National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for total electricity consumption

  1. Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

  2. Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total...

  3. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  4. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  5. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  6. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  7. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  8. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  9. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  10. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square...

  11. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity...

  12. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  13. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  14. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  15. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  16. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  17. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  18. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  19. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  20. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  2. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  3. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using...

  4. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  5. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  6. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  7. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" ...

  8. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" ...

  9. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption ... 9:10:34 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption ...

  10. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption ... 9:10:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption ...

  11. Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    loads account for an increasingly large portion of commercial electricity consumption. ... This includes analysis of their unit energy consumption and annual electricity consumption ...

  12. Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity...

  13. New Jersey Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Jersey Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption New Jersey Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  14. New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  15. New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  16. West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  17. Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  18. North Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  19. North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  20. Minnesota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  1. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2006-03-07

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  2. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2008-09-02

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  3. Table 5a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using District Heat (thousand) Total District Heat Consumption...

  4. Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ...

  5. Table A13. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region ... Office of Energy Markets and End" "Use, Energy End Use and ...

  6. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    electricity net consumption for the U.S., Europe, China, India, and the rest of the world. ... United States Europe China India Rest of World World Total 1980 284.69 471.88 ...

  7. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector November 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC ...

  8. Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization and Savings Potential in 2008 by Building Type | Department of Energy Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption Characterization and Savings Potential in 2008 by Building Type Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption Characterization and Savings Potential in 2008 by Building Type Commercial miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) are generally defined as all electric loads except those related to main systems for heating,

  9. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btu...

  10. Table 3a. Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3a. Natural Gas Consumption per Sq Ft Table 3a. Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Natural Gas...

  11. Table C10. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per Square Foot (kWh)","per...

  12. Maine Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

  13. Connecticut Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  14. Washington Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  15. Arizona Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Arizona Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  16. New Hampshire Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

  17. ,"Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"District Heat Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  18. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  19. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Below is...

  20. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Fact 840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Excel file with ...

  1. "Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a

  2. "Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of

  3. "Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent

  4. Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 ...

  5. "Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2...

  6. "Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,20...

  7. Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial ... Power Plants Into Energy-Use Sectors," at end of section. * Totals may not equal sum of ...

  8. Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2012-09-04

    Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods are described. According to one aspect, an electrical energy consumption control apparatus includes processing circuitry configured to receive a signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by a plurality of loads at a site, to compare the signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by the plurality of loads at the site with a desired substantially sinusoidal waveform of current of electrical energy which is received at the site from an electrical power system, and to use the comparison to control an amount of the electrical energy which is consumed by at least one of the loads of the site.

  9. Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and...

  10. Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity - Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity With data for 2010 | Release Date: December 11, 2012 | Next Release Date: Suspended Previous Issues year: 2009 (pdf) 2008(pdf) 2007(pdf) 2006(pdf) 2005(pdf) 2004(pdf) 2000(pdf) 1998(pdf) Go Summary U.S. renewable energy consumption grew by 6 percent, from 7.600 quadrillion Btu in 2009 to 8.090 quadrillion Btu in 2010. The relative share of renewable energy to total energy consumption has grown to 8 percent in 2010. Of the

  11. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    India's Housing Sector - Energy Information Administration Canadian Energy Demand Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector SERIES: Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis Canadian Energy Demand Release date: June 2, 2015 The residential sector is one of the main end-use sectors in Canada accounting for 16.7% of total end-use site energy consumption in 2009 (computed from NRCan 2012. pp, 4-5). In this year, the residential sector accounted for 54.5% of buildings total site

  12. Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 ... See Note 3, "Electricity Imports and Exports," at end of section. 3Natural gas, plus a ...

  13. Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant ... Plants Into Energy-Use Sectors," at end of section. * Totals may not equal sum ...

  14. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in this table do not include enclosed malls and strip malls. In the 1999 CBECS, total fuel oil consumption in malls was not statistically significant. (*)Value rounds to zero...

  15. Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 ...

  16. "Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE"

  17. "Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE"

  18. "Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a

  19. "Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE"

  20. "Table A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  2. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil...

  3. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  4. Nebraska Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 132,221 130,730 121,487 2000's ...

  5. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Growing - Dataset | Department of Energy 40: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Excel file with dataset for Fact #840: World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing fotw#840_web.xlsx (19.51 KB) More Documents & Publications Quarterly Analysis Review February 2015 Fact #892: September 28, 2015 Over One-Million in Plug-in Vehicle Sales Worldwide -

  6. Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 (Trillion Btu) End Use Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office ...

  7. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grades: All Topics: Biomass, Wind Energy, Hydropower, Solar, Geothermal Owner: The NEED Project Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and...

  8. Table 4a. Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table 4a. Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion...

  9. Table A32. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by ... The derived estimates presented" "in this table represent the consumption of energy ...

  10. Nevada Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 132,128 148,539 154,689 2000's 189,170 176,835 176,596 185,846 214,984 227,149 249,608 254,406 264,596 275,468 2010's 259,251 249,971 273,502 272,965 252,097 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release

  11. Ohio Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 897,693 811,384 841,966 2000's 890,962 804,243 830,955 848,388 825,753 825,961 742,359 806,350 792,247 740,925 2010's 784,293 823,548 842,959 912,403 1,000,231 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release

  12. Oklahoma Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 567,050 575,855 538,329 2000's 538,563 491,458 508,298 540,103 538,576 582,536 624,400 658,379 687,989 659,305 2010's 675,727 655,919 691,661 658,569 640,607 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  13. Oregon Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 185,069 229,403 235,009 2000's 224,888 229,665 202,164 212,556 234,997 232,562 222,608 251,927 268,484 248,864 2010's 239,325 199,419 215,830 240,418 220,076 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release

  14. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 706,230 644,017 688,740 2000's 702,847 634,794 675,583 689,992 696,175 691,591 659,754 752,401 749,884 809,707 2010's 879,365 965,742 1,037,979 1,121,696 1,203,418 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016

  15. Utah Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 165,253 169,776 159,889 2000's 164,557 159,299 163,379 154,125 155,891 160,275 187,399 219,700 224,188 214,220 2010's 219,213 222,227 223,039 247,285 242,457 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release

  16. Vermont Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Vermont Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 8,061 7,735 8,033 2000's 10,426 7,919 8,367 8,400 8,685 8,372 8,056 8,867 8,624 8,638 2010's 8,443 8,611 8,191 9,602 10,678 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages:

  17. Wisconsin Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 400,651 368,022 380,560 2000's 393,601 359,784 385,310 394,711 383,316 410,250 372,462 398,370 409,377 387,066 2010's 372,898 393,734 402,656 442,544 462,627 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  18. Indiana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 556,624 521,748 556,932 2000's 570,558 501,711 539,034 527,037 526,701 531,111 496,303 535,796 551,424 506,944 2010's 573,866 630,669 649,921 672,751 710,838 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release

  19. Kansas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 338,231 326,674 302,932 2000's 312,369 272,500 304,992 281,346 256,779 255,123 264,253 286,538 282,904 286,973 2010's 275,184 279,724 262,316 283,177 285,969 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release

  20. Kentucky Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 227,931 205,129 218,399 2000's 225,168 208,974 227,920 223,226 225,470 234,080 211,049 229,799 225,295 206,833 2010's 232,099 223,034 225,924 229,983 254,244 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  1. Louisiana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,661,061 1,569,190 1,495,478 2000's 1,536,725 1,219,013 1,341,444 1,233,505 1,281,428 1,254,370 1,217,871 1,289,421 1,238,661 1,189,744 2010's 1,354,641 1,420,264 1,482,343 1,396,261 1,460,031 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  2. Massachusetts Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 402,629 358,846 344,790 2000's 343,314 349,103 393,194 403,991 372,532 378,068 370,664 408,704 406,719 395,852 2010's 432,297 449,194 416,350 421,001 418,526 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  3. Michigan Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 994,342 876,444 951,143 2000's 963,136 906,001 966,354 924,819 916,629 913,827 803,336 798,126 779,602 735,340 2010's 746,748 776,466 790,642 814,635 850,974 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  4. Mississippi Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 255,475 241,342 306,733 2000's 300,652 332,589 343,890 265,842 282,051 301,663 307,305 364,067 355,006 364,323 2010's 438,733 433,538 494,016 420,594 412,979 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  5. Missouri Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 283,294 258,652 265,798 2000's 284,763 283,793 275,629 262,529 263,945 268,040 252,697 272,536 296,058 264,867 2010's 280,181 272,583 255,875 276,967 296,605 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  6. Montana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 59,851 59,840 62,129 2000's 67,955 65,051 69,532 68,473 66,829 68,355 73,879 73,822 76,422 75,802 2010's 72,025 78,217 73,399 79,670 78,010 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016

  7. Wyoming Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 100,950 109,188 96,726 2000's 101,314 98,569 112,872 115,358 107,060 108,314 108,481 140,912 142,705 142,793 2010's 150,106 156,455 153,333 149,820 135,678 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release

  8. Alaska Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 425,393 434,871 422,816 2000's 427,288 408,960 419,131 414,234 406,319 432,972 373,850 369,967 341,888 342,261 2010's 333,312 335,458 343,110 332,298 327,428 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release

  9. Arkansas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 260,113 266,485 252,853 2000's 251,329 227,943 242,325 246,916 215,124 213,609 233,868 226,439 234,901 244,193 2010's 271,515 284,076 296,132 282,120 268,453 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  10. California Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,146,211 2,309,883 2,339,521 2000's 2,508,797 2,464,565 2,273,193 2,269,405 2,406,889 2,248,256 2,315,721 2,395,674 2,405,266 2,328,504 2010's 2,273,128 2,153,186 2,403,494 2,415,571 2,344,977 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  11. Colorado Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 314,486 330,259 333,085 2000's 367,920 463,738 459,397 436,253 440,378 470,321 450,832 504,775 504,783 523,726 2010's 501,350 466,680 443,750 467,798 480,747 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  12. Delaware Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 46,511 40,809 56,013 2000's 48,387 50,113 52,216 46,177 48,057 46,904 43,190 48,155 48,162 50,148 2010's 54,825 79,715 101,676 95,978 100,776 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  13. District of Columbia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 34,105 30,409 32,281 2000's 33,468 29,802 32,898 32,814 32,227 32,085 29,049 32,966 31,880 33,177 2010's 33,251 32,862 28,561 32,743 34,057 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release

  14. Florida Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 522,116 503,844 559,366 2000's 541,847 543,143 689,337 689,986 734,178 778,209 891,611 917,244 942,699 1,055,340 2010's 1,158,452 1,217,689 1,328,463 1,225,676 1,231,957 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016

  15. Georgia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 371,376 368,579 337,576 2000's 413,845 351,109 383,546 379,761 394,986 412,560 420,469 441,107 425,043 462,799 2010's 530,030 522,897 615,771 625,283 652,230 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release

  16. Hawaii Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Hawaii Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,894 2,654 3,115 2000's 2,841 2,818 2,734 2,732 2,774 2,795 2,783 2,850 2,702 2,607 2010's 2,627 2,619 2,689 2,855 2,928 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages:

  17. Illinois Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,077,139 957,254 1,004,281 2000's 1,030,604 951,616 1,049,878 998,486 953,207 969,642 893,997 965,591 1,000,501 956,068 2010's 966,678 986,867 940,367 1,056,826 1,092,999 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  18. Rhode Island Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 117,707 130,751 118,001 2000's 88,419 95,607 87,805 78,456 72,609 80,764 77,204 87,972 89,256 92,743 2010's 94,110 100,455 95,476 85,537 88,673 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  19. South Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 153,917 159,458 162,926 2000's 160,436 141,785 184,803 146,641 163,787 172,032 174,806 175,701 170,077 190,928 2010's 220,235 229,497 244,850 232,297 231,863 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  20. South Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 36,115 33,042 35,794 2000's 37,939 37,077 41,577 43,881 41,679 42,555 40,739 53,938 65,258 66,185 2010's 72,563 73,605 70,238 81,986 79,964 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  1. Tennessee Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 282,395 279,070 278,841 2000's 270,658 255,990 255,515 257,315 231,133 230,338 221,626 221,118 229,935 216,945 2010's 257,443 264,231 277,127 279,441 303,996 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  2. Texas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4,116,722 4,205,459 4,009,689 2000's 4,421,777 4,252,152 4,303,831 4,050,632 3,908,243 3,503,636 3,432,236 3,516,706 3,546,804 3,387,341 2010's 3,574,398 3,693,905 3,850,331 4,021,851 4,088,445 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  3. Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO

  4. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings...

  5. "Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ,"

  6. "Table A2. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected" " Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day) " ,,,,," Input for Heat,",,," Primary" " ",," Consumption for All Purposes",,,"Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," Consumption for Nonfuel Purposes ",,,"RSE" "SIC",,"

  7. Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO

  8. Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 1094 1103 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041

  9. Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 7632 7676 AEO 1997 6636 6694

  10. Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO

  11. Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",19.87,20.21,20.64,20.99,21.2,21.42,21.6,21.99,22.37,22.63,22.95,23.22,23.58,23.82,24.09,24.13,24.02,24.14 "AEO 1995",,20.82,20.66,20.85,21.21,21.65,21.95,22.12,22.25,22.43,22.62,22.87,23.08,23.36,23.61,24.08,24.23,24.59 "AEO

  12. Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel

  13. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  14. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  15. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  16. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  17. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  18. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  19. Electricity in US energy consumption. [Percentages for 1973 to 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studness, C.M.

    1984-09-13

    The share of US energy consumption devoted to electric generation rose sharply again in 1983. Of 70.573 quadrillion Btu consumed nationally last year, 35.4% or 24.975 quadrillion Btu were used for electric generation. This represented an increase from 34.3% in 1982. Significantly, the share of the nation's energy consumption accounted for by electric generation has risen just as rapidly during the ten years since the Arab oil embargo in 1973 as it did during the decade leading up to the embargo. Electricity's share of energy consumption rose 7.3 percentage points from only 19.5% in 1963 to 26.8% in 1973 and another 8.6 percentage points during the last ten years to 35.4% in 1983. Moreover, electricity's share of energy consumption has grown in each of the ten years since the embargo. The nation's energy consumption actually fell 0.4% in 1983, and it declined 4.9% or roughly 0.4% per year during 1973 to 1983. By contrast, energy consumed in electric generation rose 2.9% last year and grew 2.3% per year during the last decade.

  20. Table 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil...

  1. Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9

  2. Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, ... See Note 3, "Electricity Imports and Exports," at end of section. 3Natural gas, plus a ...

  3. Environmental effects of interstate power trading on electricity consumption mixes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Marriott; H. Scott Matthews

    2005-11-15

    Although many studies of electricity generation use national or state average generation mix assumptions, in reality a great deal of electricity is transferred between states with very different mixes of fossil and renewable fuels, and using the average numbers could result in incorrect conclusions in these studies. The authors create electricity consumption profiles for each state and for key industry sectors in the U.S. based on existing state generation profiles, net state power imports, industry presence by state, and an optimization model to estimate interstate electricity trading. Using these 'consumption mixes' can provide a more accurate assessment of electricity use in life-cycle analyses. It is concluded that the published generation mixes for states that import power are misleading, since the power consumed in-state has a different makeup than the power that was generated. And, while most industry sectors have consumption mixes similar to the U.S. average, some of the most critical sectors of the economy - such as resource extraction and material processing sectors - are very different. This result does validate the average mix assumption made in many environmental assessments, but it is important to accurately quantify the generation methods for electricity used when doing life-cycle analyses. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Lifestyle Factors in U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanquist, Thomas F.; Orr, Heather M.; Shui, Bin; Bittner, Alvah C.

    2012-03-30

    A multivariate statistical approach to lifestyle analysis of residential electricity consumption is described and illustrated. Factor analysis of selected variables from the 2005 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) identified five lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices associated with air conditioning, laundry usage, personal computer usage, climate zone of residence, and TV use. These factors were also estimated for 2001 RECS data. Multiple regression analysis using the lifestyle factors yields solutions accounting for approximately 40% of the variance in electricity consumption for both years. By adding the associated household and market characteristics of income, local electricity price and access to natural gas, variance accounted for is increased to approximately 54%. Income contributed only {approx}1% unique variance to the 2005 and 2001 models, indicating that lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices better account for consumption differences than income. This was not surprising given the 4-fold range of energy use at differing income levels. Geographic segmentation of factor scores is illustrated, and shows distinct clusters of consumption and lifestyle factors, particularly in suburban locations. The implications for tailored policy and planning interventions are discussed in relation to lifestyle issues.

  5. Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Manufacturing Industries"," W ",613,0," W ",2," W ",0,0," W ",0,28.1 ,"Total",1947,98827,2220,2397,500,6887,13448,1627,728,48,8.2 ,,"West South Central Census Division" ...

  6. Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Manufacturing Industries"," W ",2,0," W ",2," W ",0,0," W ",0,28.1 ,"Total",1947,337,14,14,515,26,320,40,728,48,8.3 ,,"West South Central Census Division" ,"RSE Column ...

  7. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United ... Gases",2256,2313,1995,1932,2700 "Nuclear",100334,100266,100755,101004,10116...

  8. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Thousand Megawatthours)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 ...

  9. Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric ... Plants Into Energy-Use Sectors," at end of Section 8. * See "Useful Thermal ...

  10. Office Buildings - Energy Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity,...

  11. Consumption of the electric power inside silent discharge reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yehia, Ashraf

    2015-01-15

    An experimental study was made in this paper to investigate the relation between the places of the dielectric barriers, which cover the surfaces of the electrodes in the coaxial cylindrical reactors, and the rate of change of the electric power that is consumed in forming silent discharges. Therefore, silent discharges have been formed inside three coaxial cylindrical reactors. The dielectric barriers in these reactors were pasted on both the internal surface of the outer electrode in the first reactor and the external surface of the inner electrode in the second reactor as well as the surfaces of the two electrodes in the third reactor. The reactor under study has been fed by atmospheric air that flowed inside it with a constant rate at normal temperature and pressure, in parallel with the application of a sinusoidal ac voltage between the electrodes of the reactor. The electric power consumed in forming the silent discharges inside the three reactors was measured as a function of the ac peak voltage. The validity of the experimental results was investigated by applying Manley's equation on the same discharge conditions. The results have shown that the rate of consumption of the electric power relative to the ac peak voltage per unit width of the discharge gap improves by a ratio of either 26.8% or 80% or 128% depending on the places of the dielectric barriers that cover the surfaces of the electrodes inside the three reactors.

  12. Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: ... Plants Into Energy-Use Sectors," at end of Section 8. * See "Useful Thermal ...

  13. Table A39. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ," Electricity",," Steam" ,,,,,"RSE" ,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Economic

  14. Table A17. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  15. Table A20. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke",,"Shipments" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","of Energy

  16. Table A22. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Ener

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1994 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)","

  17. Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Use Compare Activities by ... Electricity Use Total Electricity Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 908 billion...

  18. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

    2008-03-01

    Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

  19. "Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and

  20. Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0.17 0.13 0.23 0.23 0.29 0.60 0.53 2000's 0.81 1.29 1.98 1.68 2.14 1.79 2.34 2.57 2.46 3.30 2010's 3.81 4.53 4.40 4.08 4.23 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016

  1. 2015,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",18,8...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Industry","All Sources",1,1,12,12 2015,"AR","Total Electric Power Industry","Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic",1,1,12,12 2015,"AZ","Total Electric Power ...

  2. U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,028 1,026 1,028 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,025 2010's 1,023 1,022 1,024 1,027 1,032 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages:

  3. Table 15. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (billion kilowatt-hours)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",2843,2891,2928,2962,3004,3039,3071,3112,3148,3185,3228,3263,3298,3332,3371,3406,3433,3469 "AEO 1995",,2951,2967,2983,3026,3058,3085,3108,3134,3166,3204,3248,3285,3321,3357,3396,3433,3475 "AEO

  4. Table 15. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Projected (billion kilowatt-hours) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 2843 2891 2928 2962 3004 3039 3071 3112 3148 3185 3228 3263 3298 3332 3371 3406 3433 3469 AEO 1995 2951 2967 2983 3026 3058 3085 3108 3134 3166 3204 3248 3285 3321 3357 3396 3433 3475 AEO 1996 2973 2998 3039 3074 3106 3137 3173 3215 3262 3317 3363 3409 3454 3505 3553 3604 3660 3722 3775 AEO 1997 3075

  5. Effects of Feedback on Residential Electricity Consumption: A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    none of which were elec- trically heated; each had an electric stove, dryer, dishwasher, and water heater. The researchers installed 24-h chart recorders in each residence...

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models January 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts

  7. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in Indias Housing Sector

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector November 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of

  8. Table A14. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," ","

  9. Table A30. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" "Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," ","(million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," ","

  10. Fuel consumption of freight trains hauled by diesel electric locomotives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radford, R.W.

    1983-05-01

    The cost of railway diesel fuel has become an increasingly high proportion of railway operating expenses. The paper analyzes the generation and utilization of rail horsepower in freight train operations. The effects on fuel consumption of variations in several parameters including train consist, car weight, gradient, average speed, meet strategy, throttle control, locomotive axle arrangement, and train marshalling are examined. Estimates are made of the value, in terms of fuel cost, of weight reduction of freight cars and of selective train marshalling.

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88

  12. Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, Aaron; New, Joshua Ryan; Chandler, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

  13. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Peng, J.

    2011-02-24

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  14. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption and Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE / EERE / NEED Project

    2011-06-07

    The NEED Project and the U.S. Department of Energy have collaborated to bring you this educational four-page guide to energy, electricity, consumption and efficiency. It includes, on the last page, a home energy survey to help you analyze your home energy use.

  15. A Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, Jordan; Newmark, Robin; Heath, Garvin; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The presented water factors may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

  16. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    The NEED Project and the U.S. Department of Energy have collaborated to bring you this educational four-page guide to energy, electricity, consumption and efficiency. It includes, on the last page, a home energy survey to help you analyze your home energy use.

  17. Delaware Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...e","-","-","-","-","-" "Other","-","-",11,6,"-" "Total",7182,8534,7524,4842,5628 " " "s Value is less than 0.5 of the table metric, but value is included in any associated total.

  18. Capacity utilization and fuel consumption in the electric power industry, 1970-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report updates the 1980 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publication entitled Trends in the Capacity Utilization and Fuel Consumption of Electric Utility Powerplants, 1970-1978, DOE/EIA-184/32. The analysis covers the period from 1970 through 1981, and examines trends during the period prior to the 1973 Arab oil embargo (1970-1973), after the embargo (1974-1977), and during the immediate past (1978-1981). The report also addresses other factors affecting the electric utility industry since the oil embargo: the reduction in foreign oil supplies as a result of the 1979 Iranian crisis, the 1977 drought in the western United States, the 1978 coal strike by the United Mine Workers Union, and the shutdown of nuclear plants in response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Annual data on electric utility generating capacity, net generation, and fuel consumption are provided to identify changes in patterns of power plant capacity utilization and dispatching.

  19. "Table A48. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...teristics(a)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Pipelines","Supplier(d)","Factors"," " ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.4,2.7,1.5...

  20. Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard "Barney" Carlson; Matthew G. Shirk; Benjamin M. Geller

    2001-11-01

    Primary Factors that Impact the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles RICHARD ‘BARNEY’ CARLSON, MATTHEW G. SHIRK Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption as compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICE) by utilizing electrical energy for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEV’s, analysis has shown that the fuel consumption of PHEV’s is more significantly affected than conventional vehicles by either the driver’s input or by the environmental inputs around the vehicle. Six primary factors have been identified that significantly affect the fuel consumption of PHEV’s. In this paper, these primary factors are analyzed from on-road driving and charging data from over 200 PHEV’s throughout North America that include Hymotion Prius conversions and Hybrids Plus Escape conversions. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) tests plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) vehicles as part of its conduct of DOE’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). In collaboration with its 75 testing partners located in 23 states and Canada, INL has collected data on 191 PHEVs, comprised of 12 different PHEV models (by battery manufacturer). With more than 1 million PHEV test miles accumulated to date, the PHEVs are fleet, track, and dynamometer tested. Six Primary Factors The six primary factors that significantly impact PHEV fuel consumption are listed below. Some of the factors are unique to plug-in vehicles while others are common for all types of vehicles. 1. Usable Electrical Energy is dictated by battery capacity, rate of depletion as well as when the vehicle was last plugged-in. With less electrical energy available the powertrain must use more petroleum to generate the required power output. 2. Driver Aggressiveness impacts the fuel consumption of nearly all vehicles but

  1. Total..........................................................

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 ...

  2. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Per Household Member Average Square Feet Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC1.2.2 ...

  3. Major Fuels","Site Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel, 1999" ,"All Buildings",,"Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Primary Electricity (trillion Btu)" ,"Number of Buildings...

  4. Building Technologies Office: R&D Opportunities to Reduce Energy Consumption in Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: R&D Opportunities to Reduce Energy Consumption in Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) Pat Phelan (patrick.phelan@ee.doe.gov) BTO Emerging Technologies June 3, 2016 2 Why Do We Care About MELs? Problem: Fraction of energy consumption due to MELs is rising as other building technologies become more efficient. DOE Quadrennial Technology Review (2015)  60% of remaining energy consumption after 2020 R&D targets are achieved, the majority of which are MELs. FY16 Activities: * Panel

  5. Table A33. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" " Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and

  6. Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 - Dataset | Department of Energy Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 - Dataset Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 fotw#937_web.xlsx (17.8 KB) More Documents &

  7. Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 | Department of Energy Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week The number of battery packs sold for plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) declined by 3.4% from 2014 to 2015. However, the total battery capacity for all PEVs sold between

  8. Determinants of residential electricity consumption: Using smart meter data to examine the effect of climate, building characteristics, appliance stock, and occupants' behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavousian, A; Rajagopal, R; Fischer, M

    2013-06-15

    We propose a method to examine structural and behavioral determinants of residential electricity consumption, by developing separate models for daily maximum (peak) and minimum (idle) consumption. We apply our method on a data set of 1628 households' electricity consumption. The results show that weather, location and floor area are among the most important determinants of residential electricity consumption. In addition to these variables, number of refrigerators and entertainment devices (e.g., VCRs) are among the most important determinants of daily minimum consumption, while number of occupants and high-consumption appliances such as electric water heaters are the most significant determinants of daily maximum consumption. Installing double-pane windows and energy-efficient lights helped to reduce consumption, as did the energy-conscious use of electric heater. Acknowledging climate change as a motivation to save energy showed correlation with lower electricity consumption. Households with individuals over 55 or between 19 and 35 years old recorded lower electricity consumption, while pet owners showed higher consumption. Contrary to some previous studies, we observed no significant correlation between electricity consumption and income level, home ownership, or building age. Some otherwise energy-efficient features such as energy-efficient appliances, programmable thermostats, and insulation were correlated with slight increase in electricity consumption. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption and Expenditures Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Consumption Wood and Solar Energy Consumption Fuel Oil and District Heat Consumption Energy Consumption in...

  10. Hydro and geothermal electricity as an alternative for industrial petroleum consumption in Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendis, M.; Park, W.; Sabadell, A.; Talib, A.

    1982-04-01

    This report assesses the potential for substitution of electricity for petroleum in the industrial/agro-industrial sector of Costa Rica. The study includes a preliminary estimate of the process energy needs in this sector, a survey of the principal petroleum consuming industries in Costa Rica, an assessment of the electrical technologies appropriate for substitution, and an analysis of the cost trade offs of alternative fuels and technologies. The report summarizes the total substitution potential both by technical feasibility and by cost effectiveness under varying fuel price scenarios and identifies major institutional constraints to the introduction of electric based technologies. Recommendations to the Government of Costa Rica are presented. The key to the success of a Costa Rican program for substitution of electricity for petroleum in industry rests in energy pricing policy. The report shows that if Costa Rica Bunker C prices are increased to compare equitably with Caribbean Bunker C prices, and increase at 3 percent per annum relative to a special industrial electricity rate structure, the entire substitution program, including both industrial and national electric investment, would be cost effective. The definition of these pricing structures and their potential impacts need to be assessed in depth.

  11. Power consumption and byproducts in electron beam and electrical discharge processing of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.

    1996-02-20

    Among the new methods being investigated for the post-process reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in atmospheric-pressure air streams are based on non-thermal plasmas. Electron beam, pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge methods are among the more extensively investigated techniques for producing non-thermal plasmas. In order to apply non-thermal plasmas in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process. In this paper the authors present experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor, a pulsed corona and a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. They have used these reactors to study the removal of a wide variety of VOCs. The effects of background gas composition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry have been studied. They present a description of the reactions that control the efficiency of the plasma process. They have found that pulsed corona and other types of electrical discharge reactors are most suitable only for processes requiring O radicals. For VOCs requiring copious amounts of electrons, ions, N atoms or OH radicals, the use of electron beam reactors is generally the best way of minimizing the electrical power consumption. Electron beam processing is remarkably more effective for all of the VOCs tested. For control of VOC emissions from dilute, large volume sources such as paint spray booths, cost analysis shows that the electron beam method is cost-competitive to thermal and catalytic methods that employ heat recovery or hybrid techniques.

  12. "Table A38. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,," Electricity",," Steam" ,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  13. "Table A46. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" " Gas by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries," 1991 " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,,"-","-----------","-","-----------","-","------------","-","RSE"

  14. Time evolution of the total electric-field strength in multimode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, W.; Fischer, R.; Paul, H.

    1988-05-01

    Our previous numerical studies of the output characteristics of multimode lasers are extended to include the evolution of the total electric-field strength. The regular or irregular behavior of the system, which becomes manifest in the evolution of the amplitudes and the phases in the different modes, is reflected also in the evolution of the total electric-field strength in a stroboscopic view. (The total electric-field strength, with its high-frequency time dependence suppressed, is considered at times t, t+..delta..t, t+2..delta..t,..., where ..delta..t is a multiple of the round-trip time in the resonator.) Moreover, it is demonstrated that the evolution of the system is very sensitive to slight changes in the initial conditions. This finding supports the view that the irregularity falls in the class of the so-called deterministic chaos.

  15. Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Product: Total Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases PropanePropylene Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other ...

  16. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases PropanePropylene Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel ...

  17. Table A52. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" " Categories and Presence of General Technologies and Cogeneration Technologies, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Employment Size(a)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" ,,,,,,,"1000 and","Row" "General/Cogeneration Technologies","Total","Under

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 U.S. Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Coal Steam Other Fossil Combine Cycle Combustion Turbine Nuclear Pumped Total 1980 0.0 1981 0.0 1982 0.0 1983 0.0 1984 0.0 1985 0.0 1986 0.0 1987 0.0 1988 0.0 1989 18.1 1990 19.5 1991 18.4 1992 21.2 1993 21.1 1994 21.2 1995 21.4 1996 21.1 1997 19.3 1998 19.5 1999 19.6 2000 19.5 2001 19.7 2002 20.4 2003 20.5 2004 20.8 2005 21.3 2006 21.5 2007 21.9 2008 21.9 2009 22.2 2010 22.2 2011 22.2 2012 22.2 2013 22.2 2014

  19. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.9 Q Q Q Heat Pump......7.7 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System......Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration ...

  20. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.9 Q Q Q Heat Pump......6.2 3.8 2.4 Steam or Hot Water System......Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information ...

  1. Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Total 1949 187 30 2 NA 30 33 NA NA 250 1 NA 1 1950 206 35 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 278 1 NA 1 1951 235 42 2 NA 29 31 NA NA 308 1 NA 1 1952 240 50 2 NA 31 33 NA NA 323 1 NA 1 1953 260 57 3 NA 38 40 NA NA 358 (s) NA (s)

  2. Total...................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing

  3. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to

  4. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.5 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 3.9 2.4 1.5 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 4.4 3.2 1.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 3.5 2.4 1.1 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 3.2 2.1 1.1 2,500 to

  5. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7

  6. Total................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to

  7. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7

  8. Total...................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500............................................ 3.2 0.4 Q 0.6 1.7 0.4 500 to 999................................................... 23.8 4.8 1.4 4.2 10.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499............................................. 20.8 10.6 1.8 1.8 4.0 2.6 1,500 to 1,999............................................. 15.4 12.4 1.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 2,000 to 2,499............................................. 12.2 10.7 1.0 0.2 Q Q 2,500 to

  9. Total.........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3

  10. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1

  11. Total..........................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4

  12. "Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total

  13. Table A19. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic

  14. Table A26. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Di

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic

  15. Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," ","

  16. Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent

  17. Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural

  18. Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural

  19. Table A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy Management Program, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and

  20. Table A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy-Management Program, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,"RSE" "SIC",,,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 U.S. Electricity Net Generation, by Plant Type (Billion kWh) Renewables Growth Rate Hydr(1) Oth(2) Total CHP (3) Tot.(4) 2010-year 1980 276 6 282 N.A. 1981 261 6 267 N.A. 1982 309 5 314 N.A. 1983 332 6 339 N.A. 1984 321 9 330 N.A. 1985 281 11 292 N.A. 1986 291 12 302 N.A. 1987 250 12 262 N.A. 1988 223 12 235 N.A. 1989 269 28 297 42 1990 290 35 324 61 1991 286 38 324 72 1992 250 40 290 91 1993 278 42 320 108 1994 254 42 296 123 1995 305 39 345 141 1996 341 41 382 147 1997 351 41 392 148 1998

  2. Profiling Real-Time Electricity Consumption Data for Process Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2013-01-01

    Today, smart meters serve as key assets to utilities and their customers because they are capable of recording and communicating real-time energy usage data; thus, enabling better understanding of energy usage patterns. Other potential benefits of smart meters data include the ability to improve customer experience, grid reliability, outage management, and operational efficiency. Despite these tangible benefits, many utilities are inundated by data and remain uncertain about how to extract additional value from these deployed assets outside of billing operations. One way to overcome this challenge is the development of new metrics for classifying utility customers. Traditionally, utilities classified their customers based on their business nature (residential, commercial, and industrial) and/or their total annual consumption. While this classification is useful for some operational functions, it is too limited for designing effective monitoring and control strategies. In this paper, a data mining methodology is proposed for clustering and profiling smart meters data in order to form unique classes of customers exhibiting similar usage patterns. The developed clusters could help utilities in identifying opportunities for achieving some of the benefits of smart meters data.

  3. Total...........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Shares (Percent) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 1980 15.7% 10.8% 50.2% 11.8% 0.2% 12.1% 11.3% (1) 100% 1981 15.4% 9.0% 51.8% 11.2% 0.3% 11.4% 12.3% (1) 100% 1982 13.9% 6.6% 52.6% 13.6% 0.2% 13.8% 13.1% (1) 100% 1983 12.2% 6.3% 53.9% 14.3% 0.3% 14.6% 13.1% (1) 100% 1984 12.6% 5.1% 54.9% 13.2% 0.4% 13.5% 14.0% (1) 100% 1985 12.1% 4.2% 56.2% 11.3% 0.4% 11.8% 15.7% (1) 100% 1986 10.2% 5.6% 55.3% 11.7% 0.5%

  5. Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

  6. Table A15. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry

  7. Table A34. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,"1,000","Row"

  8. Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use

  9. Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1994:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding",,"RSE" "SIC",,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"Row" "Code(a)","End-Use

  10. Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion

  11. Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000

  12. Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    " Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC",,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(c)","Natural

  13. Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Residential Commercial 34.3% 26.7% 33.6% 27.8% 34.2% 29.7% 34.6% 30.2% 34.6% 30.3% 35.0% ... EIA, State Energy Consumption Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; and EIA, Annual Energy ...

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 U.S. Electric Power Sector Cumulative Power Plant Additions Needed to Meet Future Electricity Demand (1) Typical New Number of New Power Plants to Meet Demand Electric Generator Plant Capacity (MW) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Coal Steam 1,300 7 8 8 8 8 Combined Cycle 540 28 29 43 79 130 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 148 62 105 174 250 284 Nuclear Power 2,236 1 3 3 3 4 Pumped Storage 147 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 Fuel Cells 10 0 0 0 0 0 Conventional Hydropower 20 (2) 20 47 81 125 185 Geothermal 50 9 26 41 62 81

  16. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh)...

  17. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity generated from sources that are renewable – hydroelectric power, bio-fuels, geothermal, solar, wind, wood, waste – have grown 150% from 1980 to 2011 (latest year available). Of the...

  18. Electric Power Monthly - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), ... Customers: Total by End-Use Sector 5.2 Revenue from ...

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 U.S. Renewable Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Conv. Hydropower Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Solar Thermal Solar PV Wind 1980 81.7 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. N.A. 1981 82.4 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1982 83.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1983 83.9 1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1984 85.3 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1985 88.9 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1986 89.3 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1987 89.7 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1988 90.3 1.7 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0

  20. US WNC MO Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to historically lower residential electricity prices in the state. * Missouri ... CONSUMPTION BY END USE Consumption of energy for the four major end uses in Missouri homes is ...

  1. US ESC TN Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33% ... CONSUMPTION BY END USE Compared to other areas of the United States, the warmer ...

  2. Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Short Tons Barrels Short Tons Barrels Thousand Cubic Feet Billion Btu Billion Btu Billion Btu 1989 638,798 119,640 1,471,031 762 – 1,591,433 81,669,945 2,804 24,182 5,687

  3. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

  4. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-04-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back in time, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the U.S. electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GW by 2030, and 2,900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOEs more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050.

  5. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    none,

    2015-04-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back in time, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the U.S. electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GWmore » by 2030, and 2,900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOE’s more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050.« less

  6. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-04-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back in time, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the U.S. electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GW by 2030, and 2,900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOE’s more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050.

  7. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2015-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the United States electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GW by 2030 and 2900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOE's more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050. Assessing the sustainability of such rapid growth of photovoltaics necessitates undertaking a careful analysis because PV markets largely are enabled by its promise to produce reliable electricity with minimum environmental burdens. Measurable aspects of sustainability include cost, resource availability, and environmental impact. The question of cost concerns the affordability of solar energy compared to other energy sources throughout the world. Environmental impacts include local-, regional-, and global-effects, as well as the usage of land and water, which must be considered in a comparable context over a long time, multigenerational horizon. As a result, the availability of material resources matters to current and future-generations under the constraint of affordability.

  8. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2015-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the United States electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GW bymore » 2030 and 2900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOE's more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050. Assessing the sustainability of such rapid growth of photovoltaics necessitates undertaking a careful analysis because PV markets largely are enabled by its promise to produce reliable electricity with minimum environmental burdens. Measurable aspects of sustainability include cost, resource availability, and environmental impact. The question of cost concerns the affordability of solar energy compared to other energy sources throughout the world. Environmental impacts include local-, regional-, and global-effects, as well as the usage of land and water, which must be considered in a comparable context over a long time, multigenerational horizon. As a result, the availability of material resources matters to current and future-generations under the constraint of affordability.« less

  9. "Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","

  10. Power consumption monitoring using additional monitoring device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truşcă, M. R. C. Albert, Ş. Tudoran, C. Soran, M. L. Fărcaş, F.; Abrudean, M.

    2013-11-13

    Today, emphasis is placed on reducing power consumption. Computers are large consumers; therefore it is important to know the total consumption of computing systems. Since their optimal functioning requires quite strict environmental conditions, without much variation in temperature and humidity, reducing energy consumption cannot be made without monitoring environmental parameters. Thus, the present work uses a multifunctional electric meter UPT 210 for power consumption monitoring. Two applications were developed: software which carries meter readings provided by electronic and programming facilitates remote device and a device for temperature monitoring and control. Following temperature variations that occur both in the cooling system, as well as the ambient, can reduce energy consumption. For this purpose, some air conditioning units or some computers are stopped in different time slots. These intervals were set so that the economy is high, but the work's Datacenter is not disturbed.

  11. Table 2.5 Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures by End...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Household 1 Energy Consumption and Expenditures by End Use, Selected Years, 1978-2005 Year Space ... 3 Fuel Oil 4 LPG 5 Total Electricity 3 Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 ...

  12. Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 1: technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuenca, R.; Formento, J.; Gaines, L.; Marr, B.; Santini, D.; Wang, M.; Adelman, S.; Kline, D.; Mark, J.; Ohi, J.; Rau, N.; Freeman, S.; Humphreys, K.; Placet, M.

    1998-01-01

    This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume I contains the major results, a discussion of the conceptual framework of the study, and summaries of the vehicle, utility, fuel production, and manufacturing analyses. It also contains summaries of comments provided by external peer reviewers and brief responses to these comments.

  13. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

  14. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

  15. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

  16. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

  17. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

  18. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using...

  19. US SoAtl VA Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia ... CONSUMPTION BY END USE While Virginia's weather is similar to the national average, ...

  20. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

  1. US ENC WI Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. * Wisconsin homes are typically larger and older than homes in other states. CONSUMPTION BY END USE ...

  2. US WSC TX Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than ... CONSUMPTION BY END USE Compared to other areas of the United States, the warmer ...

  3. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. * Michigan homes are typically older than homes in other states. CONSUMPTION BY END USE Since ...

  4. US ENC IL Site Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. * Over 80% of Illinois households use natural gas as their main space heating fuel. CONSUMPTION BY END ...

  5. Table 8.11a Electric Net Summer Capacity: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.11b and 8.11d; Kilowatts)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Electric Net Summer Capacity: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.11b and 8.11d; Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44,887,000 0 [5] 18,500,000 13,000 [10] NA NA NA 18,513,000 NA 63,400,000 1950 NA NA NA NA 49,987,000 0 [5] 19,200,000 13,000

  6. Electric Metering | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power outlets. ... reducing user controlled electricity consumption at Forrestal by 1,000,000 KWh per year ...

  7. Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.6b and 8.6c)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.6b and 8.6c) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Short Tons Barrels Short Tons Barrels Thousand Cubic Feet Billion Btu Billion Btu Billion Btu 1989 16,509,639 1,410,151 16,356,550 353,000 247,409 19,356,746

  8. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing...

  9. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  10. Survey Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents composing a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and...

  11. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

  12. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

  13. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand)...

  14. Health Care Buildings: Consumption Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption Tables Sum of Major Fuel Consumption by Size and Type of Health Care Building Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) Dollars per...

  15. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Total Primary Energy Detail

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption and Graph Total Primary Energy Consumption Graph Detail and Data Table 1979 to 1992 primary consumption trend with 95% confidence ranges 1979 to 1992 primary...

  16. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Total Site Energy Detail

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption and Graph Total Site Energy Consumption Graph Detail and Data Table 1979 to 1992 site consumption trend with 95% confidence ranges 1979 to 1992 site...

  17. NMR data feature: 1995 world nuclear electricity production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    World-wide nuclear electricity generation data is presented for 1995. Total nuclear power reactors in operation and under construction are listed for each country, along with MW(e) output totals and percentages of total electrical production. Detailed data is presented for the regions of Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Commonwealth of Independent States. This data includes electricity generation by source (fossil fuel, nuclear power, and hydro power and other), net electricity consumption, and percent changes since 1994. Very brief summaries of electricity production in Canada, the United States, and the Far East are also provided.

  18. Trends in energy use in commercial buildings -- Sixteen years of EIA's commercial buildings energy consumption survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Swenson, A.

    1998-07-01

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects basic statistical information on energy consumption and energy-related characteristics of commercial buildings in the US. The first CBECS was conducted in 1979 and the most recent was completed in 1995. Over that period, the number of commercial bindings and total amount of floorspace increased, total consumption remained flat, and total energy intensity declined. By 1995, there were 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of floorspace. The buildings consumed a total of 5.3 quadrillion Btu (site energy), with a total intensity of 90.5 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity consumption exceeded natural gas consumption (2.6 quadrillion and 1.9 quadrillion Btu, respectively). In 1995, the two major users of energy were space heating (1.7 quadrillion Btu) and lighting (1.2 quadrillion Btu). Over the period 1979 to 1995, natural gas intensity declined from 71.4 thousand to 51.0 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity intensity did not show a similar decline (44.2 thousand Btu per square foot in 1979 and 45.7 thousand Btu per square foot in 1995). Two types of commercial buildings, office buildings and mercantile and service buildings, were the largest consumers of energy in 1995 (2.0 quadrillion Btu, 38% of total consumption). Three building types, health care, food service, and food sales, had significantly higher energy intensities. Buildings constructed since 1970 accounted for half of total consumption and a majority (59%) of total electricity consumption.

  19. Impact of total ionizing dose irradiation on electrical property of ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, S. A.; Tang, M. H. Xiao, Y. G.; Zhang, W. L.; Ding, H.; Chen, J. W.; Zhou, Y. C.; Xiong, Y.; Li, Z.; Zhao, W.; Guo, H. X.

    2014-05-28

    P-type channel metal-ferroelectric-insulator-silicon field-effect transistors (FETs) with a 300?nm thick SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} ferroelectric film and a 10?nm thick HfTaO layer on silicon substrate were fabricated and characterized. The prepared FeFETs were then subjected to {sup 60}Co gamma irradiation in steps of three dose levels. Irradiation-induced degradation on electrical characteristics of the fabricated FeFETs was observed after 1 week annealing at room temperature. The possible irradiation-induced degradation mechanisms were discussed and simulated. All the irradiation experiment results indicated that the stability and reliability of the fabricated FeFETs for nonvolatile memory applications will become uncontrollable under strong irradiation dose and/or long irradiation time.

  20. US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on air conditioning keeps average site electricity consumption in the state high relative to other parts of the U.S. CONSUMPTION BY END USE A quarter of the energy consumed in ...

  1. US SoAtl FL Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    FL Site Consumption kilowatthours 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 US SoAtl FL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY ... CONSUMPTION BY END USE More than a quarter (27%) of the ...

  2. US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gas prices in the state. * Average electricity consumption per household is lower than most ... CONSUMPTION BY END USE Since the weather in Colorado is cooler than other areas of ...

  3. US SoAtl GA Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in ... CONSUMPTION BY END USE Georgia is one of the few states where at least 30% of ...

  4. US MidAtl PA Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    consumed in their homes. * Average electricity consumption in Pennsylvania homes is 10,402 kWh ... CONSUMPTION BY END USE Half the energy consumed in Pennsylvania homes is for space ...

  5. A survey of the electrical energy requirement of hotels in Hong Kong

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, W.K.; Chan, K.T. . Dept. of Building Services Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Electrical energy consumption in commercial buildings accounts for about 50 percent of the total electricity produced in Hong Kong. Investigation of the electrical energy requirement in these buildings is essential to energy conservation. With it, norms of energy use for the buildings in use can be deduced and can be used to establish energy management programs. This article reports on a pioneer investigation on the electrical energy use of hotels in Hong Kong. A survey on the actual consumption in 20 hotels has been conducted, and results are presented. Significance of the norms and the various end-use components of the total electrical energy requirement are discussed.

  6. Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 2: appendices A-D to technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline- powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume II contains additional details on the vehicle, utility, and materials analyses and discusses several details of the methodology.

  7. Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 4: peer review comments on technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume IV includes copies of all the external peer review comments on the report distributed for review in July 1997.

  8. "Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,...

  9. Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 ...

  10. US NE MA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher prices in New England. CONSUMPTION BY END USE Since the weather in Massachusetts and New ...

  11. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  12. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  13. US ESC TN Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33%

  14. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Customers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    706,952 91,541 3,023 0 801,516 Massachusetts 2,720,128 398,717 14,896 3 3,133,744 New Hampshire 606,883 105,840 3,342 0 716,065 Rhode Island 438,879 58,346 1,884 1 499,110 ...

  15. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Customers"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Maine",706952,91541,3023,0,801516 "Massachusetts",2720128,398717,14896,3,3133744 "New Hampshire",606883,105840,3342,0,716065 "Rhode Island",438879,58346,1884,1,499110 ...

  16. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Part 1. Energy Consumption Data Tables Total Energy Intensity Intensity by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part...

  17. Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspac...

  18. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) U.S. Petroleum Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Buildings Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Buildings Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 9% 28% 8% 56% | 14% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 8% 26% 7% 59% | 12% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 8% 26% 5% 61% | 11% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 8% 25% 5% 62% | 12% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 9% 26% 4% 61% | 11% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26%

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 13% 41% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 13% 42% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 14% 39% 18% 3% | 20% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 14% 39% 17% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 14% 40% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 14% 40% 18% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 14% 40% 16% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 14% 41% 17% 3% |

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 4% 28% 8% 56% | 6% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 4% 26% 7% 59% | 5% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 3% 26% 5% 61% | 5% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 5% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 4% 26% 4% 61% | 5% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 4% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.9

  2. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A24. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of Energy- Management Program, 1994:...

  3. Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florida Solar Energy Center; Franco, Victor; Franco, Victor; Lutz, Jim; Lekov, Alex; Gu, Lixing

    2008-05-16

    Currently, total electricity consumption of furnaces is unregulated, tested at laboratory conditions using the DOE test procedure, and is reported in the GAMA directory as varying from 76 kWh/year to 1,953 kWh/year. Furnace blowers account for about 80percent of the total furnace electricity consumption and are primarily used to distribute warm air throughout the home during furnace operation as well as distribute cold air during air conditioning operation. Yet the furnace test procedure does not provide a means to calculate the electricity consumption during cooling operation or standby, which account for a large fraction of the total electricity consumption. Furthermore, blower electricity consumption is strongly affected by static pressure. Field data shows that static pressure in the house distribution ducts varies widely and that the static pressure used in the test procedure as well as the calculated fan power is not representative of actual field installations. Therefore, accurate determination of the blower electricity consumption is important to address electricity consumption of furnaces and air conditioners. This paper compares the potential regional and national energy savings of two-stage brushless permanent magnet (BPM) blower motors (the blower design option with the most potential savings that is currently available in the market) to single-stage permanent split capacitor (PSC) blower motors (the most common blower design option). Computer models were used to generate the heating and cooling loads for typical homes in 16 different climates which represent houses throughout the United States. The results show that the potential savings of using BPM motors vary by region and house characteristics, and are very strongly tied to improving house distribution ducts. Savings decrease dramatically with increased duct pressure. Cold climate locations will see savings even in the high static pressure duct situations, while warm climate locations will see less

  4. Electric energy savings from new technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moe, R.J.; Harrer, B.J.; Kellogg, M.A.; Lyke, A.J.; Imhoff, K.L.; Fisher, Z.J.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose of the report is to provide information about the electricity-saving potential of new technologies to OCEP that it can use in developing alternative long-term projections of US electricity consumption. Low-, base-, and high-case scenarios of the electricity savings for ten technologies were prepared. The total projected annual savings for the year 2000 for all ten technologies were 137 billion kilowatt hours (BkWh), 279 BkWh, and 470 BkWh, respectively, for the three cases. The magnitude of these savings projections can be gauged by comparing them to the Department's reference case projection for the 1985 National Energy Policy Plan. In the Department's reference case, total consumption in 2000 is projected to be 3319 BkWh. Thus, the savings projected here represent between 4% and 14% of total consumption projected for 2000. Because approximately 75% of the base-case estimate of savings are already incorporated into the reference forecast, reducing projected electricity consumption from what it otherwise would have been, the savings estimated here should not be directly subtracted from the reference forecast.

  5. EIA - Electric Power Data

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    across forms) Contains electricity generation; fuel consumption; emissions; retail sales, ... and associated revenue by end-use sector, green pricing, net ...

  6. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and fuel consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which...

  7. Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,038 314 6 53 445 14 25 Q 181 20-49 918 296 11 19 381 10 97 5 97 50-99 1,018 308 7 13 440 5 130 6 110

  8. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  9. 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by

  10. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of...

  11. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent...

  12. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: August 2015 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

  13. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-05

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  14. US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    pay more for electricity than the average U.S. household. * New Jersey homes are 20% larger than the average U.S. home. CONSUMPTION BY END USE Nearly half the energy consumed in ...

  15. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    How does EIA estimate energy consumption and end uses in U.S. homes? RECS 2009 - Release date: ... ESS gathers data on how much electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and propane were ...

  16. US MidAtl NY Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in New York homes is much lower than the U.S. average, because many households use other fuels for major energy end uses like space ...

  17. Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate ...

  18. Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. ...

  19. Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil ...

  20. Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate ...

  1. Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  2. Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or ...

  3. Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel ...

  4. Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus 2010 DOE Vehicle ...

  5. US SoAtl VA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are

  6. An analysis of residential energy consumption in a temperate climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Y.Y.; Vincent, W.

    1987-06-01

    Electrical energy consumption data have been recorded for several hundred submetered residential structures in Middle Tennessee. All houses were constructed with a common energy package.'' Specifically, daily cooling usage data have been collected for 130 houses for the 1985 and 1986 cooling seasons, and monthly heating usage data for 186 houses have been recorded by occupant participation over a seven-year period. Cooling data have been analyzed using an SPSSx multiple regression analysis and results are compared to several cooling models. Heating, base, and total energy usage are also analyzed and regression correlation coefficients are determined as a function of several house parameters.

  7. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, D. B.; Hadley, S. W.; Chin, S-M.

    2008-10-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub. L. No. 109-58; EPAct 2005) amended the Uniform Time Act of 1966 (Pub. L. No. 89-387) to increase the portion of the year that is subject to Daylight Saving Time. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 extended the duration of Daylight Saving Time in the spring by changing its start date from the first Sunday in April to the second Sunday in March, and in the fall by changing its end date from the last Sunday in October to the first Sunday in November. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 also called for the Department of Energy to evaluate the impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy consumption in the United States and to submit a report to Congress. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) This report presents the results of impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on the national energy consumption in the United States. The key findings are: (1) The total electricity savings of Extended Daylight Saving Time were about 1.3 Tera Watt-hour (TWh). This corresponds to 0.5 percent per each day of Extended Daylight Saving Time, or 0.03 percent of electricity consumption over the year. In reference, the total 2007 electricity consumption in the United States was 3,900 TWh. (2) In terms of national primary energy consumption, the electricity savings translate to a reduction of 17 Trillion Btu (TBtu) over the spring and fall Extended Daylight Saving Time periods, or roughly 0.02 percent of total U.S. energy consumption during 2007 of 101,000 TBtu. (3) During Extended Daylight Saving Time, electricity savings generally occurred over a three- to five-hour period in the evening with small increases in usage during the early-morning hours. On a daily percentage basis, electricity savings were slightly greater during the March (spring) extension of Extended Daylight Saving Time than the November (fall) extension. On a regional basis, some southern portions of the United States exhibited slightly smaller impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy savings

  8. State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 FY 2007 Federal Building Energy Use Shares, by Fuel Type and Agency Site Primary | Primary | FY 2007 Fuel Type Percent Percent | Agency Percent | (10^15 Btu) Electricity 49.4% 77.3% | DOD 53.8% | Total Delivered Natural Gas 33.5% 14.9% | USPS 9.8% | Energy Consumption = 0.39 Fuel Oil 7.3% 3.3% | DOE 8.2% | Total Primary Coal 5.2% 2.3% | VA 6.4% | Energy Consumption = 0.88 Other 4.9% 2.2% | GSA 5.1% | Total 100% 100% | Other 16.8% | Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): See Table 2.3.1 for floorspace.

  10. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at...

  11. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

  12. Electricity Transmission Success Stories - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Capacity of electric power plants Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Cost, revenue and expense statistics for...

  13. Electricity Transmission and Distribution Technologies Available for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Capacity of electric power plants Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Cost, revenue and expense statistics for...

  14. Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  15. Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  16. Evaluating the Relationship between the Population Trends, Prices, Heat Waves, and the Demands of Energy Consumption in Cities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fu, Katherine; Allen, Melissa; Archibald, Richard

    2015-11-18

    The demands of energy consumption have been projected as a key factor that affects an economy at the city, national, and international level. Contributions to total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2012 by various urban sectors include electricity (31%), transportation (28%), industry (20%), agriculture (10%), and commercial and residential (10%). Moreover, the heavy demands of energy consumption in the cities by residents, commercial businesses, industries, and transportation are important for maintaining and sustaining sufficient economic growth. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between population trends, historical energy consumptions, the changes of average electricity price, average annualmore » temperature, and extreme weather events for three selected cities: New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. These cities are exemplary of, metropolitan areas in the East, Middle, and the Western regions of the U.S. Here, we find that the total energy consumptions of New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles are influenced to various degrees by changes in population, temperature and the average price of electricity and that only one city, Los Angeles, does price significantly affect electricity use. Our finding has implications for policy making, suggesting that each city s climate, size and general economic priorities must be considered in developing climate change mitigation strategies and incentives.« less

  17. Evaluating the Relationship between the Population Trends, Prices, Heat Waves, and the Demands of Energy Consumption in Cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Katherine; Allen, Melissa; Archibald, Richard

    2015-11-18

    The demands of energy consumption have been projected as a key factor that affects an economy at the city, national, and international level. Contributions to total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2012 by various urban sectors include electricity (31%), transportation (28%), industry (20%), agriculture (10%), and commercial and residential (10%). Moreover, the heavy demands of energy consumption in the cities by residents, commercial businesses, industries, and transportation are important for maintaining and sustaining sufficient economic growth. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between population trends, historical energy consumptions, the changes of average electricity price, average annual temperature, and extreme weather events for three selected cities: New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. These cities are exemplary of, metropolitan areas in the East, Middle, and the Western regions of the U.S. Here, we find that the total energy consumptions of New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles are influenced to various degrees by changes in population, temperature and the average price of electricity and that only one city, Los Angeles, does price significantly affect electricity use. Our finding has implications for policy making, suggesting that each city s climate, size and general economic priorities must be considered in developing climate change mitigation strategies and incentives.

  18. Table 10.1 Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2002

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2002; " " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: Energy Sources;" " Column: Consumption Potential;" " Unit: Physical Units." ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Energy Sources","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column

  19. Electric energy savings from new technologies. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrer, B.J.; Kellogg, M.A.; Lyke, A.J.; Imhoff, K.L.; Fisher, Z.J.

    1986-09-01

    Purpose of the report is to provide information about the electricity-saving potential of new technologies to OCEP that it can use in developing alternative long-term projections of US electricity consumption. Low-, base-, and high-case scenarios of the electricity savings for 10 technologies were prepared. The total projected annual savings for the year 2000 for all 10 technologies were 137 billion kilowatt hours (BkWh), 279 BkWh, and 470 BkWh, respectively, for the three cases. The magnitude of these savings projections can be gauged by comparing them to the Department's reference case projection for the 1985 National Energy Policy Plan. In the Department's reference case, total consumption in 2000 is projected to be 3319 BkWh. Because approximately 75% of the base-case estimate of savings are already incorporated into the reference projection, only 25% of the savings estimated here should be subtracted from the reference projection for analysis purposes.

  20. Community Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-21

    The TDIST3 program performs an analysis of large integrated community total energy systems (TES) supplying thermal and electrical energy from one or more power stations. The program models the time-dependent energy demands of a group of representative building types, distributes the thermal demands within a thermal utility system (TUS), simulates the dynamic response of a group of power stations in meeting the TUS demands, and designs an optimal base-loaded (electrically) power plant and thermal energymore » storage reservoir combination. The capital cost of the TES is evaluated. The program was developed primarily to analyze thermal utility systems supplied with high temperature water (HTW) from more than one power plant. The TUS consists of a transmission loop and secondary loops with a heat exchanger linking each secondary loop to the transmission loop. The power stations electrical output supplies all community buildings and the HTW supplies the thermal demand of the buildings connected through the TUS, a piping network. Basic components of the TES model are one or more power stations connected to the transmission loop. These may be dual-purpose, producing electricity and HTW, or just heating plants producing HTW. A thermal storage reservoir is located at one power station. The secondary loops may have heating plants connected to them. The transmission loop delivers HTW to local districts; the secondary loops deliver the energy to the individual buildings in a district.« less

  1. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    776,525 692,006 739,687 725,998 807,272 976,760 2001-2016 Alabama 34,029 29,307 31,011 26,699 33,479 39,358 2001-2016 Alaska 2,283 1,992 1,911 1,710 1,852 1,895 2001-2016 Arizona 15,294 12,584 14,192 18,703 20,333 31,156 2001-2016 Arkansas 8,589 5,839 6,041 10,460 12,107 17,193 2001-2016 California 60,889 47,924 38,281 38,443 41,483 64,275 2001-2016 Colorado 7,962 6,288 7,360 8,629 7,733 10,317 2001-2016 Connecticut 10,473 9,671 8,908 11,326 10,244 9,250 2001-2016 Delaware 2,132 2,335 3,792

  2. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,387,184 7,573,863 9,110,793 8,190,756 8,149,111 9,671,095 1997-2015 Alabama 281,722 342,841 401,306 333,897 345,102 397,961 1997-2015 Alaska 39,732 41,738 39,758 33,944 30,444 27,722 1997-2015 Arizona 224,430 180,966 228,818 222,985 207,085 249,477 1997-2015 Arkansas 96,553 107,014 129,059 93,552 71,921 108,755 1997-2015 California 736,092 616,564 855,342 825,713 824,868 816,787 1997-2015 Colorado 92,657 85,015 86,309 89,508 98,269 92,757 1997-2015 Connecticut 85,144 107,897 114,054 106,863

  3. Total Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & < Imports -

  4. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  5. U N I T E D S T A T E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Consumption 21 Table CT1. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources in Physical Units, Selected Years, 1960-2014, United States Year Coal Net Imports of Coal Coke Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power f Fuel Ethanol g Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Million Short Tons Billion Cubic Feet Million Barrels Billion Kilowatthours Million Barrels 1960 398 (s) 11,967 685 136 227 1,453 559 525 3,586 1 149 NA

  6. State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

  7. Conserving Electric Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A classroom activity whereby students participate in two experiments in which they gain an appreciation for their dependency on electricity, and learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption...

  8. Activity: Conserving Electric Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Students participate in two experiments in which they (1) gain an appreciation for their dependency on electricity and (2) learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption makes the energy...

  9. Country Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Country Total Percent of U.S. total Canada 61,078 1% China 3,323,297 57% Germany 154,800 3% Japan 12,593 0% India 47,192 1% South Korea 251,105 4% All Others 2,008,612 34% Total 5,858,677 100% Table 7 . Photovoltaic module import shipments by country, 2014 (peak kilowatts) Note: All Others includes Cambodia, Czech Republic, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan and Turkey Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic

  10. ELECTRICAL LOAD ANTICIPATOR AND RECORDER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Werme, J.E.

    1961-09-01

    A system is described in which an indication of the prevailing energy consumption in an electrical power metering system and a projected power demand for one demand in terval is provided at selected increments of time within the demand interval. Each watt-hour meter in the system is provided with an impulse generator that generates two impulses for each revolution of the meter disc. In each demand interval, for example, one half-hour, of the metering system, the total impulses received from all of the meters are continuously totaled for each 5-minute interval and multiplied by a number from 6 to 1 depending upon which 5- minute interval the impulses were received. This value is added to the total pulses received in the intervals preceding the current 5-minute interval within the half-hour demand interval tc thereby provide an indication of the projected power demand every 5 minutes in the demand interval.

  11. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    End Use: June 2016 Retail rates/prices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on

  12. National Lighting Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Energy National Lighting Energy Consumption Consumption 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all commercial buildings in commercial buildings in 2001 2001 LED (<.1% ) Incandescent 40% HID 22% Fluorescent 38% Lighting Energy Consumption by Lighting Energy Consumption by Breakdown of Lighting Energy Breakdown of Lighting Energy Major Sector and Light Source Type Major Sector and Light Source Type Source: Navigant Consulting, Inc., U.S. Lighting

  13. Residential Energy Consumption Survey:

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... ...*...,,.<,<,...,,.,,.,,. 97 Table 6. Residential Fuel Oil and Kerosene Consumption and Expenditures April 1979 Through March 1980 Northeast...

  14. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the U.S. economy based on data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. The sample used in this report represented about 250,000 of the largest manufacturing establishments which account for approximately 98 percent of U.S. economic output from manufacturing, and an expected similar proportion of manufacturing energy use. The amount of energy use was collected for all operations of each establishment surveyed. Highlights of the report include profiles for the four major energy-consuming industries (petroleum refining, chemical, paper, and primary metal industries), and an analysis of the effects of changes in the natural gas and electricity markets on the manufacturing sector. Seven appendices are included to provide detailed background information. 10 figs., 51 tabs.

  15. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  16. All Consumption Tables.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004...

  17. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Table C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV i Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy j,k Electrical System Energy Losses l Total j,k Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste g Losses and Co- products h Alabama 87.3 296.4 142.7 14.2 8.5 310.6 7.7 35.0 518.6 0.0 159.4 0.0 0.1 0.2 308.8 1,370.8 587.4 1,958.2 Alaska 8.3

  18. Performance of electric and hybrid vehicles at the 1995 American Tour de Sol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quong, S.; LeBlanc, N.; Buitrago, C.; Duoba, M.; Larsen, R.

    1995-12-31

    Energy consumption and performance data were collected on more than 40 electric and hybrid vehicles during the 1995 American Tour de Sol. At this competition, one electric vehicle drove 229 miles on one charge using nickel metalhydride batteries. The results obtained from the data show that electric vehicle efficiencies reached 9.07 mi./kWh or 70 equivalent mpg of gasoline when compared to the total energy cycle efficiency of electricity and gasoline. A gasoline-fueled 1995 Geo Metro that drove the same route attained 36.4 mpg.

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 2010 Impacts of Saving an Electric Quad (1) Utility Average-Sized Aggregate Number of Units Fuel Input Utility Unit (MW) to Provide the Fuel's Share Plant Fuel Type Shares (%) in 2010 of the Electric Quad (2) Coal 49% 36 Petroleum 1% 96 Natural Gas 19% 141 Nuclear 22% 3 Renewable (3) 10% 184 Total 100% 460 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, Electric Power Annual 2010, Feb. 2012, Table 1.2; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A2 for consumption and Table A8 for electricity

  20. State Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State Total Percent of U.S. total Alabama 482 0.0% Alaska 81 0.0% Arizona 194,476 3.3% Arkansas 336 0.0% California 3,163,120 53.0% Colorado 47,240 0.8% Connecticut 50,745 0.9% Delaware 6,600 0.1% District of Columbia 751 0.0% Florida 18,593 0.3% Georgia 47,660 0.8% Hawaii 78,329 1.3% Illinois 5,795 0.1% Indiana 37,016 0.6% Iowa 14,281 0.2% Kansas 1,809 0.0% Kentucky 520 0.0% Louisiana 12,147 0.2% Maine 1,296 0.0% Maryland 63,077 1.1% Massachusetts 157,415 2.6% Michigan 4,210 0.1% Minnesota

  1. Roles of electricity: Electric steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burwell, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Electric steel production from scrap metal continues to grow both in total quantity and in market share. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. The trend towards electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental, and energy advantages for the United States at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers up to a 4-to-1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and s similar savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces.

  2. U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 2,676,998 2,309,464 2,246,633 1,807,170 1,522,382 1,444,378 1,598,071 1,669,178 1,494,128 1,649,073 1,700,950 2,120,198 2002 2,487,638 2,242,427 2,258,431 1,880,985 1,611,453 1,591,373 1,748,435 1,725,712 1,542,170 1,645,873 1,913,629 2,378,895 2003 2,700,545 2,500,315 2,197,936 1,743,530 1,514,697 1,368,369 1,600,484 1,651,580 1,428,554 1,553,189 1,753,642 2,263,659 2004 2,675,834 2,511,097 2,100,921 1,745,171 1,573,043 1,483,684

  3. Idaho Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Year-9 1990's 68,669 69,277 70,672 2000's 72,697 80,279 71,481 69,868 75,335 74,540 75,709 81,937 88,515 85,197 2010's 83,326 82,544 89,004 104,783 91,514 - No Data Reported;...

  4. Alabama Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    337,270 2000's 353,614 332,693 379,343 350,345 382,367 353,156 391,093 418,512 404,157 454,456 2010's 534,779 598,514 666,712 615,407 634,678 - No Data Reported; -- Not ...

  5. Iowa Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 254,489 232,057 230,691 2000's 232,565 224,336 226,457 230,161 226,819 241,340 238,454 293,274 ...

  6. U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 2,677 2,309 2,247 1,807 1,522 1,444 1,598 1,669 1,494 1,649 1,701 2,120 2002 2,488 2,242 2,258 1,881 1,611 1,591 1,748 1,726 1,542 1,646 1,914 2,379 2003 2,701 2,500 2,198 1,744 1,515 1,368 1,600 1,652 1,429 1,553 1,754 2,264 2004 2,676 2,511 2,101 1,745 1,573 1,484 1,585 1,578 1,482 1,557 1,783 2,328 2005 2,562 2,243 2,206 1,725 1,523 1,534 1,687 1,695 1,422 1,428 1,663 2,326 2006 2,165 2,144 2,126 1,681 1,526 1,551 1,759 1,752 1,462

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 4,971,152 1950's 5,766,542 6,810,162 7,294,320 7,639,270 8,048,504 8,693,657 9,288,865 9,846,139 10,302,608 11,321,181 1960's 11,966,537 12,489,268 13,266,513 13,970,229 14,813,808 15,279,716 16,452,403 17,388,360 18,632,062 20,056,240 1970's 21,139,386 21,793,454 22,101,451 22,049,363 21,223,133 19,537,593 19,946,496 19,520,581 19,627,478 20,240,761 1980's 19,877,293 19,403,858 18,001,055 16,834,912 17,950,527

  8. Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 ...

  9. "Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO ...

  10. Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 ...

  11. U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 4,971 1950's 5,767 6,810 7,294 7,639 8,049 8,694 9,289 9,846 10,303 11,321 1960's 11,967 12,489 13,267 13,970 14,814 15,280 16,452 17,388 18,632 20,056 1970's 21,139 21,793 22,101 22,049 21,223 19,538 19,946 19,521 19,627 20,241 1980's 19,877 19,404 18,001 16,835 17,951 17,281 16,221 17,211 18,030 19,119 1990's 19,174 19,562 20,228 20,790 21,247 22,207 22,609 22,737 22,246 22,405 2000's 23,333 22,239 23,027

  12. Maryland Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 212,017 188,552 196,350 2000's 212,133 178,376 196,276 197,024 194,725 202,509 182,294 201,053 ...

  13. Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Hydropower Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel Wind Geothermal Solar Energy in Brief How much U.S. electricity is generated from renewable energy?...

  14. " Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Selected Energy Sources, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"RSE" ,,"Row" "Selected Energy Sources","Total","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",2105,4 "Natural Gas",6835,3 "Net Electricity",2656,2 " Purchased Electricity",2689,1 " Transfers

  15. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Revenue (Thousands Dollars)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Massachusetts",3490569.2,3827051.4,1014262.3,31636.4,8363519.3 "New Hampshire",790655.9,640173,234899.8,0,1665728.7 "Rhode Island",527115.5,532578.5,114110.7,41...

  16. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Revenue (Thousands Dollars)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    300,412 0 1,518,372 Massachusetts 3,490,569 3,827,051 1,014,262 31,636 8,363,519 New Hampshire 790,656 640,173 234,900 0 1,665,729 Rhode Island 527,116 532,579 114,111 4,158 ...

  17. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Sales (Megawatthours

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...84570,3357486,0,12002661 "Massachusetts",20071160,26076208,7960941,360983,54469292 "New Hampshire",4510487,4464530,1969064,0,10944081 "Rhode Island",3070347,3657679,887150,27928,76...

  18. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration (EIA) 1 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 2 (Estimates

  19. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration (EIA) 4 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region,

  20. Electric Metering | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Metering Electric Metering Saving Money by Saving Energy The Department of Energy has installed meters in the James Forrestal Building that will enable DOE to measure electricity use and costs in its headquarters facility. You may explore this data further by visiting our Forrestal Metering Dashboard at the following website: http://forrestal.nrel.gov The Forrestal electric meters provide daily read-outs and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power

  1. Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All consumption & efficiency data reports ... to May 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 End-Use Sector Residential 8,754 9,508 ...

  2. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March, and in the fall by changing its end date from the last Sunday in October to ... day of Extended Daylight Saving Time, or 0.03 percent of electricity consumption over the year. ...

  3. Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  4. Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of

  5. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go Commercial Buildings Available formats Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey 2012 - Detailed Tables Released: May 17, 2016 The 2012 CBECS consumption and expenditures detailed tables are comprised of Tables C1-C38, which cover overall electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and district heat consumption, and tables E1-E11, which disaggregate the same

  6. Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings*",,"Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu)" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace...

  7. Electric power monthly, April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-07

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  8. Electric power monthly, May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-25

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  9. Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), ... demand levels that occurred towards the end of the month. ...

  10. Next Generation Electric Machines | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In 2013, electricity accounted for approximately 40% of primary energy consumption in the United States and ... manufacturing was responsible for more than a quarter of end-use. ...

  11. Waukesha Electric Systems Smart Grid Demonstration Project |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    transformer, lower power consumption through reduction of losses, and increase the reliability of the electrical grid. References ARRA Smart Grid Demonstration Projects...

  12. Electrical Energy Storage A DOE ENERGY FRONTIER RESEARCH CENTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Capacity of electric power plants Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Cost, revenue and expense statistics for...

  13. Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price 2011 - Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Capacity of electric power plants Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Cost, revenue and expense

  14. Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S.

    1996-08-01

    Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

  15. Interim Data Changes in the Short-term Energy Outlook Data Systems Related to Electric Power Sector and Natural Gas Demand Data Revisions (Released in the STEO December 2002)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Beginning with the December 2002 issue of the Energy Information Administration's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), electricity generation and related fuel consumption totals will be presented on a basis that is consistent with the definitions and aggregates used in the 2001 edition of EIA's Annual Energy Review (AER). Particularly affected by these changes are the demand and balancing item totals for natural

  16. Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 5 ...

  17. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,958.2 575.9 651.5 497.4 1,724.9 431.4 277.0 -475.0 0.0 378.7 262.4 848.4 468.7 Alaska 603.1 18.2 329.6 233.6 581.4 0.0 21.8 0.0

  18. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Table C6. Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric Power e Biomass Geothermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste f Alabama 0.0 28.2 3.9 (s) 2.1 0.2 0.0 6.2 0.0 0.9 0.0 78.2 113.5 148.8 262.4 Alaska 8.3 18.0 7.3 (s) 0.7 0.4 0.0 8.4 0.0 0.8 0.1 9.4 45.0 18.2 63.2 Arizona 0.0 31.3 5.9

  19. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Table C7. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power e Biomass Geo- thermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy h,i Electrical System Energy Losses j Total h,i Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste f Losses and Co- products g Alabama 87.3 209.0 19.9 1.2 2.7 2.2 32.3 58.3 0.0 150.8 0.0 (s) 118.2 623.6 224.8 848.4 Alaska (s) 261.5 23.2 (s) 0.7 0.0 29.8 53.7 0.0

  20. US MidAtl PA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MidAtl PA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl PA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Pennsylvania households consume an average of 96 million Btu per year, 8% more than the U.S. average. Pennsylvania residents also

  1. US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in

  2. DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents composing a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and...

  3. Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99

  4. Table 2.2 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu ) NAICS 1 Code Manufacturing Group Coal Coal Coke and Breeze 2 Natural Gas Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 3 and NGL 4 Residual Fuel Oil Net Electricity 5 Other 6 Shipments of Energy Sources 7 Total 8 311 Food 147 1 638 16 3 26 251 105 (s) 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 20 0 41 1 1 3 30 11 -0 107 313 Textile Mills 32 0 65 (s) (s) 2 66 12 -0 178 314 Textile Product Mills 3 0 46 (s) 1 Q 20 (s) -0 72 315 Apparel 0 0 7 (s) (s)

  5. An analysis of residential energy consumption in a temperate climate. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Y.Y.; Vincent, W.

    1987-06-01

    Electrical energy consumption data have been recorded for several hundred submetered residential structures in Middle Tennessee. All houses were constructed with a common ``energy package.`` Specifically, daily cooling usage data have been collected for 130 houses for the 1985 and 1986 cooling seasons, and monthly heating usage data for 186 houses have been recorded by occupant participation over a seven-year period. Cooling data have been analyzed using an SPSSx multiple regression analysis and results are compared to several cooling models. Heating, base, and total energy usage are also analyzed and regression correlation coefficients are determined as a function of several house parameters.

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities of Public Multi-Family Buildings, by Fuel and Region (Thousand Btu/SF) Region Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Total Northeast 27.7 45.9 39.9 71.5 Midwest 22.5 49.9 N.A. 70.3 South 53.5 27.9 N.A. 65.9 West 22.0 25.3 N.A. 46.2 National Average 33.0 43.4 68.3

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities of Public Multi-Family Buildings, by Fuel and Region (Million Btu/Household) Region Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Total Northeast 21.2 34.9 36.2 54.7 Midwest 16.6 36.6 N.A. 51.8 South 39.4 20.0 N.A. 48.5 West 16.6 19.3 N.A. 34.8 National Average 24.6 32.2 51.0

  8. Table 2.3 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006 End-Use Category Net Electricity 1 Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 2 and NGL ...

  9. Energy consumption in thermomechanical pulping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marton, R.; Tsujimoto, N.; Eskelinen, E.

    1981-08-01

    Various components of refining energy were determined experimentally and compared with those calculated on the basis of the dimensions of morphological elements of wood. The experimentally determined fiberization energy of spruce was 6 to 60 times larger than the calculated value and that of birch 3 to 15 times larger. The energy consumed in reducing the Canadian standard freeness of isolated fibers from 500 to 150 ml was found to be approximately 1/3 of the total fiber development energy for both spruce and birch TMP. Chip size affected the refining energy consumption; the total energy dropped by approximately 30% when chip size was reduced from 16 mm to 3 mm in the case of spruce and approximately 40% for birch. 6 refs.

  10. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    20 Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 5% 28% 8% 56% | 8% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 5% 26% 7% 59% | 7% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 5% 26% 5% 61% | 6% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 6% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 5% 26% 4% 61% | 6% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 5% 24% 5% 63% | 7% 25%

  12. Residential energy consumption survey: consumption and expenditures, April 1982-March 1983. Part 1, national data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, W.

    1984-11-01

    This report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of natural gas, electricity, fuel oil or kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) from April 1982 through March 1983. Data on the consumption of wood for this period are also presented. The consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills, obtained, with the permission of the household. from the companies supplying energy to the household. Data on wood consumption are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the winter and are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors described in the report. These data come from the 1982 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the fifth in a series of comparable surveys beginning in 1978. The 1982 survey is the first survey to include, as part of its sample, a portion of the same households interviewed in the 1980 survey. A separate report is planned to report these longitudinal data. This summary gives the highlights of a comparison of the findings for the 5 years of RECS data. The data cover all types of housing units in the 50 states and the District of Columbia including single-family units, apartments, and mobile homes. For households with indirect energy costs, such as costs that are included in the rent or paid by third parties, the sonsumption and expenditures data are estimated and included in the figures reported here. The average household consumption of natural gas, electricity, fuel oil or kerosene, and LPG dropped in 1982 from the previous year, hitting a 5-year low since the first Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) was conducted in 1978. The average consumption was 103 (+-3) million Btu per household in 1982, down from 114 (+-) million Btu in 1981. The weather was the main contributing factor. 8 figures, 46 tables.

  13. Derived annual estimates of manufacturing energy consumption, 1974--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-05

    This report presents a complete series of annual estimates of purchased energy used by the manufacturing sector of the US economy, for the years 1974 to 1988. These estimates interpolate over gaps in the actual data collections, by deriving estimates for the missing years 1982--1984 and 1986--1987. For the purposes of this report, ``purchased`` energy is energy brought from offsite for use at manufacturing establishments, whether the energy is purchased from an energy vendor or procured from some other source. The actual data on purchased energy comes from two sources, the US Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census`s Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) and EIA`s Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). The ASM provides annual estimates for the years 1974 to 1981. However, in 1982 (and subsequent years) the scope of the ASM energy data was reduced to collect only electricity consumption and expenditures and total expenditures for other purchased energy. In 1985, EIA initiated the triennial MECS collecting complete energy data. The series equivalent to the ASM is referred to in the MECS as ``offsite-produced fuels.``

  14. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption &

  15. Household Energy Consumption Segmentation Using Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwac, J; Flora, J; Rajagopal, R

    2014-01-01

    The increasing US deployment of residential advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) has made hourly energy consumption data widely available. Using CA smart meter data, we investigate a household electricity segmentation methodology that uses an encoding system with a pre-processed load shape dictionary. Structured approaches using features derived from the encoded data drive five sample program and policy relevant energy lifestyle segmentation strategies. We also ensure that the methodologies developed scale to large data sets.

  16. Primary and secondary battery consumption trends in Sweden 1996–2013: Method development and detailed accounting by battery type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrício, João; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Berg, Per E.O.; Rosado, Leonardo; Åberg, Helena

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Developed MFA method was validated by the national statistics. • Exponential increase of EEE sales leads to increase in integrated battery consumption. • Digital convergence is likely to be a cause for primary batteries consumption decline. • Factors for estimation of integrated batteries in EE are provided. • Sweden reached the collection rates defined by European Union. - Abstract: In this article, a new method based on Material Flow Accounting is proposed to study detailed material flows in battery consumption that can be replicated for other countries. The method uses regularly available statistics on import, industrial production and export of batteries and battery-containing electric and electronic equipment (EEE). To promote method use by other scholars with no access to such data, several empirically results and their trends over time, for different types of batteries occurrence among the EEE types are provided. The information provided by the method can be used to: identify drivers of battery consumption; study the dynamic behavior of battery flows – due to technology development, policies, consumers behavior and infrastructures. The method is exemplified by the study of battery flows in Sweden for years 1996–2013. The batteries were accounted, both in units and weight, as primary and secondary batteries; loose and integrated; by electrochemical composition and share of battery use between different types of EEE. Results show that, despite a fivefold increase in the consumption of rechargeable batteries, they account for only about 14% of total use of portable batteries. Recent increase in digital convergence has resulted in a sharp decline in the consumption of primary batteries, which has now stabilized at a fairly low level. Conversely, the consumption of integrated batteries has increased sharply. In 2013, 61% of the total weight of batteries sold in Sweden was collected, and for the particular case of alkaline manganese

  17. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Data Show Large Reductions in Both Manufacturing Energy Use and the Energy Intensity of Manufacturing Activity between 2002 and 2010 MECS 2010 - Release date: March 19, 2013 Total energy consumption in the manufacturing sector decreased by 17 percent from 2002 to 2010 (Figure 1), according to data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). line chart:air

  18. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Resource Use: June 2016 Supply and fuel consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below, electricity generation output by fuel type and generator type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation output by region By fuel type By

  19. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-22

    This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Motor Gasoline Consumption Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The motor gasoline consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide forecasts of total U.S. consumption of motor gasolien based on estimates of vehicle miles traveled and average vehicle fuel economy.

  1. Electric power monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-13

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  2. Electric power monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-17

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  3. Electric sales and revenue 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  4. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6:35:35 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...2","N3035US2","N3025US2","N3045US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption ...

  5. End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

  6. Total U.S......................................................

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Below Poverty Line Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption ... Below Poverty Line Age of Most-Used Refrigerator Less than 2 Years......

  7. Chapter 5 - Electricity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Chapter 5 Electricity Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, world net electricity generation increases 69% by 2040, from 21.6 trillion kilowatthours (kWh) in 2012 to 25.8 trillion kWh in 2020 and 36.5 trillion kWh in 2040. Electricity is the world's fastest-growing form of end-use energy consumption, as it has been for many decades. Power systems have continued to evolve from

  8. Table C12. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Electricity Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per kWh",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  9. Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

    1982-02-01

    The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

  10. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption CBECS 2012 - Release date: March 18, 2016 2012 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for the 2012 CBECS (Detailed Tables E1-E 11) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, computing (including servers), office equipment, and other uses. Although details vary

  11. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Table C8. Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy Electrical System Energy Losses e Total Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Lubricants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama 0.0 19.4 0.3 118.8 14.2 0.5 2.3 307.7 5.5 449.4 0.0 468.7 0.0 468.7 Alaska 0.0 0.3 0.7 33.1 96.0 0.1 0.5 32.4 0.0 162.7 0.0 163.0 0.0 163.0 Arizona 0.0 16.0 1.0 106.5 21.5 1.1 1.7 316.5 0.0

  12. Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patinkin, L.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

  13. Electric power monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

  14. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  15. " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size(b)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",,,,,"1,000","Row"

  16. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Canadian Energy Demand

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The residential sector is one of the main end-use sectors in Canada accounting for 16.7% of total end-use site energy consumption in 2009 (computed from NRCan 2012. pp, 4-5). In this year, the residential sector accounted for 54.5% of buildings total site energy consumption. Between 1990 and 2009, Canadian household energy consumption grew by less than 11%. Nonetheless, households contributed to 14.6% of total energy-related greenhouse gas emissions in Canada in 2009 (computed from NRCan 2012). This is the U.S. Energy Information Administrations second study to help provide a better understanding of the factors impacting residential energy consumption and intensity in North America (mainly the United States and Canada) by using similar methodology for analyses in both countries.

  17. Minimize oil field power consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, B.; Ennis, P.

    1999-08-01

    Though electric power is a major operating cost of oil production, few producers have systematically evaluated their power consumption for ways to be more efficient. There is significant money to be saved by doing so, and now is a good time to make an evaluation because new power options are at hand. They range from small turbo generators that can run on casing head gas and power one or two lift pumps, to rebuilt major turbines and ram-jet powered generators that can be set in a multi-well field and deliver power at bargain prices. Power industry deregulation is also underway. Opportunities for more advantageous power contracts from competitive sources are not far off. This two-part series covers power efficiency and power options. This article reviews steps you can take to evaluate the efficiency of your power use and go about improving it. Part 2 will discuss opportunities for use of distributed power and changes you can expect from decentralized power.

  18. Energy consumption series: Lighting in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-11

    Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

  19. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-02

    DOE2.1E-121SUNOS is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS).« less

  20. Electric Power Annual 2014 - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), ... to ultimate customers by end-use sector XLS Table 2.5. ...

  1. Smart Grid Week: Working to Modernize the Nation's Electric Grid...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... make informed decisions about their energy consumption. ... on efforts to transform the nation's electricity grid? ... grid from generation to end use allowing users to see ...

  2. Barge Truck Total

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

  3. 1989 CBECS EUI

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity for Buildings Cooled with Electricity, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Electricity Consumption...

  4. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 269 277 185 R 159 170 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 127,417 112,268

  5. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  6. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 620 914 819 R 921 895 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 6,802 9,075

  7. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

  8. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 276 322 270 R 357 310 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 2,092 1,854

  9. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 188 239 211 200 200 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  10. Electric power monthly, October 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-11

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

  11. Electric Power Monthly, September 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-12

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and state levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 2003 Commercial Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type Consumption Percent of Total | Consumption Percent of Total Building Type (thousand Btu/SF) Consumption | Building Type (thousand Btu/SF) Consumption Health Care 345.9 8% | Education 159.0 11% Inpatient 438.8 6% | Service 151.6 4% Outpatient 205.9 2% | Food Service 522.4 6% Food Sales 535.5 5% | Religious Worship 77.0 2% Lodging 193.1 7% | Public Order and Safety 221.1 2% Office 211.7 19% | Warehouse and Storage

  13. Office Buildings: Consumption Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Type of Office Building Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) Dollars per Million Btu All Office Buildings 1,089 1,475 90.5 16.32...

  14. ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF INCREASING ELECTRIC GRID RESILIENCE TO

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... II. Status and Outlook of the Electric Grid The grid delivers electricity to more than 144 million end-use ... down" before reaching homes, offices and other locations for consumption. ...

  15. Electric power monthly, July 1995 - with data for April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This publication provides statistical data on net generation, fuel consumption, fossil fuel stocks, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on fossil fuel stocks and costs are also included.

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Alaska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,067 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 422 20.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Arizona Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,392 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,901 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,720 10.1 Solar 20 - Wind 128 - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Connecticut Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - -

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Delaware Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    District of Columbia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source - Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source - Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 790 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity - - Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Georgia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Georgia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 36,636 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,689 7.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 617 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Kansas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,543 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,082 8.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 7 0.1 Other Biomass - -

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Louisiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,744 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 517 1.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 311 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maryland Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,516 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 799 6.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 3 * MSW/Landfill Gas

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Massachusetts Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,697 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 566 4.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 Wood/Wood

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,691 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 235 1.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 235 1.5 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Missouri Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,739 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,030 4.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Montana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 5,866 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,085 52.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nebraska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,857 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 443 5.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 6

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hampshire Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,180 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 671 16.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 489 11.7 Solar - - Wind 24 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 129 3.1

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jersey Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 18,424 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 230 1.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * Wood/Wood

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,674 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,499 9.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 481 1.7

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pennsylvania Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 45,575 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,984 4.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 747 1.6 Solar 9 * Wind 696 1.5 Wood/Wood Waste 108 0.2

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Rhode Island profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 23,982 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,623 6.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,340 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 255 1.1

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - -

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tennessee Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,847 13.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,624 12.3 Solar - - Wind 29 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste 185 0.9

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Vermont Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 24,109 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,487 6.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 866 3.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 331 1.4 MSW/Landfill Gas

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    West Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 16,495 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 715 4.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 285 1.7 Solar - - Wind 431 2.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wisconsin Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 17,836 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,267 7.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 492 2.8 Solar - - Wind 449 2.5 Wood/Wood Waste 239 1.3

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wyoming Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,986 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,722 21.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 32,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,855 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8 MSW/Landfill

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,067 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 422 20.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,392 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,901 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,720 10.1 Solar 20 - Wind 128 - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - -

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source - Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source - Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 790 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity - - Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Georgia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 36,636 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,689 7.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 617 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,543 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,082 8.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 7 0.1 Other Biomass - -

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,744 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 517 1.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 311 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,516 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 799 6.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 3 * MSW/Landfill Gas

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,697 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 566 4.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 Wood/Wood

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,691 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 235 1.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 235 1.5 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,739 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,030 4.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 5,866 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,085 52.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,857 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 443 5.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 6

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,180 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 671 16.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 489 11.7 Solar - - Wind 24 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 129 3.1

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 18,424 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 230 1.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * Wood/Wood

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,674 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,499 9.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 481 1.7