.0 4.6 17.8 40.7 9.4% Refrigeration (4) 26.9 26.9 6.2% Electronics (5) 26.1 26.1 6.1% Ventilation (6) 15.9 15.9 3.7% Cooking 4.0 0.8 0.8 8.8 13.6 3.2% Computers 12.1 12.1 2.8% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 11.0 11.6 2.7% Other (8) 2.7 0.3 7.7 1.2 9.2 27.3 39.2 9.1% Adjust to SEDS (9) 6.2 5.2 5.2 11.9 23.4 5.4% Total 86.0 22.3 0.9 18.5 1.8 43.5 0.1 301.6 431.2 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.6 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($24.1 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($11.0

50

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2015 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Total Percent Space Heating (3) 49.5 15.9 1.3 8.1 0.7 25.9 0.2 18.7 94.3 22.7% Space Cooling 0.3 48.0 48.3 11.6% Lighting 45.9 45.9 11.0% Water Heating 17.6 2.6 1.5 4.1 18.3 40.0 9.6% Refrigeration (4) 24.9 24.9 6.0% Electronics (5) 19.8 19.8 4.7% Ventilation (6) 15.1 15.1 3.6% Computers 11.6 11.6 2.8% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.8 11.4 2.7% Cooking 3.9 0.9 0.9 4.4 9.1 2.2% Other (8) 2.9 0.3 8.9 1.4 10.6 54.1 67.6 16.3% Adjust to SEDS (9) 5.8 4.5 4.5 17.7 28.1 6.7% Total 80.6 23.3 1.3 19.4 2.1 46.1 0.2 289.3 416.2 100% Note(s): Source(s): Petroleum Electricity 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.7 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.4 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($22.6 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9

51

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2025 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 56.7 14.3 1.5 7.8 0.7 24.3 0.2 19.5 100.7 22.0% Space Cooling 0.3 50.5 50.9 11.1% Lighting 45.2 45.2 9.9% Water Heating 21.3 2.3 1.3 3.6 19.6 44.4 9.7% Refrigeration (4) 24.9 24.9 5.4% Electronics (5) 23.2 23.2 5.1% Computers 13.2 13.2 2.9% Wet Clean (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 2.3% Cooking 4.8 0.8 0.8 4.9 10.5 2.3% Ventilation (7) 16.6 16.6 3.6% Other (8) 4.8 0.4 10.6 1.7 12.7 69.8 87.4 19.1% Adjust to SEDS (9) 5.9 4.9 4.9 19.2 30.0 6.6% Total 94.6 21.9 1.5 20.6 2.5 46.4 0.2 316.3 457.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.7 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.7 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.7 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($22.3 billion) and freezers ($2.6 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($12.0

52

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 30.1 30.1 15.2% Space Heating 17.1 2.8 1.5 0.1 4.4 0.2 4.5 26.1 13.3% Electronics 11.2 11.2 5.7% Space Cooling 0.3 14.3 14.6 7.4% Water Heating 5.2 0.8 0.8 2.5 8.5 4.3% Computers 5.5 5.5 2.8% Refrigeration 9.4 9.4 4.8% Ventilation 16.6 16.6 8.4% Cooking 2.1 0.6 2.7 1.4% Other (4) 4.8 0.3 4.3 1.7 6.3 31.2 42.3 21.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.9 4.9 4.9 19.2 30.0 15.2% Total 35.5 8.9 1.5 4.3 1.9 16.5 0.2 145.0 197.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.7 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2011 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

53

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 32.3 32.3 14.4% Space Heating 19.0 2.7 1.6 0.2 4.5 0.2 4.6 28.2 12.5% Water Heating 6.3 1.0 1.0 18.1 25.4 11.3% Space Cooling 0.4 15.1 15.5 6.9% Electronics 13.0 13.0 5.8% Refrigeration 10.0 10.0 4.4% Computers 6.0 6.0 2.7% Cooking 2.6 0.6 3.2 1.4% Ventilation 2.4 2.4 1.1% Other (4) 9.3 0.4 4.9 2.0 7.2 40.9 57.5 25.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 4.6 5.3 5.3 21.7 31.6 14.0% Total 42.2 9.4 1.6 4.9 2.2 18.0 0.2 164.8 225.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.2 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($2.0 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

54

wf01 - Energy_Expenditures.xlsx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6-07 6-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 % Change Natural Gas Northeast Consumption (mcf**) 73.6 74.2 79.6 74.7 79.7 65.6 75.2 77.5 3.1 Price ($/mcf) 14.74 15.18 15.83 13.31 12.66 12.23 11.75 13.38 13.8 Expenditures ($) 1,085 1,127 1,260 994 1,010 802 883 1,036 17.3 Midwest Consumption (mcf) 74.5 78.2 80.8 78.6 80.1 65.4 77.5 77.9 0.5 Price ($/mcf) 11.06 11.40 11.47 9.44 9.23 8.96 8.23 9.15 11.2 Expenditures ($) 824 892 927 742 740 586 638 713 11.8 South Consumption (mcf) 45.3 44.8 47.0 53.4 49.5 41.1 46.6 47.5 1.9 Price ($/mcf) 13.57 14.19 14.08 11.52 11.03 11.47 10.69 11.78 10.3 Expenditures ($) 615 635 661 615 546 472 498 560 12.4 West Consumption (mcf) 46.4 48.1 46.2 47.7 47.2 47.6 46.9 46.5 -0.8 Price ($/mcf) 11.20 11.31 10.86 9.91 9.67 9.38 9.15 9.90 8.1 Expenditures ($) 520 544 502 473 457 447 429

55

Sex differences in energy expenditure in nonhuman primates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1986 Time and energy budgets. In...141^166. New York: Alan R. Liss...175^200. New York and London...colobus as a low-energy strategist...pp. 11^33. New York: Cambridge University...and C. Ross Energy expenditure in...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Residential Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Total 1980 158.5 1981 164.0 1982 172.3 1983 176.1 1984 178.5 1985 176.8 1986 169.2 1987 167.1 1988 170.1 1989 172.8 1990 168.2 1991 169.9 1992 166.7 1993 175.6 1994 174.9 1995 172.7 1996 181.8 1997 180.0 1998 173.5 1999 174.0 2000 192.8 2001 203.3 2002 192.1 2003 208.8 2004 215.1 2005 236.7 2006 240.0 2007 246.1 2008 259.6 2009 241.6 2010 251.8 2011 251.3 2012 247.1 2013 240.3 2014 239.4 2015 241.7 2016 241.8 2017 243.0 2018 244.7 2019 246.4 2020 247.9 2021 250.4 2022 253.3 2023 255.6 2024 257.8 2025 260.3 2026 263.2 2027 266.0 2028 267.6 2029 268.1 2030 269.7 2031 272.9 2032 276.6 2033 280.4 2034 284.6 2035 288.6 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Residential petroleum products include distillate fuel oil, LPG, and kerosene. EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table

57

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential Buildings Commercial Buildings Total Building Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (3) Total Expenditures 1980 89.1 40.5 28.9 158.5 70.9 20.5 17.2 108.6 267.2 1981 94.9 41.3 27.8 164.0 79.4 21.4 16.5 117.3 281.3 1982 99.9 47.9 24.5 172.3 83.4 25.1 13.7 122.2 294.5 1983 103.6 51.0 21.4 176.1 83.6 26.1 14.6 124.3 300.4 1984 103.3 51.6 23.6 178.5 87.6 25.9 14.7 128.2 306.7 1985 105.4 48.8 22.6 176.8 90.0 24.0 12.6 126.6 303.4 1986 106.9 44.2 18.1 169.2 90.5 20.7 9.1 120.2 289.4 1987 108.2 40.9 18.0 167.1 88.7 19.8 9.2 117.7 284.7 1988 110.3 41.8 18.0 170.1 89.9 20.4 8.2 118.5 288.7 1989 110.2 42.9 19.7 172.8 91.5 20.5 8.4 120.4 293.2 1990 110.9 39.0 18.2 168.2 92.9 19.4 9.2 121.5 289.7 1991 113.7 39.2 17.0 169.9 93.9 19.5 7.7 121.1 291.0

58

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

59

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 2003 Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace and per Building, by Building Type ($2010) ($2010) Food Service 4.88 27.2 Mercantile 2.23 38.1 Food Sales 4.68 26.0 Education 1.43 36.6 Health Care 2.76 68.0 Service 1.39 9.1 Public Order and Safety 2.07 32.0 Warehouse and Storage 0.80 13.5 Office 2.01 29.8 Religious Worship 0.76 7.8 Public Assembly 1.73 24.6 Vacant 0.34 4.8 Lodging 1.72 61.5 Other 2.99 65.5 Note(s): Source(s): Mall buildings are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table 4; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. Per Square Foot Per Building

60

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 Average Annual Energy Expenditures per Household, by Year ($2010) Year 1980 1,991 1981 1,981 1982 2,058 1983 2,082 1984 2,067 1985 2,012 1986 1,898 1987 1,846 1988 1,849 1989 1,848 1990 1,785 1991 1,784 1992 1,729 1993 1,797 1994 1,772 1995 1,727 1996 1,800 1997 1,761 1998 1,676 1999 1,659 2000 1,824 2001 1,900 2002 1,830 2003 1,978 2004 2,018 2005 2,175 2006 2,184 2007 2,230 2008 2,347 2009 2,173 2010 2,201 2011 2,185 2012 2,123 2013 2,056 2014 2,032 2015 2,030 2016 2,007 2017 1,992 2018 1,982 2019 1,973 2020 1,963 2021 1,961 2022 1,964 2023 1,962 2024 1,959 2025 1,957 2026 1,959 2027 1,960 2028 1,953 2029 1,938 2030 1,932 2031 1,937 2032 1,946 2033 1,956 2034 1,967 2035 1,978 Source(s): Average Expenditure EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A2, p. 3-

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61

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 Average Annual Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace, by Year ($2010) Year $/SF 1980 (1) 2.12 1981 2.22 (2) 1982 2.24 1983 2.21 1984 2.25 1985 2.20 1986 2.06 1987 2.00 1988 1.99 1989 2.01 1990 1.98 1991 1.92 1992 1.86 1993 1.96 1994 2.05 1995 2.12 1996 2.10 1997 2.08 1998 1.97 1999 1.88 2000 2.06 2001 2.20 2002 2.04 2003 2.13 2004 2.16 2005 2.30 2006 2.36 2007 2.35 2008 1.71 2009 2.43 2010 2.44 2011 2.44 2012 2.35 2013 2.28 2014 2.27 2015 2.29 2016 2.29 2017 2.28 2018 2.29 2019 2.29 2020 2.29 2021 2.31 2022 2.32 2023 2.32 2024 2.32 2025 2.32 2026 2.32 2027 2.33 2028 2.32 2029 2.31 2030 2.31 2031 2.32 2032 2.35 2033 2.37 2034 2.39 2035 2.42 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data Prices and Expenditures Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A2, p. 3-5 and Table A5, p. 11-12 for consumption, Table A3, p. 6-8 for prices for 2008-2035; EIA, Annual Energy Review

62

National patterns of energy demand and expenditures by Hispanics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is based on ongoing research, at Argonne National Laboratory, being done for the Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) of the US Department of Energy. Under its legislative mandate MI is required to assess the impact of government policy, programs, and actions on US minorities. In line with this mission Argonne is currently involved in characterizing and analyzing the patterns of energy demand and expenditures of minorities. A major barrier associated with this task is the availability of sufficient data. With the possible exception of blacks, analysis of the patterns of energy demand for most minority population categories is all but impossible because of small sample sizes. The major source of residential energy consumption data, the Residential Energy Consumption Survey, only collects data on 5000 to 7000 households. For many minority population categories, this number of observations make any meaningful statistical analysis at least at the regional Census level practically impossible, with any further refinement of the analysis becoming even more difficult. In this paper our primary purpose is to describe the patterns of energy demand for Hispanics and nonhispanics but ancillary to that briefly present one possible solution to the data availability problem.

Poyer, D.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Poor agreement between continuous measurements of energy expenditure and routinely used prediction equations in intensive care unit patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryBackground & aims A wide variation in 24h energy expenditure has been demonstrated previously in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The accuracy of equations used to predict energy expenditure in critically ill patients is frequently compared with single or short-duration indirect calorimetry measurements, which may not represent the total energy expenditure (TEE) of these patients. To take into account this variability in energy expenditure, estimates have been compared with continuous indirect calorimetry measurements. Methods Continuous (24h/day for ?5 days) indirect calorimetry measurements were made in patients requiring mechanical ventilation for ?5 days. The Harris-Benedict, Schofield and Ireton-Jones equations and the American College of Chest Physicians recommendation of 25kcal/kg/day were used to estimate energy requirements. Results A total of 192 days of measurements, in 27 patients, were available for comparison with the different equations. Agreement between the equations and measured values was poor. The Harris-Benedict, Schofield and ACCP equations provided more estimates (66%, 66% and 65%, respectively) within 80% and 110% of TEE values. However, each of these equations would have resulted in clinically significant underfeeding (110% of TEE) in 18%, 19% and 13% of patients, respectively. Conclusions Limits of agreement between the different equations and TEE values were unacceptably wide. Prediction equations may result in significant under or overfeeding in the clinical setting.

Clare L. Reid

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Surfacers change their dive tactics depending on the aim of the dive: evidence from simultaneous measurements of breaths and energy expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to clarify how green turtles manage their energy expenditure during...estimate internal energy expenditure, such...consumption rate of fed green turtles is approximately...Georges. 2011 Energy expenditure of freely swimming adult green turtles (Chelonia...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Annual Energy Expenditures per Gross Square Foot of Federal Floorspace Stock, by Year ($2010) FY 1985 2.13 FY 2000 1.36 FY 2001 1.58 FY 2002 1.49 FY 2003 1.45 FY 2004 1.54 FY 2005 1.59 FY 2006 2.01 (1) FY 2007 2.01 Note(s): Source(s): Total Federal buildings and facilities energy expenditures in FY 2006 were $5.79 billion (in $2010). 1) Increase due to change in FEMP categorization of Federal buildings. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table A-9, p. 97 and Table 1, p. 13; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Nov. 2008, Table A-9, p. 78 for energy costs, and Table 1, p. 12 for floorspace for 2006; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Sep. 2006, Table A-12, p. 158 for energy costs for 1985-2005; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report on FEMP, Dec. 2002, Table 8-A, p. 61 for 2000; DOE/FEMP, Annual

66

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

67

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) LPG ($/gal) 1980 2.24 1981 2.51 1982 2.30 1983 2.14 1984 2.10 1985 1.96 1986 1.54 1987 1.42 1988 1.39 1989 1.48 1990 1.69 1991 1.56 1992 1.40 1993 1.33 1994 1.27 1995 1.22 1996 1.37 1997 1.34 1998 1.15 1999 1.16 2000 1.70 2001 1.59 2002 1.42 2003 1.67 2004 1.84 2005 2.36 2006 2.64 2007 2.81 2008 3.41 2009 2.52 2010 2.92 2011 3.62 2012 3.65 2013 3.43 2014 3.60 2015 3.74 2016 3.79 2017 3.86 2018 3.89 2019 3.92 2020 3.96 2021 3.99 2022 4.02 2023 4.07 2024 4.10 2025 4.15 2026 4.19 2027 4.23 2028 4.26 2029 4.30 2030 4.34 2031 4.35 2032 4.38 2033 4.43 2034 4.50 2035 4.55 Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2, p. 24-25 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A3, p. 6-8 for 2010-2035 and Table G1, p. 215 for fuels' heat content; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

68

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

69

Energy consumption and expenditure projections by population group on the basis on the annual energy outlook 2000 forecast.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The changes in the patterns of energy use and expenditures by population group are analyzed by using the 1993 and 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Surveys. Historically, these patterns have differed among non-Hispanic White households, non-Hispanic Black households, and Hispanic households. Patterns of energy use and expenditures are influenced by geographic and metropolitan location, the composition of housing stock, economic and demographic status, and the composition of energy use by end-use category. As a consequence, as energy-related factors change across groups, patterns of energy use and expenditures also change. Over time, with changes in the composition of these factors by population group and their variable influences on energy use, the impact on energy use and expenditures has varied across these population groups.

Poyer, D. A.; Decision and Information Sciences

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for...

71

Resting and daily energy expenditures of free-living field voles are positively correlated but reflect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1050 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway; Aberdeen Centre for Energy RegulationResting and daily energy expenditures of free-living field voles are positively correlated and Obesity, Division of Energy Balance and Obesity, Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB24 9SB

Lambin, Xavier

72

The impact of the Persian Gulf crisis on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of the Kingdom of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered first immediate and then fluctuating world petroleum prices. Increases in petroleum prices and in U.S. petroleum imports resulted in increases in the petroleum prices paid by U.S. residential, commercial, and industrial consumers. The result was an immediate price shock that reverberated throughout the U.S. economy. The differential impact of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raised immediate, significant, and potentially long-term research, policy, and management issues for a variety of federal, state, and local government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Among these issues are (1) the measurement of variations in the impact of petroleum price changes on poor, nonpoor, minority, and majority households; (2) how to use the existing policy resources and policy innovation to mitigate regressive impacts of petroleum price increases on lower-income households; and (3) how to pursue such policy mitigation through government agencies severely circumscribed by tax and expenditure limitations. Few models attempt to assess household energy consumption and energy expenditure under various alternative price scenarios and with respect to the inclusion of differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. This paper provides a preliminary analysis of the nature and extent of potential impacts of petroleum price changes attributable to the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath on majority, black, and Hispanic households and on overlapping poor and nonpoor households. At the time this was written, the Persian Gulf War had concluded with Iraq`s total surrender to all of the resolutions and demands of the United Nations and United States.

Henderson, L. [Univ. of Baltimore, MD (United States); Poyer, D.; Teotia, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Surfacers change their dive tactics depending on the aim of the dive: evidence from simultaneous measurements of breaths and energy expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...simultaneously to reveal the energy expended during...turtles manage their energy expenditure during...taking physical measurements of the turtles...embedded. A logger unit was affixed to...underestimation of energy expenditure per unit body weight. Consequently...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Total Energy USA...

75

Energy consumption and expenditure projections by income quintile on the basis of the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 forecast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the base-case scenario used in the Annual Energy Outlook 1997, published by the US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, on income quintile groups. Projected energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1993 to 2015 are reported. Projected consumption of electricity, natural gas, distillate fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas over this period is also reported for each income group. 33 figs., 11 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Allison, T.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

77

Dietary Modulation of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis: Calories and Energy Expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...required in order for the HF corn oil diet to stimulate...administration & dosage Eating Energy Intake Female Lung Neoplasms...element of "net utilizable energy." Induction of MTs by...in rats fed HF and LF corn oil diets, restricted...independent of the level of energy intake." Thus, we were...

Theresa Craven-Giles; Anthony R. Tagliaferro; Anne M. Ronan; Karen J. Baumgartner; and B. D. Roebuck

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Energy Expenditure of Rats Bearing Walker Carcinoma 256  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...promotion with TPA (12). Corn oil was the fat used in all...did not show 2035s DIETARY ENERGY AND TUMOR PROMOTION Table I...similar effects of dietary corn oil on skin tumorigenesis...observations. 2036s DIETARY ENERGY AND TUMOR PROMOTION 16 weeks...

G. B. Mider; L. D. Fenninger; F. L. Haven; and J. J. Morton

1951-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The system for observing fitness instruction time (SOFIT) as a measure of energy expenditure during classroom based physical activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this investigation was to develop an equation to estimate physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) during a 10-min physically active academic lesson using The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time ...

Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Greene, Leon; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Donnelly, Joseph E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the...

84

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Energy Service Company (ESCO) Industry Activity ($Million Nominal) (1) Low High 1990 143 342 Market Segment Share 1991 218 425 MUSH (2) 69% 1992 331 544 Federal 15% 1993 505 703 Commercial & Industrial 7% 1994 722 890 Residential 6% 1995 1,105 1,159 Public Housing 3% 1996 1,294 1,396 1997 1,394 1,506 1998 1,551 1,667 2008 Revenues by Project/Technology Type 1999 1,764 1,925 2000 1,876 2,186 Market Segment Share 2001 - - Energy Efficiency 75% 2002 - - Onsite Renewables 14% 2003 - - Engine/Turbine Generators 6% 2004 2,447 2,507 Consulting/Master Planning 3% 2005 2,949 3,004 Other 2% 2006 3,579 3,627 2007 - - 2008 4,087 4,171 Note(s): Source(s): Estimated Revenue ($Million Nominal) (1) 2008 Revenue Sources 1) Estimates based on surveys of major ESCOs and input from industry experts. 2) Includes municipal and state governments, universities

85

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) Electricity Natural Gas Distillate Oil Residual Oil ($/gal) ($/gal) 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 9.39 104.50 2.79 3.78 9.35 104.74 2.81 3.81 9.47 101.25 2.73 3.69 9.40 103.22 2.76 3.75 9.54 99.28 2.67 3.60 9.51 100.49 2.70 3.64 9.52 94.53 2.66 3.52 9.55 97.45 2.64 3.55 9.46 90.92 2.61 3.46 9.48 92.13 2.63 3.49 9.49 87.65 2.54 3.41 9.47 89.48 2.58 3.42 9.58 85.91 2.41 3.28 9.54 86.36 2.49 3.34 9.57 87.02 2.07 2.97 9.52 84.58 2.26 3.14 10.09 86.14 2.34 3.55 9.76 87.22 2.37 3.57 10.27 97.87 1.49 2.03 10.14 90.95 1.66 2.86 10.04 114.33 1.51 2.47 10.56 121.16 2.01 3.34 9.59 121.45 1.24 2.07 10.13 124.31 1.39 2.32 9.44 94.94 0.93 1.23

86

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31 1992 34.79 8.28 11.23 17.76 1993 34.52 8.47 10.75 17.76 1994 34.04 8.63 10.63 17.87 1995 33.43 8.00 10.33 17.50 1996 32.63 8.21 11.70 17.28 1997 32.34 8.83 11.47 17.69 1998 31.33 8.55 9.96 17.73 1999 30.52 8.29 10.13 17.09 2000 30.13 9.54 14.18 18.06 2001 30.71 11.50 13.98 19.38 2002 29.73 9.24 12.26 17.89 2003 30.05 10.87 14.21 18.88 2004 29.98 11.97 15.54 19.76 2005 30.64 13.66 18.93 21.50 2006 32.67 14.30 21.06 23.34 2007 32.50

87

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Building Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Residential Buildings Commercial Buildings Building Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Avg. Avg. (3) 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 37.22 7.70 13.06 18.52 17.99 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 39.06 8.29 14.78 20.56 19.68 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 40.15 9.40 13.28 21.21 20.48 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 39.51 10.43 12.53 21.55 21.23 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 38.68 10.00 12.04 21.14 20.58 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 38.29 9.60 11.68 21.41 20.63 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 37.09 8.69 7.85 20.17 19.70 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 34.93 7.93 8.16 19.14 18.90 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 33.60 7.45 7.47 18.24 18.11 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 33.06 7.34 8.13 18.29 18.07 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 32.49 7.20 9.31 18.62 18.63 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31

88

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Average 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 (2) 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 27.39 10.47 27.48 21.15 27.10 10.45 27.73 21.01 27.56 10.32 27.04 21.10 27.52 10.45 27.28 21.18 27.86 10.05 26.41 21.06 27.74 10.12 26.73 21.07 28.00 9.75 25.85 20.90 27.96 9.93 26.16 21.01 27.78 9.21 25.46 20.46 27.90 9.45 25.69 20.67 27.76 8.95 24.95 20.23 27.72 9.09 25.24 20.32 27.96 8.64 24.34 20.11 27.81 8.77 24.80 20.14 27.91 8.46 23.15 19.90 28.07 8.59 24.07 20.11 28.61 8.72 23.94 20.36 28.05 8.70 22.00 19.99 29.73 9.10 20.28 20.99 29.57 8.61 24.24 21.03 30.95 12.12 23.75 23.21 30.09 9.79 15.83 21.13 29.70

89

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Building Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) (cents/therm) (cents/gal) ($/gal) 1980 12.42 83.51 1.53 2.24 12.70 77.01 1.43 2.05 1981 13.14 88.83 1.47 2.51 13.33 82.90 1.63 2.32 1982 13.70 100.83 1.54 2.30 13.70 93.95 1.40 2.11 1983 13.79 113.04 1.51 2.14 13.48 104.33 1.30 1.75 1984 13.24 110.16 1.46 2.10 13.20 100.01 1.37 1.68 1985 13.28 106.80 1.37 1.96 13.06 95.96 1.21 1.56 1986 13.05 99.76 1.25 1.54 12.66 86.86 0.71 1.01 1987 12.72 92.16 1.22 1.42 11.92 79.32 0.79 1.05 1988 12.36 87.96 1.15 1.39 11.46 74.52 0.62 0.95 1989 12.17 87.08 1.39 1.48 11.28 73.39 0.70 1.07 1990 12.01 86.28 1.40 1.69 11.08 72.04 0.78 1.26 1991 11.90 83.77 1.34 1.56 10.97 69.49 0.58 1.11 1992 11.87 82.80 1.24 1.40 10.93 68.64 0.58 1.01 1993 11.78 84.73 1.19 1.33 10.81 71.91 0.58 0.96 1994 11.62 86.30 1.25 1.27 10.57 74.09 0.60 0.90 1995 11.41 79.96 1.22 1.22 10.32 66.99 0.64 0.88 1996 11.13 82.07 1.36 1.37

90

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Superseded -- see MER for key annual tables Superseded -- see MER for key annual tables Annual Energy Review archives for data year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 all archives Go CONTENT CHANGES + EXPAND ALL Changes in Annual Energy Review 2011 Annual Energy Review 2011 Release: September 27, 2012 1. Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions Indicators Estimates (Table 1.5) has been modified to include columns for Gross Output and Energy Expenditures as Share of Gross Output and remove Greenhouse Gas Emissions per Real Dollar of Gross Domestic Product. 2. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American Indian Lands (Table 1.14) was previously titled "Fossil Fuel Production on Federally Administered Lands." It has been redesigned and now provides data on sales of fossil fuels from Federal and American Indian lands for fiscal years 2003 through 2011.

91

A Look at Commercial Buldings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOE/EIA-0625(95) DOE/EIA-0625(95) Distribution Category UC-950 A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures October 1998 En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion Of fice of En ergy Mar kets and End Use U.S. De part ment of En ergy Wash ing ton, DC 20585 This re port was pre pared by the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion, the in de pend ent sta tis ti cal and ana lytic agency within the U.S. De part ment of En ergy. The in for ma tion con tained herein should be at trib uted to the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion and should not be con strued as ad vo cat ing or re flect ing any pol icy po si tion of the De part ment of En ergy or any other or gani za tion. Contacts The En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion (EIA) pre pared this pub li ca tion un der the gen eral di rec tion of W. Cal vin

92

The federal energy policy: An example of its potential impact on energy consumption and expenditures in minority and poor households  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the National Energy Strategy on majority and minority households and on nonpoor and poor households. (Minority households are defined as those headed by black or Hispanic persons; poor households are defined as those having combined household income less than or equal to 125% of the Office of Management and Budget`s poverty-income threshold.) Energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1987 to 2009 are reported. Projected consumptions of electricity and nonelectric energy over this period are also reported for each group. An analysis of how these projected values are affected under different housing growth scenarios is performed. The analysis in this report presents a preliminary set of projections generated under a set of simplifying assumptions. Future analysis will rigorously assess the sensitivity of the projected values to various changes in a number of these assumptions.

Poyer, D.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Factors predicting the capacity of Los Angeles city-region recreation programs to promote energy expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An audit of recreation programs with moderate or higher levels of physical activity (PA) in Los Angeles area cities (N=82) was conducted using internet, telephone, and survey methods. Metabolic Equivalents (METs) were used to code programs? physical activity intensity. MET-hours per recreation program was associated with required age for enrollment, percent of residents >64 years of age, and fiscal capacity of cities. Capacity to promote energy expenditure may depend on targeted age groups, age of population, and municipal fiscal capacity. Cities with lower fiscal capacity might offer those higher MET-hour activities which require less specialized equipment and seek outside funding to offer higher MET programs.

Kim D. Reynolds; Nicholas Dahmann; Jennifer Wolch; Pascale Joassart-Marcelli; Genevieve Dunton; Diana Rudulph; Joshua Newell; Jennifer Thayer; Michael Jerrett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Estimating exergy prices for energy carriers in heating systems: Country analyses of exergy substitution with capital expenditures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exergy represents the ability of an energy carrier to perform work and can be seen as a core indicator for measuring its quality. In this article we postulate that energy prices reflect the exergy content of the underlying energy carrier and that capital expenditures can substitute for exergy to some degree. We draw our line of argumentation from cost and technology data for heating systems of four European countries: Austria, Finland, The Netherlands, and Sweden. Firstly, this paper shows that the overall consumer costs for different heating options, widely installed in those countries, are in the same range. In this analysis we derived an overall standard deviation of about 8%. Secondly, additional analysis demonstrates that the share of capital costs on total heating cost increases with lower exergy input. Based on the data used in this analysis, we conclude that for the case of modern cost effective heating systems the substitution rate between exergy and capital is in the vicinity of 2/3. This means that by reducing the average specific exergy input of the applied energy carriers by one unit, the share of capital costs on the total costs increases by 2/3 of a unit.

A. Mller; L. Kranzl; P. Tuominen; E. Boelman; M. Molinari; A.G. Entrop

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

vol. 163, no. 3 the american naturalist march 2004 Optimal Body Size and Energy Expenditure during Winter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, South Africa; e-mail: m.scantlebury@zoology.up.ac.za. § E-mail: rachel@naturebureau.co.uk. k E-mail: xvol. 163, no. 3 the american naturalist march 2004 Optimal Body Size and Energy Expenditure during energy requirements for thermogenesis at a time when little energy is available. We formulated a model

Lambin, Xavier

96

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

97

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Reduced postprandial energy expenditure and increased exogenous fat oxidation in young woman after ingestion of test meals with a low protein content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Macronutrient composition of diets can influence energy balance in humans. We tested the hypothesis whether low protein content in single meals may induce lower values of energy expenditure (EE) and fat oxidation...

Klaus J Petzke; Susanne Klaus

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Essays on pharmaceuticals and health care expenditures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health care expenditures. This dissertation also explores the relations between FDA Therapeutic Drug Classification and total health care expenditures. It offers a better methodology by incorporating both the quality and the age of the drugs to capture...

Karaca, Zeynal

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Occupational physical activity, energy expenditure and 11-year progression of carotid atherosclerosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expenditure measurements. Ergonomics. 1985;28(1):3659.time and physical workload. Ergonomics. Lynch JW, Kaplan GA,arm and leg exercise. Ergonomics. 1998;41(1):109 Shvartz E,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - adolescent energy expenditure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hedge said, "and has helped the United States become a nation of workaholics... 's expenditure on this approach. ne of the keys to stemming the obesity ... Source: Wang, Z....

103

Reading and Listening to Music Increase Resting Energy Expenditure during an Indirect Calorimetry Test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Indirect calorimetry is often done early in the morning in a fasting state, with the subject unshowered and abstained from caffeine or other stimulants. Subjects often fall asleep, resulting in measurement of a sleeping metabolic rate rather than a resting metabolic rate. The objective of this study was to determine whether listening to self-selected relaxing music or reading an electronic device or magazine affects resting energy expenditure (REE) during measurement in healthy adults. A randomized trial comparing three different conditions (ie, resting, reading, and listening to music) wasperformed. Sixty-five subjects (36 female and 29 male) were used in final dataanalysis. Inclusion criteria included healthy subjects between the ages of 18 and 50years with a stable weight. Exclusion criteria included pregnant or lactating women or use of medications known to affect metabolism. Results showed that reading either amagazine or an electronic device significantly increased REE by 102.7 kcal/day when compared with resting (Pdevice and magazine. Listening to self-selected relaxing music increased REE by 27.6 kcal/day compared with rest (P=0.0072). Based on our results, we recommend subjects refrain from reading a magazine or electronic device during an indirect calorimetry test. Whether or not the smaller difference found while listening to music ispractically significant would be a decision for the indirect calorimetry test administrator.

Blaire Snell; Susan Fullmer; Dennis L. Eggett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

TENESOL formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TENESOL formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE TENESOL formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE Jump to: navigation, search Name TENESOL (formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE) Place la Tour de Salvagny, France Zip 69890 Sector Solar Product Makes polycrystalline silicon modules, and PV-based products such as solar powered pumps. References TENESOL (formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. TENESOL (formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE) is a company located in la Tour de Salvagny, France . References ↑ "TENESOL (formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=TENESOL_formerly_known_as_TOTAL_ENERGIE&oldid=352112" Categories:

105

A look at commercial buildings in 1995: Characteristics, energy consumption, and energy expenditures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of facilities that would not be considered commercial in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The target population for the 1995 CBECS consisted of all commercial buildings in the US with more than 1,000 square feet of floorspace. Decision makers, businesses, and other organizations that are concerned with the use of energy--building owners and managers, regulators, legislative bodies and executive agencies at all levels of government, utilities and other energy suppliers--are confronted with a buildings sector that is complex. Data on major characteristics (e.g., type of building, size, year constructed, location) collected from the buildings, along with the amount and types of energy the buildings consume, help answer fundamental questions about the use of energy in commercial buildings.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail sales, and electrical system energy losses.

107

Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Facility Total Energy Facilities Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

108

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 2012 PDF | previous editions September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 A report of historical annual energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, as well as financial and environmental indicators; and data unit conversion tables. About the data Previous Editions + EXPAND ALL Annual Energy Review 2011 Edition PDF (Full issue) Annual Energy Review 2011 - Released on September 27, 2012 PDF Annual Energy Review 2010 Edition PDF (Full issue) Annual Energy Review 2010 - Released on October 19, 2011 PDF Annual Energy Review 2009 Edition PDF (Full issue) Annual Energy Review 2009 - Released on August 19, 2010 PDF

109

Serck standard packages for total energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the principle of combined heat and power generation is attractive, practical problems have hindered its application. In the U.K. the scope for small scale combined heat and power (total energy) systems has been improved markedly by the introduction of new Electricity Board regulations which allow the operation of small a.c. generators in parallel with the mains low voltage supply. Following this change, Serck have developed a standard total energy unit, the CG100, based on the 2.25 1 Land Rover gas engine with full engine (coolant and exhaust gas) heat recovery. The unit incorporates an asynchronous generator, which utilising mains power for its magnetising current and speed control, offers a very simple means of generating electricity in parallel with the mains supply, without the need for expensive synchronising controls. Nominal output is 15 kW 47 kW heat; heat is available as hot water at temperatures up to 85C, allowing the heat output to be utilised directly in low pressure hot water systems. The CG100 unit can be used in any application where an appropriate demand exists for heat and electricity, and the annual utilisation will give an acceptable return on capital cost; it produces base load heat and electricity, with LPHW boilers and the mains supply providing top-up/stand-by requirements. Applications include residential use (hospitals, hotels, boarding schools, etc.), swimming pools and industrial process systems. The unit also operates on digester gas produced by anaerobic digestion of organic waste. A larger unit based on a six cylinder Ford engine (45 kWe output) is now available.

R. Kelcher

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Financial Statistics: Expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While public attention is usually focussed on one category of expenditure viz Rate Fund expenditure-both revenue and capital (see section 3.3)-it is ... financial statistics to realise that the term expenditure...

J. M. Gillespie

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections All Reports Most Requested Annual Monthly Projections U.S. States Annual Energy Review September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Important notes about the data Note: The emphasis of the Annual Energy Review (AER) is on long-term trends. Analysts may wish to use the data in this report in conjunction with EIA's monthly releases that offer updates to the most recent years' data. In particular, see the Monthly Energy Review for statistics that include updates to many of the annual series in this report. Data Years Displayed: For tables beginning in 1949, some early years (usually 1951-1954, 1956-1959, 1961-1964, 1966-1969, and 1971-1974) are not

112

SEDS CSV File Documentation: Price and Expenditure  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices and Expenditures Prices and Expenditures The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain the price and expenditure estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are three files that contain estimates for all states and years. Prices contains the price estimates for all states and Expenditures contains the expenditure estimates for all states. The third file, Adjusted Consumption for Expenditure Calculations contains adjusted consumption estimates used in calculating expenditures (see Appendix E below). Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named with the two-letter U.S. Postal Code listed in Appendix A, as well as a file for the United States.

113

Capital and revenue expenditures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T and Charaoteristios of Various Expenditures ~ ~ 7 III. Bases for Expenditure Classifioationi ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ r ~ ' ~ IV ~ Methods of kooountiag for Capital and Revenue Expenditure( ~ ~ I CkPITLL ERE RKVRRUm bXPLM)ITURkiS ISTRORUGTIOR kn ?ttonpt will be made... whish represent part of the nooessary cost of usine the asset during the current period, shouLd be oharged abainst the revenue of the period? heveaue expenditures are expensosg capital expenditures are noti fhe toras aooounting period' and "fiscal...

Owens, Jack Bailey

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Achieving Total Employee Engagement in Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ratheon and GM share their experiences with employee engagement to achieve energy efficiency and sustainability goals in this presentation.

115

Achieving Total Employee Engagement in Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Raytheon Employee Engagement Raytheon Employee Engagement in Energy Conservation Department of Energy August 5, 2010 Steve Fugarazzo Raytheon Company Enterprise Energy Team Copyright © 2007 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. Customer Success Is Our Mission is a trademark of Raytheon Company. Page 2 8/9/2010 Presentation Overview  Company Background  Communication & Outreach Initiatives - Internal Partnerships - Energy Champions - Energy Citizens - Energy Awareness Events & Contests Page 3 8/9/2010 Raytheon ... What We Do Raytheon is a global technology company that provides innovative solutions to customers in 80 nations. Through strategic vision, disciplined management and world-class talent, Raytheon is delivering operational advantages for customers every day while helping them prepare for the

116

Property:TotalValue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalValue TotalValue Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "TotalValue" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 3,088,007 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 22,888,360 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 2,661,650 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 37,400,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 40,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 451,814,234 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 177,642,503 +

117

SolarTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarTotal SolarTotal Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarTotal Place Bemmel, Netherlands Zip 6681 LN Sector Solar Product The company sells and installs PV solar instalations Coordinates 51.894112°, 5.89881° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.894112,"lon":5.89881,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

118

An investigation of regulatory and voluntary environmental capital expenditures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the firm-specific economic consequences of regulatory and voluntary environmental capital expenditures. Using firm-level environmental data, I decompose total environmental capital expenditures into estimates of regulatory and voluntary components. I then examine the relations of regulatory and voluntary environmental capital outlays with future abnormal earnings, stock prices, and stock returns. As predicted, the empirical analysis reveals that regulatory environmental capital expenditures are negatively associated with future abnormal earnings. Moreover, market-based tests indicate that the regulatory component of environmental capital expenditures is negatively priced. Finally, the results suggest that voluntary environmental capital expenditures and regulatory environmental capital expenditures have different firm-specific economic consequences.

Derek Johnston

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

120

EQUUS Total Return Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EQUUS Total Return Inc EQUUS Total Return Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EQUUS Total Return Inc Place Houston, Texas Product A business development company and VC investor that trades as a closed-end fund. EQUUS is managed by MCC Global NV, a Frankfurt stock exchange listed management and merchant banking group. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Incubation temperature affects hatching success, embryonic expenditure of energy and hatchling phenotypes of a prolonged egg-retaining snake, Deinagkistrodon acutus (Viperidae)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We used eggs of Deinagkistrodon acutus to study the effects of incubation temperature on hatching success, embryonic expenditure of energy and hatchling phenotypes. One egg from each of the 15 fertile clutches was dissected for determination of egg composition, and a total of 164 eggs were incubated at five constant temperatures. Embryonic mortality increased dramatically at 30C, and none of eggs incubated at 32C hatched. Within the range from 24 to 30C, temperature affected incubation length and most hatchling traits examined. The mean incubation length at 24, 26, 28 and 30C was 36.4, 28.7, 21.8 and 15.7 days, respectively. Embryos developing at higher temperatures (28 and 30C) consumed more energy but produced less developed (and hence smaller) hatchlings, which characteristically had larger residual yolks but smaller carcasses. A principal component analysis resolved two components (with eigenvalues ?1) from ten size (initial egg mass)-free hatchling variables, accounting for 79.3% of variation in the original data. The first component (43.8% variance explained) had high positive loading for size-free values of dry mass, lipid mass, energy contents and ash mass of hatchlings, and the second component (35.5% variance explained) had high positive loading for size-free values of SVL, carcass dry mass and fatbody dry mass. Hatchlings from different incubation temperatures did not differ in scores on the first axis of the principal component analysis, whereas hatchlings from higher incubation temperatures (28 and 30C) had significantly lower scores on the second axis than did those from lower incubation temperatures (24 and 26C). As the second axis mainly represents traits relating to the developmental condition at hatching, the analysis therefore provided further evidence that eggs incubated at higher temperatures produced less developed hatchlings. Taken together, our data show that the optimal temperatures for embryonic development are relatively low in D. acutus largely due to its use of relatively cool habitats.

Zhi-Hua Lin; Xiang Ji; Lai-Gao Luo; Xiao-Mei Ma

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Correlation...

123

Total Pollution Effect and Total Energy Cost per Output of Different Products for Polish Industrial System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years a broad use has been made of the indices of total energy requirements in the whole large production system corresponding to unit output of particular goods (Boustead I., Hancock G.F., 1979). The...

Henryk W. Balandynowicz

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Compilation of Expenditures for the Hawai`i Gateway Energy Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discussed in earlier reporting to the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) chose to simply develop fuel cell and storage activities, reported in a previous document to NETL, were conducted at Kahua for space that have been charged to the project, since we developed the contract with NETL. The space

125

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Direct Appropriations on Federal Buildings Energy Conservation Retrofits and Capital Equipment ($2010 Million) FY 1985 FY 1986 FY 1987 FY 1988 FY 1989 FY 1990 Source(s): DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table 11-B, p. 31; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Nov. 2007, Table 9-B, p. 26 for 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000-2006; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Sep. 2004, Table 4-B, p. 38 for 1986-1989, 1991-1994, 1996-1999; EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. 349,350 102,135 FY 1996 238,232 FY 2002 147,895 83,340 FY 1995 438,943 FY 2001 162,488 FY 2007 321,686 108,705 FY 1994 318,739 FY 2000 150,900 FY 2006 301,222 98,708 FY 1993 170,826 FY 1999 261,784 FY 2005 201,156 342,653 FY 1992 209,973

126

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of Chinasof Chinas total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof Chinas total energy consumption, while others estimate

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABORATORY Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissionscomponent of Chinas total energy consumption mix. However,about 19% of Chinas total energy consumption, while others

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Total and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building HVAC Systems Using Model Predictive Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combination of the total energy consumption and the peakalso reduces the total energy consumption of the occupancyTotal and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building

Maasoumy, Mehdi; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

130

Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalProjectCost TotalProjectCost Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/TotalProjectCost Property Type Number Description Total Project Cost Pages using the property "Geothermal/TotalProjectCost" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 6,135,381 + A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project + 1,629,670 +

131

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What's New in Monthly Energy Review What's New in Monthly Energy Review December 2013 PDF | previous editions Release Date: December 24, 2013 Next Update: January 28, 2014 Listed below are changes in Monthly Energy Review content. Only months with changes beyond the standard updates are shown. CONTENT CHANGES + EXPAND ALL Changes in 2013 December 2013 Release Electricity statistics have been revised in coordination with EIA's Electric Power Annual 2012. Revisions affect data series in Energy Overview, Energy Consumption, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Coal, Electricity, Nuclear Energy, Energy Prices, Renewable Energy, and Environment. Final 2012 heat content values for electricity (Table A6) have also been incorporated. October 2013 Release Excel and CSV files now include pre-1973 data for all series except for Section 12. The Excel files now have two worksheets, one for monthly data and one for annual data.

132

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

133

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

134

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Total Energy USA 2012 meeting in Houston, Texas, on November 27, 2012.

135

Military Expenditure, Threats, and Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a country's external military threat; lgdp is the log ofMilitary Expenditure, Threats, and Growth * September 2003expenditure, external threats, corruption, and other

Aizenman, Joshua; Glick, Reuven

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector diagram image Footnotes: 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public.

137

Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from of work done by the field, W*= -W. Bring q1 from , W *= 0 since no electric F yet #12;Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from the work done by an external

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

138

1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels................................................................................................... 145 Table C6. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels......................... 150 Table C7. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of

139

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

140

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

142

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures This chapter analyzes trends in fuel economy, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures, using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, as well as selected data from other sources. Analysis topics include the following: Following the oil supply and price disruptions caused by the Arab oil embargo of 1973-1974, motor gasoline price increases, the introduction of corporate average fuel economy standards, and environmental quality initiatives helped to spur major changes in vehicle technology. But have the many advances in vehicle technology resulted in measurable gains in the fuel economy of the residential vehicle fleet?

143

Public Expenditure on Education  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of Commons on December 17, Mr. Geoffrey Lloyd, Minister of Education, said that expenditure by the Ministry and local education authorities, excluding ... by the Ministry and local education authorities, excluding capital ...

1959-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

144

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

145

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

146

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

147

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

148

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

149

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

150

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

151

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

152

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

153

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

154

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

155

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

156

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Electricity Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Electricity Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of generation and delivery to the customer) are estimated

157

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Flow, (Million Barrels per Day) Petroleum Flow, (Million Barrels per Day) Petroleum Energy Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Unfinished oils, hydrogen/oxygenates/renewables/other hydrocarbons, and motor gasoline and aviation gasoline blending components. 2 Renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production (0.972), net imports (1.164) and adjustments (0.122) minus stock change (0.019) and product supplied (0.001). 3 Finished petroleum products, liquefied petroleum gases, and pentanes plus. 4 Natural gas plant liquids. 5 Field production (2.183) and renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production (-.019) minus refinery and blender net imputs (0.489). 6 Production minus refinery input. (s)= Less than 0.005. Notes: * Data are preliminary. * Values are derived from source data prior to rounding for publication.

158

Use of the Predictive Sugars Biomarker to Evaluate Self-Reported Total Sugars Intake in the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN...Human Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, United...biomarker to assess measurement error (ME) structure...Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN...Schoeller DA .Measurement of energy expenditure in...

Nataa Tasevska; Douglas Midthune; Nancy Potischman; Amy F. Subar; Amanda J. Cross; Sheila A. Bingham; Arthur Schatzkin; and Victor Kipnis

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 Figure 6 Primary Energy Consumption by End-Use in24 Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel in Commercialbased on total primary energy consumption (source energy),

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A comparative analysis of energy demand and expenditures by minority and majority households within the context of a conditional demand system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis and evaluation of the impact that programs and policies have on energy consumption and expenditures are confounded by many intervening variables. A clear understanding of how these variables influence energy consumption patterns should be grounded in a rigorously developed framework. In this regard much is documented in the literature. However, an analysis of the comparative relationship between energy demand and variables which influence it among different socioeconomic groups has not been thoroughly explored with any theoretical rigor. It is proposed that differences in patterns of energy use between black, Hispanic, and majority households (where the household head is neither black nor Hispanic) are due to both structural and distribution differences. It is felt that the structural dissimilarities are primarily due to the dynamic nature in which energy consumption patterns evolve, with differences in changing housing patterns playing a significant role. For minorities, this implies a potential difference in the effect of policy and programs on economic welfare when compared to majority households.To test this hypothesis, separate conditional demand systems are estimated for majority, black, and Hispanic households. With the use of separate variance/covariance matrices, various parameter groups are tested for statistically significant differences.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A comparative analysis of energy demand and expenditures by minority and majority households within the context of a conditional demand system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis and evaluation of the impact that programs and policies have on energy consumption and expenditures are confounded by many intervening variables. A clear understanding of how these variables influence energy consumption patterns should be grounded in a rigorously developed framework. In this regard much is documented in the literature. However, an analysis of the comparative relationship between energy demand and variables which influence it among different socioeconomic groups has not been thoroughly explored with any theoretical rigor. It is proposed that differences in patterns of energy use between black, Hispanic, and majority households (where the household head is neither black nor Hispanic) are due to both structural and distribution differences. It is felt that the structural dissimilarities are primarily due to the dynamic nature in which energy consumption patterns evolve, with differences in changing housing patterns playing a significant role. For minorities, this implies a potential difference in the effect of policy and programs on economic welfare when compared to majority households.To test this hypothesis, separate conditional demand systems are estimated for majority, black, and Hispanic households. With the use of separate variance/covariance matrices, various parameter groups are tested for statistically significant differences.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Government Expenditure on Scientific Research, 1961  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... year is mainly concerned with assisting industry to apply the results of research, records gross expenditure in the year ended March 31, 1961, of 14,467,278, compared with ... the Research Grants Committee considered 447 applications for grants, other than those for very expensive capital projects, with a total value of 3,156,000, compared with 422 valued ...

1962-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

163

Operating and Capital Expenditures Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, you will learn how to plan, create, and use the Operating Expenditure (OPEX) model and the Capital Expenditure (CAPEX) model. These models are used ... to forecast, respectively, general operatin...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Economy slows Arco's capital expenditures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economy slows Arco's capital expenditures ... Arco Chemical's new president and chief executive officer, Alan R. Hirsig, told shareholders the company plans to stretch out its capital expenditure program and as a result, expects sharply lower capital spending in 1992. ...

MARC REISCH

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Corporate Expenditure on Environmental Protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the determinants of firms current environmental expenditure and firms capital investment in equipment for pollution control in ... The main determinants for the two types of expenditure are similar: ...

Stefanie A. Haller; Liam Murphy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

United States - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rankings Rankings Additional State Rankings Consumption Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expenditures Total Energy per Capita Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity More State Ranking Tables › Notes & Sources Consumption Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Consumption Per Capita Expenditures Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Expenditures Per Capita Production Total Energy: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Energy Production Crude Oil: EIA, Petroleum Supply Annual, Crude Oil Production Natural Gas: EIA, Natural Gas Annual, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Coal: EIA, Annual Coal Report, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State

167

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

168

The Excitation Energy Dependence of the Total Kinetic Energy Release in 235U(n,f)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The total kinetic energy release in the neutron induced fission of $^{235}$U was measured (using white spectrum neutrons from LANSCE) for neutron energies from E$_{n}$ = 3.2 to 50 MeV. In this energy range the average post-neutron total kinetic energy release drops from 167.4 $\\pm$ 0.7 to 162.1 $\\pm$ 0.8 MeV, exhibiting a local dip near the second chance fission threshold. The values and the slope of the TKE vs. E$_{n}$ agree with previous measurements but do disagree (in magnitude) with systematics. The variances of the TKE distributions are larger than expected and apart from structure near the second chance fission threshold, are invariant for the neutron energy range from 11 to 50 MeV. We also report the dependence of the total excitation energy in fission, TXE, on neutron energy.

R. Yanez; L. Yao; J. King; W. Loveland; F. Tovesson; N. Fotiades

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

Association of Energy Intake and Energy Balance with Postmenopausal Breast Cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...extreme estimates of energy consumption (upper or lower...Implication of total energy intake for epidemiologic...equation for resting energy expenditure in...per capita food consumption. Cancer 1986...of the effect of World War II in Norway...

Shih-Chen Chang; Regina G. Ziegler; Barbara Dunn; Rachael Stolzenberg-Solomon; James V. Lacey, Jr.; Wen-Yi Huang; Arthur Schatzkin; Douglas Reding; Robert N. Hoover; Patricia Hartge; and Michael F. Leitzmann

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were used to calculate the energy mix in manufacturing,of Chinas total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof Chinas total energy consumption mix. However, accurately

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Measured energy savings and demand reduction from a reflective roof membrane on a large retail store in Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the abated annual energy and demand expenditures, simplea/c annual abated energy and demand expenditures and presentof future abated energy and demand expenditures is estimated

Konopacki, Steven J.; Akbari, Hashem

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

"Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

173

"Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" 5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

174

"Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

175

"Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row"

176

"Table A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumsption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(PERCENT)","(percent)","Factors"

177

"Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

178

"Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

179

"Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent of","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(Percent)","(percent)","Factors"

180

Validity of predictive equations for resting energy expenditure according to the body mass index in a population of 1726 patients followed in a Nutrition Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryBackground & aims The resting energy expenditure (REE) predictive formulas are often used in clinical practice to adapt the nutritional intake of patients or to compare to REE measured by indirect calorimetry. We aimed to evaluate which predictive equations was the best alternative to REE measurements according to the BMI. Methods 28 REE prediction equations were studied in a population of 1726 patients without acute or chronic high-grade inflammatory diseases followed in a Nutrition Unit for malnutrition, eating disorders or obesity. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry for 30min after a fasting period of 12h. Some formulas requiring fat mass and free-fat mass, body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis. The percentage of accurate prediction (10%/REE measured) and Pearson r correlations were calculated. Results Original Harris & Benedict equation provided 73.0% of accurate predictions in normal BMI group but only 39.3% and 62.4% in patients with BMI40kgm?2, respectively. Conclusion Usual predictive equations of REE are not suitable for predicting REE in patients with extreme BMI, in particularly in patients with BMI <16kgm?2. Indirect Calorimetry may still be recommended for an accurate assessment of REE in this population until the development of an adapted predictive equation.

Pierre Jsus; Najate Achamrah; Sbastien Grigioni; Jocelyne Charles; Agns Rimbert; Vanessa Folope; Andr Petit; Pierre Dchelotte; Mose Coffier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

182

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

183

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

184

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

185

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

186

U.S. States - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rankings Rankings Additional State Rankings Consumption Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expenditures Total Energy per Capita Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity More State Ranking Tables › Notes & Sources Consumption Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Consumption Per Capita Expenditures Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Expenditures Per Capita Production Total Energy: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Energy Production Crude Oil: EIA, Petroleum Supply Annual, Crude Oil Production Natural Gas: EIA, Natural Gas Annual, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Coal: EIA, Annual Coal Report, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State

187

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Central Government Buildings. Available at: http://Energy Commission, PIER Building End-Use Energy Efficiencythe total lifecycle of a building such as petroleum and

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Abstract One way for animals to decrease energy ex-penditures is to minimize the cost of movement. For ani-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract One way for animals to decrease energy ex- penditures is to minimize the cost of movement. For ani- mals dwelling on slopes, gravity can impart a large ener- getic cost to movement. For this reason (specifically hillslope angle) so as to minimize their energetic costs. Subterra- nean animals should also

Chadwick, Oliver A.

189

An Adaptive Tree Code for Computing Total Potential Energy in Classical Molecular Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Adaptive Tree Code for Computing Total Potential Energy in Classical Molecular Systems Zhong, 2000 Abstract A tree code algorithm is presented for rapid computation of the total potential energy are presented for a variety of systems. Keywords: adaptive tree code; total potential energy; nonbonded

Duan, Zhong-Hui

190

THE USE OF TRUST REGIONS IN KOHN-SHAM TOTAL ENERGY MINIMIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-consistent and the Kohn-Sham (KS) total energy function associated with the system reaches the global minimum. It has longTHE USE OF TRUST REGIONS IN KOHN-SHAM TOTAL ENERGY MINIMIZATION CHAO YANG , JUAN C. MEZA , AND LIN system, is viewed in this paper as an optimization procedure that minimizes the Kohn- Sham total energy

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

191

Total China Investment Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total China Investment Co Ltd Total China Investment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Total (China) Investment Co. Ltd. Place Beijing, China Zip 100004 Product Total has been present in China for about 30 years through its activities of Exploration & Production, Gas & Power, Refining & Marketing, and Chemicals. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

192

Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/TotalFloorArea Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total floor area (BRA), m2 Pages using the property "Building/TotalFloorArea" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,855 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,310 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 +

193

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/Total | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Total Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/Total" Showing 15 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 13.95 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 26 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15.2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 28 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 16.55 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 30 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 18.15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 9 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 33 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 20.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 11.1 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 36 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 22.25 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 12.95 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 24 +

194

Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaTotal FloorAreaTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,454 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 14,348 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,300 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,546 +

195

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercTotal SPElectrtyUsePercTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Total Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 100.0 +

196

AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

197

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Total Maximum Daily Load Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) The overall goal of the Clean Water Act is to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation’s waters." In 1999, EPA proposed changes to Section 303(d), to establish Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for watersheds that do not meet this goal. The TMDL is the highest amount of a given pollutant that is permissible in that body of water over a given period of time. TMDLs include both waste load allocation (WLA) for point sources and load allocations for non-point sources. In Appalachia, acid mine drainage (AMD) is the single most damaging non-point source. There is also particular concern of the atmospheric deposition of airborne sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury compounds. States are currently in the process of developing comprehensive lists of impaired waters and establishing TMDLs for those waters. EPA has recently proposed a final rule that will require states to develop TMDLs and implement plans for improving water quality within the next 10 years. Under the new rule, TMDL credits could be traded within a watershed.

198

Toward understanding the exchange-correlation energy and total-energy density functionals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If an accurate ground-state electron density ?0 for a system is known, it is shown from calculations on atoms that a strikingly good estimate for the total electronic energy of atoms is provided by the formula E[?0]=tsumi?i-(1-1/N)J[?0], where N is the number of electrons, J[?0] is the classical Coulomb repulsion energy for ?0, and the ?i are the Kohn-Sham orbital energies determined by the Zhao-Morrison-Parr procedure [Phys. Rev. A 50, 2138 (1994)] for implementation of the Levy-constrained search determination of the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy. The surprising accuracy of this formula is attributed to the fact that the exchange-correlation functional is equal to -J/N plus a functional that behaves as if it were approximately homogeneous, of degree 1 in the electron density. A corresponding exact formula is given, and various approximate models are constructed.

Robert G. Parr and Swapan K. Ghosh

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1994:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion...

200

A Constrained Optimization Algorithm for Total Energy Minimization in Electronic Structure Calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functionals for Electronic Structure Calculations. J. Comp.Minimization in Electronic Structure Calculation ? ChaoKey words: electronic structure calculation, total energy

Yang, Chao; Meza, Juan C.; Wang, Lin-Wang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

More on Capital Expenditure Anticipations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We turn now to analysis of investment realizations functions, beginning with the one-year ahead, or short run capital expenditure anticipations,based upon McGraw-Hill data over...a fortiori..., for all firms of a...

R. Eisner

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the seventh report submitted to Congress in accordance with section 5(d)(2)(E)(ii)(II) of Title I--Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (the Act). This section of the Act directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to summarize the annual expenditures of funds disbursed from the DOE surcharge escrow account and to assess compliance of these expenditures with the limitations specified in the Act. In addition to placing limitations on the use of these funds, the Act also requires the nonsited compact regions and nonmember States to provide DOE with an itemized report of their expenditures on December 31 of each year in which funds are expended. Within 6 months after receiving the individual reports, the Act requires the Secretary to furnish Congress with a summary of the reported expenditures and an assessment of compliance with the specified usage limitations. This report fulfills that requirement. DOE disbursed funds totaling $15,037,778.91 to the States and compact regions following the July 1, 1986, January 1, 1988, and January 1, 1990, milestones specified in the Act. Of this amount, $1,445,701.61 was expended during calendar year 1992 and $10,026,763.87 was expended during the prior 6 years. At the end of December 1992, $3,565,313.43 was unexpended. DOE has reviewed each of the reported expenditures and concluded that all reported expenditures comply with the spending limitations stated in section 5(d)(2)(E)(i) of the Act.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Modal and Nonmodal Symmetric Perturbations. Part II: Nonmodal Growths Measured by Total Perturbation Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Maximum nonmodal growths of total perturbation energy are computed for symmetric perturbations constructed from the normal modes presented in Part I. The results show that the maximum nonmodal growths are larger than the energy growth produced by ...

Qin Xu; Ting Lei; Shouting Gao

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Total electron and proton energy input during auroral substorms: Remote sensing with IMAGE-FUV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, it is found that the most critical factor is the assumption made on the energy of the auroral protonsTotal electron and proton energy input during auroral substorms: Remote sensing with IMAGE-FUV B and proton energy fluxes. The proton energy flux is derived from the Lyman a measurements on the basis

California at Berkeley, University of

205

Table A14. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

206

Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent Conditioned Floorspace","Total","Present","Not Present","Factors" " "," " "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1.3,0.9 "ALL SQUARE FEET CATEGORIES" "Approximate Conditioned Floorspace"

207

Table A30. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" 0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" "Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," ","(million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

208

Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"

209

"Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" 1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","(trillion","Row"

210

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

211

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

212

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

213

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

214

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

215

Table A54. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of General Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,," "," ",," "," ",," "," "," "," " ,,,,"Computer Control" ,," "," ","of Processes"," "," ",," "," ",," " ,," ","Computer Control","or Major",,,"One or More"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"of Building","Energy-Using","Waste Heat"," Adjustable-Speed","General Technologies","None","Row"

216

The Role of Capital Expenditures in Signalling Firm Value  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Corporate Capital Expenditure Announcements," PurdueTHE ROLE OF CAPITAL EXPENDITURES IN SIGNALLING FIRM VALUEAngeles THE ROLE OF CAPITAL EXPENDITURES IN SIGNALLING FIRM

Titman, Brett

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

0 2005 Average Energy Expenditures per Household Member and per Square Foot, by Weatherization Eligibility (2010) Members Hhold Hhold Total U.S. Households 780 2.6 0.86 Federally...

218

Table A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy-Management Program, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,"RSE" "SIC",,,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.2,1.1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",12605,1209,3303,6386,1706,2.9

219

Table A20. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke",,"Shipments" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" " ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

220

Table A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy Management Program, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.3,1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",10743,1150,2819,5309,1464,2.6,,,"/WIR{D}~"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

222

energy prices | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prices prices Dataset Summary Description The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates. Source EIA Date Released June 30th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Energy Consumption Energy Expenditures energy prices energy production SEDS State energy data States US Data text/csv icon Complete SEDS dataset as csv (may be too big for Excel) (csv, 40.6 MiB)

223

AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu and the U.S. Dollar. The data is broken down into production, imports, exports, consumption and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption disposition energy exports imports Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary- Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

224

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Forecasting Capital Expenditure with Plan Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The short-term forecasting of capital expenditure presents one of the most difficult problems ... reason is that year-to-year fluctuations in capital expenditure are extremely wide. Some simple methods which...

W. Gerstenberger

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ab initio total energy study of brucite, diaspore and hypothetical hydrous wadsleyite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ab initio total energy calculations based on the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalised gradient approximation (GGA) of density functional theory have been performed for brucite, Mg(OH)2, diaspore,...

B. Winkler; V. Milman; B. Hennion; M. C. Payne

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - ab-initio total energy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ab-initio total energy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING MEASUREMENT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Meas. Sci. Technol. 16 (2005) 296301 doi:10.10880957-0233...

228

The impact of rising energy prices on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns: The Persian Gulf crisis as a case example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered immediate increases in world oil prices. Increases in world petroleum prices and in US petroleum imports resulted in higher petroleum prices for US customers. In this report, the effects of the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath are used to demonstrate the potential impacts of petroleum price changes on majority, black, and Hispanic households, as well as on poor and nonpoor households. The analysis is done by using the Minority Energy Assessment Model developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The differential impacts of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raise significant issues for a variety of government agencies, including DOE. Although the Persian Gulf crisis is now over and world oil prices have returned to their prewar levels, the differential impacts of rising energy prices on poor and minority households as a result of any future crisis in the world oil market remains a significant long-term issue.

Henderson, L.J. (Baltimore Univ., MD (United States)); Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Capital Expenditure Policy Final V1.0 Approved 110613 -1 -Capital Expenditure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capital Expenditure Policy Final V1.0 Approved 110613 - 1 - Capital Expenditure Policy Version and Risk Committee Audit and Risk Committee: 11 June 2013 (Draft v.11) #12;Capital Expenditure Policy Final on intranet To be referenced during Capital Expenditure training As approved by Audit & Risk Committee 11

Chittka, Lars

230

"Table A22. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

231

Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

232

Table A56. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"RSE" "SIC",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1 20,"FOOD and KINDRED PRODUCTS" ,"Industry-Specific Technologies" ,"One or More Industry-Specific Technologies Present",2353,9 ," Infrared Heating",607,13 ," Microwave Drying",127,21 ," Closed-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Recover Heat",786,19

233

Table A17. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.5,1.5,1,0.9,0.9,0.9 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1193,119,207,265,285,195,122,6

234

Table A15. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.3,1,1,0.9,1.2,1.2

235

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 2007 total system life cycle cost estimate includes the cost to research, construct and operate Yucca Mountain during a period of 150 years, from the beginning of the program in 1983 through closure and decommissioning in 2133. The new cost estimate of $79.3 billion, when updated to 2007 dollars comes to $96.2 billion, a 38 percent

236

Benchmark quality total atomization energies of small polyatomic Jan M. L. Martin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benchmark quality total atomization energies of small polyatomic molecules Jan M. L. Martin Successive coupled-cluster CCSD T calculations in basis sets of spdf, spdfg, and spdfgh quality, combined with separate Schwartz-type extrapolations A B/(l 1/2) of the self-consistent field SCF and correlation energies

Martin, Jan M.L.

237

Table A33. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" " Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "

238

State energy data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Varnish cache server State energy data Dataset Summary Description The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates. Source EIA Date Released June 30th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Energy Consumption Energy Expenditures energy prices energy production SEDS State energy data States US Data text/csv icon Complete SEDS dataset as csv (may be too big for Excel) (csv, 40.6 MiB)

239

Low-energy positron scattering from methanol and ethanol: Total cross sections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report total cross sections for positron scattering from two primary alcohols, methanol (CH3OH) and ethanol (C2H5OH). The energy range of the present study is 0.140eV. The ethanol measurement appears to be original while for methanol we compare our data to the only previous result from Kimura and colleagues [Adv. Chem. Phys. 111, 537 (2000)], with a significant discrepancy between them being found at the lower energies. Positronium formation threshold energies for both species, deduced from the present respective total cross section data sets, are found to be consistent with those expected on the basis of their known ionization energies. There are currently no theoretical results against which we can compare our total cross sections.

Antonio Zecca, Luca Chiari, A. Sarkar, Kate L. Nixon, and Michael J. Brunger

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aggregate Aggregate Ratio: See Mean and Ratio Estimate. AMPD: Average miles driven per day. See Appendix B, "Estimation Methodologies." Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled: See Vehicle Miles Traveled. Automobile: Includes standard passenger car, 2-seater car and station wagons; excludes passenger vans, cargo vans, motor homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for all RTECS households divided by the total number of households. See Ratio Estimate, and Combined Household Energy Expenditures. Average Number of Vehicles per Household: The average number of vehicles used by a household for personal transportation during 1991. For this report, the average number of vehicles per household is computed as the ratio of the total number of vehicles to the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Audit of controls over Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory subcontractor expenditures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 1989 the Department of Energy contracted with Universities Research Association, Inc. to design, construct, manage, operate, and maintain the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. Through Fiscal Year 1992, costs for subcontractor goods and services accounted for about 75 percent of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory expenditures. The Office of Inspector General evaluated the adequacy of controls in place to ensure that subcontractor costs were reasonable, as required by the contract. The following conclusions were drawn from the audit. The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory did not consistently exercise prudent business judgment in making subcontractor expenditures. As a result, $60 million in expenditures already made and $128 million planned with commercial subcontractors were, in the authors opinion, unnecessary, excessive, or represented uncontrolled growth. The audit also found inadequate justifications, accountability, and cost controls over $143 million in expenditures made and $47 million planned with other Department of Energy laboratories. Improvements were needed in subcontract administration and internal controls, including appropriate audit coverage of the subcontracts. In addition, Department of Energy guidance concerning procurement actions between the laboratories needed to be established.

Not Available

1993-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

242

Green Pricing Program Marketing Expenditures: Finding the Right Balance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

449 449 September 2009 Green Pricing Program Marketing Expenditures: Finding the Right Balance Barry Friedman and Mackay Miller National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46449 September 2009 Green Pricing Program Marketing Expenditures: Finding the Right Balance Barry Friedman and Mackay Miller Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3003 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

243

Table A55. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Cogeneration Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"Steam Turbines",,,,"Steam Turbines" ,," ","Supplied by Either","Conventional",,,"Supplied by","One or More",," " " "," ",,"Conventional","Combustion ","Combined-Cycle","Internal Combustion","Heat Recovered from","Cogeneration",,"RSE" "SIC"," ",,"or Fluidized","Turbines with","Combustion","Engines with","High-Temperature","Technologies","None","Row"

244

A Total Quality Management (TQM) Approach for Energy Savings Through Employee Awareness and Building Upgrades to Improve Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A TOTAL QUALIn' MANAGEMENT (TQM) APPROACH FOR ENERGY SAVINGS THROUGH EMPLOYEE AWARENESS AND BUILDING UPGRADES TO IMPROVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY Daniel H. Stewart, Principal Engineer, Facilities Department, Rh6oe-Poulenc. Inc., Cranbury, NJ...) approach depends on the input from the end-users, clients, employees, power companies, various consultants and site operation management. This paper discusses the energy efficiency projects that are currently in progress at Rhone Poulenc's Corporate...

Stewart, D. H.

245

Table A32. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,," ","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ," "," "," ",,,,,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "

246

Total electron scattering cross sections for methanol and ethanol at intermediate energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absolute total cross section (TCS) measurements of electron scattering from gaseous methanol and ethanol molecules are reported for impact energies from 60 to 500 eV, using the linear transmission method. The attenuation of intensity of a collimated electron beam through the target volume is used to determine the absolute TCS for a given impact energy, using the BeerLambert law to first approximation. Besides these experimental measurements, we have also determined TCS using the additivity rule.

D G M Silva; T Tejo; J Muse; D Romero; M A Khakoo; M C A Lopes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Table A52. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" 2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" " Categories and Presence of General Technologies and Cogeneration Technologies, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Employment Size(a)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" ,,,,,,,"1000 and","Row" "General/Cogeneration Technologies","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","Over","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2,2.1,1,0.7,0.7,0.9 "One or More General Technologies Present",14601,387,781,2054,2728,3189,5462,3.1 " Computer Control of Building Environment (b)",5079,64,116,510,802,1227,2361,5

248

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

249

Accelerating the convergence of the total energy evaluation in density functional theory calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerating the convergence of the total energy evaluation in density functional theory.1063/1.2821101 I. INTRODUCTION Density functional theory DFT ,1,2 one of the most widely used first functional theory OO-DFT B. Zhou and Y. A. Wang, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 081107 2006 is that the second

Wang, Yan Alexander

250

Total cross section of neutron-proton scattering at low energies in quark-gluon model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that analysis of nonrelativistic neutron-proton scattering in a framework of relativistic QCD based quark model can give important information about QCD vacuum structure. In this model we describe total cross section of neutron-proton scattering at kinetic energies of projectile neutron from 1 eV up to 1 MeV.

V. A. Abramovsky; N. V. Radchenko

2011-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

252

EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES Foundation FOUNDATION EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES are used primarily by Accounting Services for Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES ­ Foundation 2-J page 1 FOUNDATION EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES are used primarily by Accounting Services for Foundation transactions. 3080 Foundation Service Fee: Allocation of administrative costs to Foundation beneficiary departmental accounts. 3120 LSU Magazine Costs - Foundation

Harms, Kyle E.

253

Measurement of the total energy of an isolated system by an internal observer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the situation in which an observer internal to an isolated system wants to measure the total energy of the isolated system (this includes his own energy, that of the measuring device and clocks used, etc...). We show that he can do this in an arbitrarily short time, as measured by his own clock. This measurement is not subjected to a time-energy uncertainty relation. The properties of such measurements are discussed in detail with particular emphasis on the relation between the duration of the measurement as measured by internal clocks versus external clocks.

S. Massar; S. Popescu

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Table N11.4. Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 19  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" 4. Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam"," ",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources","RSE"

255

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the DOE low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240, requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to manage an escrow account creatd by collection of 25% of the non-penalty surcharge fees paid by the generators in non-sited regions and nonmember states to sited states for disposal of low-level radioactive waste. For the milestone period ending June 30, 1986, a total of $921,807.84, representing surcharge fees collected and interest earned, was in escrow during 1986 for rebate to the nonmember states, non-sited compact regions, and sited states. As of December 31, 1986, $802,194.54 had been rebated from the Escrow Account with an additional $118,517.62 scheduled for rebate in early 1987. The remaining rebate to be disbursed under this milestone is $1,095.68 for the state of Delaware. At the request of the state of Delaware, this rebate amount is being held in the Escrow Account until the state provides specific instructions for its disbursement. Individual rebate expenditure reports were submitted to DOE by all the non-sited compact regions and nonmember states that received rebates in 1986. Only $14.00 of these rebates were expended in 1986. DOE reviewed all of these reports and concluded that the single expenditure complies with the expenditure limitations stated in the Act.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

257

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal systems lose their heat by a site-specific combination of conduction (heat flow) and advection (surface discharge). The conductive loss at or near the surface (shallow heat flow) is a primary signature and indication of the strength of a geothermal system. Using a database of

258

CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Figure on Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Source, 1992 Divider Line The 49 tables present detailed energy consumption and expenditure data for buildings in the commercial sector. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the data categories. It will also explain the use of row and column factors to compute both the confidence levels of the estimates given in the tables and the statistical significance of differences between the data in two or more categories. The section concludes with a "Quick-Reference Guide" to the statistics in the different tables. Categories of Data in the Tables After Table 3.1, which is a summary table, the tables are grouped into the major fuel tables (Tables 3.2 through 3.13) and the specific fuel tables (Tables 3.14 through 3.29 for electricity, Tables 3.30 through 3.40 for natural gas, Tables 3.41 through 3.45 for fuel oil, and Tables 3.46 through 3.47 for district heat). Table 3.48 presents energy management and DSM data as reported by the building respondent. Table 3.49 presents data on participation in electric utility-sponsored DSM programs as reported by both the building respondent and the electricity supplier.

259

"Table A32. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

260

Total energy and band structure of the 3d, 4d, and 5d metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We performed total-energy calculations by the scalar-relativistic augmented-plane-wave method in the local-density and muffin-tin approximations for all 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals in the fcc and bcc structures. These calculations predict the correct equilibrium structure and give good agreement with experiment and other calculations for lattice constants and bulk moduli.

M. Sigalas; D. A. Papaconstantopoulos; N. C. Bacalis

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter provides information on Federal building energy consumption, characteristics, and expenditures, as well as information on legislation affecting said consumption. The main points from this chapter are summarized below: In FY 2007, Federal buildings accounted for 2.2% of all building energy consumption and 0.9% of total U.S. energy consumption.

262

Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part of the total energy consumed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appropriate strategies of giving households' effective feedback on their energy consumption. This study, Energy efficiency. I. INTRODUCTION HE energy consumption of households in buildings attracts a lot in the housing sector. Energy consumption in buildings accounts for 39% of Sweden's total final energy

Beigl, Michael

263

Sorting through the many total-energy-cycle pathways possible with early plug-in hybrids.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the 'total energy cycle' methodology, we compare U.S. near term (to {approx}2015) alternative pathways for converting energy to light-duty vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT) in plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), hybrids (HEVs), and conventional vehicles (CVs). For PHEVs, we present total energy-per-unit-of-VKT information two ways (1) energy from the grid during charge depletion (CD); (2) energy from stored on-board fossil fuel when charge sustaining (CS). We examine 'incremental sources of supply of liquid fuel such as (a) oil sands from Canada, (b) Fischer-Tropsch diesel via natural gas imported by LNG tanker, and (c) ethanol from cellulosic biomass. We compare such fuel pathways to various possible power converters producing electricity, including (i) new coal boilers, (ii) new integrated, gasified coal combined cycle (IGCC), (iii) existing natural gas fueled combined cycle (NGCC), (iv) existing natural gas combustion turbines, (v) wood-to-electricity, and (vi) wind/solar. We simulate a fuel cell HEV and also consider the possibility of a plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicle (FCV). For the simulated FCV our results address the merits of converting some fuels to hydrogen to power the fuel cell vs. conversion of those same fuels to electricity to charge the PHEV battery. The investigation is confined to a U.S. compact sized car (i.e. a world passenger car). Where most other studies have focused on emissions (greenhouse gases and conventional air pollutants), this study focuses on identification of the pathway providing the most vehicle kilometers from each of five feedstocks examined. The GREET 1.7 fuel cycle model and the new GREET 2.7 vehicle cycle model were used as the foundation for this study. Total energy, energy by fuel type, total greenhouse gases (GHGs), volatile organic compounds (VOC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), fine particulate (PM2.5) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) values are presented. We also isolate the PHEV emissions contribution from varying kWh storage capability of battery packs in HEVs and PHEVs from {approx}16 to 64 km of charge depleting distance. Sensitivity analysis is conducted with respect to the effect of replacing the battery once during the vehicle's life. The paper includes one appendix that examines several recent studies of interactions of PHEVs with patterns of electric generation and one that provides definitions, acronyms, and fuel consumption estimation steps.

Gaines, L.; Burnham, A.; Rousseau, A.; Santini, D.; Energy Systems

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

EA-1861: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1861: Final Environmental Assessment Frito-Lay Biomass Boiler Project, Beloit, Wisconsin The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of Federal grant funding to design, permit, and construct a biomass boilerhouse at the Frito-Lay North America (Frito-Lay) plant in Beloit, Wisconsin. DOE awarded the grant under the State Energy Program, but has not yet authorized the expenditure of grant funds on this proposed project. DOE prepared this EA to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of DOE's Proposed Action, which is to authorize the expenditure of Federal funding for Frito-Lay's proposed boilerhouse. DOE's Proposed Action would authorize up to $5.5 million in grant expenditures. The total cost of Frito-Lay's proposed project would be

265

Total Neutron Cross Section of Xe135 as a Function of Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The total neutron cross section of Xe135 as a function of energy has been remeasured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under more favorable conditions than obtained in earlier measurements. A sample thickness of 2.51018 atoms of Xe135 gas per cm2 was procured from the gases generated in a homogeneous reactor. A mechanical time-of-flight chopper was used to select neutrons in the energy range from 0.01 ev to several thousand ev. The number of Xe135 atoms in the sample was determined by means of mass spectrometer measurements on the long-lived daughter, Cs135. The data of the low-energy resonance were fitted to the single-level Breit-Wigner formula, taking into account Doppler corrections, equally well with the following two sets of parameters: statistical weight factor g=38; resonance energy ?0=0.084720.00027 ev; neutron width at energy ?0, ?n0=0.034770.00021 ev; capture width, ??=0.0833030.00062 ev; for g=58, ?0=0.084150.00028 ev; ?n0=0.020570.00012 ev; ?a=0.094930.00071 ev. The errors quoted are the standard deviations derived from the statistics of the measurements. Systematic errors are discussed in the body of the paper. No evidence for resonances at energies greater than 0.085 ev was observed. The results described are interpreted in terms of recent considerations on the statistics of the properties of nuclear energy levels.

E. C. Smith, G. S. Pawlicki, P. E. F. Thurlow, G. W. Parker, W. J. Martin, G. E. Creek, P. M. Lantz, and S. Bernstein

1959-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Chapter 9 - CAPEX and OPEX Expenditures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter is dedicated to expenditures related to all investments that are made in advance and the operational expenses that will occur from the start up of production onward.

Luiz Amado

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

268

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

269

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

270

Association of Energy Intake and Energy Balance with Postmenopausal Breast Cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...XO, et al. Energy balance and breast...cancer in western New York. Am J Epidemiol...Implication of total energy intake for epidemiologic...Epidemiology. New York (NY): Oxford...Koh YO. A new predictive equation for resting energy expenditure in...

Shih-Chen Chang; Regina G. Ziegler; Barbara Dunn; Rachael Stolzenberg-Solomon; James V. Lacey, Jr.; Wen-Yi Huang; Arthur Schatzkin; Douglas Reding; Robert N. Hoover; Patricia Hartge; and Michael F. Leitzmann

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Nuclear Physics A 772 (2006) 113137 Total prompt energy release in the neutron-induced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study addresses, for the first time, the total prompt energy release and its components for the fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu as a function of the kinetic energy of the neutron inducing the fission. The components are extracted from experimental measurements, where they exist, together with model-dependent calculation, interpolation, and extrapolation. While the components display clear dependencies upon the incident neutron energy, their sums display only weak, yet definite, energy dependencies. Also addressed is the total prompt energy deposition in fission for the same three systems. Results are presented in equation form. New measurements are recommended as a consequence of this study.

D. G. Madland

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Reduced Total Energy Requirements For The Original Alcubierre and Natario Warp Drive Spacetimes-The Role Of Warp Factors.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced Total Energy Requirements For The Original Alcubierre and Natario Warp Drive Spacetimes Alcubierre and Natario themselves the Warp Drive violates all the known energy conditions because the stress energy momentum tensor(the right side of the Einstein Field Equations) for the Einstein tensor G00

Boyer, Edmond

273

Juvenile salmon with high standard metabolic rates have higher energy costs but can process meals faster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a greater total energy expenditure when...shorter. The greater energy costs they incur...their assimilation efficiency. These relationships...as the level of energy consumption when...defended, such as pools in rivers (Nakano...insufficient to prompt swimming, and therefore...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

material intensity, energy intensity of materials, buildingtypes manufacturing energy intensity (how much energy itthe manufacturing energy intensity of each type of building

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Annual Capital Expenditures Survey | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual Capital Expenditures Survey Annual Capital Expenditures Survey BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Annual Capital Expenditures Survey Dataset Summary Description Provides national estimates of investment in new and used buildings and other structures, machinery, and equipment by U.S. nonfarm businesses with and without employees. Data are published by industry for companies with employees for NAICS 3-digit and selected 4-digit industries. Data on the amount of business expenditures for new plant and equipment and measures of the stock of existing facilities are critical to evaluate productivity growth, the ability of U.S. business to compete with foreign business, changes in industrial capacity, and measures of overall economic performance. In addition, ACES data provide industry analysts with capital expenditure data for market analysis, economic forecasting, identifying business opportunities and developing new and strategic plans. The ACES is an integral part of the Federal Government's effort to improve and supplement ongoing statistical programs. Private companies and organizations,, educators and students, and economic researchers use the survey results for analyzing and conducting impact evaluations on past and current economic performance, short-term economic forecasts, productivity, long-term economic growth, tax policy, capacity utilization, business fixed capital stocks and capital formation, domestic and international competitiveness trade policy, market research, and financial analysis.

276

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

277

Parametric analysis of total costs and energy efficiency of 2G enzymatic ethanol production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an analysis of total costs (TPC) and energy efficiency of enzymatic ethanol production. The analysis is parametrized with respect to plant capacity and polysaccharides content (pc) of lignocellulosic feedstock. The feedstock is based on wheat straw whose price is proportional to its pc ranging from new straw with high pc and high cost to agro-wastes with limited pc but lower cost. The plant flowsheet was built using a conventional biochemical platform with co-saccharification and fermentation (SHF) technologies. A parametric analysis of TPC as a function of plant capacity (1002100ton DB/day) and pc (i.e. feedstock price) (80% (75 USD/ton DB)35% (6 USD/ton DB)) was performed with Net Present Value (NPV) techniques. Current data from Mexican economics and the agro-industrial sector were used as an illustrative case. A quasi-linear section of the TCP surface was identified delimited by (3001100ton DB/day) and (8055% pc) with increments no larger than 21% of the minimum TPC obtained (0.99 USD/l etOH for 2100ton DB/day and 80% pc). Major cost contributions are detailed and quantified for boundary cases of this surface. Energy consumption and production were also calculated for all the plant capacity and feedstock pc cases, taking into consideration the Maximum Energy Recovery (MER) obtained from a Pinch analysis. The end-use energy index eer was less than 0.82 for all cases, thus stressing the need to use process equipment with lower energy requirements. TPC are compared against previously published results for SHF technology between 500 and 2100ton DB/day plant capacities. These values were updated and normalized with respect to feedstock and enzyme costs employed in this work. Differences among TPC and recently published normalized results are within a 5% range, thus confirming the dependence of TPC from feedstock and enzyme prices, regardless of flowsheet technology and economic conditions.

A. Sanchez; V. Sevilla-Gitrn; G. Magaa; L. Gutierrez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Capital expenditure decision making in small firms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of studies have been conducted to determine the extent to which large firms utilize sophisticated techniques in capital expenditure decision making. This research effort focuses on financial decision making procedures of small firms, exploring the techniques utilized to evaluate investment opportunities, methods employed to adjust for risk, purposes of expenditures and concern for profitability, and the source and cost of funds. In light of the recent debate on the capital shortage issue, small firms were also asked what type of tax reform they deemed most desirable to stimulate capital investments.

L.R. Runyon

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Total energy loss to fast ablator-ions and target capacitance of direct-drive implosions on OMEGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623, USA 3 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545Total energy loss to fast ablator-ions and target capacitance of direct-drive implosions on OMEGA N 19, 093101 (2012) Target normal sheath acceleration sheath fields for arbitrary electron energy

280

Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

but then declined until about 2004 when gasoline and motor oil expenditures began to rise again. The share of household expenditures on gasoline and oil was exactly the same...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Expenditure on Research and Development in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... annual report for 1961-62*, the Advisory Council on Scientific Policy again reviews the expenditure on scientific and technical research and development, which in 1961-62 is estimated at ... -7 per cent of the gross national product, of which about 67 million was capital ...

1963-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

282

Beryllium and Graphite High-Accuracy Total Cross-Section Measurements in the Energy Range from 24 to 900 keV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beryllium and Graphite High-Accuracy Total Cross-Section Measurements in the Energy Range from 24 new measurements of the carbon and beryllium neutron total cross section in the energy range of 24 the measurement of the energy-dependent total cross section st ~Ei ! by applying Eq. ~1! for every TOF channel i

Danon, Yaron

283

"Table B29. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,15996,32970,3818,4907 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,1779,2672,484,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,1686,3068,428,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,3366,5807,536,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,2264,4974,300,325

284

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 12,812 10,348 2,155 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 9,398 7,296 1,689 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 13,140 10,001 2,524 232 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 10,392 7,871 1,865 127 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 11,897 8,717 1,868 203 Q

285

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 107,897 82,783 16,010 1,826 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 13,083 10,547 2,227 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 10,443 8,199 1,830 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15,689 12,172 2,897 238 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 11,898 9,179 2,054 134 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 15,171 11,694 2,140 229 Q

286

Increased energy prices: energy savings and equity aspects. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model has been developed which approximates the reduction in a household's total energy consumption in response to higher energy prices and different rebate schemes. This model is based on the assumption that energy consumption is a function of a household's real income, prices of different commodities and energy intensities. The amount of energy saved and the change in real expenditure of a household has been calculated for four tax rates; 50%, 100%, 224% and 400%, and five rebate schemes; one regressive, two progressive, one income distribution preserving and the flat per capita rebate. The results indicate that, for a given tax rate, the choice of rebate scheme does not significantly affect the amount of energy conserved by the households. However, the effect of different rebate schemes on a household's real expenditure could be dramatically different.

Herendeen, R.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

288

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

289

energy production | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

52 52 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278352 Varnish cache server energy production Dataset Summary Description The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates. Source EIA Date Released June 30th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown

290

Total fission cross section of {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb induced by protons at relativistic energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total fission cross section induced by protons in {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb at energies in the range of 300 to 1000 A MeV have been measured at GSI (Germany) using the inverse kinematics technique. A dedicated setup with high efficiency made it possible to determine these cross sections with high accuracy. The new data seed light in the controversial results obtained so far and contribute to the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energies. (authors)

Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Schmidt, K. H. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Jurado, B. [Universite Bordeaux I, CNRS/IN2 P3, CENBG, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Kelic-Heil, A. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Pol, H. A. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ricciardi, M. V.; Pleskac, R. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Enqvist, T. [CUPP Project, P.O. Box 22, FI-86801, Pyhsalmi (Finland); Rejmund, F. [Grand Accelerateur National D Ions Lourds, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Giot, L. [Subatech - Ecole des Mines de Nantes (France); Henzl, V. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77, Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lukic, S. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ngoc, S. N. [Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Inst. of Physics, National Centre for Natural Science and Technology, NgiaDo-TuLiem, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Boudard, A. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Leray, S. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Fernandez, M. [Entro de Investigaciones Energticas Medioambientales Y Tecnolgicas, Madrid (Spain); Kurtukian, T. [Universite Bordeaux I, CNRS/IN2 P3, CENBG, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Nadtochy, P. [Omsk State Univ., Dept. of Theoretical Physics, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation); Schmitt, C. [Grand Accelerateur National D'Ions Lourds, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Henzlova, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Safeguards Science and Technology Group N-1, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Paradela, C. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bacquias, A. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Loureiro, D. P. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Foehr, V. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Tarrio, D. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Kezzar, K. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:","NF",0.4,1.6,1.5,0.7,1,1.6,"NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",15027,2370,414,139,5506,105,1184,5309,3 "Boiler Fuel","--","W",296,40,2098,18,859,"--",3.6

292

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:"," NF",0.5,1.3,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2," NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",16515,2656,441,152,6141,99,1198,5828,2.7 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel"," --",28,313,42,2396,15,875," --",4

293

Effect of window type, size and orientation on the total energy demand for a building in Indian climatic conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Windows in a building allow daylight to enter a building space but simultaneously they also result in heat gains and losses affecting energy balance. This requires an optimisation of window area from the point of view of total energy demand viz., for lighting and cooling/heating. This paper is devoted to this kind of study for Indian climatic conditions, which are characterised by six climatic zones varying from extreme cold to hot, dry and humid conditions. Different types of windows have been considered because the optimised size will also depend on the thermo-optical parameters like heat transfer coefficient (U-value), solar heat gain coefficient (g), visual (?), and total transmittance (T) of the glazing in the window. It is observed that in a non-insulated building, cooling/heating energy demand far exceeds lighting energy demand, making the optimisation of window area a futile exercise from the point of view of total energy demand. Only for buildings with U-value below 0.6 W/m²K can optimisation be achieved. The optimised window area and the corresponding specific energy consumption have been calculated for different climates in India, for different orientations, and for three different advanced window systems.

Inderjeet Singh; N.K. Bansal

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrtyTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ElctrtyTotal ElctrtyTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Electricity, total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrtyTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 71.2214478303 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 95.9357541899 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 72.2496632241 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 65.8830409357 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 54.2477876106 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 58.7608028994 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 61.5607534672 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 40.3846153846 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 56.4810818587 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 152.219679634 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 25.5555555556 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 35.8807888323 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 61.3267863536 +

295

Total Facility Control - Applying New Intelligent Technologies to Energy Efficient Green Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lighting, co-generation stations, and much more. This paper will discuss some of the basic concepts, architectures, and technologies that are being used today to implement a Total Facility Control model....

Bernstein, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors" ,...

297

Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"...

298

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors" ,,,,,,,,,,, ,"Total United States"

299

Table 7.10 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; 0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: Million U.S. Dollars. Electricity Components Natural Gas Electricity Electricity from Sources Natural Gas NAICS Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Total United States 311 Food 5,328 4,635 692 3,391 1,675 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 932 850 82 673 261 311221 Wet Corn Milling 352 331 21 296 103 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 105 87 18 87 39 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 698

300

Neither Agouti-Related Protein nor Neuropeptide Y Is Critically Required for the Regulation of Energy Homeostasis in Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...3. For expression surveys, 6-month-old male...whole-body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry...compositions (Fig. 2b). A survey of serum parameters revealed...contribution to total energy expenditure. Agrp mice...of light and 12 h of dark exhibited normal levels...

Su Qian; Howard Chen; Drew Weingarth; Myrna E. Trumbauer; Dawn E. Novi; Xiaoming Guan; Hong Yu; Zhu Shen; Yue Feng; Easter Frazier; Airu Chen; Ramon E. Camacho; Lauren P. Shearman; Shobhna Gopal-Truter; Douglas J. MacNeil; Lex H. T. Van der Ploeg; Donald J. Marsh

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrElctrtyTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrElctrtyTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Electricity, total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrElctrtyTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1400.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 686.9 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 321.8 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 1689.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 122.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 843.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1487.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 315.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 1963.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 66.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 391.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 809.65 +

302

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," "," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row"

303

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

304

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 4355.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1530.1 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 872.1 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 4466.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 768.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 3031.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3479.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 1336.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 4876.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 131.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 1501.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 2405.65 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3436.6002445 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 389.66 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 270.0 +

305

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 4228.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1501.1 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 847.1 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 4360.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 727.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 2915.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3385.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 1282.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 4739.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 127.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 1436.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 2334.65 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3323.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 381.66 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 257.0 +

306

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Electricity, total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1399.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 686.9 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 321.8 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 1689.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 122.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 843.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1487.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 315.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 1963.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 66.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 391.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 809.65 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 1199.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 227.66 +

307

Bounds on the Solar Antineutrino total Flux and Energy spectrum from the SK experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for inverse beta decay electron antineutrinos has been carried out using the 825 days sample of solar data obtained at SK. The absence of a significant signal, that is, contributions to the total SK background and their angular variations has set upper bounds on a) the absolute flux of solar antineutrinos originated from ${}^8 B$ neutrinos $\\Phi_{\\bar{\

E. Torrente-Lujan

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

308

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry"," Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

309

Isotopic Mo Neutron Total Cross Section Measurements in the Energy Range 1 to 620 keV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A series of new total cross section measurements for the stable molybdenum isotopes of 92,94,95,96,98,100Mo covering the energy range between 1 keV and 620 keV was performed at the Gaerttner LINAC Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. New high-accuracy resonance parameters were extracted from an analysis of the data using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. In the unresolved resonance region, average resonance parameters and fits to the total cross sections were obtained using the Bayesian Hauser-Feshbach statistical model code FITACS.

R. Bahran; D. Barry; G. Leinweber; M. Rapp; R. Block; A. Daskalakis; B. McDermott; S. Piela; E. Blain; Y. Danon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Total and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building HVAC Systems Using Model Predictive Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inputs. The idea of modeling building thermal behavior usingThe detail of building thermal modeling is pre- sented in [Modeling and optimal control algorithm design for hvac systems in energy efficient buildings,

Maasoumy, Mehdi; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rate of technology penetration and rate of intensity change,energy. In addition, the penetration rate of each end-use isinstalled base (i.e. penetration rate) for each end-use set

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Asymptotic High Energy Total Cross Sections and Theories with Extra Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rate at which cross sections grow with energy is sensitive to the presence of extra dimensions in a rather model-independent fashion. We examine how rates would be expected to grow if there are more spatial dimensions than 3 which appear at some energy scale, making connections with black hole physics and string theory. We also review what is known about the corresponding generalization of the Froissart-Martin bound and the experimental status of high energy hadronic cross sections which appear to saturate it up to the experimentally accessible limit of 100 TeV. We discuss how extra dimensions can be searched for in high energy cross section data and find no room for large extra dimensions in present data. Any apparent signatures of extra dimensions at the LHC may have to be interpreted as due to some other form of new physics.

J. Swain; A. Widom; Y. Srivastava

2014-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

313

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy consumed from coal, coke, liquid fuels, naturalwas expressed in terms of coal equivalency. 2.1.8.1 Tnational fuel inputs of coal, natural gas and petroleum were

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total" SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 71.4577086539 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 110.926946534 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 72.9096074806 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 66.0248923654 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 54.8654809632 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 65.291976787 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 65.5403331042 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 41.6418235453 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 56.5413268466 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 150.269021739 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 27.5018481341 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 37.9937990385 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 68.8990371973 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 166.794253904 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 71.0813662687 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 38.5267410327 +

315

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total" SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 221.549575215 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 213.701117318 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 195.801526718 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 174.148148148 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 340.088495575 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 211.255924171 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 144.028151521 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 171.282051282 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 140.296360236 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 300.961098398 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 98.1045751634 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 106.609793929 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 175.776187637 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 291.160427408 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 174.193548387 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 145.793794187 +

316

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

317

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1",,,,,,,"Coal" 1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Other","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

318

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 Short","Other","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors",

319

Total energy study of the microscopic structure and electronic properties of tetragonal perovskite SrTiO{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study the structural and electronic properties of cubic perovskite SrTiO{sub 3} and its stress-induced tetragonal phase, we have performed total energy calculations and studied the effect of oxygen vacancies on the electronic properties of tetragonal perovskite SrTiO{sub 3}. The method used was the relativistic full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method. To obtain the geometry that minimizes the total energy, we relaxed the internal atomic sites of the tetragonal cell. As a result of this procedure, we have found that the titanium atoms move toward the plane of the vacancy by 0.03 , and the apical oxygen atoms move to the same plane by approximately 0.14 . These results are discussed in comparison with experimental data.

Rubio-Ponce, A. [Departamento de Ciencias Bsicas, Universidad Autnoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180, 02200 Mxico, D.F. (Mexico); Olgun, D. [Departamento de Fsica, Centro de Investigacin y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politcnico Nacional, A.P. 14740, Mxico, D.F. (Mexico)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

High energy Gamma-Ray Bursts as a result of the collapse and total annihilation of neutralino clumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rare astrophysical events - cosmological gamma-ray bursts with energies over GeV - are considered as an origin of information about some SUSY parameters. The model of generation of the powerful gamma-ray bursts is proposed. According to this model the gamma-ray burst represents as a result of the collapse and the total annihilation of the neutralino clump. About 80 % of the clump mass radiates during about 100 second at the final stage of annihilation. The annihilation spectrum and its characteristic energies are calculated in the framework of Split Higgsino model.

R. S. Pasechnik; V. A. Beylin; V. I. Kuksa; G. M. Vereshkov

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

"Table A33. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000 ","(1000","(trillion","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","Btu)","Factors"

322

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

323

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

324

OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS John R. Mc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v SECTION ONE - OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Recreation Demand Methods

O'Laughlin, Jay

325

Simulating Progressive Expenditure Taxation in an Aging Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter investigates the effects of tax reform from progressive labor income taxation toward progressive expenditure taxation, on capital accumulation, and intragenerational income redistribution. The ... th...

Akira Okamoto Ph.D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Projections up for total energy demand by IEA nations in 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author reviews the most recent IEA projections for energy demand to the year 2000 in IEA countries. These show that the expectations for 1990 are now higher than estimates made last year. Production of solid fuels is expected to increase from 814 million toe in 1983 to 1044 million toe in 1990 and 1345 million toe by 2000. Nearly all the increase is expected in the US, Canada and Australia.

Vielvoye, R.

1985-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

327

Estimate the fraction of the total transported energy (in the form of gasoline) in the Trans-Alaska Pipeline that is consumed in pumping.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimate the fraction of the total transported energy (in the form of gasoline) in the Trans m). So we can toss this out. Now estimate the energy content of gasoline: Many of you tried figuring

Nimmo, Francis

328

How Much Do You Spend on Energy? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Click on a state Energy Expenditure 3724 per person in 2012 Transportation Residential Data: EIA State Energy Data System View All Maps Addthis...

329

Energy-efficient control in injection molding.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As an energy-intensive process, in injection molding, energy cost is one of the major cost components. The energy expenditure during molding can be divided into (more)

Yao, Ke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Electron induced dissociation of trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) platinum (IV): Total cross section as a function of incident electron energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total cross section has been measured for the electron induced dissociation of trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) platinum (IV) [MeCpPt(IV)Me{sub 3}], a Pt precursor often used in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP), for incident electron energies ranging between 3-3 keV. Measurements were performed for the precursor in the adsorbed state under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The techniques used in this study were temperature programmed desorption, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Two surfaces were used in these experiments, amorphous carbon overlayers containing embedded Pt atoms (a:C-Pt), formed by the electron decomposition of the Pt precursor, and atomically clean Au. The results from these three experiments revealed a comparatively low total cross section at 8 eV (4.2+-0.3x10{sup -17} cm{sup 2} on the a:C-Pt and 1.4+-0.1x10{sup -17} cm{sup 2} on the Au) that increases with increasing incident electron energy, reaching a maximum at around 150 eV (4.1+-0.5x10{sup -16} cm{sup 2} on the a:C-Pt and 2.3+-0.2x10{sup -16} cm{sup 2} on the clean Au), before decreasing at higher incident electron energies, up to 3000 eV. Differences in the measured cross sections between Au and a:C-Pt surfaces demonstrate that the substrate can influence the reaction cross section of adsorbed species. Temperature programmed desorption was also used to measure the adsorption energy of MeCpPt(IV)Me{sub 3}, which was found to depend on both the substrate and the adsorbate coverage. The work in this paper demonstrates that surface science techniques can be used to quantitatively determine the total cross section of adsorbed FEBIP precursors for electron induced dissociation as a function of incident electron energy. These total cross section values are necessary to obtain quantitatively accurate information from FEBIP models and to compare the reaction efficiencies of different precursors on a quantitative basis.

Dorp, W. F. van [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laboratory of Surface Modification, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Charged Particle Optics Group, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Wnuk, J. D.; Gorham, J. M.; Fairbrother, D. H. [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Madey, T. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laboratory of Surface Modification, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Hagen, C. W. [Charged Particle Optics Group, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

CORPORATE DISCLOSURE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES: A TEST OF ALTERNATIVE THEORIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORPORATE DISCLOSURE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES: A TEST OF ALTERNATIVE THEORIES Charles capital expenditure; environmental disclosure; environmental regulation; legitimacy theory; materiality DISCLOSURE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES: A TEST OF ALTERNATIVE THEORIES Introduction The United

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

Fourth Annual Report to the Northwest Governors on Expenditures of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S.ArmyCorpsofEngineers #12;Fourth Annual Report on Expenditures of the Bonneville Power Administration 1 For Fiscal Year 2003 in this report were supplied by the Bonneville Power Administration at the Council's request and were Report on Expenditures of the Bonneville Power Administration 3 Background In July 1999, the governors o

333

Capital Expenditures, Financial Constraints, and the Use of Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capital Expenditures, Financial Constraints, and the Use of Options Tim Adam RMI Working Paper No@nus.edu.sg 1 #12;Capital Expenditures, Financial Constraints, and the Use of Options Abstract This paper of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of NUS Risk Management Institute (RMI). #12;Capital

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

334

Expenditures on Children by Families | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Expenditures on Children by Families Expenditures on Children by Families Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Expenditures on Children by Families Dataset Summary Description This dataset provides expenditures on Children by Families provides estimates of the cost of raising children from birth through age 17 for major budgetary components. Tags {children,families,expenditures,cost,budget,household,income,single-parent,husband-wife} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 2012 Publisher Food and Nutrition Service, Department of Agriculture Contact Name Contact Email Mark.Lino@cnpp.usda.gov

335

Small modular HTGR nuclear power plant concept to meet the total energy needs of the developing nations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a small modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is described that can support the total energy needs of the developing nations by supplying electrical power, process steam, low-grade heat for desalination, and hydrogen production. Major features of the nuclear power plant concept, currently under development by GA Technologies Inc. (GA), are discussed with emphasis on (1) plant simplicity, (2) inherent safety, (3) ease of operation, (4) design and licensing standardization, and (5) acceptable power generation economics.

McDonald, C.F.

1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

336

An input-output approach to analyze the ways to increase total output of energy sectors: The case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to analyze the ways to increase total output of Japanese energy sectors in future time. In this study, Input-Output (IO) analysis is employed as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on petroleum refinery products and non-ferrous metals as analyzed sectors. The results show that positive impact observed in export and outside households consumption modifications while opposite impact is given by modification of import. The recommendations suggested based on these results are Japanese government should make breakthroughs so analyzed sector's export activities can increase and they have to careful in conducting import activities related to these sectors.

Ubaidillah Zuhdi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Minority energy assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to project household energy consumption, energy expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income for five population groups from 1991 to 2009. The approach uses the Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy's Office of Minority Economic Impact. The MEAM provides a framework that can be used to forecast regional energy consumption and energy expenditure for majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. The forecasts of key macroeconomic and energy variables used as exogenous variables in the MEAM were obtained from the Data Resources, Inc., Macromodel and Energy Model. Generally, the projections of household energy consumption, expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income vary across population groups and census regions.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Poyer, D.A.; Lampley, L.; Anderson, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Skylarks trade size and energy content in weed seeds to maximize total ingested lipid biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The trade-off between forage quality and quantity has been particularly studied in herbivore organisms, but much less for seed eating animals, in particular seed-eating birds which constitute the bulk of wintering passerines in European farmlands. The skylark is one of the commonest farmland birds in winter, mainly feeding on seeds. We focus on weed seeds for conservation and management purposes. Weed seeds form the bulk of the diet of skylarks during winter period, and although this is still a matter for discussion, weed seed predation by granivorous has been suggested as an alternative to herbicides used to regulate weed populations in arable crops. Our objectives were to identify whether weed seed traits govern foraging decisions of skylarks, and to characterize key seed traits with respect to size, which is related to searching and handling time, and lipid content, which is essential for migratory birds. We combined a single-offer experiment and a multiple-offer one to test for feeding preferences of the birds by estimating seed intake on weed seed species differing in their seed size and seed lipid content. Our results showed (1) a selective preference for smaller seeds above a threshold of seed size or seed size difference in the pair and, (2) a significant effect of seed lipid biomass suggesting a trade-off between foraging for smaller seeds and selecting seeds rich in lipids. Skylarks foraging decision thus seems to be mainly based on seed size, that is presumably a proxy for weed seed energy content. However, there are clearly many possible combinations of morphological and physiological traits that must play crucial role in the plantbird interaction such as toxic compound or seed coat.

Sabrina Gaba; Claire Collas; Thibaut Powolny; Franois Bretagnolle; Vincent Bretagnolle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Economic growth and alternative deficit-reducing tax increases and expenditure cuts: A cross-sectional study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classifying government expenditures into capital and current expenditures renders the latter as the best type for implementing a reduction in expenditures. Deficit-reducing cuts in capital expenditures are concom...

Mohsen Fardmanesh

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Measurement of low-energy Na^+ -- Na total collision rate in an ion--neutral hybrid trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present measurements of the total elastic and resonant charge-exchange ion-atom collision rate coefficient $k_\\mathrm{ia}$ of cold sodium (\\ce{Na}) with optically-dark low energy \\ce{Na+} ions in a hybrid ion-neutral trap. To determine $k_\\mathrm{ia}$, we measured the trap loading and loss from both a \\ce{Na} magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a linear radio frequency quadrupole Paul trap. We found the total rate coefficient to be $7.4 \\pm 1.9 \\times 10^{-8}$ cm$^3$/s for the type I \\ce{Na} MOT immersed within an $\\approx 140$ K ion cloud and $1.10 \\pm 0.25 \\times 10^{-7}$ cm$^3$/s for the type II \\ce{Na} MOT within an $\\approx 1070$ K ion cloud. Our measurements show excellent agreement with previously reported theoretical fully quantal \\textit{ab initio} calculations. In the process of determining the total rate coefficient, we demonstrate that a MOT can be used to probe an optically dark ion cloud's spatial distribution within a hybrid trap.

Goodman, D S; Kwolek, J M; Blmel, R; Narducci, F A; Smith, W W

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Return on investment and corporate capital expenditures: Empirical evidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known (e.g., Gordon 1996, Chapter 8) that maximizing a firm's ROI is not equivalent to maximizing the value of the firm. This fact notwithstanding, it is often claimed that many managers use ROI in making capital expenditure decisions. The purpose of our paper is to empirically examine this claim. The primary findings presented in this paper offer substantial evidence demonstrating the positive association between ROI and capital expenditures. The positive association between ROI and capital expenditures occurs even where the interests of owners and managers are apparently in conflict.

Lawrence A. Gordon; Raghavan J. Iyengar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Investment opportunities and market reaction to capital expenditure decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we argue that share price reaction to a firm's capital expenditure decisions depends critically on the market's assessment of the quality of its investment opportunities. We postulate that announcements of increases (decreases) in capital expenditures positively (negatively) affect the stock prices of firms with valuable investment opportunities. Contrarily, we predict that announcements of increases (decreases) in capital spending negatively (positively) affect the share prices of firms without such opportunities. Our empirical results are generally consistent with these predictions. Overall, empirical evidence supports our conjecture that it is the quality of the firm's investment opportunities rather than its industry affiliation which determines the share price reaction to its capital expenditure decisions.

Kee H. Chung; Peter Wright; Charlie Charoenwong

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The Total Energy Content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The important message of RG theory [1] is that we have to attribute a specific symmetry to the continuous or infinite solid. Also, magnets with long range magnetic order show properties of an infinite system. Usi...

Dr. Ulrich Kbler; Dr. Andreas Hoser

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Total and partial capture cross sections in reactions with deformed nuclei at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the quantum diffusion approach, the capture of a projectile nucleus by a target nucleus is studied at bombarding energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The effects of deformation of interacting nuclei and neutron transfer between them on the total and partial capture cross sections and the mean angular momentum of the captured system are studied. The results obtained for the {sup 16}O + {sup 112}Cd, {sup 152}Sm, and {sup 184}W; {sup 19}F +{sup 175}Lu; {sup 28}Si +{sup 94,100}Mo and {sup 154}Sm; {sup 40}Ca +{sup 96}Zr; {sup 48}Ca+ {sup 90}Zr; and {sup 64}Ni +{sup 58,64}Ni, {sup 92,96}Zr, and {sup 100}Mo reactions are in good agreement with available experimental data.

Kuzyakin, R. A., E-mail: rkuzyakin@theor.jinr.ru; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

State Energy Data System (SEDS) Complete Dataset through 2009 | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Data System (SEDS) Complete Dataset through 2009 Energy Data System (SEDS) Complete Dataset through 2009 Dataset Summary Description The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates. The multi-dimensional nature of this EIA dataset allows users to make comparisons across States, energy sources, sectors, and over time. Related Links Link to state SEDS SEDS documentation Complete SEDS data tables and files

346

Basis for Contributions by New Members to Past Capital Expenditure - Draft Note by the UK Delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basis for Contributions by New Members to Past Capital Expenditure - Draft Note by the UK Delegation

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Special Contribution by New Member States to Capital Expenditure Previously Incurred by the Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special Contribution by New Member States to Capital Expenditure Previously Incurred by the Organization

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Special Contribution by New Member States to Capital Expenditure Previously Incurred by the Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special Contribution by New Member States to Capital Expenditure Previously Incurred by the Organization

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Note on R&D expenditures and fixed capital formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we deal with the fixed capital nature of the means of production and ... . We argue that these R&D current expenditures typically have the nature of fixed investments. ... then present an empirical ...

Mario De Marchi; Maurizio Rocchi

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 2: appendices A-D to technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline- powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume II contains additional details on the vehicle, utility, and materials analyses and discusses several details of the methodology.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 4: peer review comments on technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume IV includes copies of all the external peer review comments on the report distributed for review in July 1997.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Structure in the energy dependence of the proton total reaction cross section for C and Si in the energy region 20-40 MeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of proton total reaction cross sections for Be9, C12, O16, and Si28 have been made in the energy range between 20-44 MeV. The cross sections show irregular energy variation for C12 at about 23.8 and 25.9 MeV, and for Si28 at 30.3 and 33.5 MeV; irregularities were not observed clearly for Be9 or O16.NUCLEAR REACTIONS Be9, C12, O16, Si28: 20MeV

I. laus; D. J. Margaziotis; R. F. Carlson; W. T. H. van Oers; J. Reginald Richardson

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Intra-hour forecasting with a total sky imager at the UC San Diego solar energy testbed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solener.2011.02.014, Solar Energy. Lave, M. , Kleissl, J. ,smoothing. Submitted to Solar Energy. Linke, F. , 1922.24th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Hamburg,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES Capital Outlays CAPITAL OUTLAYS are expenditures that result in acquisitions of, additions to, replacement of, or major repairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES ­ Capital Outlays 2-G page 1 CAPITAL OUTLAYS are expenditures that result and other purchase-related costs. #12;EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES ­ Capital Outlays 2-G page 2 7300 and future fiscal periods. These objects are not to include cost of service contracts. 7100 Capital Outlays

Harms, Kyle E.

355

Combined iterative reconstruction and image-domain decomposition for dual energy CT using total-variation regularization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is being increasingly used for its capability of material decomposition and energy-selective imaging. A generic problem of DECT, however, is that the decomposition process is unstable in the sense that the relative magnitude of decomposed signals is reduced due to signal cancellation while the image noise is accumulating from the two CT images of independent scans. Direct image decomposition, therefore, leads to severe degradation of signal-to-noise ratio on the resultant images. Existing noise suppression techniques are typically implemented in DECT with the procedures of reconstruction and decomposition performed independently, which do not explore the statistical properties of decomposed images during the reconstruction for noise reduction. In this work, the authors propose an iterative approach that combines the reconstruction and the signal decomposition procedures to minimize the DECT image noise without noticeable loss of resolution. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which balances the data fidelity and total variation of decomposed images in one framework, and the decomposition step is carried out iteratively together with reconstruction. The noise in the CT images from the proposed algorithm becomes well correlated even though the noise of the raw projections is independent on the two CT scans. Due to this feature, the proposed algorithm avoids noise accumulation during the decomposition process. The authors evaluate the method performance on noise suppression and spatial resolution using phantom studies and compare the algorithm with conventional denoising approaches as well as combined iterative reconstruction methods with different forms of regularization. Results: On the Catphan600 phantom, the proposed method outperforms the existing denoising methods on preserving spatial resolution at the same level of noise suppression, i.e., a reduction of noise standard deviation by one order of magnitude. This improvement is mainly attributed to the high noise correlation in the CT images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm. Iterative reconstruction using different regularization, including quadratic orq-generalized Gaussian Markov random field regularization, achieves similar noise suppression from high noise correlation. However, the proposed TV regularization obtains a better edge preserving performance. Studies of electron density measurement also show that our method reduces the average estimation error from 9.5% to 7.1%. On the anthropomorphic head phantom, the proposed method suppresses the noise standard deviation of the decomposed images by a factor of ?14 without blurring the fine structures in the sinus area. Conclusions: The authors propose a practical method for DECT imaging reconstruction, which combines the image reconstruction and material decomposition into one optimization framework. Compared to the existing approaches, our method achieves a superior performance on DECT imaging with respect to decomposition accuracy, noise reduction, and spatial resolution.

Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

A fast interactive solution method for large capital expenditure selection problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many capital expenditure planning problems, a large number of alternatives compete for the expenditure of the capital budget. Standard integer programming approaches select alternatives to maximize total return, subject to financial and other constraints. For large problems, obtaining an optimal solution may be so time consuming, the slow turn-around time prevents extensive sensitivity analyses. Typically, the constraints in the problem are actually soft and expending a large amount of computing effort to find an optimal solution satisfying these constraints is not necessary. It is more important to understand the value of the constrained resources. It is argued here that, in many cases, the integer programming formulation is not appropriate. In the integer programming formulation, alternatives are selected to fill out the resource constraints and maximize total return, and some of these alternatives are generally not those that give the best return on resource use. By recognizing this, a solution method is developed that provides more useful solutions quickly. This allows for the development of an interactive decision analysis tool.

Roger L. Tobin

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Relationship Between Surface Free Energy and Total Work of Fracture of Asphalt Binder and Asphalt Binder-Aggregate Interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the surface free energy of the asphalt binder and the aggregate. Surface free energy, which is a thermodynamic material property, is directly related to the adhesive bond energy between the asphalt binder and the aggregate as well as the cohesive bond energy...

Howson, Jonathan Embrey

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

ESTIMATE OF THE TOTAL MECHANICAL FEEDBACK ENERGY FROM GALAXY CLUSTER-CENTERED BLACK HOLES: IMPLICATIONS FOR BLACK HOLE EVOLUTION, CLUSTER GAS FRACTION, AND ENTROPY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total feedback energy injected into hot gas in galaxy clusters by central black holes can be estimated by comparing the potential energy of observed cluster gas profiles with the potential energy of non-radiating, feedback-free hot gas atmospheres resulting from gravitational collapse in clusters of the same total mass. Feedback energy from cluster-centered black holes expands the cluster gas, lowering the gas-to-dark-matter mass ratio below the cosmic value. Feedback energy is unnecessarily delivered by radio-emitting jets to distant gas far beyond the cooling radius where the cooling time equals the cluster lifetime. For clusters of mass (4-11) x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}, estimates of the total feedback energy, (1-3) x 10{sup 63} erg, far exceed feedback energies estimated from observations of X-ray cavities and shocks in the cluster gas, energies gained from supernovae, and energies lost from cluster gas by radiation. The time-averaged mean feedback luminosity is comparable to those of powerful quasars, implying that some significant fraction of this energy may arise from the spin of the black hole. The universal entropy profile in feedback-free gaseous atmospheres in Navarro-Frenk-White cluster halos can be recovered by multiplying the observed gas entropy profile of any relaxed cluster by a factor involving the gas fraction profile. While the feedback energy and associated mass outflow in the clusters we consider far exceed that necessary to stop cooling inflow, the time-averaged mass outflow at the cooling radius almost exactly balances the mass that cools within this radius, an essential condition to shut down cluster cooling flows.

Mathews, William G.; Guo Fulai, E-mail: mathews@ucolick.org [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey 2003 - Detailed Tables  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The tables contain information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Minority energy assessment report. Fall 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to project household energy consumption, energy expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income for five population groups from 1991 to 2009. The approach uses the Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy`s Office of Minority Economic Impact. The MEAM provides a framework that can be used to forecast regional energy consumption and energy expenditure for majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. The forecasts of key macroeconomic and energy variables used as exogenous variables in the MEAM were obtained from the Data Resources, Inc., Macromodel and Energy Model. Generally, the projections of household energy consumption, expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income vary across population groups and census regions.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Poyer, D.A.; Lampley, L.; Anderson, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Towards energy-efficient workload placement in Data Centers Rania Elnaggar (student & presenter) , Raj Yavatkar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; first, the cost of power, cooling and facilities provisioning in capital expenditure (CapEx); and second, the operational energy cost of powering servers, cooling and facilities equipment in operational expenditure (Op is proportional to average power. In our research we focus on improving operational energy expenditure and hence

Walpole, Jonathan

362

Court Committee Structure Capital Expenditure Committee is a "peer" committee sitting between Estates Committee, Finance Committee and Senior Management Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Court Committee Structure Capital Expenditure Committee is a "peer" committee sitting between Audit Committee Estates Committee Estates Management Committee Capital Expenditure Committee Finance Committee Capital Expenditure Committee Investment Advisory Committee Student Finance Subcommittee Health

Glasgow, University of

363

An intervention analysis for the relationship between capital expenditure decisions and the market value of firms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article is meant to explore the relationship between corporate capital expenditure decisions and the market value of firms ... . The article shows that deep cuts in capital expenditures may, for sink-hole ty...

Yang-Tzong Tsay; Ken Hung

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Nonlinear relationship between health care expenditure and its determinants: a panel smooth transition regression model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper employs a panel of 16 OECD countries over the period 19752009 to reexamine the health care expenditure (HCE)-income relationship by considering a lagged ratio of public expenditures on health as th...

Po-Chin Wu; Shiao-Yen Liu; Sheng-Chieh Pan

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Bis(4-methylanilinium) and bis(4-iodoanilinium) pentamolybdates from laboratory X-ray powder data and total energy minimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal structures of bis(4-methylanilinium) and bis(4-iodoanilinium) pentamolybdates were determined using laboratory X-ray data and refined by total energy minimization methods. The obtained structures present alternating organic cation and inorganic polyanion layers bound by weak bonding (apart from ionic interactions).

Oszajca, M.

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Effects of Forest Management on Total Biomass Production and CO2 Emissions from use of Energy Biomass of Norway Spruce and Scots Pine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of forest management on the total biomass production (t ha-1a-1) and CO2 emissions (kg CO2 MWh-1) from use of energy biomass of Norway spruce and Scots pine grown ...

Johanna Routa; Seppo Kellomki; Harri Strandman

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Special Inquiry on the Office of the Chief Financial Officer's Information Technology Expenditures, OAS-RA-L-12-01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Special Inquiry on the Office of the Special Inquiry on the Office of the Chief Financial Officer's Information Technology Expenditures OAS-RA-L-12-01 November 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 28, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DEPUTY SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Special Report on "Inquiry on the Office of the Chief Financial Officer's Information Technology Expenditures" INTRODUCTION The Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) is responsible for ensuring the effective management and financial integrity of Department of Energy programs, projects, and resources. To achieve its mission, the OCFO develops, implements, and monitors policies and systems related to areas such as budget administration, program analysis, and strategic planning. The

368

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

369

2012-13 Expenditures Req # Amount Category Vendor Detail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

803472 $800 Food Costco Food, drink, paper COGS 802508 $891 Expense Advance Business Machines Service2012-13 Expenditures Req # Amount Category Vendor Detail SGA OFFICES COGS 801857 $800 Food Publix Food, drink, paper COGS 803830 $2,750 Expense Astro Tour Rental - Tour Bus COGS 803835 $650 Food Grammy

370

Expenditure by Colleges of Advanced Technology in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... at the colleges of advanced technology to be 660,000. He estimated net recurrent expenditure after allowing for income receivable from fees and sources other than Ministry grant was ... receivable from fees and sources other than Ministry grant was 7,532,107, besides capital ...

1962-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory JUN16 1954 WOODS HOLE, MASS MAP CREEL CENSUS SUN RIVER MONTANA DRAWN i*^ ^ TRACED- _2£jLt:l SUBMITTED . 1 V N 01 1 VN ei

372

Annual Energy Review - financial indicators section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Annual statistics on consumer energy prices and expenditures, fossil fuel production prices and value, and value of fossil fuel imports and exports back to 1949.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet First Use/Ton of steel End Uses of Consumption Blue Bullet Total End Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet Total End Use/Ton of Steel Boiler Fuel as End Use Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Value of Production Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Ton of Steel Process Heating as End Use Blue Bullet Process Heating Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Process Heating /Value of Production Machine Drive as End Use Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel/Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel /Value of Production Expenditures Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Value of Production

374

Energy content of spider eggs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy content of spider eggs was determined on samples ... stages within the egg sac. Rates of energy expenditure of developing eggs and spiderlings within ... 19% of those of emerged spiderlings. The energy

John F. Anderson

375

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Cost of a Generic Quad Used in the Residential Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential 1980 10.45 1981 11.20 1982 11.58 1983 11.85 1984 11.65 1985 11.43 1986 10.90 1987 10.55 1988 10.18 1989 9.98 1990 10.12 1991 9.94 1992 9.78 1993 9.77 1994 9.78 1995 9.44 1996 9.44 1997 9.59 1998 9.23 1999 8.97 2000 9.57 2001 10.24 2002 9.33 2003 10.00 2004 10.32 2005 11.10 2006 11.60 2007 11.61 2008 12.29 2009 11.65 2010 9.98 2011 9.99 2012 9.87 2013 9.77 2014 9.76 2015 9.88 2016 9.85 2017 9.83 2018 9.86 2019 9.88 2020 9.91 2021 10.00 2022 10.09 2023 10.11 2024 10.12 2025 10.09 2026 10.10 2027 10.13 2028 10.11 2029 10.06 2030 10.06 2031 10.13 2032 10.23 2033 10.34 2034 10.45 2035 10.57 Note(s): 1) See Table 1.5.1 for generic quad definition. This table provides the consumer cost of a generic quad in the buildings sector. Use this table to estimate the average consumer cost savings resulting from the savings of a generic (primary) quad in the buildings sector. 2) Price of

376

The Energy Expenditure of Rats Bearing Walker Carcinoma 256  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Calorimetrische Untersuchungen. Ztschr. f. Biol., 21:250 "884, 557 "410,1885. 6. . Die Quelle der thierischen Warme. Ibid., 30: 78 " 142, 1894. 7. SHERMAN, C. D., JR. ; MORTON, J. J. ; and Mmaa, G. B. Potential Sources of...

G. B. Mider; L. D. Fenninger; F. L. Haven; J. J. Morton

1951-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

ViziCal: Accurate Energy Expenditure Prediction for Playing Exergames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@cse.unr.edu Jeff Angermann2 jeff@medicine.unr.edu George Bebis1 bebis@cse.unr.edu Eelke Folmer1 efolmer to promote physical activity, fitness, and gross motor skill development [26]. As exergames typi- cally

Bebis, George

378

Partition of Energy Expenditure between Host and Tumor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...tumor growth. Daily food intake, water intake, evaporated water, urine weight, and fresh and...elevations attributable to spontaneous motor activity (24). The environmental...semisynthetic diet (22, 24) and water ad libitum. The calorimetric...

S. D. Morrison

1971-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy expenditures and carbon-dioxide emissions at blast furnaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic analysis of the reduction of iron and the material balances of carbon shows that the CO2 levels in the blast-furnace gas may be maintained by lowering the carbon consumption in the direct reduction ...

G. V. Korshikov; V. N. Titov; V. G. Mikhailov

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Total Floorspace Total Buildings Primary Energy Consumption 1) For primary energy intensities by building type, see Table 3.1.13. Total CBECS 2003 commercial building floorspace is 71.7 billion SF. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table C1A

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Material and Energy Dependence of Services and Its Implications for Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By decomposing the CO2 emissions embodied in material goods and services, this study quantitatively analyzes the implications of energy and materials consumption in services for the change in indirect CO2 emissions by household consumers in Japan. ... In contrast to p?kl, this indicator is independent of the total expenditure of households and thus allows the structure of supply chain CO2 emission by each segment to be compared from year to year. ...

Keisuke Nansai; Shigemi Kagawa; Sangwon Suh; Minoru Fujii; Rokuta Inaba; Seiji Hashimoto

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy Conservation Management Can Pay For Itself  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With proper management of energy conservation programs, any structure can be energy efficient. And this energy efficiency need not require great expenditures. A 'systems approach' to energy management identifies a series of activities which...

McCall, R.; Bickle, L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Post-IPO capital expenditures and market feedback  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an empirical test of the market feedback hypothesis, a theory suggesting that information aggregated in the IPO process is used for the firms investment decision. We examine the relation between post-IPO unexpected capital expenditures and feedback generated during the IPO process for 1543 \\{IPOs\\} between 1987 and 1995. Feedback is measured by (i) the unexpected price adjustment made at the end of the waiting period and (ii) the unexpected initial return. Consistent with the hypothesis, we find that positive feedback is followed by positive abnormal capital expenditures. A long-term event study finds no significant difference in stock returns between positive and negative feedback IPOs. This suggests that firms should not ignore market feedback as there is no evidence for a feedback related bias in post-IPO stock prices.

Jos van Bommel; Theo Vermaelen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Private health care expenditure and quality in Beveridge systems: Cross-regional differences in the Italian NHS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Private health care expenditure ranges from 15% to 30% of total healthcare spending in OECD countries. The literature suggests that there should be an inverse correlation between quality of public services and private expenditures. The main objective of this study is to explore the association between quality of public healthcare and private expenditures in the Italian Regional Healthcare Systems (RHSs).The institutional framework offered by the Italian NHS allows to investigate on the differences among the regions while controlling for institutional factors.The study uses micro-data from the ISTAT Household Consumption Survey (HCS) and a rich set of regional quality indicators. The results indicate that there is a positive and significant correlation between quality and private spending per capita across regions. The study also points out the strong association between the distribution of private consumption and income. In order to account for the influence of income, the study segmented data in three socio-economic classes and computed cross-regional correlations of \\{RHSs\\} quality and household healthcare expenditure per capita, within each class. No correlation was found between the two variables.These findings are quite surprising and call into question the theory that better quality of public services crowds out private spending, or, at the very least, it undermines the simplistic notions that higher levels of private spending are a direct consequence of poor quality in the public sector. This suggests that policies should avoid to simplistically link private spending with judgements or assessments about the functioning or efficacy of the public system and its organizations.

Mario Del Vecchio; Lorenzo Fenech; Anna Prenestini

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hadronic Total Cross Sections (R) in E+E- Interactions: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on total hadronic cross sections, and R ratios, in e+e- interactions is presented. Published data from the Novosibirsk, Orsay, Frascati, SLAC, CORNELL, DESY, KEK and CERN e+e- colliders on both exclusive and inclusive final particle states are included from threshold energies to the highest LEP energies. The data are presented in tabular form supplemented by compilation plots of different exclusive final particle states and of different energy regions. (Taken from abstract of paper, A Compilation of Data on Hadronic Total Cross Sections in E+E- Interactions, M.R. Whalley, Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics), Volume 29, Number 12A, 2003). The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. The data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database, which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

Whalley, M.R.

386

The comparative impact of the market penetration of energy-efficient measures: A sensitivity analysis of its impact on minority households  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sensitivity study was made of the potential market penetration of residential energy efficiency as energy service ratio (ESR) improvements occurred in minority households, by age of house. The study followed a Minority Energy Assessment Model analysis of the National Energy Strategy projections of household energy consumption and prices, with majority, black, and Hispanic subgroup divisions. Electricity and total energy consumption and expenditure patterns were evaluated when the households` ESR improvement followed a logistic negative growth (i.e., market penetration) path. Earlier occurrence of ESR improvements meant greater discounted savings over the 22-year period.

Bozinovich, L.V.; Poyer, D.A.; Anderson, J.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

388

The acid precipitation provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and minorities' energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November 1990 Congress passed a comprehensive set of amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1977 with potentially very high compliance costs. The provisions pertaining to control of acid precipitation have been specified with sufficient detail to examine their cost impacts. These provisions will require investment in emissions control technology, mainly by electric utilities. Production costs will increase due to the required investment, resulting in higher electricity prices. This paper examines the possible magnitude of these effects and whether there might be differential impacts on racial/ethnic minority groups. Differential impacts were considered a possibility because of the differences in the percentage of total income spent on energy by various population subgroups. In 1989, the Majority group (defined as non-Black, non-Hispanic) spent about three percent of household income on energy, while Blacks spent double that, six percent, and Hispanics spent about four percent. (The differences in income underlying these figures are greater, however, than the differences in energy expenditures). To address these issues, we compare projected electricity consumption and expenditures and total energy expenditures for Black, Hispanic, and Majority households. The distribution of benefits from reducing acid precipitation is not addressed since the possible effects on ambient air quality in specific geographical areas that are directly attributable to reducing utilities' sulfur dioxide emissions are highly uncertain.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The acid precipitation provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and minorities` energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November 1990 Congress passed a comprehensive set of amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1977 with potentially very high compliance costs. The provisions pertaining to control of acid precipitation have been specified with sufficient detail to examine their cost impacts. These provisions will require investment in emissions control technology, mainly by electric utilities. Production costs will increase due to the required investment, resulting in higher electricity prices. This paper examines the possible magnitude of these effects and whether there might be differential impacts on racial/ethnic minority groups. Differential impacts were considered a possibility because of the differences in the percentage of total income spent on energy by various population subgroups. In 1989, the Majority group (defined as non-Black, non-Hispanic) spent about three percent of household income on energy, while Blacks spent double that, six percent, and Hispanics spent about four percent. (The differences in income underlying these figures are greater, however, than the differences in energy expenditures). To address these issues, we compare projected electricity consumption and expenditures and total energy expenditures for Black, Hispanic, and Majority households. The distribution of benefits from reducing acid precipitation is not addressed since the possible effects on ambient air quality in specific geographical areas that are directly attributable to reducing utilities` sulfur dioxide emissions are highly uncertain.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Exploring alternative symmetry breaking mechanisms at the LHC with 7, 8 and 10 TeV total energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In view of the annnouncement that in 2012 the LHC will run at 8 TeV, we study the possibility of detecting signals of alternative mechanisms of ElectroWeak Symmetry Breaking, described phenomenologically by unitarized models, at energies lower than 14 TeV. A complete calculation with six fermions in the final state is performed using the PHANTOM event generator. Our results indicate that at 8 TeV some of the scenarios with TeV scale resonances are likely to be identified while models with no resonances or with very heavy ones will be inaccessible, unless the available luminosity will be much higher than expected.

Alessandro Ballestrero; Diogo Buarque Franzosi; Ezio Maina

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

391

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Natural Gas Natural Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion cubic feet) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 2,538 48,473 19.1 2,100 2,037 16,010 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,134 3,175 2.8 257 249 2,227 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 531 3,969 7.5 224 218 1,830 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 500 7,824 15.6 353 343 2,897 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 185 6,604 35.8 278 270 2,054

392

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 465 16,265 35 228 1,644 1,826 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 211 606 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 102 736 7 36 262 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 66 1,043 16 28 201 238 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 24 895 38 17 124 134 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 25 1,852 76 29 209 229

393

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is submitted in response to Title 1 of the 1980 Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, as amended, (the Act). The report summarizes expenditures made by compact regions and unaffiliated states during calendar year 1995 of surcharge rebates from the July 1, 1986, January 1, 1988, and January 1, 1990, milestones, and the January 1, 1993, deadline. Section 5(d)(2)(A) of the Act requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to administer a surcharge escrow account. This account consists of a portion of the surcharge fees paid by generators of low-level radioactive waste in nonsited compact regions (compact regions currently without disposal sites) and nonmember states (states without disposal sites that are not members of compact regions) to the three sited states (states with operating disposal facilities--Nevada, South Carolina, and Washington) for the use of facilities in sited states through the end of 1992. In administering the surcharge escrow account, the Act requires DOE to: (1) Invest the funds in interest-bearing United States Government securities with the highest available yield; (2) Determine eligibility for rebates of the funds by evaluating compact region and state progress toward developing new disposal sites against the milestone requirements set forth in the Act; (3) Disburse the collected rebates and accrued interest to eligible compact regions, states, or generators; (4) Assess compliance of rebate expenditures in accordance with the conditions and limitations prescribed in the Act; and (5) Submit a report annually to Congress summarizing rebate expenditures by state and compact region and assessing the compliance of each such state or compact region with the requirement for expenditure of the rebates as provided in section 5(d)(2)(E) of the Act.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Purchasing or installing a clean energy system outright requires a large initial expenditure. High initial costs are often prohibitive for a consumer interested in...

395

978-3-901882-56-2 c 2013 IFIP Energy Considerations in EoS-over-WDM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption and capital expenditure. We then propose an exact integer linear program to minimize either cost configurations. Our results for a realistic network show that capital expenditure optimization would result the energy efficiency (or capital expenditure efficiency) of the metro optical network, based on the Ethernet

Kuipers, Fernando A.

396

Table 5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures, 1994 (Continued) (Million Households) 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All...

397

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 4.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 4. Expenditures for Purchased Energy 1998, 2002, and 2006 (million constant 2000 U.S. dollars1) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 2 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total3 5,601 6,241 5,806 Electricity 1,580 1,971 1,537 Natural Gas 1,287 1,659 2,037 Coal 971 994 1,010 Residual Fuel 60 3 75 Coke and Breeze 1,584 1,462 999 Notes: 1. Deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 3. 'Total' is the sum of all of the listed energy sources, including wood waste, hydrogen, and waste oils and tars.

398

Market reaction to capital expenditures of powerful CEOs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is controversial whether governance structure affects the value of the firm. This paper examines the sensitivity of firm value to capital expenditure under various levels of CEO power. The paper uses two measures of CEO power and finds that the greater the power of the CEO the less the increase in market value for a given increase in capital spending. The results are robust to the inclusion of firm and governance characteristics and indicate that the market is weary of investment decisions made by powerful CEOs.

Anwar Boumosleh; Elias Raad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The accuracy of financial report projections of future environmental capital expenditures: a research note  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Financial report environmental disclosure has been widely criticized because the extent of disclosure both varies in response to exposures facing the firm and because it is not an accurate measure of firm environmental performance. This study suggests there are at least two potential problems that need to be addressed before this disclosure can be completely condemned as meaningless. A first potential problem is the earlier studies' focus on broad measures of environmental disclosure. Hidden within those broader measures may be pieces of meaningful information. Second, while the disclosure examined previously may not correspond well with past environmental performance, it, or at least parts of it, may still provide meaningful information for assessing future environmental action. This study attempts to address these shortcomings by examining one specific, but potentially useful, category of environmental disclosure: projections of future spending for pollution abatement and control equipment. Based on 355 sets of projected/actual spending drawn from 10K reports filed with the US's Security and Exchange Commission between 1993 and 2002, inclusive, results suggest that the projections may be more misleading than meaningful. Actual spending was lower than the projected amount for more than 75% of the observations, and the mean projection error (the difference adjusted for the size of the projection) was a negative 16.4%. Analysis of projection errors for a 2-year, rather than a 1-year window revealed a similar distribution. In contrast to the accuracy of the environmental capital expenditure projections, the actual/projection difference for total capital expenditures was very small, suggesting that it is not a difficulty in estimating future capital spending that is driving the error results. The projection errors also did not appear to be a function of changes in company revenues or profitability. Overall, therefore, it appears that, similar to broader measures of corporate environmental disclosure, projections of future spending on environmental control lack value.

Dennis M. Patten

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. 1. Introduction The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is mandated by Congress to collect, analyze, and disseminate impartial, comprehensive data about energy--how much is produced, who uses it, and the purposes for which it is used. To comply with this mandate, EIA collects energy data from a variety of sources covering a range of topics 1 . Background The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Study of energy tax and rebate schemes: energy conservation and the question of equity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taxing all kinds of primary energy at the wellhead on a $/Btu basis is suggested. This aims at inducing energy conservation throughout the economic system. To reduce the financial pressure of the tax on consumers, especially the poor, tax revenues could be rebated to households. It has been attempted to design an equitable rebate scheme. A mathematical model was developed that approximates the reduction in a household's total energy consumption in response to higher energy prices and different rebate schemes. This model is based on the assumption that energy consumption is a function of a household's real income, prices of different commodities, and energy intensities. The amount of energy saved and the change in real expenditure of a household was calculated for four tax rates; 50%, 100%, 224% and 400%, and five rebate schemes; one regressive, two progressive, one income distribution preserving and the flat per-capita rebate. The results indicate that, for a given tax rate, the choice of rebate scheme does not significantly affect the amount of energy conserved by the households. However, the effectof different rebate schemes on a household's real expenditure could be dramatically different.

Fazel Sarjui, F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 67 5,576 83 636 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 289 16 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 10 369 35 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8 574 70 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 9 1,399 148 165 Q

403

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 2007 Professional and Do-It-Yourself Improvements, by Project ($2010) Total Mean Total Mean Projects Expenditures Expenditures Projects Expenditures Expenditures Repair/Improvement (thousand) ($million) ($) (thousand) ($million) ($) Room Additions, Alterations, and Remodelings Kitchen Bathroom Bedroom Other Systems and Equipment Plumbing (Pipes and Fixtures) Electrical System HVAC Appliance/Major Equipment Exterior Additions and Replacements Roof Siding Windows/Doors Interior Additions and Replacements Insulation Flooring/Paneling/Ceiling Other Interior Disaster Repair Other Additions and Replacements (1) Total (2) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Other additions and replacements include porches, carports, swimming pools and other major improvements or repairs to lot or yard. 2)Total expenditures (professional installation plus do-it-yourself installation) are $1.8 billion higher compared to Table 2.6.1. This

404

Effect of local government expenditure on the ratio of output to capital: Evidence from panel data at Chinas provincial level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper divides the expenditure of local government into the productive and nonproductive expenditure for revealing the effect of local governments expenditure on output-capital efficiency through model and e...

Tao Jin; Jianhui Zhang

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Fact #638: August 30, 2010 Average Expenditure for a New Car Declines in Relation to Family Earnings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Although the average expenditure for a new car has increased from 1967 to 2009, family earnings have also been on the rise. For this period, new car expenditures went from $3,216 to $23,186, while...

406

Comparison of approaches to Total Quality Management. Including an examination of the Department of Energy`s position on quality management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of several qualitatively different approaches to Total Quality Management (TQM). The continuum ranges from management approaches that are primarily standards -- with specific guidelines, but few theoretical concepts -- to approaches that are primarily philosophical, with few specific guidelines. The approaches to TQM discussed in this paper include the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9000 Standard, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, Senge`s the Learning Organization, Watkins and Marsick`s approach to organizational learning, Covey`s Seven Habits of Highly Successful People, and Deming`s Fourteen Points for Management. Some of these approaches (Deming and ISO 9000) are then compared to the DOE`s official position on quality management and conduct of operations (DOE Orders 5700.6C and 5480.19). Using a tabular format, it is shown that while 5700.6C (Quality Assurance) maps well to many of the current approaches to TQM, DOE`s principle guide to management Order 5419.80 (Conduct of Operations) has many significant conflicts with some of the modern approaches to continuous quality improvement.

Bennett, C.T.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Slide24 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

(related to national energy R&D expenditures relative to other member countries). * Contracting party has right to determine ETDEWEB access policies and any fees within its...

408

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division. Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2003 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2003 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

409

AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF CAPITAL PROJECTS GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS TO MAKE CAPITAL EXPENDITURES FOR SENIOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF CAPITAL PROJECTS GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS TO MAKE CAPITAL EXPENDITURES.--For the purpose of providing funds for capital expenditures as authorized in the 2014 Capital Projects General Capital Projects General Obligation Bond Act. SECTION 4. EXPENDITURES.--The proceeds from the sale of #12

Johnson, Eric E.

410

Effects of Energy Conservation in Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...percent per year. The cumulative direct energy saving...users. Present worth of cumulative (1977-2000) expenditures...145 340 350 425 *Cumulative expenditures represent...15). 1) Energy production and delivery re-quire...and distillate fuel oil) to a customer consume...

Eric Hirst; Bruce Hannon

1979-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

411

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

's > Overview 's > Overview Overview Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and Form EIA-871 of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line Introduction The Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects data on energy consumption, expenditures, and other energy-related topics in the major energy-consuming sectors of the U.S. economy. The residential and commercial sectors are two major sectors that many energy analysts like to consider together, as energy use is primarily related to the building shell and the stock of energy-consuming goods within the shell in these sectors. EIA conducts separate surveys for the two sectors, the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS).1 Prior to the first CBECS, there was a very poor understanding of the complexities of energy use in commercial buildings, or the amount of energy consumed in the commercial sector. This report summarizes and synthesizes energy data that were collected by these two surveys during the 1980’s, when major changes in energy policy were implemented following the energy crisis decade of the 1970’s.

412

Energy Metabolism and Requirements in the Cancer Patient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...view. Finally, resting energy metabolism per unit of body weight declines...syn thesis expressed per unit of resting energy metabolism. These observations...upon modern methods for measurement of whole-body energy expenditure in human subjects...

Vernon R. Young

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Allocating energy in a first-to-n match  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......expenditure. The modelling of energy replenishment during the match...deal with a limited supply of energy. R EFERENCES BLACKWELL,D...Games and Statistical Decisions.New York: Wiley. ALLOCATING ENERGY IN A FIRST-TOn MATCH 37 GAESSER......

Jack Brimberg; W. J. Hurley; D. U. Lior

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

1. [M] Estimate the fraction of the total transported energy (in the form of gasoline) in the Trans-Alaska Pipeline that is consumed in pumping. As always, try not to look anything up.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. [M] Estimate the fraction of the total transported energy (in the form of gasoline) in the Trans to this (which is 1 bend per 10 m). So we can toss this out. Now estimate the energy content of gasoline: Many

Nimmo, Francis

415

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

416

Fiscal Federalism and Decentralization in India?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revenue Expenditure Capital Expenditure Total ExpenditureRevenue Expenditure Capital Expenditure Total Expendituresubstantial debt-funded capital expenditure since 2003-04.

Singh, Nirvikar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Energy-Aware Manufacturing Using Information Technology Tools: A Knowledge Based System Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This manuscript discusses the implementation of information technology tools; specifically, computerized Knowledge Based Systems (KBS), in managing the energy flows, conversions, and expenditures within manufacturing environments; including renewable ... Keywords: Energy Auditing, Energy Management, Energy Optimization, Knowledge Based Systems, Sustainable Manufacturing

Mohammed A. Omar, Ahmad Mayyas, Qilun Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effects of Physical Activity and Restricted Energy Intake on Chemically Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Effects of Physical Activity and Restricted Energy Intake on Chemically Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis...little attention has been given to whether energy balance directed interventions designed to regulate body weight by increasing energy expenditure versus reducing energy intake...

Weiqin Jiang; Zongjian Zhu; Henry J. Thompson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The impact of ageing on health care expenditures: a study of steepening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some researchers claim that health care expenditures for older people are growing faster than for the rest of the population. This process is referred to as steepening. The aim of this paper is to test steepening

Fredrik Alexander Gregersen

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Manager Power and Decision of Capital Expenditure: Empirical Research from Chinas Securities Market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Manager power in the firm is so strength that weakens the effect of incentive pay, and always brings out various negative consequences. So the actual capital expenditure, which could be the engine of firm ... pap...

Jing Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The overall share of annual household expenditures for transportation was lower in 2010 than it was in 1984, reaching its lowest point in 2009 at 15.5%. In the early to mid-1980s when oil prices...

423

Evidence on the Usefulness of Capital Expenditures as an Alternative Measure of Depreciation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investment professionals often suggest that accounting earnings is a more useful indicator of share value if adjusted by substituting current capital expenditures for reported depreciation. We investigate the use...

Dennis Chambers; Ross Jennings; Robert B. Thompson II

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Fact #747: October 1, 2012 Behind Housing, Transportation is the Top Household Expenditure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Except for housing, transportation was the largest single expenditure for the average American household in 2010. The average household spends more on transportation in a year than on food. Vehicle...

425

EnvironmentalManagementExpenditures: AssessingtheFinancialReturnsfromStructuralandInfrastructuralInvestments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and inventory metrics. Key Words: sustainable development, environmental management practices, pollution;2 compliance within a region or industry (Hahn, 2000). In addition, the nature and form of environmentalEnvironmentalManagementExpenditures: Assessingthe

Edwards, Paul N.

426

Analysis of dynamics of public and private expenditures on health care and education in contemporary Russia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides an estimate of the dynamics in expenditures on health care and education made from all sources in Russia in the 19952012 and viewed as investments in human capital. These data from Russia ...

V. N. Ivanov; A. V. Suvorov; E. E. Balashova

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Note on gross capital formation and R&D expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Companies often consider the cost of R&D projects (especially salaries paid to R&D personnel) as part of their current expenses. Companies continue to do this practice even without exactly specifying what they mean by R&D project costs. This practice is misleading because spending on research is undeniably a form of fixed capital investment, even more so than the item that economists consider as the epitome of fixed capital investment ?? purchase of machinery. The dynamics of the possible relationship between investment in research and investment in machinery is that during times of economic expansion, firms tend to increase their investment in research to come up with product innovations capable of exploiting increasing effectual demand. Over time, this investment results in the emergence of the direct relationship between expense on industrial R&D and the business cycle. We tested this hypothesis both in Italy and in the USA. Our experiments are based on OECD statistics, referring to R&D spending from 1987 to 1999, and on the magnitude 'Gross Capital Formation' in the manufacturing industry. We chose to represent our conjecture about a causal relationship between investment cycle and R&D expenditure econometrically.

Mario De Marchi; Maurizio Rocchi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Chapter 17 - Expenditure Incidence and Economy-Wide Incidence Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chapter 17 has two distinct sets of topics. The first part offers an analysis of expenditure incidence that covers the incidence of transfer payments, decreasing cost services, and nonexclusive goods. The second part discusses economy-wide incidence studies. Highlighted are the Pechman and Okner sources and uses approach to tax incidence, computable general equilibrium models (briefly), the Auerbach and Kotlikoff analysis of tax incidence in a dynamic setting using an OLG model, and the Fullerton and Rodgers model of lifetime tax incidence. The Appendix to Chapter 17 on tax reform considers four broad-based tax reform proposals that are common in the economics literature, bringing together some theoretical results from previous chapters and then turning to other issues that are not discussed elsewhere in the text. These include whether income from capital should be taxed, Michael Kremer's call for aged-based marginal tax rates, and the general problem of commitment or time-inconsistency in second-best analysis with imperfect information.

Richard W. Tresch

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Table 7.10 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam"," ",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources","RSE"

430

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - January 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 2005 January 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Consumer prices for heating fuels are relatively unchanged since the December Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously projected, despite continued warm weather in the middle of the heating season. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 30 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about 20 percent this winter.

431

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - February 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 2005 February 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Despite some cold weather during the second half of January, expected average consumer prices for heating fuels this heating season are little changed since the January Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously reported. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 32 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about

432

The impact of medicare capital prospective payment regulation on hospital capital expenditures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our study examines the impact of the capital prospective payment system (CPPS), implemented by Medicare in 1991, on capital expenditures and cost-effective behavior of non-proprietary hospitals. As noted in the paper, we use audited financial statement data for a large national sample of hospitals. Univariate analyses demonstrate a statistically significant decline in capital expenditures in the years following the CPPS regulation without significant changes in relative aggregate operating expenses. These preliminary findings suggest that CPPS induces some cost-effective behavior by hospital managers. Ordinary least-squares (OLS) regressions indicate that capital expenditures before and after CPPS are differently affected by the changes in most explanatory variables. Further OLS regressions indicate that high-cost (low-cost) hospitals decrease (increase) capital expenditures following CPPS, once other factors are controlled for. Managerial accounting implications for hospitals include the effect of the regulation on capital budgeting decisions. Greater accounting disclosure may be necessary so that alternative modes of coping with the regulation can be discerned. Policymakers and regulators should also be aware that although reductions in capital expenditures may have favorable short-term effects of reducing health care costs, a potentially negative public health impact may result if capital expenditures continue to decrease.

Ran Barniv; Kreag Danvers; Joanne Healy

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C13. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Primary Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ............................... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890 69,032 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,384 6,346 2.7 1,164 386 113 10,348 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 834 6,197 7.4 790 262 77 7,296 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 727 11,370 15.6 1,229 407 119 10,001

434

Managing R&D Risk in Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

75: 547-561. Chevron (2008). Renewable Energy At Chevron.www.chevronenergy.com/renewable_energy/ . Accessed on JuneOptimizing the Level of Renewable Electric R&D Expenditures

Rausser, Gordon C.; Papineau, Maya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Radio Planning of Energy-Aware Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that including energy costs in Opex and taking into .... Management strategies for energy saving in solar powered wireless MESH ..... we strove to highlight the benefits achieved by jointly minimizing costs and power expenditures in.

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

436

Energy 29 (2004) 1317 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

travel and expenditures. Details for the energy conversion factors are given in the notes Venere Workshop. Conversion factors for travel were erroneously large, and are corrected here. FortyEnergy 29 (2004) 13­17 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy Brief Note Personal energy impact

Vermont, University of

437

Automation, Energy Conservation and Common Sense  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, capital costs and possible savings. Approval for facility expenditure has been obtained. The energy management system will consist of hardware and software for a distributed system concept and a supervisory computer. The system will be expandable...

Hester, D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Use of the Predictive Sugars Biomarker to Evaluate Self-Reported Total Sugars Intake in the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Katan MB.Underestimation of energy intake by 3-d records compared with energy intake to maintain body weight...Multimodel Inference.2nd ed.New York:Springer;2002. Supplementary...the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) study...

Nataa Tasevska; Douglas Midthune; Nancy Potischman; Amy F. Subar; Amanda J. Cross; Sheila A. Bingham; Arthur Schatzkin; and Victor Kipnis

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Use of the Predictive Sugars Biomarker to Evaluate Self-Reported Total Sugars Intake in the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...whereas in analysis with energy-adjusted intakes...epidemiology may have prevented us from detecting a causal...and overreporting of energy intake related to weight status and lifestyle in a nationwide...Elliott P.Who are the low energy reporters' in the dietary...

Nataa Tasevska; Douglas Midthune; Nancy Potischman; Amy F. Subar; Amanda J. Cross; Sheila A. Bingham; Arthur Schatzkin; and Victor Kipnis

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of total primary energy consumption was also announced forenergy in total primary energy consumption to 10% by 2010coal in total primary energy consumption as well as slightly

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Buenos Aires, Argentina Variation in...landscape-dependent energy expenditure of...in a variable energy landscape using...Leon, Chubut, Argentina. These birds...Gov't | Animals Argentina Birds physiology Diving Energy Metabolism Feeding...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Evidence for energy savings from aerial running in the Svalbard rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nonsensical result. Energy savings during aerial...attributed to elastic storage mechanisms [4...horizontal kinetic energy of the COM. Figure-3...and (d) stride frequency = 1.499 + 1...C. Prefaut 1994 Energy expenditure and cardiorespiratory responses at the transition...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-table 8b.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

> Table 8b > Table 8b Table 8b. Expenditures for Purchased Energy per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (constant 2000 dollars 1per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS2331111) 19983 20023 20063 Total4 58.8 78.1 71.4 Electricity 16.6 24.7 18.9 Natural Gas 13.5 20.8 25.1 Coal 10.2 12.4 12.4 Residual Fuel 0.6 0.0 0.9 Coke and Breeze 16.6 18.3 12.3 Notes:1. Deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

444

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Frequently Asked Questions about the Commercial Buildings Energy Frequently Asked Questions about the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) For the 2007 CBECS, why is there information only for large hospitals and not the rest of the commercial building population? What do you mean by "commercial"? Can I get this information by State (or county, or city, etc.)? What does the figure "4,859,000 total commercial buildings" represent? Are the consumption and expenditures estimates annual data? Are historical CBECS data available? Do you have any forecasts for growth in the commercial sector? Are the data available by NAICS or SIC code? Why are the CBECS figures different from the commercial data in the Annual Energy Review or the Monthly Energy Review? Is it possible to obtain a list of all the buildings that

445

Household vehicles energy consumption 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted during 1991 and early 1992. The 1991 RTECS represents 94.6 million households, of which 84.6 million own or have access to 151.2 million household motor vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

446

Analysis of influence of fuel price on individual activity-travel time expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fluctuation in fuel prices may lead to adaptations in people?s activity-travel behavior. Compared to other triggers of behavioral change, the impact of fuel prices has received only scant attention in the literature, especially with respect to short-run change in activity-travel behavior. To gain insight into this issue, travel diaries of a representative sample of individuals in the Netherlands who use the car for daily travel were analyzed. Seemingly unrelated regression analysis was used to examine the effects of fuel price on people?s travel time expenditures for different kinds of activities, differentiating between weekdays and weekends. The results indicate that fuel price is negatively correlated with travel time expenditures by car, and that this relationship differs between weekdays and weekends. When faced with increasing fuel prices, people seem to prefer reducing travel time expenditure by car for compulsory trips more than for leisure trips.

Dujuan Yang; Harry Timmermans

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51 - 24160 of 31,917 results. 51 - 24160 of 31,917 results. Page EA-1823: Rockford Solar, Rockford, Illinois This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide Federal funding to the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) under the State Energy Program (SEP). DCEO is seeking to provide $4 million of its SEP funds to Rockford Solar Partners LLC (RSP), who would use these funds for the design, permitting, and construction of a solar photovoltaic facility with a generating capacity of up to 20 megawatts (MW). DOE's Proposed Action would authorize $4,025,000 million in grant expenditures. The total cost of Rockford Solar Partner's proposed project would be approximately $127 million. http://energy.gov/nepa/ea-1823-rockford-solar-rockford-illinois

448

Sources of influence on capital expenditure decisions: a contextual study of accounting performance measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of a series of case studies of capital expenditure decision processes in divisionalized firms. The case studies were designed to explore the elements of broadly defined control systems operating on divisional management participants in these decisions. Twenty-one interviews were conducted with central and divisional management. The findings provide an insight into the incidence of functional capital expenditure decisions, and the contextual influences on divisional management. In particular they illustrate the role of managerial service histories, corporate familiarity with divisional operations, strategic planning and multiple performance measures within the organizational control system.

Anne M. Lillis

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Maintenance and repair expenditures: determinants and tradeoffs with new capital goods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditionally economic analysis has focused on new capital investment, while ignoring expenditures to maintain or repair existing stock. Recent, broader theories of replacement have emphasized the important role played by both maintenance and utilization rates. However, the decision to extend the service life of capital has been given scant empirical attention, owing partly to a lack of appropriate data. This study exploits survey data that report annual maintenance/repair expenditures for Canadian manufacturing industries. A standard production framework, modified to incorporate endogenous depreciation, guides the econometric analysis. The empirical results indicate that the cost of capital, among other variables, has a statistically significant effect on maintenance/repair decisions.

J.K. Mullen; Martin Williams

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2007 and 2009 Do-It-Yourself Home Improvements, by Project ($2010) Total Mean Total Mean Projects Expenditures Expenditures Projects Expenditures Expenditures Repair/Improvement (thousand) ($million) ($) (thousand) ($million) ($) Room Additions, Alterations, and Remodelings Kitchen Bathroom Bedroom Other Systems and Equipment Plumbing (Pipes and Fixtures) Electrical System HVAC Appliance/Major Equipment Exterior Additions and Replacements Roof Siding Windows/Doors Interior Additions and Replacements Insulation Flooring/Paneling/Ceiling Other Interior Disaster Repair Other Additions and Replacements (1) Total Note(s): Source(s): 1) Other additions and replacements include porches, carports, swimming pools and other major improvements or repairs to lot or yard. Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, The Remodeling market in Transition, 2009, Table A.2, p. 30 for 2007; Joint Center for Housing

451

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 2007 and 2009 Professional Home Improvements, by Project ($2010) Total Mean Total Mean Projects Expenditures Expenditures Projects Expenditures Expenditures Repair/Improvement (thousand) ($million) ($) (thousand) ($million) ($) Room Additions, Alterations, and Remodelings Kitchen Bathroom Bedroom Other Systems and Equipment Plumbing (Pipes and Fixtures) Electrical System HVAC Appliance/Major Equipment Exterior Additions and Replacements Roof Siding Windows/Doors Interior Additions and Replacements Insulation Flooring/Paneling/Ceiling Other Interior Disaster Repair Other Additions and Replacements (1) Total Note(s): Source(s): 1) Other additions and replacements include porches, carports, swimming pools and other major improvements or repairs to lot or yard. Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, The Remodeling Market in Transition, 2009, Table A.2, p. 30 for 2007; Joint Center for Housing

452

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locatingdominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater[186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locatingtotal dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

454

A trade-off between current and future sex allocation revealed by maternal energy budget in a small mammal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...offspring exploiting more maternal energy in the uterus. In fact, there...producing male offspring increases energy expenditure of mothers, what...limits for female's maximum sustainable level of energy intake? Current understanding...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction Accomplishments and Opportunities During the 11th Five Year Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as the US Residential Energy Consumption Survey (U.S.after the US Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) ortheir energy consumption and expenditures (U.S. EIA, 2008a).

Levine, Mark D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Do households smooth expenditure over anticipated income changes? Evidence from bonus payments to public employees in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new evidence of consumers reaction to an anticipated sizable change in income. Until FY2002, Japanese public employees received predictable large bonus payments three times a fiscal year (in June, December, and March), but the March bonus was abolished in FY2003. We compare the seasonal patterns of public employees expenditure before and after the reform of the bonus payment schedule. Contrary to the prediction of the life cycle/permanent income hypothesis (LC/PIH), we find evidence that monthly patterns of household expenditure were significantly affected by the anticipated large change in income pattern. However, at closer inspection, this excess sensitivity of expenditure is observed only for expenditure subcategories of some durability, i.e., durables and semi-durables. Thus, while the LC/PIH does not appear to hold for expenditure (which we observe here), it may still hold for consumption.

Masahiro Hori; Satoshi Shimizutani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

try. Calcium carbide and phosphorous intensities declined,total energy use Yellow phosphorous, total energy use W o ototal energy use Yellow phosphorous, total energy use Wood

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? Background and Overview Did You Know? In the CBECS, commercial refers to any structure that is neither residential, manufacturing/ industrial, nor agricultural. Building refers to a structure that is totally enclosed by walls that extend from the foundation to the roof. Data collection for the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) will begin in April 2013, collecting data for reference year 2012. The goal of the CBECS is to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The 2003 CBECS estimated that there were 4.9 million commercial buildings in the US. Because it would be completely impractical and prohibitively

459

COMMON EXPENDITURE TYPES USED FOR PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT "ET" Description Notes "ET" Description Notes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMON EXPENDITURE TYPES USED FOR PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT "ET" Description Notes "ET" Description CAPITAL EXP SU OWNED ($5K AND GREATER) Useful Life 55136 SPEC PURPOSE DATA HOLDING (Note 3) lab eqpt POSTAGE AND SHIPPING 52077 SU PROCEEDS DISP CAP EQUIP (SALE) N/A 55310 POSTAGE stamps, fedex, etc CAPITAL

Straight, Aaron

460

Do Campaign Contributions and Lobbying Expenditures by Firms Create Political Capital?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the relation between a firms campaign contributions and lobbying expenditures and its Tobins q. We follow other studies that use q...to measure the value of the firms intangible capital (e.g., the v...

Philip Hersch; Jeffry M. Netter; Christopher Pope

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Gambling with the house money in capital expenditure decisions: An experimental analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper extends the work of Thaler and Johnson (Management Science, 1990, 36, no. 6, 643660) on prior gains and losses in a business context. In support of their results, the current experimental analysis on capital expenditure decisions finds that prior gains shift behaviour towards risk seeking. The results do not, however, offer evidence of prior losses shifting behaviour towards risk aversion.

Kevin Keasey; Philip Moon

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The association between research and development expenditure and firm performance: testing a life cycle hypothesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although prior studies provide evidence that investment in research and development (R&D) expenditure enhances a firm's performance, very little evidence is available on the impact of a firm's life cycle stages on the association between R&D expenditures and firm performance. We classify firms into three-life cycle stages, namely, growth, mature and stagnant, and choose four-life cycle classification variables which are dividends, sales growth, capital expenditure and firm age. Using 769-firm-year observations over a period of 11-years in Australia, we find that the abnormal returns to unexpected expensed R&D amounts are significantly negative. Further, our results suggest that market reaction to expensed R&D is more negatively pronounced during the stagnant phase of a firm's life cycle, suggesting that the market perceives that firms have limited prospects to derive benefits arising out of expensed R&D expenditures. The results suggest that the relationship between performance and investment in R&D is not linear but is moderated by a firm's life cycle which should be taken into account when making policy that is based on stock-based performance.

Kamran Ahmed; Mohammed Jinan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in order to bring the price of oil closer to its marginal social cost. There is in fact a long historyUS military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles Mark A. Delucchi l e i n f o Article history: Received 7 May 2007 Accepted 3 March 2008 Available online 21 April

Murphy, James J.

464

Solar-hydrogen energy system for Pakistan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solar-hydrogen energy system has been proposed for Pakistan as the best replacement for the present fossil fuel based energy system. It has been suggested to produce hydrogen via photovoltaic-electrolysis, utilizing the available non-agricultural sunny terrain in Baluchistan region. There will be a desalination plant for sea water desalination. The area under the photovoltaic panels with the availability of water would provide suitable environment for growing some cash crops. This would change the cast useless desert land into green productive farms. In order to show the quantitative benefits of the proposed system, future trends of important energy and economical parameters have been studied with and without hydrogen introduction. The following parameters have been included: population, energy demand (fossil + hydrogen), energy production (fossil + hydrogen), gross national product, fossil energy imports, world energy prices, air pollution, quality of life, environmental savings due to hydrogen introduction, savings due to the higher utilization efficiency of hydrogen, by-product credit, agricultural income, income from hydrogen sale, photovoltaic cell area, total land area, water desalination plant capacity, capital investment, operating and maintenance cost, and total income from the system. The results indicate that adopting the solar-hydrogen energy system would eliminate the import dependency of fossil fuels, increase gross product per capita, reduce pollution, improve quality of life and establish a permanent and clean energy system. The total annual expenditure on the proposed system is less than the total income from the proposed system. The availability of water, the cash crop production, electricity and hydrogen would result in rapid development of Baluchistan, the largest province of Pakistan.

Lutfi, N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 21.01.03.A1.01 Expenditure of Funds Page 1 of 1 Texas AgriLife Research Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 21.01.03.A1.01 Expenditure of Funds Page 1 of 1 Texas AgriLife Research Procedures 21.01.03.A1.01 EXPENDITURE OF FUNDS Approved: May 11, 2012 Next Scheduled Review: May 11, 2014 PROCEDURE STATEMENT This procedure establishes the guidelines for expenditure of Texas Agri

466

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Nonresidential Window Stock and Sales, by Glass Type Existing U.S. Stock Vision Area of New Windows (Million Square Feet) Type (% of buildings) 1995 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 Single Pane 56 57 48 56 60 48 Insulating Glass (1) 294 415 373 407 476 389 Total 350 472 421 463 536 437 Clear 36% 49% 43% 44% 38% 33% Tinted 40% 24% 17% 15% 11% 10% Reflective 7% 8% 6% 4% 3% 3% Low-e 17% 19% 34% 37% 48% 54% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): (2) 1) Includes double- and triple-pane sealed units and stock glazing with storm windows. 2) Included as part of the Tinted category. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, June 2006, Table B1 for stock data; AAMA/NWWDA, 1996 Study of the U.S. Market for Windows and Doors, Table 27, p. 60 for 1995 usage values; 2003 AAMA/WDMA Study of the U.S. Market

467

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

3.1 RESEARCH EXPENDITURES AND FUNDING ECE Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Criteria Metric under ESD Stress Conditions Analog Devices $600,000.00 Design, Characterization-organizing Control and Scalable Game-theoretical Dispatch of Distributed Generations for High- Penetration Smart Grids NSF $165,831.00 Foundations for Engineering Education for Distributed Energy Resources (FEEDER) US

Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

469

Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's Opportunity for Energy Savings Through Improved Management of Facility Lighting"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) highlighted the importance of reducing the Nation's dependence on foreign oil and conserving scarce energy resources. The Department of Energy, as the designated lead agency for promoting new technologies, providing leadership for energy conservation and helping Federal agencies reduce energy costs, plays a pivotal role in achieving the Recovery Act's energy related goals. The Department spends nearly $300 million per year in energy costs for its 9,000 buildings at 24 sites. Electricity costs, totaling $190 million, account for close to two-thirds of the Department's total energy expenditures, with roughly 40 percent or $76 million of those costs attributable to the cost of lighting. New lighting technologies and advanced lighting systems offer the Department the opportunity to significantly reduce energy consumption; decrease operating costs at its sites throughout the country; and, demonstrate the benefits of using new lighting technologies that are currently being developed in its laboratories and by other sources. Because of its energy conservation leadership role, we initiated this audit to determine whether the Department's facilities had implemented lighting conservation measures.

None

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

471

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

472

Monthly energy review, August 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two brief articles are presented: measuring dependence on imported oil; and preliminary estimates of household energy consumption and expenditures in 1993. Then statistical tables are presented: energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. Appendices present thermal conversion factors, metric and other physical conversion factors, CO{sub 2} emission factors for coal, and listing of previous articles. A glossary is also included.

NONE

1995-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

473

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 4. Expenditures for Purchased Energy 1998, 2002, and 2006 (million constant 2000 U.S. dollars 1 ) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 2 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 3 5,601 6,241 5,806 Electricity 1,580 1,971 1,537 Natural Gas 1,287 1,659 2,037 Coal 971 994 1,010 Residual Fuel 60 3 75 Coke and Breeze 1,584 1,462 999 Notes: 1. Deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 3. 'Total' is the sum of all of the listed energy sources, including wood waste, hydrogen, and waste oils and tars.

474

Green Pricing Program Marketing Expenditures: Finding the Right Balance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In practice, it is difficult to determine the optimal amount to spend on marketing and administering a green pricing program. Budgets for marketing and administration of green pricing programs are a function of several factors: the region of the country; the size of the utility service area; the customer base and media markets encompassed within that service area; the point or stage in the lifespan of the program; and certainly, not least, the utility's commitment to and goals for the program. All of these factors vary significantly among programs. This report presents data on programs that have funded both marketing and program administration. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) gathers the data annually from utility green pricing program managers. Programs reporting data to NREL spent a median of 18.8% of program revenues on marketing their programs in 2008 and 16.6% in 2007. The smallest utilities (those with less than 25,000 in their eligible customer base) spent 49% of revenues on marketing, significantly more than the overall median. This report addresses the role of renewable energy credit (REC) marketers and start-up costs--and the role of marketing, generally, in achieving program objectives, including expansion of renewable energy.

Friedman, B.; Miller, M.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Audit Report: IG-0600 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Audit Report: IG-0600 May 23, 2003 Oversight Funds Provided to Local Governments in the State of Nevada Governments are entitled to exercise oversight of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Oversight funds provided by the Department may be used to review Yucca Mountain activities with the potential to affect local economies, public health and safety, and the environment. In Fiscal Years 2001 and 2002, ten local governments received a total of $12 million for oversight expenditures. The funds could also be used to request impact assistance; provide information to Nevada residents and the Secretary regarding activities of the Yucca Mountain Project; and, engage in any monitoring, testing, or evaluation of activities with respect to site characterization programs. Congress specifically prohibited the use of

476

Audit Report: IG-0600 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Audit Report: IG-0600 May 23, 2003 Oversight Funds Provided to Local Governments in the State of Nevada Governments are entitled to exercise oversight of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Oversight funds provided by the Department may be used to review Yucca Mountain activities with the potential to affect local economies, public health and safety, and the environment. In Fiscal Years 2001 and 2002, ten local governments received a total of $12 million for oversight expenditures. The funds could also be used to request impact assistance; provide information to Nevada residents and the Secretary regarding activities of the Yucca Mountain Project; and, engage in any monitoring, testing, or evaluation of activities with respect to site characterization programs. Congress specifically prohibited the use of

477

Potential use of geothermal energy sources for the production of lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lithium-ion battery is one of the most promising technologies for energy storage in many recent and emerging applications. However, the cost of lithium-ion batteries limits their penetration in the public market. Energy input is a significant cost driver for lithium batteries due to both the electrical and thermal energy required in the production process. The drying process requires 4557% of the energy consumption of the production process according to a model presented in this paper. The model is used as a base for quantifying the energy and temperatures at each step, as replacing electric energy with thermal energy is considered. In Iceland, it is possible to use geothermal steam as a thermal resource in the drying process. The most feasible type of dryer and heating method for lithium batteries would be a tray dryer (batch) using a conduction heating method under vacuum operation. Replacing conventional heat sources with heat from geothermal steam in Iceland, we can lower the energy cost to 0.008USD/Ah from 0.13USD/Ah based on average European energy prices. The energy expenditure after 15 years operation could be close to 2% of total expenditure using this renewable resource, down from 12 to 15% in other European countries. According to our profitability model, the internal rate of return of this project will increase from 11% to 23% by replacing the energy source. The impact on carbon emissions amounts to 393.4215.1g/Ah lower releases of CO2 per year, which is only 25% of carbon emissions related to battery production using traditional energy sources.

Gudrun Saevarsdottir; Pai-chun Tao; Hlynur Stefansson; William Harvey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSIONCOMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commission$ gy 0% rate loans and technical assistance grants · $3M: California Workforce Investment Board· $3M: California Workforce Investment Board Competitive grants for community-based and workforce requests for planning projects and energy expenditure plans #12;CHAPTER 2: LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY AWARD

479

Energy Production Over the Years | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

an energy source Total Energy Produced Coal Crude Oil Natural Gas Total Renewable Energy Non-Biofuel Renewable Energy Biofuels Nuclear Power Source: EIA State Energy Data Systems...

480

Data:Df0db423-af24-49ec-9719-7449c2818b91 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

db423-af24-49ec-9719-7449c2818b91 db423-af24-49ec-9719-7449c2818b91 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Hastings, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Street Light Rates Sector: Lighting Description: (B + or - C + D)/(A = 12 x N) where, A = Monthly charge expressed as $ per month. This charge shall be reviewed for reasonableness and appropriate cost recovery annually and shall apply to bills rendered for the 12 months beginning each January 1. B = The total budget of the Street Lighting Department approved by City Council for the next fiscal year expressed as $. Such budget shall include all estimated expenditures for Operating Expenditures and Capital Improvements. Operating Expenditures shall include: Operation and Maintenance, Delivered Power Cost, Outside Services, and Administrative Charges.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

The Bioenergetic Description of Light Energy Migration in Photoactive Membranes; Equivalence between the Theory of the Energy Fluxes and the Theory of the Proportion of Pigments Forms to Total Pigments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy exchanges between pigments in biological membranes irradiated with light can be described in a number of ... , is equivalent to the theory of the energy exchange fluxes developed by Strasser (1978). .....

C. Sironval; R. Strasser; M. Brouers

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

CX-009574: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

74: Categorical Exclusion Determination 74: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009574: Categorical Exclusion Determination City of Las Vegas, Nevada Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 12/19/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. DOE is proposing to provide federal funding to the City of Las Vegas, Nevada under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. DOE is proposing to authorize the expenditure of federal funds for the installation of five new solar canopy structures totaling 527 kilowatts of solar photovoltaic capacity. CX-009574.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-009546: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002858: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001013

483

EA-1823: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1823: Final Environmental Assessment Rockford Solar Energy Project, Chicago-Rockford Airport, Winnebago County, Illinois This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide Federal funding to the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) under the State Energy Program (SEP). DCEO is seeking to provide $4 million of its SEP funds to Rockford Solar Partners LLC (RSP), who would use these funds for the design, permitting, and construction of a solar photovoltaic facility with a generating capacity of up to 20 megawatts (MW). DOE's Proposed Action would authorize $4,025,000 million in grant expenditures. The total cost of Rockford Solar Partner's proposed project would be approximately $127 million.

484

The efficiency of internal capital markets: Evidence from the Annual Capital Expenditure Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Does firm diversity result in an efficient or inefficient allocation of capital? Are diversified firms value creating or value destroying? We apply a panel data model to examine the relationship between firm diversity and firm value using both COMPUSTAT and the Annual Capital Expenditure Survey (ACES) data. Our main empirical result confirms that firm diversity is negatively related to the efficiency of investment (firm value), which is consistent with the majority findings of recent studies. However, once we distinguish between capital expenditure for structures and equipment, we find that while firms do inefficiently allocate capital for equipment, they efficiently allocate capital for structures. These results suggest that when the decision has long-lasting repercussions, headquarters will, more often than not, make the correct choice.

Sumit Agarwal; I-Ming Chiu; Victor Souphom; Guy M. Yamashiro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Creatine phosphate as energy source in the cerulein-stimulated rat pancreas study by31P nuclear magnetic resonance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stimulation of the rat exocrine pancreas by cerulein induces a variety of cellular processes, some of which require the expenditure of energy. In this study, changes in the amounts of various energy metabolite...

S. Aired; Y. Creach; C. Palevody; J. Esclassan

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6A. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 6A. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars) Electricity Expenditures (dollars) per kWh per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 16,907 15,677 31,849 18,350 0.10 0.07 0.07 0.10 1.22 0.88 1.22 1.46 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,685 2,415 4,257 2,190 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.63 1.39 1.77 1.69 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 1,364 1,347 3,064 2,424 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.21 0.86 1.16 1.84 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 2,126 2,539 4,651 2,856 0.10 0.08 0.08 0.10 1.02 0.77 0.98 1.22

487

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6A. Natural Gas Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 6A. Natural Gas Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Expenditures (million dollars) Natural Gas Expenditures (dollars) per Thousand Cubic Feet per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 3,883 5,215 4,356 2,557 8.66 7.16 8.53 7.31 0.38 0.37 0.29 0.29 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 489 788 632 318 9.87 8.58 9.30 7.95 0.89 0.73 0.69 0.51 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 358 485 632 356 9.16 7.67 9.14 7.69 0.54 0.46 0.44 0.44 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 576 1,060 760 500 9.85 7.97 9.40 7.10 0.45 0.40 0.33 0.32

488

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S RENSEN a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for total re verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation generally is less energy e cient than

Skogestad, Sigurd