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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Annual Electricity Generation (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration...

2

Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent Conditioned Floorspace","Total","Present","Not Present","Factors" " "," " "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1.3,0.9 "ALL SQUARE FEET CATEGORIES" "Approximate Conditioned Floorspace"

3

Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"

4

Table A15. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.3,1,1,0.9,1.2,1.2

5

Table 8.2a Electricity Net Generation: Total (All Sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage 5: Renewable Energy: Other 10: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2: Natural Gas 3: Other Gases 4: Total: Conventional Hydroelectric Power ...

6

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

7

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

8

Table 8.2a Electricity Net Generation: Total (All Sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. ... 10 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, ...

9

Table 7.2a Electricity Net Generation: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Woodg Wasteh PVi Wind ... 2007 Total..... 2,016,456 65,739 896,590 13,453 806,425 -6,896 247,510 39,014 16,525 14,637 612 34,450 4,156,745

10

OpenEI - Electricity Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Generation (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/878 Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA).

License
Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of

11

Electricity Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Generation world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_generation_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 46.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote

12

Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

13

Biomass for Electricity Generation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

Zia Haq

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Electrical generating plant availability  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of actions that can improve availability, including the following: the meaning of power plant availability; The organization of the electric power industry; some general considerations of availability; the improvement of power plant availability--design factors, control of shipping and construction, maintenance, operating practices; sources of statistics on generating plant availability; effects of reducing forced outage rates; and comments by electric utilities on generating unit availability.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Category:Electricity Generating Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Electricity Generating Technologies Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B...

16

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 9  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 9. Biomass-Fired Electricity Generation ...

17

Winning in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Should you be a buyer or a seller of generation? In general, spot buyers should do very well, while many generation owners will be fortunate to recover their stranded costs. Successful generators will capitalize on superior operating performance and market knowledge. The smartest natural gas strategy in the early 1980`s was to short natural gas. Will this lesson of restructuring be written again of the electricity generation business of the late 1990`s? The authors will examine whether and how winners might emerge in the generation business of the future. The U.S. electric generation market, already marked by intense competition for new capacity and industrial demand, will become even more competitive as it makes the transition from regulated local monopoly to marketbased commodity pricing. At risk is up to $150 billion of shareholder equity and the future viability of half of the country`s investor-owned utilities. The winners in year 2005 will be those who early on developed strategies that simultaneously recovered existing generation investments while restructuring their asset portfolios and repositioning their plants to compete in the new market. Losers will have spent the time mired in indecision, their strategies ultimately forced upon them by regulators or competitors.

Hashimoto, L. [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jansen, P. [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Geyn, G. van [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)] [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

19

PRODCOST: an electric utility generation simulation code  

SciTech Connect

The PRODCOST computer code simulates the operation of an electric utility generation system. Through a probabilistic simulation the expected energy production, fuel consumption, and cost of operation for each plant are determined. Total system fuel consumption, energy generation by type, total generation costs, as well as system loss of load probability and expected unserved energy are also calculated.

Hudson, II, C. R.; Reynolds, T. M.; Smolen, G. R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Electrical pulse generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for generating high-voltage, wide dynamic range, shaped electrical pulses in the nanosecond range. Two transmission lines are coupled together by resistive elements distributed along the length of the lines. The conductance of each coupling resistive element as a function of its position along the line is selected to produce the desired pulse shape in the output line when an easily produced pulse, such as a step function pulse, is applied to the input line.

Norris, Neil J. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008,...

22

Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA).
...

23

Generation of electrical power  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat-to-electricity converter is disclosed which includes a radioactive heat source and a thermoelectric element of relatively short overall length capable of delivering a low voltage of the order of a few tenths of a volt. Such a thermoelectric element operates at a higher efficiency than longer higher-voltage elements; for example, elements producing 6 volts. In the generation of required power, thermoelectric element drives a solid-state converter which is controlled by input current rather than input voltage and operates efficiently for a high signal-plus-noise to signal ratio of current. The solid-state converter has the voltage gain necessary to deliver the required voltage at the low input of the thermoelectric element.

Hursen, Thomas F. (Monroeville, PA); Kolenik, Steven A. (Leechburg, PA); Purdy, David L. (Indiana, PA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Annual Renewable Electricity Net Generation by Country (1980...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net Generation by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual renewable electricity net generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu)....

25

EERE: Renewable Electricity Generation - Geothermal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Renewable Energy Search Search Search Help | A-Z Subject Index EERE Geothermal Renewable Electricity Generation EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all...

26

EERE: Renewable Electricity Generation - Solar  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Renewable Electricity Generation EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all of the above" energy strategy, leading a large network of researchers and other partners to...

27

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 3. Biomass Resources by Price: Quantities ...

29

Method for protecting an electric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for protecting an electrical generator which includes providing an electrical generator which is normally synchronously operated with an electrical power grid; providing a synchronizing signal from the electrical generator; establishing a reference signal; and electrically isolating the electrical generator from the electrical power grid if the synchronizing signal is not in phase with the reference signal.

Kuehnle, Barry W. (Ammon, ID); Roberts, Jeffrey B. (Ammon, ID); Folkers, Ralph W. (Ammon, ID)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

30

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation,...

31

THERMO-ELECTRIC GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The conversion of heat energy into electrical energy by a small compact device is descrtbed. Where the heat energy is supplied by a radioactive material and thermopIIes convert the heat to electrical energy. The particular battery construction includes two insulating discs with conductive rods disposed between them to form a circular cage. In the center of the cage is disposed a cup in which the sealed radioactive source is located. Each thermopile is formed by connecting wires from two adjacent rods to a potnt on an annular ring fastened to the outside of the cup, the ring having insulation on its surface to prevent electrica1 contact with the thermopiles. One advantage of this battery construction is that the radioactive source may be inserted after the device is fabricated, reducing the radiation hazard to personnel assembling the battery.

Jordan, K.C.

1958-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fossil fuels in Canada account for 27 percent of the electricity generated. The combustion of these fuels is a major source of emissions which affect air quality and climate change. The Government...

33

Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills  

SciTech Connect

At present, the total installed electricity generating capacity of Thailand is 7500 MW. Because this level of investment will take an unacceptable large part of total foreign borrowing, the government plans to encourage participation of the private sector in electricity generation. Among the various technology options for power production, cogeneration appears to be the most promising technology due to its very high effectiveness of fuel utilization. Therefore, in the first phase of private power generation, the Thai government is encouraging cogeneration systems. This paper discusses sugar mills, where expertise and equipment for electricity generation already exist, appear to be in a particularly advantageous position to participate in the private power generation program. At present, there are 46 sugar mills in Thailand with a total capacity of 338,000 tons of cane per day. The fiber part delivered from the milling of sugarcane, bagasse, is normally used to produce steam for the process heat and electricity generation. The investment and operating costs for each of these alternatives have been evaluated. The internal rate of return is used to indicate the benefit of each alternative.

Therdyothin, A.; Bhattacharaya, S.C.; Chirarattananon, S. (Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Total energy cycle energy use and emissions of electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

A total energy cycle analysis (TECA) of electric vehicles (EV) was recently completed. The EV energy cycle includes production and transport of fuels used in power plants to generate electricity, electricity generation, EV operation, and vehicle and battery manufacture. This paper summarizes the key assumptions and results of the EVTECA. The total energy requirements of EVS me estimated to be 24-35% lower than those of the conventional, gasoline-fueled vehicles they replace, while the reductions in total oil use are even greater: 55-85%. Greenhouse gases (GHG) are 24-37% lower with EVs. EVs reduce total emissions of several criteria air pollutants (VOC, CO, and NO{sub x}) but increase total emissions of others (SO{sub x}, TSP, and lead) over the total energy cycle. Regional emissions are generally reduced with EVs, except possibly SO{sub x}. The limitations of the EVTECA are discussed, and its results are compared with those of other evaluations of EVs. In general, many of the results (particularly the oil use, GHG, VOC, CO, SO{sub x}, and lead results) of the analysis are consistent with those of other evaluations.

Singh, M. K.

1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) Electric generating or transmission facility: determination...

36

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the...

37

Renewable Electricity Generation | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Geothermal Read more Solar Read more Water Read more Wind Read more Our nation has abundant solar, water, wind,...

38

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" "...

39

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1991:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in...

40

Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1994:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Table A12. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical...

42

Motor generator electric automotive vehicle  

SciTech Connect

A motor generator electric automotive vehicle is described comprising in combination, a traction drive motor coupled by a first drive shaft to a differential of an axle of the vehicle, a main battery bank electrically connected by wires to a small electric motor driving a large D.C. generator having a second drive shaft therebetween, an on-off switch in series with one of the wires to the small motor, a speed control unit attached to an accelerator pedal of the vehicle being coupled with a double pole-double throw reverse switch to the traction drive motor, a charger regulator electrically connected to the generator, a bank of solar cells coupled to the charge regulator, an electric extension cord from the charge regulator having a plug on its end for selective connection to an exterior electric power source, a plurality of pulleys on the second drive shaft, a belt unit driven by the pulley, one the belt unit being connected to a present alternator of the vehicle which is coupled to a present battery and present regulator of the vehicle, and other of the units being connected to power brakes and equipment including power steering and an air conditioner.

Weldin, W.

1986-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",,,"Renewable Energy" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "Economic","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.1,1.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

44

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy",," " " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,0.8,1.1,1.3

45

Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

Coal-fired electric generators continue to dominate electric ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

More than 60% of electricity in the central region of the United States comes from coal-fired electric generators, down from 80% in the early part of ...

47

Definition: Electricity generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity generation Electricity generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electricity generation The process of producing electric energy or the amount of electric energy produced by transforming other forms of energy into electrical energy; commonly expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh) or megawatt-hours (MWh).[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electricity generation is the process of generating electrical power from other sources of primary energy. The fundamental principles of electricity generation were discovered during the 1820s and early 1830s by the British scientist Michael Faraday. His basic method is still used today: electricity is generated by the movement of a loop of wire, or disc of copper between the poles of a magnet. For electric utilities, it is the

48

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Electricity Generation By Electricity Generation Compare Activities by ... Electricity Generation Capability For commercial buildings as a whole, approximately 8 percent of buildings had the capability to generate electricity, and only 4 percent of buildings actually generated any electricity. Most all buildings generated electricity only for the purpose of emergency back-up. Inpatient health care and public order and safety buildings were much more likely to have the capability to generate electricity than other building types. Over half of all inpatient health care buildings and about one-third of public order and safety buildings actually used this capability. Electricity Generation Capability and Use by Building Type Top Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels

49

Electric Power Generation Expansion in Deregulated Markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The generation expansion problem involves increasing electric power generation capacity in an existing power network. In competitive environment, power producers, distributors, and consumers all make… (more)

KAYMAZ, PINAR

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility MunicipalPublic...

51

"Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" 6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

52

Definition: Electric generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generator generator Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electric generator A device for converting mechanical energy to electrical energy. Note: The EIA defines "electric generator" as a facility rather than as a device; per the EIA definition, examples include electric utilities and independent power producers.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In electricity generation, an electric generator is a device that converts mechanical energy to electrical energy. A generator forces electric current to flow through an external circuit. The source of mechanical energy may be a reciprocating or turbine steam engine, water falling through a turbine or waterwheel, an internal combustion engine, a wind turbine, a hand crank, compressed air, or any other source of

53

California Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) California Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

54

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

55

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

56

Table A39. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam" 9. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ," Electricity",," Steam" ,,,,,"RSE" ,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.3,2,1.6,1.2

57

Conditions on Electric Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of the Effects of Drought An Analysis of the Effects of Drought Conditions on Electric Power Generation in the Western United States April 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1365 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

58

Total Thermal Management System for Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles  

Total Thermal Management System for Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

59

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

60

Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel — the "Power Ring" — with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing – a radial gap “shear-force levitator” – that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, ... Energy sources and percent share of total electricity generation in 2012 were:

62

Water Use in Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water use is increasingly viewed as an important sustainability metric for electricity generation technologies. Most of the attention on the link between electricity generation and water use focuses on the water used in cooling thermoelectric power plants during operations. This is warranted given the size of these withdrawals; however, all electricity generation technologies, including those that do not rely on thermoelectric generation, use water throughout their life cycles. Each life cycle stage cont...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 97, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into Texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, Midwest reliability council and Northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB)

64

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

65

Curtailing Intermittent Generation in Electrical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy generation from intermittent renewable sources introduces additional variability into electrical systems, resulting in a higher cost of balancing against the increased variabilities. Ways to balance demand and supply for electricity include using ... Keywords: economic curtailment, energy storage operations, flexible generation, intermittent generation, operations management practice, wind power

Owen Q. Wu, Roman Kapuscinski

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Generation, distribution and utilization of electrical energy  

SciTech Connect

An up-to-date account of electric power generation and distribution (including coverage of the use of computers in various components of the power system). Describes conventional and unconventional methods of electricity generation and its economics, distribution methods, substation location, electric drives, high frequency power for induction and heating, illumination engineering, and electric traction. Each chapter contains illustrative worked problems, exercises (some with answers), and a bibliography.

Wadhwa, C.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Table A19. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,1.4,1.3,1.9,0.5 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

68

Table A26. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2.1,1.2,2,0.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

69

Permits for Electricity Generating Facilities (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All applicants for conditional permits for electricity generating facilities must provide opportunity for public participation and quantify expected air emissions from the proposed project.

70

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of the NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebook for Electricity Generation with information directing people to the Web site for more in-depth information.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

electric generation | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(TCDB) advanced vehicles electric generation NREL OpenEI renewables tcdb This new web application collects cost and performance estimates and makes it available to everyone...

72

Nuclear steam-generator transplant total rises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several utilities with pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are replacing leaking and corroded steam generators. Over half the PWRs face corrosion problems that will cost $50 million to $100 million per unit to correct. An alternative approach of installing new tube sleeves has only had one application. Corrosion prevention still eludes utilities, whose problems differ. Westinghouse units were the first to experience corrosion problems because they have almost all operated for a decade or more. Some advances in condenser and steam-generator technology should extend the component life of younger units, and some leaking PWR tubes can be plugged. Operating differences may explain why PWRs have operated for over 20 years on submarines using phosphate water chemistry, while the use of de-aerators in the secondary-systems of foreign PWRs may explain their better performance. Among the corrective steps recommended by Stone and Webster are tighter chemistry control, better plant layup practices, revamping secondary-system hardware, condensate polishing, and de-aerators. Research continues to find the long-term preventative. 2 tables. (DCK)

Smock, R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 96, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, midwest reliability council and northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electricity generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 400.2 KiB) Quality Metrics

74

"Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"...

75

Table A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy-Management Program, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,"RSE" "SIC",,,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.2,1.1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",12605,1209,3303,6386,1706,2.9

76

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

77

Renewable Electricity Generation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Geothermal Read more Solar Read more Water Read more Wind Read more Our nation has abundant solar, water, wind, and geothermal energy resources, and many U.S. companies are developing, manufacturing, and installing cutting-edge, high-tech renewable energy systems. The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative technologies that will make renewable electricity generation cost competitive with traditional sources of energy. Working with our national laboratories and through these partnerships, we are catalyzing the transformation of the nation's energy system and building on a tradition of U.S. leadership in science and

78

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants projected electricity

79

Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

Schmalensee, Richard

80

Generation Trends in the Electricity Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key questions concerning the interaction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and the electricity grid is how the upstream emissions and energy use of power plants used to charge PEVs compare with the lifecycle emissions and energy use of conventional vehicles. This Update provides a look at recent data on trends in power generation in the United States from 1990 to 2013, including capacity, generation, capacity factor, energy use, and heat rate—emissions rates will be analyzed in ...

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

How much U.S. energy consumption and electricity generation comes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In 2012, renewable sources of energy accounted for about 9% of total U.S. energy consumption and 12% of electricity generation. 1. Learn more:

82

CO2 Intensity in Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior to the launch of the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) in 2005, the electricity sector was widely proclaimed to have more low-cost emission abatement opportunities than other sectors. If this were true, effects of the EU ETS on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions would likely be visible in the electricity sector. Our study looks at the effect of the price of emission allowances (EUA) on CO2 emissions from Swedish electricity generation, using an econometric time series analysis for the period 2004–2008. We control for effects of other input prices and hydropower reservoir levels. Our results do not indicate any link between the price of EUA and the CO2 emissions of Swedish electricity production. A number of reasons may explain this result and we conclude that other determinants of fossil fuel use in Swedish electricity generation probably diminished the effects of the EU ETS.

Anna Widerberg; Markus Wråke; Anna Widerberg; Markus Wråke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT INSTRUCTIONS|Year: 2013 No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours| |PURPOSE|Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry.| |REQUIRED RESPONDENTS|Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT,

84

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 5,666 5,414 81 171 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3,494 3,491 Q 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3,213 3,211 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,382 1,319 64 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 336 325 Q * 3115 Dairy Products 38 36 1 1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 19 Q Q 14 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 342 238 Q 7 3121 Beverages 308 204 Q 7 3122 Tobacco 34

85

AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Capacity Generating Capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

86

Table A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy Management Program, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.3,1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",10743,1150,2819,5309,1464,2.6,,,"/WIR{D}~"

87

"Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

88

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and Transmission Facilities (Nebraska) Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and...

89

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? In 2012, the United States generated about 4,054 billion kilowatthours of electricity. About 68% ...

90

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility...

91

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and...

92

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet),...

93

Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of coal for electricity generation in the United States....

94

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Provides annual net electricity generation (thousand kilowatt-hours) from...

95

Pages that link to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies" Category:Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to:...

96

Changes related to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies" Category:Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to:...

97

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial...

98

Consumption of Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of natural gas for electricity generation in the...

99

On Low-Frequency Electric Power Generation With PZT Ceramics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piezoelectric materials have long been used as sensors and actuators, however their use as electrical generators is less established. A piezoelectric power generator has great potential for some remote applications such as in vivo sensors, embedded MEMS devices, and distributed networking. Such materials are capable of converting mechanical energy into electrical energy, but developing piezoelectric generators is challenging because of their poor source characteristics (high voltage, low current, high impedance) and relatively low power output. In the past these challenges have limited the development and application of piezoelectric generators, but the recent advent of extremely low power electrical and mechanical devices (e.g., MEMS) make such generators attractive. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of piezoelectric power generation that is verified with simulation and experimental results. Several important considerations in designing such generators are explored, including parameter identification, load matching, form factors, efficiency, longevity, energy conversion and energy storage. Finally, an application of this analysis is presented where electrical energy is generated inside a prototype Total Knee Replacement (TKR) implant.

Stephen R. Platt; et al.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

THE BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY The first time that electricity was generated from nuclear energy occurred in an experimental breeder reactor in Idaho in 1951. The idea for a breeder reactor (a reactor that could produce more fuel than it uses) first occurred to scientists working on the nation's wartime atomic energy program in the early 1940's. Experimental evidence indicated that the breeding of nuclear fuel was possible in a properly designed reactor, but time and resources were not then available to pursue the idea After the war, the newly established Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy) assigned some of the nation's nuclear skills and resources to developing peaceful uses of the atom. The large bodies of uranium ore found in the 1950's were

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Distributed Generation and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation and Generation and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector Ed Torrero Cooperative Research Network (CRN) National Rural Electric Cooperative Association September 22, 2004 Co-op Basics  Customer owned  Serve 35 million people in 47 states  75 percent of nation's area  2.3 million miles of line is close to half of nation's total  Growth rate twice that of IOU Electrics  Six customers per line-mile vs 33 for IOU  Co-ops view DP as a needed solution; not as a "problem" Broad Range of Technologies Chugach EA 1-MW Fuel Cell Installation Post Office in Anchorage, AK Chugach EA Microturbine Demo Unit at Alaska Village Electric Co-op CRN Transportable 200kW Fuel Cell at Delta- Montrose EA in Durango, CO Plug Power Fuel Cell at Fort Jackson, SC

102

"Table A17. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," 7. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.4,1.2

103

Unalaska geothermal exploration project. Electrical power generation analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the most cost-effective power cycle for utilizing the Makushin Volcano geothermal resource to generate electricity for the towns of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor. It is anticipated that the geothermal power plant would be intertied with a planned conventional power plant consisting of four 2.5 MW diesel-generators whose commercial operation is due to begin in 1987. Upon its completion in late 1988, the geothermal power plant would primarily fulfill base-load electrical power demand while the diesel-generators would provide peak-load electrical power and emergency power at times when the geothermal power plant would be partially or completely unavailable. This study compares the technical, environmental, and economic adequacy of five state-of-the-art geothermal power conversion processes. Options considered are single- and double-flash steam cycles, binary cycle, hybrid cycle, and total flow cycle.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

The rising cost of electricity generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades. (author)

Winters, Tobey

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

External Costs Associated to Electricity Generation Options in Brazil  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses external costs associated with electricity generation options in Brazil.

Jacomino, V.M.F.; Arrone, I.D.; Albo, J.; Grynberg, S.; Spadaro, J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

Table N13.2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998;" 2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy",," " " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1,0.8,1.5,0.9

108

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing distributed generation sources are more difficultfrom all electricity generation sources using a standarda co-located distributed generation source. It reads in text

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Table A52. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" 2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" " Categories and Presence of General Technologies and Cogeneration Technologies, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Employment Size(a)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" ,,,,,,,"1000 and","Row" "General/Cogeneration Technologies","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","Over","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2,2.1,1,0.7,0.7,0.9 "One or More General Technologies Present",14601,387,781,2054,2728,3189,5462,3.1 " Computer Control of Building Environment (b)",5079,64,116,510,802,1227,2361,5

110

Wind electric generator project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind generator is installed and connected at Iowa Western Community College. It is heating water through four hot water tanks and has proven to be an excellent demonstration project for the community. The college gets frequent inquiries about the wind mill and has been very cooperative in informing the public about the success. The windmill generates more electricity than is needed to heat four hot water heaters and future plans are to hook up more. The project requires very little maintenance. Attached is a date sheet on the project.

Not Available

1983-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

Compressed Air Storage for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Report focuses on the use of underground storage of natural gas as a means of leveling the load between supply and demand. The book presents a view of the way compressed air storage can reduce costs when constructing new facilities for generating peak load electricity. The primary emphasis given concerns underground storage of air in underground porous media, the vehicle utilized on a large scale for over 25 years by the natural gas industry.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Total energy cycle emissions and energy use of electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to provide estimates of changes in life cycle energy use and emissions that would occur with the introduction of EVs. The topics covered include a synopsis of the methodology used in the project, stages in the EV and conventional vehicle energy cycles, characterization of EVs by type and driving cycle, load analysis and capacity of the electric utility, analysis of the materials used for vehicle and battery, description of the total energy cycle analysis model, energy cycle primary energy resource consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, energy cycle emissions, and conclusions.

Singh, M.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Wave Pipe Generating Wave Pipe < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Generating Wave Pipe.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Able Technologies Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The EGWAP incorporates a specially designed environmentally sound hollow noncorroding pipe also known as a tube or container whose total height is from the ocean floor to above the highest wave peak The pipe is anchored securely beneath the ocean floor When the water level in the pipe rises due to wave action a float rises and a counterweight descends This action will empower a main drive gear and other gearings to turn a generator to produce electricity The mechanism also insures that either up or down movement of the float will turn the generator drive gear in the same direction Electrical output of the generator is fed into a transmission cable

115

Converting Site Electricity to Include Generation and Transmission...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Electricity Consumption in the Manufacturing Division The energy intensities presented in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation...

116

Fuel Use in Electricity Generation - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Use in Electricity Generation ... Cost of coal and natural gas delivered to electric power plants in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast, Jan 2007- April 2012 . 2

117

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate? ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

118

Rapid increases in electricity demand challenge both generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because supply and demand for electricity must balance in real-time, rapid changes in demand create operational challenges for the electric system and generating unit ...

119

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Generating Capacity by Fuel...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual...

120

Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 69 Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water May 26, 2010 - 12:11pm Addthis San Diego’s Otay Water Treatment Plant is generating clean electricity along with clean water, with a total capacity of 945 KW | Photo courtesy of SunEdison San Diego's Otay Water Treatment Plant is generating clean electricity along with clean water, with a total capacity of 945 KW | Photo courtesy of SunEdison Just north of the U.S.-Mexican border, San Diego's Otay Water Treatment Plant processes up to 34 million gallons of water a day. Thanks to the city's ambitious solar energy program, the facility may soon be able to do that with net zero electricity consumption. In early April, workers activated a 945-kW solar photovoltaic (PV) energy

122

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Gross System Electricity Production for 2001.CA. http://energy.ca.gov/electricity/gross_system_power.htmlCEC. 2002c. 1992-2001 Electricity Generation By Fuel Type.

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection All electric generating facilities operating in the state, with the

124

KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting (Kentucky) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting (Kentucky) KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Kentucky Public Service Commission No person shall commence to construct a merchant electric generating facility until that person has applied for and obtained a construction certificate for the facility from the Kentucky State Board on Electric Generation and Transmission. The construction certificate shall be valid

125

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water May 26, 2010 - 12:11pm Addthis San...

126

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region...

127

Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources varies ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

May 2, 2012 Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources varies by state. Wind accounted for most non-hydro renewable generation in 2011, but sources of ...

128

Electricity generation and environmental externalities: Case studies, September 1995  

SciTech Connect

Electricity constitutes a critical input in sustaining the Nation`s economic growth and development and the well-being of its inhabitants. However, there are byproducts of electricity production that have an undesirable effect on the environment. Most of these are emissions introduced by the combustion of fossil fuels, which accounts for nearly 70 percent of the total electricity generated in the United States. The environmental impacts (or damages) caused by these emissions are labeled environmental ``externalities.`` Included in the generic term ``externality`` are benefits or costs resulting as an unintended byproduct of an economic activity that accrue to someone other than the parties involved in the activity. This report provides an overview of the economic foundation of externalities, the Federal and State regulatory approaches, and case studies of the impacts of the externality policies adopted by three States.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of concern about such emissions has led to significant improvements in the polluting characteristics of electricity generation

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Recent mix of electric generating capacity additions more diverse ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: natural gas generation capacity electricity. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

131

2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AK","Natural Gas",6,244.7,210.5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TYPE_OF_PRODUCER","STATE_CODE","FUEL_SOURCE","GENERATORS","NAMEPLATE_CAPACITY TYPE_OF_PRODUCER","STATE_CODE","FUEL_SOURCE","GENERATORS","NAMEPLATE_CAPACITY (Megawatts)","SUMMER_CAPACITY (Megawatts)" 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AK","Natural Gas",6,244.7,210.5 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AK","Petroleum",4,4.8,4.8 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AK","Wind",1,24.6,24 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AK","All Sources",11,274.1,239.3 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AR","Coal",1,755,600 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AR","Natural Gas",1,22,20 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AR","All Sources",2,777,620

132

Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PWP-030 Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James;PWP-030 Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James Bushnell. Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James Bushnell and Steven Stoft

California at Berkeley. University of

133

Electrical Generating Capacities of Geothermal Slim Holes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations are presented to estimate the electrical generating capacity of the hot fluids discharged from individual geothermal wells using small wellhead generating equipment over a wide range of reservoir and operating conditions. The purpose is to appraise the possibility of employing slim holes (instead of conventional production-size wells) to power such generators for remote off-grid applications such as rural electrification in developing countries. Frequently, the generating capacity desired is less than one megawatt, and can be as low as 100 kilowatts; if slim holes can be usefully employed, overall project costs will be significantly reduced. This report presents the final results of the study. Both self-discharging wells and wells equipped with downhole pumps (either of the ''lineshaft'' or the ''submersible'' type) are examined. Several power plant designs are considered, including conventional single-flash backpressure and condensing steam turbines, binary plants, double-flash steam plants, and steam turbine/binary hybrid designs. Well inside diameters from 75 mm to 300 mm are considered; well depths vary from 300 to 1200 meters. Reservoir temperatures from 100 C to 240 C are examined, as are a variety of reservoir pressures and CO2 contents and well productivity index values.

Pritchett, J.W.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

"Table A27. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.6,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",6962,6754,90,118,11.2

136

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Electricity Generation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation Electricity Generation Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Electricity Generation U.S. electricity consumption—including both purchases from electric power producers and on-site generation—increases steadily in the AEO2008 reference case, at an average rate of 1.3 percent per year. In comparison, electricity consumption grew by annual rates of 4.2 percent, 2.6 percent, and 2.3 percent in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, respectively. The growth rate in the AEO2008 projection is lower than in the AEO2007 reference case (1.5 percent per year), and it leads to lower projections of electricity generation. Figure 4. Electricity generation by fuel, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

137

MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Current Electric Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Current Electric Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Current Electric Generator will create electricity in three different processes simultaniously by harnessing the motion of water current to rotate the generator Two forms of magnetic induction and solar cells on the outer housing will produce electricity very efficiently The generators will be wired up together in large fields on open waterways sumerged from harm The electricity will be sent back to mainland via an underwater wire for consumption The Current Electric Generator is designed with the environment in mind and will primarilly be constructed from recycled materials cutting emmisions cost

138

Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage 5: Renewable Energy: Other 10: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2: Natural Gas 3: Other Gases 4: Total: Conventional Hydroelectric Power ...

139

Table 8.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage 5: Renewable Energy: Other 10: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2: Natural Gas 3: Other Gases 4: Total: Conventional Hydroelectric Power ...

140

Vogtle Electric Generating Plant ETE Analysis Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL)-Albuquerque reviewed the evacuation time estimate (ETE) analysis dated April 2006 prepared by IEM for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP). The ETE analysis was reviewed for consistency with federal regulations using the NRC guidelines in Review Standard (RS)-002, Supplement 2 and Appendix 4 to NUREG-0654, and NUREG/CR-4831. Additional sources of information referenced in the analysis and used in the review included NUREG/CR-6863 and NUREG/CR-6864. The PNNL report includes general comments, data needs or clarifications, and requests for additional information (RAI) resulting from review of the ETE analysis.

Diediker, Nona H.; Jones, Joe A.

2006-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Automation and Optimization for Electrical Design of Hydro Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the author presents a software platform to conceptually design hydraulic generator, a typical complex manufacture.Applying this platform, the generator’s electrical design can be performed interactively through a friendly human-machine ...

Zhu Dianhua; Guo Wei; Ma Ruimin

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

International Coal Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria 45.70 52.67 64.47 81.28 87.52 92.75 96.24 122.10 120.10 Belgium 37.72 34.48 35.94 72.46 80.35 63.24 75.54 130.54 NA Canada 18.52 19.17 21.03 20.32 24.50 26.29 NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 31.29 31.43 31.18 47.75 57.70 54.68 70.17 118.49 NA Czech Republic3 8.05 8.52 C C C C C C C Denmark NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Finland 46.66 44.02 48.28 67.00 72.06 74.27 83.72 142.90 NA France 45.28 42.89 42.45 63.55 74.90 72.90 83.90 136.10 NA Germany 51.86 45.70 50.02 70.00 79.74 77.95 90.26 152.60 NA

143

Integration of decentralized generators with the electric power grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report develops a new methodology for studying the economic interaction of customer-owned electrical generators with the central electric power grid. The purpose of the report is to study the reciprocal effects of the ...

Finger, Susan

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

145

Exotic Electricity Options and the Valuation of Electricity Generation and Transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exotic Electricity Options and the Valuation of Electricity Generation and Transmission Assets a methodology for valuing electricity deriva- tives by constructing replicating portfolios from electricity-storable nature of electricity, which rules out the traditional spot mar- ket, storage-based method of valuing

146

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Conventional Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Pumped Storage Other Total Source(s): EIA, Electric Power Annual 2010,...

147

Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality After a proposed power plant has received approval from the State Corporation Commission (SCC) and location approval from the local government, it must apply for all applicable permits from the Virginia

148

Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Focus Area: Water power Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-renewable-energy-electricity-generatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-electricity-generati Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This video teaches the viewer about the current status and future

149

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal, People and Policy Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy11osti/49476.pdf Cost: Free References: Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation[1] Overview This guidebook is a short discussion on how to create policy that overcomes challenges to geothermal implementation. The document follows a five step

150

Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating capacity, 1949-2040 (index, 1949 = 1.0) Subject: Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Author

151

Figure 15. Renewable electricity generation in three cases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 15. Renewable electricity generation in three cases, 2005-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Extended Policies No Sunset ...

152

Figure 17. Electricity generation from natural gas in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 17. Electricity generation from natural gas in three cases, 2005-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Extended Policies No Sunset

153

Electrical motor/generator drive apparatus and method - Energy ...  

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple currents and ...

154

High Strength Undiffused Brushless Electric Motors and Generators  

A brushless electric motor/generator with enhanced air-gap flux density and simplified field weakening. Inventor HSU, JOHN S Engineering Science & Technology Div

155

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

156

NREL: Energy Analysis - Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Over the last 30 years, researchers have conducted hundreds of life cycle assessments of...

157

Most electric generating capacity additions in the last decade ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report, and Form EIA-860M (see Table ES3 in the March 2011 ...

158

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of...

159

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council Northwest Power Pool Area This...

160

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Jersey" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Illinois" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

162

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

163

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Texas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

164

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Washington" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

165

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Montana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,199...

166

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Maine" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

167

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "South Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,199...

168

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Kansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999...

169

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "West Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

170

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Louisiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1...

171

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Hampshire" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

172

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

173

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is from renewable energy? EIA estimates that about 10% of world marketed energy consumption is from ...

174

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Electricity generation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Electricity generation by fuel, 1970-2025 (billion kilowatthours). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy...

175

Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, including combined heat and power, 2012-2040 (gigawatts) Coal

176

ELECTRICAL MOTOR/GENERATOR DRIVE APPARATUS AND METHOD - Energy ...  

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple ...

177

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Ohio Power Siting Board Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be used to assess the environmental effects of the proposed facility. An applicant for a certificate to site a wind-powered electric generation

178

Power Plant Electrical Reference Series, Volume 1: Electric Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive and practical guide to electric power apparatus and electrical phenomena provides an up-to-date source book for power plant managers, engineers, and operating personnel. Aiding in the recognition and prevention of potential problems, the 16-volume guide can help utilities save staff time and reduce operating expenses.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Wind Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% Provider Office of the State Tax Commissioner Electrical generating facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes in North Dakota. The exemption is granted for the purchase of building materials, production equipment, and any other tangible personal property that is used for constructing or expanding the facility. In order to qualify, the facility must have at least one electrical generation unity

180

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption.
2011-07-25T20:15:39Z...

182

A rotating suspended liquid film as an electric generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed that a rotating liquid film generates electricity when a large external electric field is applied in the plane of the film. In our experiment suspended liquid film (soap film) is formed on a circular frame positioned horizontally on a rotating motor. This devise is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply external electric field in X-direction.The produced electric energy is piked up by two brushes in Y-direction of the suspended liquid film. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this letter we report that the same system can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to an electric energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed in very small scales like micro scales applicable in lab on a chip. The device is comparable to commercial DC electric motors or DC electric generators. but there is a significant difference in their working principle; in a DC electric motor or generator the Lorence force is the driving force, while in an LFEG the Coulomb force is the deriving force. So in despite to usual electric generators, this generator does not use a magnetic field and is purely electrical, which brings a similarity to bio mechanisms. We have investigated the characteristics of such a generator experimentally. This investigation sheds light on the physics of Electrohydrodynamics on liquid films.

Ahmad Amjadi; Sadegh Feiz; Reza Montazeri Namin

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Kansas Corporation Commission This legislation permits the KCC to determine rate-making principles that will apply to a utility's investment in generation or transmission before constructing a facility or entering into a contract for purchasing power. There is no restriction on the type or the size of electric generating unit

184

Global Potential for Wind-Generated Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... free, non-urban areas and operating at as little as 20% of their rated capacity, could supply >40 times current worldwide consumption of electricity ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

185

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," "," "," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","Pulping","Wood Chips,","And Waste","Row"

186

"Table A38. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas" 8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,," Electricity",," Steam" ,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

187

Axial Current Generation from Electric Field: Chiral Electric Separation Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the Chiral Electric Separation Effect (CESE). On very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to $\\mu_V\\mu_A$ with $\\mu_V$ and $\\mu_A$ the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable of CESE in heavy-ion collisions is also discussed.

Xu-Guang Huang; Jinfeng Liao

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

THE EFFICIENCY OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION IN THE US AFTER RESTRUCTURING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

segments of the electricity industry, such as transmission and distribution, which are likely to remainTHE EFFICIENCY OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION IN THE US AFTER RESTRUCTURING Catherine Wolfram· UC Berkeley, NBER and UCEI June 2003 · Prepared for the 2003 Electricity Deregulation Conference at Bush

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

189

Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO Xinmin Hu Daniel Ralph to model markets for delivery of electrical power on looped transmission networks. It analyzes in transmission capacity mean the ISO potentially sets a different electricity price at each node of the trans

Ferris, Michael C.

190

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and Transmission Facilities (Nebraska) Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and Transmission Facilities (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info

191

The Economic Value of Temperature Forecasts in Electricity Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Every day, the U.S. electricity-generating industry decides how to meet the electricity demand anticipated over the next 24 h. Various generating units are available to meet the demand, and each unit may have its own production lead time, start-...

Thomas J. Teisberg; Rodney F. Weiher; Alireza Khotanzad

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

,"Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Electric Power Deliveries ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Deliveries " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Share of Total...

193

Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation by Energy Use Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomass, geothermal, etc.) This data was compiled and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Commercial Electric Power Electricity Generation geothermal Industrial PV Renewable Energy Consumption solar wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Elec_.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 19.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

194

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 07/01/2011 Expiration Date 10/01/2013 State Connecticut Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider Connecticut Department of Revenue Services In 2011, Connecticut created a new tax requiring electric power plants in the state that generate and upload electricity to the regional bulk power grid to pay $2.50 per megawatt hour. Renewable energy facilities and customer-sited facilities are exempt from the tax. The tax and related

195

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation and Generating Capacity Data Released: July 25, 2013 Data for : May 2013 Next Release: August 2013 Contacts: Michael Mobilia Phone: 202-287-6318 E-mail:...

196

La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Wind Maximum Rebate PV 10 kW or smaller: $4,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV 10 kW-DC or smaller: Upfront incentive of $0.40 per watt DC PV greater than 10 kW-DC: Performance-based incentive of $44.91/MWh ($0.04491/kWh) paid every 6 months for 10 years Provider La Plata Electric Association La Plata Electric Association (LPEA) offers a one-time rebate, not to exceed the cost of the system, to residential and small commercial customers who install a photovoltaic (PV), wind or hydropower facility. To

197

Can I generate and sell electricity to an electric utility? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many alternative fuel and hybrid vehicles are there in the U.S.? How much U.S. energy consumption and electricity generation comes from renewable sources?

198

Renewable electricity generation in California includes variable ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power produced by geothermal, biomass, biogas, and small hydro generators can be easily dispatched, meaning it can be either increased, decreased, ...

199

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants ...

200

Table 16. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual (billion kilowatt-hours) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2364 2454 2534 2626 2708 2811 AEO 1983 2318 2395 2476 2565 2650 2739 3153 AEO 1984 2321 2376 2461 2551 2637 2738 3182 AEO 1985 2317 2360 2427 2491 2570 2651 2730 2808 2879 2949 3026 AEO 1986 2363 2416 2479 2533 2608 2706 2798 2883 2966 3048 3116 3185 3255 3324 3397 AEO 1987 2460 2494 2555 2622 2683 2748 2823 2902 2977 3363 AEO 1989* 2556 2619 2689 2760 2835 2917 2994 3072 3156 3236 3313 3394 3473 AEO 1990 2612 2689 3083 3488.0 3870.0 AEO 1991 2700 2762 2806 2855 2904 2959 3022 3088 3151 3214 3282 3355 3427 3496 3563 3632 3704 3776 3846 3916 AEO 1992 2746 2845 2858 2913 2975 3030 3087 3146 3209 3276 3345 3415 3483 3552 3625 3699 3774 3847 3921 AEO 1993 2803 2840 2893 2946 2998 3052 3104 3157 3214 3271 3327

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wood Economic Total Onsite and Characteristic(a) Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars)...

202

" Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size(b)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",,,,,"1,000","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "

203

The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to… (more)

Hagerty, John Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (kWh). There were 65 nuclear power plants with 104 operating nuclear reactors that generated a total of 790 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh), ...

205

"Table A46. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" 6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" " Gas by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries," 1991 " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,,"-","-----------","-","-----------","-","------------","-","RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Transmission","Other","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Pipelines","Supplier(d)","Factors"

206

"Table A48. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" 8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" " Gas by Type of Supplier, Census Region, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,"-","-----------","-","-----------","-","------------","-----------","RSE" " ","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Transmission","Other","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Pipelines","Supplier(d)","Factors"," "

207

Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

208

"2012 Total Electric Industry- Customers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Customers" Customers" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A, 4B, 4D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U)" "State","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "New England",6203726,842773,34164,5,7080668 "Connecticut",1454651,150435,4647,2,1609735 "Maine",703770,89048,2780,0,795598 "Massachusetts",2699141,389272,21145,2,3109560 "New Hampshire",601697,104978,3444,0,710119 "Rhode Island",435448,57824,1927,1,495200 "Vermont",309019,51216,221,0,360456 "Middle Atlantic",15727423,2215961,45836,26,17989246 "New Jersey",3455302,489943,12729,6,3957980 "New York",7010740,1038268,8144,6,8057158

209

Table A20. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and" Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,,"RSE" " "," "," "," "," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.2,1.3 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",562,349,"W","W",23 " 20-49",4127,3917,79,131,20.1 " 50-99",8581,7255,955,371,10

210

Table A28. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region, Cens  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and" Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,"Renewables" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" " "," "," ","and"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.6,0.6,1.8,1.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",1098,868," W "," W ",22.3

211

Wind and solar power electric generation to see strong growth...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by roughly 30 percent in each of the next two years. Even with such strong growth, the amount of solar energy will remain a very small part of the total U.S. electricity supply...

212

"2012 Total Electric Industry- Sales (Thousand Megawatthours)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Thousand Megawatthours)" Sales (Thousand Megawatthours)" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A, 4B, 4D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U)" "State","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "New England",47207.696,44864.227,27817.984,566.173,120456.08 "Connecticut",12757.633,12976.05,3565.944,192.711,29492.338 "Maine",4480.736,4053.188,3027.135,0,11561.059 "Massachusetts",20313.469,17722.811,16927.205,349.839,55313.324 "New Hampshire",4439.208,4478.42,1952.633,0,10870.261 "Rhode Island",3121.367,3639.866,923.478,23.623,7708.334 "Vermont",2095.283,1993.892,1421.589,0,5510.764 "Middle Atlantic",132230.522,157278.208,69506.519,3910.06,362925.309

213

"2012 Total Electric Industry- Revenue (Thousands Dollars)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue (Thousands Dollars)" Revenue (Thousands Dollars)" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U)" "State","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "New England",7418025.1,6137400,3292222.3,37797.4,16885444.6 "Connecticut",2212594.3,1901294.3,451909.7,18679.5,4584477.8 "Maine",656822,467228,241624.4,0,1365674.3 "Massachusetts",3029291.6,2453106,2127180,17162,7626739.5 "New Hampshire",713388.2,598371.1,231041,0,1542800.3 "Rhode Island",449603.6,431951.9,98597.2,1955.9,982108.6 "Vermont",356325.4,285448.7,141870,0,783644.1 "Middle Atlantic",20195109.9,20394744.7,5206283.9,488944,46285082.4

214

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning January 14, 2014 2:00PM to 3:00PM EST Online Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV "ownership" are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies, especially PV. In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their resource planning processes. Analysts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Solar Electric Power

215

DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage March 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a cooperative agreement to Summit Texas Clean Energy LLC (STCE) for the Texas Clean Energy Project to design, build, and demonstrate an integrated gasification combined cycle electric generating facility, complete with co-production of high-value products and carbon capture and storage. The project was a third round selection under DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a cost-shared collaboration between the Federal Government and

216

DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage March 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a cooperative agreement to Summit Texas Clean Energy LLC (STCE) for the Texas Clean Energy Project to design, build, and demonstrate an integrated gasification combined cycle electric generating facility, complete with co-production of high-value products and carbon capture and storage. The project was a third round selection under DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a cost-shared collaboration between the Federal Government and

217

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Utah" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

218

INSTRUCTION MANUAL--SNAP-7C ELECTRIC GENERATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A description of SNAP-7C isotope-fueled electric generation system is presented. The operational limits and transportation, handling, installation, and adjustment procedures are described. Maintenance instructions and emergency and safety precautions are included. (M.C.G.)

Blazek, E.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Iowa" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

220

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Ohio" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

222

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New York" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

223

Applications for Certificates for Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An applicant for a certificate to site an electric power generating facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a...

224

Climate Impact on Water Availability for Electricity Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Impact on Water Availability for Electricity Generation Speaker(s): Denis Aelbrecht Date: April 11, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Europe and France experienced a huge...

225

Alternative electric generation impact simulator : final summary report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a short summary of three related research tasks that were conducted during the project "Alternative Electric Generation Impact Simulator." The first of these tasks combines several different types of ...

Gruhl, Jim

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Role of Renewable Energy in a Sustainable Electric Generation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) Widely Available and Deployed After 2020 None Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Nuclear Generation 12.5 GWe by 2030 64 GWe by 2030

227

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States

Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual...

228

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001...

229

Evaluating Policies to Increase Electricity Generation from Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building on a review of experience in the United States and the European Union, this article advances four main propositions concerning policies aimed at increasing electricity generation from renewable energy. First, who ...

Schmalensee, Richard

230

Competitive electricity markets and investment in new generating capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Fees Provider Montana Department of Revenue This Act reforms taxes paid by electricity generators to reduce tax rates and imposes replacement taxes in response to the 1997 restructuring of the

232

Intelligence in Electricity Networks for Embedding Renewables and Distributed Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Over the course of the 20 th century, the electrical power systems of industrialized economies have become one of the most complex systems created by mankind. In the same period, electricity made a transition from a novelty, to a convenience, to an advantage, and finally to an absolute necessity. World-wide electricity use has been ever-growing. The electricity infrastructure consists of two highlyinterrelated and complex subsystems for commodity trade and physical delivery. To ensure the infrastructure is up and running in the first place, the increasing electricity demand poses a serious threat. Additionally, there are a number of other trends that are forcing a change in infrastructure management. Firstly, there is a shift to intermittent sources: a larger share of renewables in the energy mix means a higher influence of weather patterns on generation. At the same time, introducing more combined heat and power generation (CHP) couples electricity production to heat demand patterns. Secondly, the location of electricity generation relative to the load centers is changing. Large-scale generation from wind is migrating towards and into the seas and oceans, away from the locations of high electricity demand. On

J. K. Kok; M. J. J. Scheepers; I. G. Kamphuis; J. K. Kok; M. J. J. Scheepers; I. G. Kamphuis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Composition of Electricity Generation Portfolios, Pivotal Dynamics, and Market Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use simulations to study how the diversification of electricity generation portfolios influences wholesale prices. We find that the relationship between technological diversification and market prices is mediated by the supply-to-demand ratio. In ... Keywords: electricity, market power, simulations, technology diversification

Albert Banal-Estaòol; Augusto Rupérez Micola

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Voltaic Cells: Using Chemical Reactions to Generate Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Voltaic Cells: Using Chemical Reactions to Generate Electricity Project Overview: Middle and high electricity. A voltaic cell allows for the transfer of electrons through a wire as a result of chemical where the increase in zinc ions creates a demand for them. Lab preparation: 1. Pour the sulfate

Weston, Ken

236

Handbook for Utility Participation in Biogas-Fueled Electric Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is a methane-rich gas produced from the controlled biological degradation of organic wastes. Biogas is produced as part of the treatment of four general classes of wet waste streams: Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge Animal Manure Industrial Wastes Municipal Solid Waste in Sealed Landfills. The high methane content of biogas makes it suitable for fueling electric power generation. As energy prices increase, generation of electric power form biogas becomes increasingly attractive and the number of ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XXXXX XXXXX Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 PNNL-XXXXX Electrical Generation for More- Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 iii Summary This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate

238

Water Use for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes how thermoelectric plants use water and the strengths, limitations, and costs of available technologies for increasing water use efficiency (gal/MWh). The report will be of value to power company strategic planners, environmental managers, and generation managers as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

239

A rotating suspended liquid film as an electric generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed that a rotating liquid film generates electricity when a large external electric field is applied in the plane of the film. In our experiment suspended liquid film (soap film) is formed on a circular frame positioned horizontally on a rotating motor. This devise is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply external electric field in X-direction.The produced electric energy is piked up by two brushes in Y-direction of the suspended liquid film. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this letter we report that the same system can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to an electric energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed in very small scales like micro scales applicable in lab on a chip. The device is comparable to commercial DC ele...

Amjadi, Ahmad; Namin, Reza Montazeri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Insufficient Incentives for Investment in Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contracts, which are typically only signed once in a lifetime, with large commissions involved, and therefore require strict regulation. An institutional change, which would create a credible counterpart for generators to sign long-term contracts... . In our calculations we assume an open cycle gas turbine with investment costs of £300/kw.13,14 If contractual arrangements ensure constant revenue streams, then such peak units could be financed at weighted...

Neuhoff, Karsten; de Vries, Laurens

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Application of field-modulated generator systems to dispersed solar thermal electric generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Parabolic Dish-Electric Transport concept for dispersed solar thermal generation is considered. In this concept the power generated by 15 kWe Solar Generation Units is electrically collected in a large plant. Various approaches are possible for the conversion of mechanical shaft output of the heat engines to electricity. This study focuses on the Application of Field Modulated Generation System (FMGS) for that purpose. Initially the state-of-the-art of FMGS is presented, and the application of FMGS to dispersed solar thermal electric generation is investigated. This is followed by the definition of the control and monitoring requirements for solar generation system. Then comparison is made between FMGS approach and other options. Finally, the technology developmental needs are identified.

Ramakumar, R.; Bahrami, K.

1979-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities...

243

Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as intermittent) output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Market concentration and marketing power among electricity generators in Texas  

SciTech Connect

Policy initiatives designed to foster competition among electricity generators in Texas face a special challenge due to the relative isolation of that system. This isolation contributes to high levels of market concentration and market power that could hinder the development of a truly competitive market. This paper examines market concentration and market power in the ERCOT market for electricity generation by calculating the Herfindahl-Hirschman index (HHI) under various assumptions to gauge the degree of market concentration among generators in ERCOT. In addition, some ongoing studies of market power in ERCOT are discussed. The distinction between market concentration and market power is highlighted.

Zarnikau, J.; Lam, A. [Planergy Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

"Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f...

246

"End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke...

247

Present coal potential of Turkey and coal usage in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Total coal reserve (hard coal + lignite) in the world is 984 billion tons. While hard coal constitutes 52% of the total reserve, lignite constitutes 48% of it. Turkey has only 0.1% of world hard coal reserve and 1.5% of world lignite reserves. Turkey has 9th order in lignite reserve, 8th order in lignite production, and 12th order in total coal (hard coal and lignite) consumption. While hard coal production meets only 13% of its consumption, lignite production meets lignite consumption in Turkey. Sixty-five percent of produced hard coal and 78% of produced lignite are used for electricity generation. Lignites are generally used for electricity generation due to their low quality. As of 2003, total installed capacity of Turkey was 35,587 MW, 19% (6,774 MW) of which is produced from coal-based thermal power plants. Recently, use of natural gas in electricity generation has increased. While the share of coal in electricity generation was about 50% for 1986, it is replaced by natural gas today.

Yilmaz, A.O. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 118, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. This dataset contains data for the northwest power pool area of the U.S. Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Northwest Power Pool Area Renewable Energy Generation WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area - Reference (xls, 119.3 KiB)

249

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 116, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest (xls, 119.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

250

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

251

U.S. coal’s share of total net generation continues to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Amid historically low natural gas prices and the warmest March ever recorded in much of the United States, coal's share of total net generation dropped to 34%—the ...

252

U.S. coal’s share of total net generation continues to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Amid historically low natural gas prices and the warmest March ever recorded in much of the United States, coal's share of total net generation ...

253

" and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Total Inputs of Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products for Heat, Power," 3. Total Inputs of Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products for Heat, Power," " and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Billion Btu)" ,,,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,,,"Biomass" " "," ",," "," "," ","Wood Residues","Wood-Related"," " " "," ","Pulping Liquor",," ","Wood Harvested","and Byproducts","and","RSE" "SIC"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Directly","from","Paper-Related","Row"

254

Investment under Regulatory Uncertainty: U.S. Electricity Generation Investment Since 1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand. North American Electricity Reliability Council.Regulatory Risk in U.K. Electricity Distribution. ” JournalAn Empirical Model of Electricity Generation Investment

Ishii, Jun; Yan, Jingming

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply. National Renewable20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology byTERMS wind-generated electricity; wind energy; 20% wind

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

257

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generate electricity and thermal energy to serve heating andenergy source for thermal energy loads and the generation of2 emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

259

Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Place Yancheng, Jiangsu Province, China Sector Biomass Product A biomass project developer in China. Coordinates 33.583°, 113.983009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.583,"lon":113.983009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

260

Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

761 761 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142263761 Varnish cache server Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-860 is a generator-level survey that collects specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. The survey data is summarized in reports such as the Electric Power Annual. The survey data is also available for download here. The data are compressed into a self-extracting (.exe) zip folder containing .XLS data files and record layouts. The current file structure (starting with 2009 data) consists

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Agency/Company /Organization: International Atomic Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Agriculture, Energy Efficiency, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.iaea.org/OurWork/ST/NE/Pess/PESSenergymodels.shtml References: Overview of IAEA PESS Models [1] Related Tools DNE21+ Integrated Global System Modeling Framework Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS

262

The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to increased scrutiny of the public policies ...

Hagerty, John Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

264

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

265

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

266

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

267

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

268

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

269

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 119, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region of WECC. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Rockies WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB)

270

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

271

The Spanish Experience in Electric Generation Capacity Turnover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an authoritative review of the recent changes in Spain's electric generation, capacity additions and regulation. Concerns about energy security and environmental performance motivated these changes and the scale is dramatic, certainly on a par with changes that other countries may elicit to reduce CO2 emissions. First motivated to reduce oil use and coal generation, Spain turned to natural gas combustion turbine combined cycle plants. Since this occurred at a time of extraordinary ec...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well understood. Some gets to find the fuel and sell it. The fuel and all associated activities factor into the economic equation of the nation and the wrold. What is the economics of generating 20 percent of my total capacity from say wind? And all of it replaces coal powered electricty ? What happended to GDP ? Is the economy a net gain or net loss ? The value of the electricity came into the system, but no coal is bought or sold. Submitted by Jamespr on 6 May, 2013 - 17:46 0 answers Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

273

HAS222d Intro to Energy and Environement: 40% off energy use in US goes into generating electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_power_transmission#Losses http goes into generating electricity generation efficiency: 33% electric power loss: plant to consumer 7 fuel power generation plants that dominate our electricity production. Remember that electricity

274

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under VariousElectricity Tariffs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The on-site generation of electricity can offer buildingowners and occupiers financial benefits as well as social benefits suchas reduced grid congestion, improved energy efficiency, and reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. Combined heat and power (CHP), or cogeneration,systems make use of the waste heat from the generator for site heatingneeds. Real-time optimal dispatch of CHP systems is difficult todetermine because of complicated electricity tariffs and uncertainty inCHP equipment availability, energy prices, and system loads. Typically,CHP systems use simple heuristic control strategies. This paper describesa method of determining optimal control in real-time and applies it to alight industrial site in San Diego, California, to examine: 1) the addedbenefit of optimal over heuristic controls, 2) the price elasticity ofthe system, and 3) the site-attributable greenhouse gas emissions, allunder three different tariff structures. Results suggest that heuristiccontrols are adequate under the current tariff structure and relativelyhigh electricity prices, capturing 97 percent of the value of thedistributed generation system. Even more value could be captured bysimply not running the CHP system during times of unusually high naturalgas prices. Under hypothetical real-time pricing of electricity,heuristic controls would capture only 70 percent of the value ofdistributed generation.

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011).

276

Co-generation of electricity and heat from biogas  

SciTech Connect

Biogas powered co-generation of electricity and hot water is being documented in a full scale demonstration with a 25 kW capacity system. The performance characteristics and effects of operating on biogas for 1400 hours are presented in this paper.

Koelsch, R.K.; Cummings, R.J.; Harrison, C.E.; Jewell, W.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

Erin Boedecker

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Use of a thermophotovoltaic generator in a hybrid electric vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Viking 29 is the World’s first thermophotovoltaic (TPV) powered automobile. The prototype was funded by the Department of Energy and designed and built by students and faculty at the Vehicle Research Institute (VRI) at Western Washington University. Viking 29 is a series hybrid electric vehicle that utilizes TPV generators to charge its battery pack. Acceleration

Orion Morrison; Michael Seal; Edward West; William Connelly

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment, 1985-2010 (Megawatts)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," " 1985-2010 (Megawatts)" "Year","Coal",,,,"Petroleum and Natural Gas",,,,"Total 1" ,,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2" ,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization" ,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 19-20, 2011 April 19-20, 2011 Editors: Joseph H. Eto Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Robert J. Thomas Cornell University Proceedings Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid LBNL-5105E Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings April 19-20, 2011 Editors: Joseph H. Eto, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Robert J. Thomas, Cornell University The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the

282

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Treatment of Solar Generation Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning John Sterling Solar Electric Power Association Joyce McLaren National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mike Taylor Solar Electric Power Association Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-60047 October 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

283

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

47 47 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281847 Varnish cache server Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB)

284

" Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.4,1.5,1,0.9,1,1

285

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Executive Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, legal, and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of all known geothermal sites. This data base would enhance the making of credible forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. The four states, working under a cooperative agreement, identified a total of 1265 potential geothermal sites. The 1265 sites were screened to eliminate those with little or no chance of providing either electrical generation and/or electrical offset. Two hundred and forty-five of the original 1265 sites were determined to warrant further study. On the basis of a developability index, 78 high temperature sites and 120 direct utilization sites were identified as having ''good'' or ''average'' potential for development and should be studied in detail. On the basis of cost, at least 29 of the high temperature sites appear to be technically capable of supporting a minimum total of at least 1000 MW of electrical generation which could be competitive with the busbar cost of conventional thermal generating technologies. Sixty direct utilization sites have a minimum total energy potential of 900+ MW and can be expected to provide substantial amounts of electrical offset at or below present conventional energy prices. Five direct utilization sites and eight high temperature sites were identified with both high development and economic potential. An additional 27 sites were shown to have superior economic characteristics, but development problems. 14 refs., 15 figs., 10 tabs.

Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

287

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

289

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity from Steam Turbine-Generators: A System-level2. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics3. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

291

1 The Price Elasticity of Supply of Renewable Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many states have adopted policies aimed at promoting the growth of renewable electricity within their state. The most salient of these policies is a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) which mandates that retail electricity providers purchase a predetermined fraction of their electricity from renewable sources. Renewable portfolio standards are a policy tool likely to persist for many decades due to the long term goals of many state RPSs and the likely creation of a federal RPS alongside any comprehensive climate change bill. However, there is little empirical evidence about the costs of these RPS policies. I take an instrumental variables approach to estimate the long-run price elasticity of supply of renewable generation. To instrument for the price paid to renewable generators I use the phased-in implementation of RPSs over time. Using this IV strategy, my preferred estimate of the supply elasticity is 2.7. This parameter allows me to measure the costs of carbon abatement in the electricity sector and to compare those costs with the costs of a broader based policy. Using my parameter estimates, I find that a policy to reduce the CO2 emissions in the northeastern US electricity sector by 2.5 % using only an RPS would cost at least six times more than the regional cap-and-trade system (Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative). The marginal cost of CO2 abatement is $12 using the most optimistic assumptions for an RPS compared to a marginal cost of abatement of $2 in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative.

Erik Johnson; Erik Johnson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors" ,,,,,,,,,,, ,"Total United States"

293

Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 6 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 5 5 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 10 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 8 8 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 10 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 11 11 Over 500,000 26 18 18 21 Principal Building Activity Education 8 9 6 6 Food Sales and Service 8 9 8 7 Health Care 14 12 12 9 Lodging 11 22 16 16 Mercantile and Service 5 7 7 7 Office 6 10 7 6 Public Assembly 7 12 28 30 Public Order and Safety 18 29 18 18 Religious Worship 10 10 11 11 Warehouse and Storage

294

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Managing Water Resource Requirements for Growing Electric Generation Demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a general guide to analytical techniques used to address water resource management as related to long-term sustainability planning, and short-term regulatory requirements, including total maximum daily loads, endangered species, and relicensing of hydropower facilities. The example applications presented in the report highlight the capability of the techniques, and help electric power company and government regulatory staffs identify the best approach for a specific need.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

296

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:","NF",0.4,1.6,1.5,0.7,1,1.6,"NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",15027,2370,414,139,5506,105,1184,5309,3 "Boiler Fuel","--","W",296,40,2098,18,859,"--",3.6

297

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:"," NF",0.5,1.3,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2," NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",16515,2656,441,152,6141,99,1198,5828,2.7 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel"," --",28,313,42,2396,15,875," --",4

298

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

DRENNEN, THOMAS E.; KAMERY, WILLIAM

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercuty. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

Kamery, William (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

CDCA Final EIS for Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA DESERT CONSERVATION AREA PLAN CALIFORNIA DESERT CONSERVATION AREA PLAN AMENDMENT / FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR IVANPAH SOLAR ELECTRIC GENERATING SYSTEM FEIS-10-31 JULY 2010 BLM/CA/ES-2010-010+1793 In Reply Refer To: In reply refer to: 1610-5.G.1.4 2800lCACA-48668 Dear Reader: Enclosed is the proposed California Desert Conservation Area Plan Amendment and Final Environmental Impact Statement (CDCA Plan Amendment/FEIS) for the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS) project. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) prepared the CDCA Plan Amendment/FEIS for the ISEGS project in consultation with cooperating agencies and California State agencies, taking into account public comments received during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. The proposed plan amendment adds the Ivanpah

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301

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

302

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

303

The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

87 87 January 2010 The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation Paul Denholm, Erik Ela, Brendan Kirby, and Michael Milligan National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-47187 January 2010 The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation Paul Denholm, Erik Ela, Brendan Kirby, and Michael Milligan Prepared under Task No. WER8.5005 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

304

Annual Electric Generator data - EIA-860 data file  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

60 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B) 60 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B) Release Date: October 10, 2013 for Final 2012 data Next Release Date: September 2014 Re-Release 2012 data: December 4, 2013 (CORRECTION) The survey Form EIA-860 collects generator-level specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. Summary level data can be found in the Electric Power Annual. Detailed data are compressed (zip) and contain the following files: LayoutYyy – Provides a directory of all (published) data elements collected on the Form EIA-860 together with the related description, specific file location(s), and, where appropriate, an explanation of codes.

305

Microgrids in the Evolving Electricity Generation and DeliveryInfrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The legacy paradigm for electricity service in most of the electrified world today is based on the centralized generation-transmission-distribution infrastructure that evolved under a regulated environment. More recently, a quest for effective economic investments, responsive markets, and sensitivity to the availability of resources, has led to various degrees of deregulation and unbundling of services. In this context, a new paradigm is emerging wherein electricity generation is intimately embedded with the load in microgrids. Development and decay of the familiar macrogrid is discussed. Three salient features of microgrids are examined to suggest that cohabitation of micro and macro grids is desirable, and that overall energy efficiency can be increased, while power is delivered to loads at appropriate levels of quality.

Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: New Zealand Energy Authority Sector: Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentTOC____45553.aspx Country: New Zealand Cost: Free Australia and New Zealand Coordinates: -40.900557°, 174.885971°

307

BUILDOUT AND UPGRADE OF CENTRAL EMERGENCY GENERATOR SYSTEM, GENERATOR 3 AND 4 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SECTION 01000—SUMMARY OF WORK PART 1—GENERAL 1.1 SUMMARY The work to be performed under this project consists of providing the labor, equipment, and materials to perform "Buildout and Upgrade of Central Emergency Generator System, Generator 3 and 4 Electrical Installation" for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Dryden Flight Research Center (NASA/DFRC), Edwards, California 93523. All modifications to existing substations and electrical distribution systems are the responsibility of the contractor. It is the contractor’s responsibility to supply a complete and functionally operational system. The work shall be performed in accordance with these specifications and the related drawings. The work of this project is defined by the plans and specifications contained and referenced herein. This work specifically includes but is not limited to the following: Scope of Work - Installation 1. Install all electrical wiring and controls for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing electrical installation for generators 1 and 2 and in accordance with drawings. Contractor shall provide as-built details for electrical installation. 2. Install battery charger systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing battery charging equipment and installation for generators 1 and 2. This may require exchange of some battery charger parts already on-hand. Supply power to new battery chargers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 3. Install electrical wiring for fuel/lube systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Supply power to lube oil heaters and fuel system (day tanks) from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to fuel systems. 4. Install power to new dampers/louvers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Wiring shall be similar to installation to existing dampers/louvers. Utilize existing conduits already routed to louver areas to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to new dampers/louvers. 5. Install power to jacket water heaters for new generators 3 and 4 from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 6. Install new neutral grounding resistor and associated parts and wiring for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Grounding resistors will be Government Furnished Equipment (GFE). 7. Install two new switchgear sections, one for generator #3 and one for generator #4, to match existing generator #1 cubicle design and installation and in accordance with drawings and existing parts lists. This switchgear will be provided as GFE. 8. Ground all new switchgear, generators 3 and 4, and any other new equipment to match existing grounding connections for generators 1 and 2, switchgear and other equipment. See drawings for additional details. Grounding grid is already existing. Ensure that all grounding meets National Electrical Code requirements. 9. Cummins DMC control for the generator and switchgear syste

Gary D. Seifert; G. Shawn West; Kurt S. Myers; Jim Moncur

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Pricing Carbon for Electricity Generation: National and International Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CO2 equivalent). This is equivalent to specifying a stock of GHGs, or a quantity limit on the amount of fossil fuel that can be burned over the next 100-200 years. The argument for choosing this quantity target, loosely stated, is that mitigation... treatment), but it is the combination of long timescales and policy risk that is damaging, - While fossil-fuel generation is at the margin and setting the electricity price, conventional generators will be largely hedged against both fuel and carbon price...

Grubb, Michael; Newbery, David

309

Review of Electricity Generation Technology Lifecycle GHG Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a selection of published cross-technology assessments and two recent meta-analyses evaluating life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from different electricity generation technologies. Differences in life-cycle GHG estimates reflect differing assessment methodologies, plant and equipment construction practices, power plant conversion efficiencies, power plant size and operating characteristics, practices in fuel preparation and transport, and system boundary as...

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

310

Role of Renewable Energy in Sustainable Electricity Generation Portfolios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update describes the use of energy system and capacity planning models and alternative scenarios of the future to evaluate the potential role of renewable energy in a sustainable electricity generation portfolio. Base case runs of the three models considered in this study all forecast growing contributions from renewables over a range of scenarios, but predictions vary widely due to differing modeling approaches and differing assumptions about future market, policy, technology, and other c...

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Economic Modeling of Mid-Term Electric Generation Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The type and stringency of environmental mandates and carbon regulation in the next 10 years continue to be a topic of substantial uncertainty and debate. This study applies a model-based approach for exploring the potential magnitude of shifts in electric generation trends that could occur over a broad range of future environmental regulatory outcomes. Cases examined include a path of stringent environmental regulations, a high cost carbon policy, and their combination. This study is a follow-on modelin...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Clearance and Tagging Guideline for Fossil Electric Generating Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In their trips to more than a dozen plants in the past three years, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teams observed that clearance and tagging processes have ranged from comprehensive to less than adequate. In plants with detailed procedures and plants with less than adequate procedures, activities have been observed that were not as safe as they should have been. EPRI and fossil generating advisors determined that a clearance and tagging guideline was needed. EPRI and the industry advisors decid...

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

313

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Firestone,Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Table of3 2.1 Electricity Tariff

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal, People and Policy Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Guide/manual, Case studies/examples, Templates, Technical report User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/geothermal/publications.html Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

315

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

316

Economic impact of non-utility generation on electric power systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-Utility Generation is a major force in the way electrical energy is now being produced and marketed, and electric utilities are reacting to the growth… (more)

Gupta, Rajnish

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Decentralized control techniques applied to electric power distributed generation in microgrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Distributed generation of electric energy has become part of the current electric power system. In this context a new scenario is arising in which small… (more)

Vásquez Quintero, Juan Carlos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu)

319

Impacts of Electric Industry Restructuring on Electric Generation and Fuel Markets: Analytical and Business Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Restructuring and increasing competition are likely to have a major impact on electric generating companies and the individuals and organizations that buy, transport, market, or supply fuels. Restructuring may also affect the patterns of coal and gas use. This report, the first in a series by EPRI and the Gas Research Institute (GRI), describes the scope of these potential impacts.

1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

320

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies Volume 2 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai, T. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Arent, D. Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Porro, G. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Meshek, M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sandor, D. National Renewable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

322

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

323

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

324

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

325

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

326

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

327

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

328

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

329

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

330

Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. (e) "Facility" means one or all generating units at an electric generating station. (f) "Fuel (b)(3)(C) of section 1392. (g) "Generating facility output" means the electrical energy and/or fuel1 Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure

331

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

332

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

333

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

334

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California retail industrial electricity price, as reportedindustrial customers, 2005 source: CAISO (2006) 2005 TOU electricity prices

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric  vehicles  and appliances.   For  coordination  and  organization  purposes,  most  of  the  electricity  industry 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Increased use of reject heat from electric generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to determine existing barriers to greater use of reject heat by electric power producers, including utilities and cogenerators. It includes analytical studies of the technical and economic issues and a survey of several electric power producers. The core analytic findings of the study are that although electric utility- based, cogenerated district heating is sometimes cost competitive with currently common furnaces and boilers, it is not clearly less expensive, and is often more expensive. Since market penetration by a new technology depends on strong perceived advantages, district heating will remain at a disadvantage unless its benefits, such as lowered emissions and decreased reliance on foreign oil, are given overt financial form through subsidies or tax incentives. The central finding from the survey was that electric utilities have arrived at the same conclusion by their own routes; we present a substantial list of their reasons for not engaging in district heating or for not pursuing it more vigorously, and many of them can be summarized as the lack of a clear cost advantage for district heat. We also note that small-scale district heating systems, based on diesel generators and located near the thermal load center, show very clear cost advantages over individual furnaces. This cost advantage is consistent with the explosive growth currently observed in private cogeneration systems.

Leigh, R.W. [Leigh (Richard W.), New York, NY (United States); Piraino, M. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 Short","Other","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors",

338

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1",,,,,,,"Coal" 1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Other","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

339

Generation of electricity with fuel cell using alcohol fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for generating electricity in a fuel cell, the fuel cell comprising a cathode, an electrolyte, an anode comprising a first, fluid-permeable face and a second face in contact with the electrolyte, and an external circuit connecting the cathode and the anode. It comprises bringing a lower primary alcohol into contact with the first fluid-permeable face of the anode, thereby permitting the lower primary alcohol to penetrate into the cross-section of the anode toward the second face; oxidizing the lower primary alcohol essentially to carbon dioxide and water at the second face of the anode, reducing a reducible gas at the cathode, and obtaining electricity from the fuel cell.

Reddy, N.R.K.V.; Taylor, E.J.

1992-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

340

Strongly coupled copper plasma generated by underwater electrical wire explosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of theoretical approaches to the analysis of the parameters of a discharge channel consisting of strongly coupled plasma generated in the process of underwater electrical wire explosion are presented. The analysis is based on experimental results obtained from discharges employing Cu wire. The obtained experimental data included electrical measurements and optical observations from which information about the dynamics of the water flow was extrapolated. Numerical calculation based on a 1D magnetohydrodynamic model was used to simulate the process of underwater wire explosion. A wide range conductivity model was applied in this calculation and good agreement with a set of experimental data was obtained. A method of determining the average temperature of the discharge channel based on this model and experimental results is proposed, and the limits of this method's applicability are discussed.

Grinenko, A.; Gurovich, V.Tz.; Saypin, A.; Efimov, S.; Krasik, Ya.E.; Oreshkin, V.I. [Physics Department, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Institute of High Current Electronics, SB RAN, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors)...

342

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000. Distributed Power Generation, Marcel Dekker. pp.180-This greatly influences power generation costs and reducesand Ogden, 2000) total power generation is estimated at 5.3

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and T. O’Brien. 2003. Free Electricity from Steam Turbine-plants and sites that need electricity and heat (i.e. steam)of the Potential for Electricity Generation Owen Bailey and

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

THE IMPACTS OF RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES ON RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATING CAPACITY .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources has increased rapidly in the last decade. For example, Renewable Energy Sources for Electricity (RES-E) generating capacity in the… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Optimization of Piezoelectric Electrical Generators Powered by Random Vibrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper compares the performances of a vibrationpowered electrical generators using PZT piezoelectric ceramic associated to two different power conditioning circuits. A new approach of the piezoelectric power conversion based on a nonlinear voltage processing is presented and implemented with a particular power conditioning circuit topology. Theoretical predictions and experimental results show that the nonlinear processing technique may increase the power harvested by a factor up to 4 compared to the Standard optimization technique. Properties of this new technique are analyzed in particular in the case of broadband, random vibrations, and compared to those of the Standard interface.

Lefeuvre, E; Richard, C; Petit, L; Guyomar, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Electrical motor/generator drive apparatus and method  

SciTech Connect

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple currents and thus the volume and cost of a capacitor. The drive methodology is based on a segmented drive system that does not add switches or passive components but involves reconfiguring inverter switches and motor stator winding connections in a way that allows the formation of multiple, independent drive units and the use of simple alternated switching and optimized Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) schemes to eliminate or significantly reduce the capacitor ripple current.

Su, Gui Jia

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

347

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Electricity from Steam Turbine-Generators: A System-scale back-pressure steam turbine. Several manufactures2. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of  Electrical Power & Energy Systems,  27 (2005), Journal  of  Electrical  Power  &  Energy  Systems Journal of Electrical Power & Energy  Systems, 27 (2005), 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and relatively high electricity prices, capturing 97% of thecases, real-time electricity prices. Smaller DG installerselectric, and heating), electricity prices, DG availability,

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under Various Electricity Tariffs Firestone, R. , Creighton,Under Various Electricity Tariffs Table of Contents Table of3 2.1 Electricity Tariff

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and tools related to the electric power  industry and its 2003.   American Electric Power.  Interstate transmission by  Means  of  Enhanced  Electric  Power  Systems  Control: 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

domains.  The electricity industry is well poised to evolution  of  the  electricity  industry.   This  paper Behavior  The  electricity  industry  is  in  the  midst 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1983, the Bonneville Power Administration contracted for an evaluation and ranking of all geothermal resource sites in the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington which have a potential for electrical generation and/or electrical offset through direct utilization of the resource. The objective of this program was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, legal, and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of all known geothermal sites. This data base would enhance the making of credible forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. The four states, working together under a cooperative agreement, identified a total of 1,265 potential geothermal sites. The 1,265 sites were screened to eliminate those with little or no chance of providing either electrical generation and/or electrical offset. Two hundred and forty-five of the original 1,265 sites were determined to warrant further study. The Four-State team proceeded to develop a methodology which would rank the sites based upon an estimate of development potential and cost. Development potential was estimated through the use of weighted variables selected to approximate the attributes which a geothermal firm might consider in its selection of a site for exploration and possible development. Resource; engineering; and legal, institutional, and environmental factors were considered. Cost estimates for electrical generation and direct utilization sites were made using the computer programs CENTPLANT, WELLHEAD, and HEATPLAN. Finally, the sites were ranked utilizing a technique which allowed for the integration of development and cost information. On the basis of the developability index, 78 high temperature sites and 120 direct utilization sites were identified as having ''good'' or ''average'' potential for development and should be studied in detail. On the basis of cost, at least 29 of the high temperature sites appear to be technically capable of supporting a minimum total of at least 1,000 MW of electrical generation which could be competitive with the busbar cost of conventional thermal generating technologies. Sixty direct utilization sites have a minimum total energy potential of 900+ MW and can be expected to provide substantial amounts of electrical offset at or below present conventional energy prices. The combined development and economic rankings can be used to assist in determining sites with superior characteristics of both types. Five direct utilization sites and eight high temperature sites were identified with both high development and economic potential. An additional 27 sites were shown to have superior economic characteristics, but development problems. The procedure seems validated by the fact that two of the highest ranking direct utilization sites are ones that have already been developed--Boise, Idaho and Klamath Falls, Oregon. Most of the higher ranking high temperature sites have received serious examination in the past as likely power production candidates.

Bloomquist, R.G.; Black, G.L.; Parker, D.S.; Sifford, A.; Simpson, S.J.; Street, L.V.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Smartgrids and distributed generation: the future electricity networks of the European union  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new concept for the European electrical system is emerging where a portion of the electricity generated by large conventional plants will be displaced by a great number of small generators disseminated throughout the territory. In this scenario, each ... Keywords: distributed generation, electrical distribution systems, energy and environment

Francesco Muzi

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation at high ionic strength in microbial fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation at high ionic strength in microbial fuel cell organic matter using elec- trochemically active bacteria as catalysts to generate electrical energy of the most exciting applications of MFCs is their use as benthic unattended generators to power electrical

Sun, Baolin

357

El Paso County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied to the Geothermal Resource Potential at Ft. Bliss Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title El Paso County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied to the Geothermal Resource Potential at Ft. Bliss Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description A dynamic and technically capable project team has been assembled to evaluate the commercial viability of geothermal resources on the Ft. Bliss Military Reservation with a focus on the McGregor Test Range. Driving the desire of Ft. Bliss and El Paso County to assess the commercial viability of the geothermal resources are four factors that have converged in the last several years. The first is that Ft. Bliss will be expanding by nearly 30,000 additional troops, an expansion which will significantly increase utilization of energy resources on the facility. Second is the desire for both strategic and tactical reasons to identify and control a source of power than can directly provide the forward fire bases with "off grid" electricity in the event of a major power outage. In the worst case, this power can be sold to the grid and be used to reduce energy costs at the main Ft. Bliss installation in El Paso. Finally, Congress and the Department of Defense have mandated that Ft. Bliss and other military reservations obtain specified percentages of their power from renewable sources of production. The geothermal resource to be evaluated, if commercially viable, could provide Ft. Bliss with all the energy necessary to meet these goals now and in the future. To that end, the garrison commander has requested a target of 20 megawatts as an initial objective for geothermal resources on the installation. Finally, the County government has determined that it not only wishes to facility this effort by Ft. Bliss, but would like to reduce its own reliance on fossil based energy resources to provide power for current and future needs.

358

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

359

International Natural Gas Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per 107 Kilocalories - Gross Calorific Value2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium C C C C C C C C C Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Canada 145.5 144.7 174.9 171.9 225.2 NA NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 244.7 252.1 258.6 281.0 326.2 348.5 400.8 499.3 NA

360

Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria 83.0 96.4 146.4 153.3 182.2 226.1 220.3 342.3 248.3 Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium 155.1 160.4 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Canada 115.7 117.8 180.4 141.5 198.4 222.4 NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Colombia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Cuba NA NA NA 183.4 NA NA NA NA NA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

362

Unbundling generation and transmission services for competitive electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

Ancillary services are those functions performed by the equipment and people that generate, control, and transmit electricity in support of the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) defined such services as those `necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.` The nationwide cost of ancillary services is about $12 billion a year, roughly 10% of the cost of the energy commodity. More important than the cost, however, is the necessity of these services for bulk-power reliability and for the support of commercial transactions. FERC`s landmark Order 888 included a pro forma tariff with provision for six key ancillary services. The Interconnected Operations Services Working Group identified another six services that it felt were essential to the operation of bulk-power systems. Several groups throughput the United States have created or are forming independent system operators, which will be responsible for reliability and commerce. To date, the electricity industry (including traditional vertically integrated utilities, distribution utilities, power markets and brokers, customers, and state and federal regulators) has paid insufficient attention to these services. Although the industry had made substantial progress in identifying and defining the key services, much remains to be doe to specify methods to measure the production, delivery, and consumption of these services; to identify the costs and cost-allocation factors for these services; and to develop market and operating rules for their provision and pricing. Developing metrics, determining costs, and setting pricing rules are important because most of these ancillary services are produced by the same pieces of equipment that produce the basic electricity commodity. Thus, the production of energy and ancillary services is highly interactive, sometimes complementary and sometimes competing. In contrast to today`s typical time-invariant, embedded-cost prices, competitive prices for ancillary services would vary with system loads and spot prices for energy.

Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Distributed Electrical Power Generation: Summary of Alternative Available Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000ABSTRACT: The Federal government is the greatest consumer of electricity in the nation. Federal procurement and installation of higher efficiency energy sources promises many benefits, in terms of economy, employment, export, and environment. While distributed generation (DG) technologies offer many of the benefits of alternative, efficient energy sources, few DG systems can currently be commercially purchased “off the shelf, ” and complicated codes and standards deter potential users. Federal use of distributed generation demonstrates the technology, can help drive down costs, and an help lead the general public to accept a changing energy scheme. This work reviews and describes various distributed generation technologies, including fuel cells, microturbines, wind turbines, photovoltaic arrays, and Stirling engines. Issues such as fuel availability, construction considerations, protection controls are addressed. Sources of further information are provided. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents.

Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik; Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Exotic electricity options and the valuation of electricity generation and transmission assets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: capacity valuation, electricity derivatives, electricity futures contract, exchange option, mean reversion, real options, spark spread

Shi-Jie Deng; Blake Johnson; Aram Sogomonian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Total Cost of Ownership for Current Plug-in Electric Vehicles: Fall 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dramatic growth over the last three years in the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market has resulted in many unanswered questions concerning total cost of ownership (TCO). In June 2013, EPRI released a public study that presented a new way of analyzing driving data for the purpose of calculating TCO for PEV ownership (EPRI report 3002001728). That study—which focused on the 2013 Chevrolet Volt and 2013 Nissan LEAF—used a full year’s worth of driving data to calculate the TCO of ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

366

Dynamic Analysis of a Grid-Connected Wind Electric Generator with Embedded Static VAR Compensator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes modeling and simulation of Wind Electric Generator (WEG) comprising a pitch controlled Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) coupled to squirrel cage induction generator through a gear. The generic issue of VAR drain from the grid ... Keywords: Wind turbine, induction generator, two mass model - drive train, SVC, wind electric generator dynamics

Vishnuvardhanan V.; Sasi K. Kottayil

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-54447. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimizationrelated work. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization3 2.2 Distributed Generation

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Air Quality Impact of Distributed Generation of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality impact of distributed generation. California Energyquality impacts of distributed generation, Proceedings ofquality impacts of distributed generation, Proceedings of

Jing, Qiguo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefits of Distributed Generation. Unpublished draftto Establish a Distributed Generation Certification Program.Order: Establish a Distributed Generation Certification

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The April 2011 DOE workshop, 'Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid', was the culmination of a year-long process to bring together some of the Nation's leading researchers and experts to identify computational challenges associated with the operation and planning of the electric power system. The attached papers provide a journey into these experts' insights, highlighting a class of mathematical and computational problems relevant for potential power systems research. While each paper defines a specific problem area, there were several recurrent themes. First, the breadth and depth of power system data has expanded tremendously over the past decade. This provides the potential for new control approaches and operator tools that can enhance system efficiencies and improve reliability. However, the large volume of data poses its own challenges, and could benefit from application of advances in computer networking and architecture, as well as data base structures. Second, the computational complexity of the underlying system problems is growing. Transmitting electricity from clean, domestic energy resources in remote regions to urban consumers, for example, requires broader, regional planning over multi-decade time horizons. Yet, it may also mean operational focus on local solutions and shorter timescales, as reactive power and system dynamics (including fast switching and controls) play an increasingly critical role in achieving stability and ultimately reliability. The expected growth in reliance on variable renewable sources of electricity generation places an exclamation point on both of these observations, and highlights the need for new focus in areas such as stochastic optimization to accommodate the increased uncertainty that is occurring in both planning and operations. Application of research advances in algorithms (especially related to optimization techniques and uncertainty quantification) could accelerate power system software tool performance, i.e. speed to solution, and enhance applicability for new and existing real-time operation and control approaches, as well as large-scale planning analysis. Finally, models are becoming increasingly essential for improved decision-making across the electric system, from resource forecasting to adaptive real-time controls to online dynamics analysis. The importance of data is thus reinforced by their inescapable role in validating, high-fidelity models that lead to deeper system understanding. Traditional boundaries (reflecting geographic, institutional, and market differences) are becoming blurred, and thus, it is increasingly important to address these seams in model formulation and utilization to ensure accuracy in the results and achieve predictability necessary for reliable operations. Each paper also embodies the philosophy that our energy challenges require interdisciplinary solutions - drawing on the latest developments in fields such as mathematics, computation, economics, as well as power systems. In this vein, the workshop should be viewed not as the end product, but the beginning of what DOE seeks to establish as a vibrant, on-going dialogue among these various communities. Bridging communication gaps among these communities will yield opportunities for innovation and advancement. The papers and workshop discussion provide the opportunity to learn from experts on the current state-of-the-art on computational approaches for electric power systems, and where one may focus to accelerate progress. It has been extremely valuable to me as I better understand this space, and consider future programmatic activities. I am confident that you too will enjoy the discussion, and certainly learn from the many experts. I would like to thank the authors of the papers for sharing their perspectives, as well as the paper discussants, session recorders, and participants. The meeting would not have been as successful without your commitment and engagement. I also would like to thank Joe Eto and Bob Thomas for their vision and leadership in bringing together su

Birman, Kenneth; Ganesh, Lakshmi; Renessee, Robbert van; Ferris, Michael; Hofmann, Andreas; Williams, Brian; Sztipanovits, Janos; Hemingway, Graham; University, Vanderbilt; Bose, Anjan; Stivastava, Anurag; Grijalva, Santiago; Grijalva, Santiago; Ryan, Sarah M.; McCalley, James D.; Woodruff, David L.; Xiong, Jinjun; Acar, Emrah; Agrawal, Bhavna; Conn, Andrew R.; Ditlow, Gary; Feldmann, Peter; Finkler, Ulrich; Gaucher, Brian; Gupta, Anshul; Heng, Fook-Luen; Kalagnanam, Jayant R; Koc, Ali; Kung, David; Phan, Dung; Singhee, Amith; Smith, Basil

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

371

Framing Scenarios of Electricity Generation and Gas Use: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a systematic appraisal of trends in electric generation and demands for gas for power generation. Gas-fired generation is the leading driver of forecasted growth in demand for natural gas in the United States, and natural gas is a leading fuel for planned new generating capacity. The report goes behind the numbers and forecasts to quantify key drivers and uncertainties.

1996-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Microgrids in the Evolving Electricity Generation and Delivery Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

progress of the electricity industry is here described inpractical and the electricity industry because a highlyIndustry An Update. Available: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/

Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Economics of geothermal electricity generation from hydrothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most important factors affecting the economics of geothermal electricity production are the wellhead temperature or enthalpy, the well flow rate, and the cost of the wells. The capital cost of the powerplant is significant, but not highly sensitive to these resource characteristics. The optimum geothermal plant size will remain small, usually in the 50-100 MWe range. Therefore, the opportunities for achieving significant cost reductions through ''economies of scale'' are small. The steam and binary power cycles are closely competitive; the binary cycle appears better when the brine temperature is below 200-230/sup 0/C, and the flashed steam cycle appears better above this range. Geothermal electricity production is capital intensive; over 75 percent of the generation costs are fixed costs related to capital investment. Technological advances are needed to reduce costs from marginal geothermal resources and thus to stimulate geothermal energy development. Significant reduction in power costs would be achieved by reducing well drilling costs, stimulating well flow rates, reducing powerplant capital costs, increasing powerplant efficiency and utilization, and developing more effective exploration techniques for locating and assessing high-quality resources. (auth)

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1976-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

375

Parallel electric field generation by Alfven wave turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

{This work aims to investigate the spectral structure of the parallel electric field generated by strong anisotropic and balanced Alfvenic turbulence in relation with the problem of electron acceleration from the thermal population in solar flare plasma conditions.} {We consider anisotropic Alfvenic fluctuations in the presence of a strong background magnetic field. Exploiting this anisotropy, a set of reduced equations governing non-linear, two-fluid plasma dynamics is derived. The low-$\\beta$ limit of this model is used to follow the turbulent cascade of the energy resulting from the non-linear interaction between kinetic Alfven waves, from the large magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) scales with $k_{\\perp}\\rho_{s}\\ll 1$ down to the small "kinetic" scales with $k_{\\perp}\\rho_{s} \\gg 1$, $\\rho_{s}$ being the ion sound gyroradius.} {Scaling relations are obtained for the magnitude of the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations, as a function of $k_{\\perp}$ and $k_{\\parallel}$, showing that the electric field develops ...

Bian, N H; Brown, J C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Economics of geothermal electricity generation from hydrothermal resources  

SciTech Connect

The most important factors affecting the economics of geothermal electricity production are the wellhead temperature or enthalpy, the well flow rate, and the cost of the wells. The capital cost of the powerplant is significant, but not highly sensitive to these resource characteristics. The optimum geothermal plant size will remain small, usually in the 50-100 MWe range. Therefore, the opportunities for achieving significant cost reductions through ''economies of scale'' are small. The steam and binary power cycles are closely competitive; the binary cycle appears better when the brine temperature is below 200-230/sup 0/C, and the flashed steam cycle appears better above this range. Geothermal electricity production is capital intensive; over 75 percent of the generation costs are fixed costs related to capital investment. Technological advances are needed to reduce costs from marginal geothermal resources and thus to stimulate geothermal energy development. Significant reduction in power costs would be achieved by reducing well drilling costs, stimulating well flow rates, reducing powerplant capital costs, increasing powerplant efficiency and utilization, and developing more effective exploration techniques for locating and assessing high-quality resources. (auth)

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1976-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

377

Analysis of the electrical harmonic characteristics of a slip recovery variable speed generating system for wind turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

Variable speed electric generating technology can enhance the general use of wind energy in electric utility applications. This enhancement results from two characteristic properties of variable speed wind turbine generators: an improvement in drive train damping characteristics, which results in reduced structural loading on the entire wind turbine system, and an improvement in the overall efficiency by using a more sophisticated electrical generator. Electronic converter systems are the focus of this investigation -- in particular, the properties of a wound-rotor induction generator with the slip recovery system and direct-current link converter. Experience with solid-state converter systems in large wind turbines is extremely limited. This report presents measurements of electrical performances of the slip recovery system and is limited to the terminal characteristics of the system. Variable speed generating systems working effectively in utility applications will require a satisfactory interface between the turbine/generator pair and the utility network. The electrical testing described herein focuses largely on the interface characteristics of the generating system. A MOD-O wind turbine was connected to a very strong system; thus, the voltage distortion was low and the total harmonic distortion in the utility voltage was less than 3% (within the 5% limit required by most utilities). The largest voltage component of a frequency below 60 Hz was 40 dB down from the 60-Hz< component. 8 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs.

Herrera, J.I.; Reddoch, T.W.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Coal regains some electric generation market share from natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... a combination of higher prices for natural gas and increased demand for electricity during the summer months led electric systems across much of the country to ...

379

Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate electricity and would operate continuously during flight. The focus of this study is on more-electric aircraft which minimize bleed air extraction from the engines and instead use electrical power obtained from generators driven by the main engines to satisfy all major loads. The increased electrical generation increases the potential fuel savings obtainable through more efficient electrical generation using a SOFCPU. However, the weight added to the aircraft by the SOFCPU impacts the main engine fuel consumption which reduces the potential fuel savings. To investigate these relationships the Boeing 787­8 was used as a case study. The potential performance of the SOFCPU was determined by coupling flowsheet modeling using ChemCAD software with a stack performance algorithm. For a given stack operating condition (cell voltage, anode utilization, stack pressure, target cell exit temperature), ChemCAD software was used to determine the cathode air rate to provide stack thermal balance, the heat exchanger duties, the gross power output for a given fuel rate, the parasitic power for the anode recycle blower and net power obtained from (or required by) the compressor/expander. The SOFC is based on the Gen4 Delphi planar SOFC with assumed modifications to tailor it to this application. The size of the stack needed to satisfy the specified condition was assessed using an empirically-based algorithm. The algorithm predicts stack power density based on the pressure, inlet temperature, cell voltage and anode and cathode inlet flows and compositions. The algorithm was developed by enhancing a model for a well-established material set operating at atmospheric pressure to reflect the effect of elevated pressure and to represent the expected enhancement obtained using a promising cell material set which has been tested in button cells but not yet used to produce full-scale stacks. The predictions for the effect of pressure on stack performance were based on literature. As part of this study, additional data were obtained on button cells at elevated pressure to confirm the validity of the predictions. The impact of adding weight to the 787-8 fuel consumption was determined as a function of flight distance using a PianoX model. A conceptual design for a SOFC power system for the Boeing 787 is developed and the weight estimated. The results indicate that the power density of the stacks must increase by at least a factor of 2 to begin saving fuel on the 787 aircraft. However, the conceptual design of the power system may still be useful for other applications which are less weight sensitive.

Whyatt, Greg A.; Chick, Lawrence A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Generating Electricity with your Steam System: Keys to Long Term Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of combined heat and power principals to existing plant steam systems can help produce electricity at more than twice efficiency of grid generated electricity. In this way, steam plant managers can realize substantial savings with relatively quick payback of capital. Carefully planned and executed projects are the key to unlocking the maximum value of generating electricity from an existing steam system. This paper illustrates the key concepts of generating onsite power with backpressure steam turbine generators along with practical considerations.

Bullock, B.; Downing, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Do Generation Firms in Restructured Electricity Markets Have Incentives to Support Socially-Efficient Transmission Investments? *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that generation firms have in restructured electricity markets for supporting long-term transmission investments electricity markets, have the incentives to fund or support social-welfare-improving transmission investments.S. transmission system is under stress (Abraham, 2002). Growth of electricity demand and new generation capacity

382

Investigation of Enabling Wind Generations Employing Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Investigation of Enabling Wind Generations Employing Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Mahdi challenges such as mitigating variability. Plug-in hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) have been considered the variability in wind generation could be to use a fleet of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs

383

November 21, 2000 PV Lesson Plan 3 PV Array Generating Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 21, 2000 PV Lesson Plan 3 ­ PV Array Generating Electricity Prepared for the Oregon in Arrays: Solar Cells Generating Electricity Lesson Plan Content: In this lesson, students will learn about electricity. Objectives: Students will learn to use a tool called PV WATTS to calculate the output of PV

Oregon, University of

384

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources for electric power generation. i. Plant size ii.SYSTEMS Electric Power Generation Systems NonelectricFLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal resources for electric power generation. i. PlantOF GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS Electric Power Generation SystemsUSE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

RESEARCH ARTICLE The proteome survey of an electricity-generating organ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH ARTICLE The proteome survey of an electricity-generating organ (Torpedo californica electric organ) Javad Nazarian1 , Yetrib Hathout1 , Akos Vertes2 and Eric P. Hoffman1 1 Research Center Chondrichthyes. Electric rays have evolved the electric organ, which is similar to the mammalian neuromuscular

Vertes, Akos

387

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

388

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

389

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F.  Wollenburg, “Power Generation Operation and Control”, Commitment  with  Wind  Power  Generation:  Integrating Optimal investments in  power generation under centralized 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The economic impact of state ordered avoided cost rates for photovoltaic generated electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978 requires that electric utilities purchase electricity generated by small power producers (QFs) such as photovoltaic systems at rates that will encourage the ...

Bottaro, Drew

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A simulation solution of the integration of wind power into an electricity generating network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To effectively harness the power of wind electricity generation, significant infrastructure challenges exist. First, the individual wind turbines must be sited and constructed as part of a wind farm. Second, the wind farm must be connected to the electricity ...

Thomas F. Brady

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity from combustion of the waste wood (whether forcombustion is used for many purposes. For instance, a wood

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Shares of electricity generation from renewable energy sources up ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity.

394

Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The team of university and industry engineers, scientists, and project developers will evaluate the power capacity, efficiency, and economics of five commercially available ORC engines in collaboration with the equipment manufacturers. The geothermal ORC system will be installed at an oil field operated by Continental Resources, Inc. in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. Data and experience acquired can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

395

Feasibility investigation of the giromill for generation of electrical power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cyclogiro computer program, obtained from Prof. H. C. Larsen of the United States Air Force Institute of Technology, was modified to incorporate computation of blade loads for the normal operating and gust loading conditions. The program was also changed to allow computation of the effects of smoothing the blade rock angles in the region where they experienced large oscillations due to passing through a vortex shed by the previous blade. Using this program the various effects of rotor geometric parameters were investigated. Giromill configuration design concepts were explored. A baseline concept was adopted having an upper structural triangular tower extending through the lower support tower and supported by two main rotor bearings. Twenty-one different Giromill systems covering a power range of 120, 500 and 1500 kW were then synthesized. These were structurally analyzed and sized. An automatic electronic control concept built around existing equipment and employing state of the art techniques was developed. Preliminary cost estimates for generating electrical power from the Giromill systems were completed. Cost estimating relationships of the major items of equipment were formulated. 10 references. (auth)

Brulle, R.V.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Solar Electric Generating System II finite element analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On June 2, 1992, Landers` earthquake struck the Solar Electric Generating System II, located in Daggett, California. The 30 megawatt power station, operated by the Daggett Leasing Corporation (DLC), suffered substantial damage due to structural failures in the solar farm. These failures consisted of the separation of sliding joints supporting a distribution of parabolic glass mirrors. At separation, the mirrors fell to the ground and broke. It was the desire of the DLC and the Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and to redesign these joints so that, in the event of future quakes, costly breakage will be avoided. To accomplish this task, drawings of collector components were developed by the STDAC, from which a detailed finite element computer model of a solar collector was produced. This nonlinear dynamic model, which consisted of over 8,560 degrees of freedom, underwent model reduction to form a low order nonlinear dynamic model containing only 40 degrees of freedom. This model was then used as a design tool to estimate joint dynamics. Using this design tool, joint configurations were modified, and an acceptable joint redesign determined. The results of this analysis showed that the implementation of metal stops welded to support shafts for the purpose of preventing joint separation is a suitable joint redesign. Moreover, it was found that, for quakes of Landers` magnitude, mirror breakage due to enhanced vibration in the trough assembly is unlikely.

Dohner, J.L.; Anderson, J.R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

AVESTAR Center for Operational Excellence of Electricity Generation Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address industry challenges in attaining operational excellence for electricity generation plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM). This presentation will highlight the AVESTARTM Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of high-efficiency, near-zero-emission electricity generation plants. The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with full-scope operator training systems (OTSs) and 3D virtual immersive training systems (ITSs) into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. AVESTAR’s initial offering combines--for the first time--a “gasification with CO2 capture” process simulator with a “combined-cycle” power simulator together in a single OTS/ITS solution for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option for power generation, especially when capturing and storing CO2 is necessary to satisfy emission targets. The AVESTAR training program offers a variety of courses that merge classroom learning, simulator-based OTS learning in a control-room operations environment, and immersive learning in the interactive 3D virtual plant environment or ITS. All of the courses introduce trainees to base-load plant operation, control, startups, and shutdowns. Advanced courses require participants to become familiar with coordinated control, fuel switching, power-demand load shedding, and load following, as well as to problem solve equipment and process malfunctions. Designed to ensure work force development, training is offered for control room and plant field operators, as well as engineers and managers. Such comprehensive simulator-based instruction allows for realistic training without compromising worker, equipment, and environmental safety. It also better prepares operators and engineers to manage the plant closer to economic constraints while minimizing or avoiding the impact of any potentially harmful, wasteful, or inefficient events. The AVESTAR Center is also used to augment graduate and undergraduate engineering education in the areas of process simulation, dynamics, control, and safety. Students and researchers gain hands-on simulator-based training experience and learn how the commercial-scale power plants respond dynamically to changes in manipulated inputs, such as coal feed flow rate and power demand. Students also analyze how the regulatory control system impacts power plant performance and stability. In addition, students practice start-up, shutdown, and malfunction scenarios. The 3D virtual ITSs are used for plant familiarization, walk-through, equipment animations, and safety scenarios. To further leverage the AVESTAR facilities and simulators, NETL and its university partners are pursuing an innovative and collaborative R&D program. In the area of process control, AVESTAR researchers are developing enhanced strategies for regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control, including gasifier and gas turbine lead, as well as advanced process control using model predictive control (MPC) techniques. Other AVESTAR R&D focus areas include high-fidelity equipment modeling using partial differential equations, dynamic reduced order modeling, optimal sensor placement, 3D virtual plant simulation, and modern grid. NETL and its partners plan to continue building the AVESTAR portfolio of dynamic simulators, immersive training systems, and advanced research capabilities to satisfy industry’s growing need for training and experience with the operation and control of clean energy plants. Future dynamic simulators under development include natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) and supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC) plants with post-combustion CO2 capture. These dynamic simulators are targeted for us

Zitney, Stephen

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Support for solar power and renewable electricity generation at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is poised to play an important role in supporting national plans for renewable electricity generation. As distributed… (more)

Krausz, Brian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Year-to-date natural gas use for electric power generation is down ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas used to generate electricity so far this year is below the high level during the comparable 2012 period, when low natural gas prices led to significant ...

400

Fuel used in electricity generation is projected to shift over the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Projected fuel prices and economic growth are key factors influencing the future electricity generation mix. The price of natural gas, coal's chief competitor, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants? EIA has historical data on the average annual operation, maintenance, ...

402

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, ... How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants?

403

Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion ...

404

Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes the details of purchasing green power. Discussion covers topics like renewable electricity, renewable energy certificates, and on-site renewable generation.

405

The Efficiency of Electricity Generation in the U.S. After Restructuri...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

costs and restructuring has a larger impact on generation than on other segments of the electricity industry, such as transmission and distribution, which are likely to remain...

406

Electricity-independent Generation of Si Based on the Use of Rice ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Electricity-independent Generation of Si Based on the Use of Rice Husk: A ... Delivering a National Process Design Unit with Industry Support.

407

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AEO 2007 high fuel price forecast Coal prices follow AEOcoal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid… (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Method of generating electricity using an endothermic coal gasifier and MHD generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method of generating electrical power wherein a mixture of carbonaceous material and water is heated to initiate and sustain the endothermic reaction of carbon and water thereby providing a gasified stream containing carbon monoxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and waste streams of hydrogen sulfide and ash. The gasified stream and an ionizing seed material and pressurized air from a preheater go to a burner for producing ionized combustion gases having a temperature of about 5000.degree. to about 6000.degree. F. which are accelerated to a velocity of about 1000 meters per second and passed through an MHD generator to generate DC power and thereafter through a diffuser to reduce the velocity. The gases from the diffuser go to an afterburner and from there in heat exchange relationship with the gasifier to provide heat to sustain the endothermic reaction of carbon and water and with the preheater to preheat the air prior to combustion with the gasified stream. Energy from the afterburner can also be used to energize other parts of the system.

Marchant, David D. (Richland, WA); Lytle, John M. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Electricity generation from coal and natural gas both increased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Historically, the average fuel cost of operating a combined-cycle natural gas generator exceeded that for a coal-fired generator. Until 2010, ...

411

Electricity generation from coal and natural gas both increased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal generation shares declined in some regions ... the share of natural gas-fired power generation is most influenced by the availability of hydroelectric power, ...

412

The Efficiency of Electricity Generation in the U.S. After Restructuring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Efficiency of Electricity Generation in the U.S. After Restructuring The Efficiency of Electricity Generation in the U.S. After Restructuring Speaker(s): Catherine Wolfram Date: June 9, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Over the past eleven years, US electric utilities have faced significant changes to their competitive and regulatory environments. The industry restructuring is designed to enhance economic efficiency at all levels of operation, including distribution, transmission, generation and retail services. The gains are likely to be largest in electric generation because generation costs are the largest component of end-use costs and restructuring has a larger impact on generation than on other segments of the electricity industry, such as transmission and distribution, which are likely to remain more heavily regulated. This paper evaluates changes in

413

Survey and screening of intermediate-size photovoltaic total energy and electric applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the principal objectives of this photovoltaic mission analysis effort has been to identify and evaluate applications for photovoltaic solar energy conversion that could lead to significant contributions to the national energy supply and that would provide attractive opportunities for application experiments aimed at stimulating the adoption of photovoltaic technology. The scope of the study has included applications both for electric-only photovoltaic (PV) systems and for photovoltaic total energy systems (PTES), i.e., systems that provide both photovoltaic electricity and solar thermal energy to meet all or part of the energy demand at a single load point or a group of related load points. In either case, both flat-plate and concentrating systems have been considered and it has been assumed that the thermal energy is collected in and transported by the fluid used in an active cooling system for the photovoltaic cells. Because the efficiency of photovoltaic devices decreases rapidly with increasing temperature and because the operational lifetime of such devices is reduced by prolonged operation at elevated temperatures, a practical upper limit of about 200/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) was assumed for the temperature at which arrays can be allowed to be operated. This limitation, in turn, places an upper bound on the temperature at which solar thermal energy is available in PTES applications. An initial screening aimed at identifying the most promising applications has therefore been required, with the expectation that detailed evaluation will be made of only the higher-ranking candidates. A description of the screening procedure that was adopted and a discussion of the results are presented.

Rattin, E.J.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Large mergers drive changes in ownership of electric generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphics on energy, facts, issues, and ... (17.5%), El Paso Electric Co. (15.8%), Southern California Edison (15.8%), Public Service ...

415

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission vision for wind integration.   www.aep.com/Corporation.  Eastern wind integration and transmission a recent study on wind integration (American Electric 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

417

Coordinating Fuel Inventory and Electric Power Generation Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the problem of hedging between the natural gas and electric power markets. Based on multiple forecasts for natural gas prices, natural gas demand, and electricity prices, a stochastic optimization model advises a decision maker on when to buy or sell natural gas and when to transform gas into electricity. For relatively small models, branch-and-bound solves the problem to optimality. Larger models are solved using Benders decomposition and Lagrangian relaxation. We apply our approach to the system of an electric utility and succeed in solving problems with 50,000 binary variables in less than 4 minutes to within 1.16% of the optimal value.

Samer Takriti; Chonawee Supatgiat; Lilian S.-Y. Wu

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Powered Generation: Canadians, Electricity, and Everyday Life.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Most studies of electricity in Canada have examined the process of electrification from a business or political perspective, emphasizing the role of private and public… (more)

Gucciardo, Dorotea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Western Electricity Coordinating Council California This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA),...

420

Electric generator dispatch depends on system demand and the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum › Weekly Petroleum Status Report ... for electricity changes over the course of the ... for a future article? Send your feedback ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Japanese power companies using more LNG to generate electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... which led to the accident at Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and subsequent outages at other plants.

422

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper provides information on the cost of building new electricity power plants. These cost estimates are critical inputs in the development of energy projections and analyses.

Michael Leff

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Market for Coal Based Electric Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's initiative to effectively remove environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for producing electricity and transportation fuels through better technology....

424

Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Focus Area: Water power Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.orgwebinar-renewable-energy-electricity-gene...

425

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in November 2005 during a natural gas price spike. Figure 226. electricity and natural gas prices for January 2004 tonatural gas price ..

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 during a natural gas price spike. Figure 22 through6. electricity and natural gas prices for January 2004 togas price ..

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Stirling engines in generating heat and electricity for micro: CHP systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an analysis of different generating heat and electricity systems with Stirling engine is made from the point of view of benefits and limitations, both operational and economic and environmental. Stirling engine has the ability to work ... Keywords: biomass, fossil fuels, generating heat and electricity system, m-CHP, stirling engine

Dan Scarpete; Krisztina Uzuneanu

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of New York State electricity and natural gas rates. DER_CAMElectricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State 4.4.1.2 RateElectricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State Standby rate

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Superconductivity for Electric Systems Program Review LANL Contributions to GE HTS Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-section · Develop a heat generation profile => thermal analysis #12;Superconductivity for Electric Systems Program analysis of the coolant path ­ Investigated affect of rotation on heat load · Completed initial simulationsSuperconductivity for Electric Systems Program Review LANL Contributions to GE HTS Generator

430

Investigating the electric power distribution system (EPDS) bus voltage in the presence of distributed generation (DG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the Electric Power Distribution System (EPDS) bus voltage in the presence of Distributed Generation (DG). Distribution Company's (Discos) planner endeavor to develop new planning strategies for their network in order to serve ... Keywords: PSCAD, distributed generation, electric power distribution system, islanding, power quality, voltage stability

Hasham Khan; Mohammad Ahmad Choudhry; Tahir Mahmood; Aamir Hanif

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Nuclear electric generation: Political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia, the largest archipelagic country with a population the fourth biggest in the world, is now in the process of development. It needs a large quantity of energy electricity to meet the industrial and household demands. The currently available generating capacity is not sufficient to meet the electricity demand for the rapidly growing industries and the increasing population. In order to meet the future demand for electricity, new generating capacity is required to be added to the current capacity. Nuclear electricity generation is one possible alternative to supplement Indonesia`s future demand of electricity. This thesis investigates the possibility of developing nuclear electricity generation in Indonesia, considering the political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia.

Waliyo

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world, with much work aiming to optimize engine and battery for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, the general expectation has been that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of PHEVs because the recharging will occur during off-peak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough so that capacity planning will respond adequately. This expectation does not consider that drivers will control the timing of recharging, and their inclination will be to plug in when convenient, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of adding load from PHEVs onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require the addition of new electric capacity and increase the utilization of existing capacity. Usage patterns of local distribution grids will change, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to meet the demand for recharging PHEVs will depend on the region of the country and the timing of recharging. This paper analyzes the potential impacts of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and associated emission levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 regions specified by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), and on which the data and analysis in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 are based (Figure ES-1). The estimates of power plant supplies and regional hourly electricity demand come from publicly available sources from EIA and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Electricity requirements for PHEVs are based on analysis from the Electric Power Research Institute, with an optimistic projection of 25% market penetration by 2020, involving a mixture of sedans and sport utility vehicles. The calculations were done using the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model, a model developed over the past 12 years to evaluate a wide variety of critical electricity sector issues. Seven scenarios were run for each region for 2020 and 2030, for a total of 182 scenarios. In addition to a base scenario of no PHEVs, the authors modeled scenarios assuming that vehicles were either plugged in starting at 5:00 p.m. (evening) or at 10:00 p.m.(night) and left until fully charged. Three charging rates were examined: 120V/15A (1.4 kW), 120V/20A (2 kW), and 220V/30A (6 kW). Most regions will need to build additional capacity or utilize demand response to meet the added demand from PHEVs in the evening charging scenarios, especially by 2030 when PHEVs have a larger share of the installed vehicle base and make a larger demand on the system. The added demands of evening charging, especially at high power levels, can impact the overall demand peaks and reduce the reserve margins for a region's system. Night recharging has little potential to influence peak loads, but will still influence the amount and type of generation.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world, with much work aiming to optimize engine and battery for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, the general expectation has been that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of PHEVs because the recharging will occur during off-peak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough so that capacity planning will respond adequately. This expectation does not consider that drivers will control the timing of recharging, and their inclination will be to plug in when convenient, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of adding load from PHEVs onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require the addition of new electric capacity and increase the utilization of existing capacity. Usage patterns of local distribution grids will change, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to meet the demand for recharging PHEVs will depend on the region of the country and the timing of recharging. This paper analyzes the potential impacts of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and associated emission levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 regions specified by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), and on which the data and analysis in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 are based (Figure ES-1). The estimates of power plant supplies and regional hourly electricity demand come from publicly available sources from EIA and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Electricity requirements for PHEVs are based on analysis from the Electric Power Research Institute, with an optimistic projection of 25% market penetration by 2020, involving a mixture of sedans and sport utility vehicles. The calculations were done using the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model, a model developed over the past 12 years to evaluate a wide variety of critical electricity sector issues. Seven scenarios were run for each region for 2020 and 2030, for a total of 182 scenarios. In addition to a base scenario of no PHEVs, the authors modeled scenarios assuming that vehicles were either plugged in starting at 5:00 p.m. (evening) or at 10:00 p.m.(night) and left until fully charged. Three charging rates were examined: 120V/15A (1.4 kW), 120V/20A (2 kW), and 220V/30A (6 kW). Most regions will need to build additional capacity or utilize demand response to meet the added demand from PHEVs in the evening charging scenarios, especially by 2030 when PHEVs have a larger share of the installed vehicle base and make a larger demand on the system. The added demands of evening charging, especially at high power levels, can impact the overall demand peaks and reduce the reserve margins for a region's system. Night recharging has little potential to influence peak loads, but will still influence the amount and type of generation.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Uniqueness of electrical currents in a network of finite total resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that if the sum of the resistances of an electrical network $N$ is finite, then there is a unique electrical current in $N$ provided we do not allow, in a sense, any flow to escape to infinity.

Georgakopoulos, Agelos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011). Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download February 17, 2012 EIS-0476: Notice of Adoption of Final Environmental Impact Statement Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4, Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Support Funding for Construction, Burke County, GA

436

Estimating Water Needs to Meet 2025 Electricity Generating Capacity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(fossil, nuclear, or biomass) to heat water to steam that is used to drive a turbine-generator. Steam exhausted from the turbine is condensed and recycled to a steam generator or...

437

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables (Information and data on nuclear power reactors Generation: by State and Reactor. Annual Energy Review, ...

438

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation Facilities. California Energy Commission,Production for 2001. California Energy Commission,Power Plants. California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA.

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Microgrids in the Evolving Electricity Generation and Delivery Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the centralized generation-transmission-distributiongeneration, long distance energy transmission over a network of high voltage lines, then distribution

Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Natural gas and renewable shares of electricity generation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The mix of fuels used for electricity generation in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ... ...

442

An electrical modeling and fuzzy logic control of a fuel cell generation system  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cell generation system consists of a stack, a reformer, and converters. The stack generates DC power by electrochemical reaction. For system design and analysis, it is necessary to obtain electrical models. Simplified electrical models of a fuel cell generation system for system control are proposed. Then using the electrical models, system performance of a fuel cell generation system in which power is boosted by step-up choppers is analyzed. A fuzzy controller is designed for improved system performance. Simulation and experimental results confirmed the high performance capability of the designed system.

Kim, Y.H.; Kim, S.S. [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States are undergoing unprecedented structural changes as a result of the confluence of regulatory, competitive, and technological forces. This paper will introduce the role of distributed generation technologies in evolving electric markets and will review both current and emerging distributed generation technologies aimed at retail industrial, commercial and residential markets. This paper will draw upon several Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) and member utility case studies involving the assessment of distributed generation in premium power service, standby power and industrial cogeneration applications. In addition, EPRI products and services which can help evaluate energy service options involving distributed generation will also be briefly reviewed.

Rastler, D. M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",76231696,85050801,907922...

445

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4493024,4286431,4167054,...

446

Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on renewable energy, and to develop efficient electricity storage. Renewable energy--such as wind energy. However, most renewable energy is inh, who is extremely instrumental in guiding my research on energy. His insights have significantly

447

Electrical ship demand modeling for future generation warships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of future warships will require increased reliance on accurate prediction of electrical demand as the shipboard consumption continues to rise. Current US Navy policy, codified in design standards, dictates methods ...

Sievenpiper, Bartholomew J. (Bartholomew Jay)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for back-up, peaking, or baseload power and may include anof pollutants emitted from baseload electricity generationcurve, i.e. , in peaking, baseload and load-following modes.

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Transmission Pricing Issues for Electricity Generation From Renewable Resources  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article discusses how the resolution of transmission pricing issues which have arisen under the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) open access environment may affect the prospects for renewable-based electricity.

Information Center

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

month are sorted by the real-time price and plotted on theand, in some cases, real-time electricity prices. Smaller DGthe TOU rates. Real-time clearing prices for zone SP15 in

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electric Generating and Transmission Facilities – Emissions Management (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section details responsibilities of the Iowa Utility Board, including the policies for electricity rate-making for the state of Iowa, certification of natural gas providers, and other policies...

452

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

Ã?nay, Devrim

453

Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This information package is intended to provide an overview of 'Coal's resurgence in electric power generation' by examining proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under consideration in the USA. The results contained in this package are derived from information that is available from various tracking organizations and news groups. Although comprehensive, this information is not intended to represent every possible plant under consideration but is intended to illustrate the large potential that exists for new coal-fired power plants. It should be noted that many of the proposed plants are likely not to be built. For example, out of a total portfolio (gas, coal, etc.) of 500 GW of newly planned power plant capacity announced in 2001, 91 GW have been already been scrapped or delayed. 25 refs.

NONE

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Recent mix of electric generating capacity additions more diverse ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas combined-cycle plants accounted for about 68% of the total natural gas-fired capacity added between 1999 and 2010.

455

Annual Electric Generator data - EIA-860 data file  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The "Boiler_Gen" identifies which boilers are associated with each generator; the "Boiler_Cool" tab shows which cooling systems are associated with each boiler; ...

456

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Almost all of these factors can vary by region, as do capacity factors for renewable generation, operations and maintenance costs associated with individual ...

457

The Impact of Wind Power Generation on Wholesale Electricity Price ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

price for power generation are examined to forecast LNG price for power genera- tion. Information on future power plant's construction and decommission plan ...

458

New electric generators typically come online at the start of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... Other generators may target an online date before the end of a particular year for financial or tax purposes, ...

459

New electric generators typically come online at the start of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Taking natural gas-fired generators as an example ... the trend toward summer online dates is more pronounced for gas combustion turbines and combined-cycle units, ...

460

Shares of electricity generation from renewable energy sources ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In 2011, the states with the largest shares of generation coming from renewables, including hydro, were: Idaho (93%), Washington (82%), and Oregon ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of generation and transmission lines deployment.   b.major interstate transmission lines. These require economicchoice  for  the  transmission  line  expansion  to  reduce 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collective output isQg, and intermittent generators (which we will assume here is wind generation) whose output is assumed to have a fixed and stochastic component Qw,0+ ?w. We assume that E[?w] = 0 and V ar[?w] = ?2w. The intermittent output is produced by a... conventional generation assets. In equilibrium demand matches supply: DT = Qg +Qw,0 + ?w, (2) and using (1) gives: p = D0 ? b(Qg +Qw,0 + ?w). (3) We assume that a conventional generator has a quadratic cost function: Cg(Qg) = ?Qg + ? 2Q 2 g, (4) and thus...

Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

463

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies, especially PV. In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their...

464

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... by the costs has changed significantly. Prior estimates were for a highly efficient plant employing gasification and a combined cycle generator; the new ...

465

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kauai...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

coming from renewable energy by 2023. vii List of Acronyms Btu British thermal unit CSP concentrating solar power DER distributed energy resource DG distributed generation DOE...

466

Shares of electricity generation from renewable energy sources ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Non-hydroelectric renewable generation has increased in many states over the past decade. In 2011, Maine had the highest percentage of non-hydroelectric renewable ...

467

Electric generator dispatch depends on system demand and the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The type of generators with the lowest variable costs are nuclear, hydroelectric, and renewable power (wind and solar). For economic and technical reasons, ...

468

Electricity generation from coal and natural gas both ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... the share of natural gas-fired power generation is most influenced by the availability of hydroelectric power, ...

469

EPRI Ergonomics Handbook for the Electric Power Industry: Ergonomic Design Handbook for Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Research Program has provided ergonomic information to the electric energy industry workforce since 1999. This is the fifth EPRI ergonomics handbook; it provides a framework and specific guidelines for decisionmaking that will apply ergonomic principles to the design of electric generating stations. Fossil-fueled power plant operation and maintenance is physically strenuous, and it may contribute to development of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) such as carp...

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

470

Role of Renewable Energy in Sustainable Electricity Generation Portfolios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The future electric power system is likely to use far more renewable energy, including biomass, geothermal, small hydro, and intermittent renewable resources such as wind and solar power, than today (3.4% of U.S. primary energy and 2.3% of electricity during 2004, U.S. Energy Information Agency). Exogenous factors such as global climate change and high fossil fuel prices are leading policymakers and energy companies to seek more sustainable energy futures. But how much can renewable energy contribute? Th...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

471

Pipelines to Power Lines: Gas Transportation for Electricity Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas-fired power generation represents a major growth market for the natural gas industry; but the large, high pressure, highly variable loads required for individual power generators can be difficult to serve. This report, cosponsored by the Gas Research Institute and EPRI, is a design stage assessment of the engineering and costs of the pipelines needed to handle these types of loads.

1995-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

472

Electric power generating plant having direct-coupled steam and compressed-air cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, M.K.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

473

Electric power generating plant having direct coupled steam and compressed air cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, Monte K. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Optimal control of generator resynchronisation in electric power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimal control techniques are discussed for the resynchronisation of a steam turbine unit in an electric power system after it has lost synchronism. A time optimal control is derived and the resulting bang-bang control law is first simulated on an analogue ...

D. Rosenfeld; F. J. Evans

1972-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Use of Geothermal Energy for Electric Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and its 1,000 member systems are involved in the research, development and utilization of many different types of supplemental and alternative energy resources. We share a strong commitment to the wise and efficient use of this country's energy resources as the ultimate answer to our national prosperity and economic growth. WRECA is indebted to the United States Department of Energy for funding the NRECA/DOE Geothermal Workshop which was held in San Diego, California in October, 1980. We would also like to express our gratitude to each of the workshop speakers who gave of their time, talent and experience so that rural electric systems in the Western U. S. might gain a clearer understanding of the geothermal potential in their individual service areas. The participants were also presented with practical, expert opinion regarding the financial and technical considerations of using geothermal energy for electric power production. The organizers of this conference and all of those involved in planning this forum are hopeful that it will serve as an impetus toward the full utilization of geothermal energy as an important ingredient in a more energy self-sufficient nation. The ultimate consumer of the rural electric system, the member-owner, expects the kind of leadership that solves the energy problems of tomorrow by fully utilizing the resources at our disposal today.

Mashaw, John M.; Prichett, III, Wilson (eds.)

1980-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

476

TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relative to increases in its consumption at a higher rate than all but two states (in part because California is the lowest user of electricity per capita and per dollar of gross state product in the west). Annual WSCC consumption increased 64% from 1977 to 1998, but California's consumption grew by only 44

California at Berkeley. University of

477

The Installed Base of Distributed Electrical Generating Resources in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of electric power at or near electric loads, referred to here as distributed resources (DR), has received considerable attention during recent years, with some experts projecting that DR technologies may provide up to 30 percent of all new generation resources installed in the United States within a couple of decades. There are, in fact, many electric generators in place that are or could be used as DR. There has not, however, been a concerted effort to quantify this fleet nor to understan...

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

478

Air Quality Impact of Distributed Generation of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the latest USEPA eGrid (USEPA, 2008), and is presentedfactors are taken from the eGrid and the stack parametersand are listed in both eGrid and NEI; 2) Total capacity of

Jing, Qiguo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

International Conference on Solar Concentrators for the Generation of Electricity or Hydrogen: Book of Abstracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The International Conference on Solar Concentrators for the Generation of Electricity or Hydrogen provides an opportunity to learn about current significant research on solar concentrators for generating electricity or hydrogen. The conference will emphasize in-depth technical discussions of recent achievements in technologies that convert concentrated solar radiation to electricity or hydrogen, with primary emphasis on photovoltaic (PV) technologies. Very high-efficiency solar cells--above 37%--were recently developed, and are now widely used for powering satellites. This development demands that we take a fresh look at the potential of solar concentrators for generating low-cost electricity or hydrogen. Solar electric concentrators could dramatically overtake other PV technologies in the electric utility marketplace because of the low capital cost of concentrator manufacturing facilities and the larger module size of concentrators. Concentrating solar energy also has advantages for th e solar generation of hydrogen. Around the world, researchers and engineers are developing solar concentrator technologies for entry into the electricity generation market and several have explored the use of concentrators for hydrogen production. The last conference on the subject of solar electric concentrators was held in November of 2003 and proved to be an important opportunity for researchers and developers to share new and crucial information that is helping to stimulate projects in their countries.

McConnell, R.; Symko-Davies, M.; Hayden, H.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Annual Electric Generator data - EIA-860 data file  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

equipment data collected on the Form EIA-860. The "BoilerGen" identifies which boilers are associated with each generator; the "BoilerCool" tab shows which cooling systems...

482

2001 EPRI International Maintenance Conference: Maintaining Reliable Electric Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Energy Conversion Division organized and presented a three-day conference on fossil and nuclear generation plant maintenance during August 2001, in Houston, Texas. This CD presents the proceedings of that conference.

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

483

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beach Gen Station 1: Duke Energy Moss Landing LLC 2: Moss2: So Cal Edison Co 1: Duke Energy-South Bay Power PL 2:Beach Generating Station Duke Energy Moss Landing LLC AES

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Simplest AB-Thermonuclear Space Propulsion and Electric Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author applies, develops and researches mini-sized Micro- AB Thermonuclear Reactors for space propulsion and space power systems. These small engines directly convert the high speed charged particles produced in the thermonuclear reactor into vehicle thrust or vehicle electricity with maximum efficiency. The simplest AB-thermonuclear propulsion offered allows spaceships to reach speeds of 20,000 50,000 km/s (1/6 of light speed) for fuel ratio 0.1 and produces a huge amount of useful electric energy. Offered propulsion system permits flight to any planet of our Solar system in short time and to the nearest non-Sun stars by E-being or intellectual robots during a single human life period. Key words: AB-propulsion, thermonuclear propulsion, space propulsion, thermonuclear power system.

Bolonkin, A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Simplest AB-Thermonuclear Space Propulsion and Electric Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author applies, develops and researches mini-sized Micro- AB Thermonuclear Reactors for space propulsion and space power systems. These small engines directly convert the high speed charged particles produced in the thermonuclear reactor into vehicle thrust or vehicle electricity with maximum efficiency. The simplest AB-thermonuclear propulsion offered allows spaceships to reach speeds of 20,000 50,000 km/s (1/6 of light speed) for fuel ratio 0.1 and produces a huge amount of useful electric energy. Offered propulsion system permits flight to any planet of our Solar system in short time and to the nearest non-Sun stars by E-being or intellectual robots during a single human life period. Key words: AB-propulsion, thermonuclear propulsion, space propulsion, thermonuclear power system.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

486

Assessing the Long-Term System Value of Intermittent Electric Generation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This research investigates the economic penetration and system-wide effects of large-scale intermittent technologies in an electric generation system. The research extends the standard screening curve analysis to optimize the penetration and system structure with intermittent technologies. The analysis is based on hour-by-hour electric demands and intermittent generation. A theoretical framework is developed to find an expression for the marginal value of an intermittent technology as a function of the average system marginal cost, the capacity factor of the generator, and the covariance between the generator's hourly production and the hourly system marginal cost. A series of model runs are made examining the penetration of wind and photovoltaic in a simple electric generation system. These illustrate the conclusions in the theoretical analysis and illustrate the effects that large-scale intermittent penetration has on the structure of the generation system. In the long-term, adding intermittent generation to a system allows us to restructure the dispatchable generation capacity to a mix with lower capital cost. It is found that large scale intermittent generation tends to reduce the optimal capacity and production of baseload generators and increase the capacity and production of intermediate generators, although the extent to which this occurs depends strongly on the pattern of production from the intermediate generators. It is also shown that the marginal value of intermittent generation declines as it penetrates. The analysis investigates the specific mechanism through which this occurs.

Lamont, A D

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

487

Assessing the Long-Term System Value of Intermittent Electric Generation Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research investigates the economic penetration and system-wide effects of large-scale intermittent technologies in an electric generation system. The research extends the standard screening curve analysis to optimize the penetration and system structure with intermittent technologies. The analysis is based on hour-by-hour electric demands and intermittent generation. A theoretical framework is developed to find an expression for the marginal value of an intermittent technology as a function of the average system marginal cost, the capacity factor of the generator, and the covariance between the generator's hourly production and the hourly system marginal cost. A series of model runs are made examining the penetration of wind and photovoltaic in a simple electric generation system. These illustrate the conclusions in the theoretical analysis and illustrate the effects that large-scale intermittent penetration has on the structure of the generation system. In the long-term, adding intermittent generation to a system allows us to restructure the dispatchable generation capacity to a mix with lower capital cost. It is found that large scale intermittent generation tends to reduce the optimal capacity and production of baseload generators and increase the capacity and production of intermediate generators, although the extent to which this occurs depends strongly on the pattern of production from the intermediate generators. It is also shown that the marginal value of intermittent generation declines as it penetrates. The analysis investigates the specific mechanism through which this occurs.

Lamont, A D

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

488

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Characteristics of New and Stock Generating Capacities, by Plant Type Total Capital Costs Size Overnight Costs (2) of Typical New Plant New Plant Type (MW) (2010 $/kW) ($2010 million) Scrubbed Coal 1300 2809 3652 Integrated Coal-Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) 1200 3182 3818 IGCC w/Carbon Sequestration 520 5287 2749 Conv. Gas/Oil Combined Cycle 540 967 522 Adv. Gas/Oil Combined Cycle 400 991 396 Conv. Combustion Turbine 85 961 82 Adv. Combustion Turbine 210 658 138 Fuel Cell 10 6752 68 Advanced Nuclear 2236 5275 11795 Municipal Solid Waste 50 8237 412 Conventional Hydropower (3) 500 2221 1111 Wind 100 2409 241 Stock Plant Type 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Fossil Fuel Steam Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) Nuclear Energy Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Plant use of electricity is included in heat rate calculations; however, transmission and distribution losses of the electric grid are excluded.

489

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Electric Capacity Factors, by Year and Fuel Type (1) Conventional Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Solar/PV Wind Total 1990 59% 17% 23% 66% 45% 13% 18% 46% 1991 59% 18% 22% 70% 43% 17% 18% 46% 1992 59% 14% 22% 71% 38% 13% 18% 45% 1993 61% 16% 21% 70% 41% 16% 19% 46% 1994 61% 15% 22% 74% 38% 17% 23% 46% 1995 62% 11% 22% 77% 45% 17% 21% 47% 1996 65% 11% 19% 76% 52% 18% 22% 48% 1997 66% 13% 20% 72% 51% 17% 23% 48% 1998 67% 20% 23% 79% 47% 17% 20% 50% 1999 67% 20% 22% 85% 46% 15% 23% 51% 2000 70% 18% 22% 88% 40% 15% 27% 51% 2001 68% 20% 21% 89% 31% 16% 20% 48% 2002 69% 16% 18% 90% 38% 16% 27% 46% 2003 71% 21% 14% 88% 40% 15% 21% 44% 2004 71% 22% 16% 90% 39% 17% 25% 44% 2005 72% 22% 17% 89% 40% 15% 23% 45% 2006 71% 11% 19% 90% 42% 14% 27% 45% 2007 72% 12% 21% 92% 36% 14% 24% 45% 2008 71% 8% 20% 91% 37% 18% 26% 44% 2009 63% 7% 21% 90% 40% 16% 25% 42% 2010 (2) 65% 6% 23% 91% 37% 17% 29% 43% Note(s): Source(s) 1) EIA defines capacity factor to be "the ratio of the electrical energy produced by a generating unit for the period of time considered to the

490

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Total (All Sectors) by State, 2011 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts...

491

Floating offshore wind farms : demand planning & logistical challenges of electricity generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Floating offshore wind farms are likely to become the next paradigm in electricity generation from wind energy mainly because of the near constant high wind speeds in an offshore environment as opposed to the erratic wind ...

Nnadili, Christopher Dozie, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Did English generators play cournot? : capacity withholding in the electricity pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generators can raise the price of power by withholding their plant from the market. We discuss two ways in which this could have affected prices in the England and Wales Pool. Withholding low-cost capacity which ...

Green, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

494

Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

Heath, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue gas streams to electricity. The NTU-effectiveness method, exergy, and ...

Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

A two-phase spherical electric machine for generating rotating uniform magnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the design and construction of a novel two-phase spherical electric machine that generates rotating uniform magnetic fields, known as a fluxball machine. Alternative methods for producing uniform ...

Lawler, Clinton T. (Clinton Thomas)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Optimal Generation Expansion Planning for Electric Utilities Using Decomposition and Probabilistic Simulation Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three related methods are presented for determining the least-cost generating capacity investments required to meet given future demands for electricity. The models are based on application of large-scale mathematical ...

Bloom, Jeremy A.

498

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Electric and Magnetic Field Exposure Levels (0 to 3000 Hz) near Residential Photovoltaic Energy Generation Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric and magnetic field levels associated with two residential photovoltaic energy generation facilities were characterized in this study. This measurement evaluation included static (direct current [DC]) magnetic fields and power-frequency alternating current (AC) electric and magnetic fields (up to 3,000 Hz).The major source of DC and AC magnetic fields associated with a residential solar facility is the power inverter that converts DC to AC electricity. In close proximity to one ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Using coalitions of wind generators and electric vehicles for effective energy market participation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind power is becoming a significant source of electricity in many countries. However, the inherent uncertainty of wind generators does not allow them to participate in the forward electricity markets. In this paper, we foster a tighter integration of ... Keywords: coalition formation, energy and emissions, organisations

Matteo Vasirani; Sascha Ossowski; Ramachandra Kota; Renato L. G. Cavalcante; Nicholas R. Jennings

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z