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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Data Processing Procedures and Methodology for Estimating Trip Distances for the 1995 American Travel Survey (ATS)  

SciTech Connect

The 1995 American Travel Survey (ATS) collected information from approximately 80,000 U.S. households about their long distance travel (one-way trips of 100 miles or more) during the year of 1995. It is the most comprehensive survey of where, why, and how U.S. residents travel since 1977. ATS is a joint effort by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) and the U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of Census (Census); BTS provided the funding and supervision of the project, and Census selected the samples, conducted interviews, and processed the data. This report documents the technical support for the ATS provided by the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which included the estimation of trip distances as well as data quality editing and checking of variables required for the distance calculations.

Hwang, H.-L.; Rollow, J.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

3Solar Energy and the Distance to Juno from the Sun As the Juno spacecraft travels to Jupiter,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at its maximum distance from the sun? Space Math http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov #12;Answer Key 3 Problem, it gets farther from the sun every day. Because the spacecraft generates its electrical power using solar(r)? Problem 3 ­ For what angle, , will the spacecraft be able to generate only ¼ of the electrical power

3

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

4

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

5

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

6

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

7

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

8

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

9

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

10

Travel Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCOPE OF PROBLEM SCOPE OF PROBLEM * 21% of U.S. Adult Population Travel for Business * 1.4 million International Travelers Daily * Numbers will Increase * Include Workers in Planning TRAVEL AND INFECTIOUS DISEASE * Endemic Exotic Diseases * Antimicrobial Resistance *Non-Specific Presentation of Disease * Emergence/ Re-emergence of Infectious Agents * Importation/ Exportation of Infection Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM DOE Headquarters January 17,2002 INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL * Economic Expansion * Globalization of Companies * Extended * Extended & Short-tenn Assignments * Multi-National Travel * Circle Globe in Three Days * Incubation Period for Infectious Diseases * Employee Needs Advice from OHN HEALTH ASSESSMENT * Potential Travel Illnesses * Employee Health Risks

11

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

12

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

13

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

14

Travel Visa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Please note that the Department of Homeland Security is implementing the Electronic System for Travel Authorization, which is expected to be mandatory for

15

Travel Reimbursement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fund. TRAVEL RESOURCES Albuquerque Sunport Albuquerque Sunport Car Rental Center Atomic City Transit FastPark and Relax Albuquerque Airport Parking GSA Domestic Per Diem...

16

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

17

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

18

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

19

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

20

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

22

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

23

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

24

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

25

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

26

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

27

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

28

Zero Energy Travel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is fundamentally possible to travel with zero energy based on Newton Laws of Motion. According to the first law of motion, a body will continue to travel for infinite distance unless it is acted upon by another force. For a body in motion, the force which stops perpetual motion is friction. However, there are many circumstances that friction is zero, for example in space, where there is vacuum. On earth, gravity makes objects to be in constant contact with each other generating friction but technology exists to separate them in the air using powerful magnetic forces. At low speeds, the friction caused by air is minimal but we can create vacuum even on land for high speed travel. Another condition for travelling is for it to stop at its destination. On land, we can recover the kinetic energy back into electrical energy using brushless permanent magnet generators. These generators can also convert electric energy into kinetic energy in order to provide motion. This article reviews technologies that will allow us to travel with zero energy. It is easier to do it on land but in the air, it is not obvious.

Othman Ahmad; Aroland Kiring; Ali Chekima

2011-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

29

New York Household Travel Patterns: A Comparison Analysis  

SciTech Connect

In 1969, the U. S. Department of Transportation began collecting detailed data on personal travel to address various transportation planning issues. These issues range from assessing transportation investment programs to developing new technologies to alleviate congestion. This 1969 survey was the birth of the Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. Longer-distance travel was collected in 1977 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed to the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and collected both daily and longer-distance trips in one survey. In addition to the number of sample households that the national NPTS/NHTS survey allotted to New York State (NYS), the state procured an additional sample of households in both the 1995 and 2001 surveys. In the 1995 survey, NYS procured an addition sample of more than 9,000 households, increasing the final NY NPTS sample size to a total of 11,004 households. Again in 2001, NYS procured 12,000 additional sample households, increasing the final New York NHTS sample size to a total of 13,423 households with usable data. These additional sample households allowed NYS to address transportation planning issues pertinent to geographic areas significantly smaller than for what the national NPTS and NHTS data are intended. Specifically, these larger sample sizes enable detailed analysis of twelve individual Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs). Furthermore, they allowed NYS to address trends in travel behavior over time. In this report, travel data for the entire NYS were compared to those of the rest of the country with respect to personal travel behavior and key travel determinants. The influence of New York City (NYC) data on the comparisons of the state of New York to the rest of the country was also examined. Moreover, the analysis examined the relationship between population density and travel patterns, and the similarities and differences among New York MPOs. The 1995 and 2001 survey data make it possible to examine and identify travel trends over time. This report does not address, however, the causes of the differences and/or trends.

Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Travel | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Travel Travel Travel The Travel Services Team serves as the Headquarters POC for the following services: Headquarters Travel Management Center (TMC) Official Travel, Domestic and Foriegn Foreign Travel Management System (FTMS) Official Travel Regulations and Guidelines U.S. Passports and Visa Services (Official and Diplomatic) Non-Refundable Airfare Guidance International Insurance for DOE Officials (MEDEX) RezProfiler Instructions Car Rental Hotel Reservations Travel FAQs For questions about Travel Services or the Travel Management Center, see the Contact Us, Travel Services Section Travel Management Center (TMC) The Travel Services Team oversees the Travel Management Center (TMC), which is operated by ADTRAV Travel Management. Office Hours - 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Office Location - Forrestal, Room GE-180

31

Travel Award Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Travel Award Program. What is the travel award? The CNST has a Cooperative Agreement with the University of Maryland Nanocenter. ...

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

32

Information for Travelers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information for Travelers. Background Notes of Countries and International Organizations; Centers for Disease Control Health Information; ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

Travel Notes - World Market Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Travel notes, air travel, rail travel. Travel Notes - World Market Update Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Processing Elearning Olive oil Industry Events Industrial Oil Products Abstracts Program Travel Hotel Short Courses Exhibits Regi

34

TMS Intl Travel Visa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Please note that the Department of Homeland Security is implementing the Electronic System for Travel Authorization, which is expected to be mandatory for

35

Segmenting the mature travel market by motivation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to segment mature travellers based on their motivations and to profile the similarities and differences between mature travel market segments according to their sociodemographic and travel-related characteristics. A ... Keywords: USA, United States, cluster analysis, data analysis, educational travellers, factor analysis, mature markets, mature travellers, personal travellers, segmentation, social travellers, sociodemographics, travel market segments, travel motivation

Yawei Wang; Yanli Zhang; John Xia; Zhongxian Wang

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

An investigation of the information needs of air passengers traveling to the airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, nearly 200 million person-trips over 100 miles one-way were taken by airplane in 1995, a 186 percent increase since 1977 (Bureau of Transportation Statistics, 1998). As the popularity of air travel continues to increase, the number of trips to and from the airport will inevitably rise also. Passengers will need accurate information about all modes on a total trip basis. This includes the modes of access to and from the airport in addition to the long distance segment of the trip (Sverdrup & Parcel Consultants, Inc., et al., 1996). The purpose of this study was to determine the specific information needs of departing air travelers with regard to the pre-trip and en-route phases of their trip to the airport. Based on the results of this research, effective plans for providing supplementary information in support of ground-side travel can be developed by local, state, and national agencies. To gain an understanding of air passenger information needs, personal interviews were conducted with 216 passengers at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston, Texas. One major finding from this research was that in general, passengers are content with the existing types of real-time travel information that are available. Specifically, the survey results showed that passengers currently use and would prefer to have access to flight information including, confirmed schedules, flight delays, and gate assignments. It was also found that most passengers would prefer to receive travel information earlier in their trip (i.e., before beginning their trip). This could possibly be so that they have the information earlier in their decision-making process and thus would have adequate time to evaluate their options. Finally, based on the survey results, air passengers indicated they would prefer to use e-mail, pagers, telephones, and the Internet when making future travel information inquiries. In particular, business travelers were found to have a higher affinity toward e-mail and pagers, while younger travelers simply preferred newer technologies to receive travel information. As a result, these population categories are prime targets for marketing of information services. Overall, each of these findings was similar to and backed up the results from previous studies.

Burdette, Debra Arlene

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope These regulations apply to the reimbursement of round-trip travel expenses incurred by interviewees. These regulations do not apply to applicants who live within a 50-mile radius of Los Alamos based on the Rand McNally Standard Highway Mileage Guide. Reimbursement With the exception of airfare, interviewees will be reimbursed for travel expenses according to Federal travel regulations. For interviewees, airfare reimbursement is limited to the lesser of the standard coach airfare or the actual amount paid. The lowest available airfare should be obtained based on the official business dates and locations. The reimbursement amount will be based on the most direct route available between the interviewee's residence and the laboratory. Costs incurred over the lowest available fare will be the

38

Travel Request Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lodging Lodging Transportation SNAP COLLABORATION MEETING JUNE 1 - 3, 2006 TRAVEL FUNDING REQUEST FORM If you require Travel funding support from LBNL to attend the SNAP Collaboration Meeting, please fill out the travel request form below and click on the "SEND" button. As an alternative, you can simply email the requested information on the form to snap@lbl.gov Deadline: Please submit your request NLT Wednesday, May 10, 2006. Disclaimer: Please note that the submission of this request does not automatically constitute funding approval. 1. First Name Last Name 2. Has this travel funding support been pre-approved by the SNAP management? Yes No 3. If answer to #2 is "Yes": a) Approval by whom? b) What was the maximum reimbursement amount from SNAP?

39

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

40

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Traveling-wave photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A Joint Household Travel Distance Generation and Car Ownership Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at a~ljustmentsof car ownership usage that representare from previous car ownership, train usage, and bus-tram-car usageare moreimportantthan the laggedeffects of public transport usage.

Golob, Thomas F.; Van Wissen , Leo

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Joint Household Travel Distance Generation And Car Ownership Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at a~ljustmentsof car ownership usage that representare from previous car ownership, train usage, and bus-tram-car usageare moreimportantthan the laggedeffects of public transport usage.

Golob, Thomas F.; Van Wissen, Leo

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

University of Kansas Travel Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................................................5 Future Employees Traveling Before Start Date .....................................................................................................................................6 Transportation Expenses.................................................................................................................................6 Reimbursable Transportation

Peterson, Blake R.

45

Transferring 2001 National Household Travel Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Policy makers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and to accommodate future demand. These data are also needed to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-mitigating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, and intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and it collected both daily and long-distance trips. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey. Due to the survey's design, data in the NHTS survey series were not recommended for estimating travel statistics for categories smaller than the combination of Census division (e.g., New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific), MSA size, and the availability of rail. Extrapolating NHTS data within small geographic areas could risk developing and subsequently using unreliable estimates. For example, if a planning agency in City X of State Y estimates travel rates and other travel characteristics based on survey data collected from NHTS sample households that were located in City X of State Y, then the agency could risk developing and using unreliable estimates for their planning process. Typically, this limitation significantly increases as the size of an area decreases. That said, the NHTS contains a wealth of information that could allow statistical inferences about small geographic areas, with a pre-determined level of statistical certainty. The question then becomes whether a method can be developed that integrates the NHTS data and other data to estimate key travel characteristics for small geographic areas such as Census tract and transportation analysis zone, and whether this method can outperform other, competing methods.

Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

2005 PTM Travel Information - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRAVEL INFORMATION SOCIAL EVENTS & TOURS VISA INFORMATION ... Wind: SSW at 7 mph. Airport Delays Beach Conditions Pollen Reports...

47

Travel plans: opportunities for ICT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-based mobility management or 'travel plans' address the transport problem by engaging with those organisations such as employers that are directly responsible for generating the demand for travel, and hence have the potential to have a major impact ... Keywords: ict, market niche, sustainable transport, travel plans

Marcus P. Enoch

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

2001 New York State NHTS: Travel Patterns of Special Populations  

SciTech Connect

Policymakers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and accommodate future demands; to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-alleviating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. Longer-distance travel was collected in 1977 and 1995. The 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) collected both daily and longer-distance trips in one survey. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel was not part of the survey. New York State participated in the 2001 NHTS by procuring additional 12,000 sample households. These additional sample households allowed New York State to address transportation planning issues pertinent to geographic areas that are significantly smaller than what the national NHTS data allowed. The final sample size for New York State was 13,423 usable households. In this report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identifies and analyzes differences, if any, in travel patterns that are attributable to demographic characteristics (e.g., gender, age, race and ethnicity), household characteristics (e.g., low income households, zero and one car households), modal characteristics and geographic location. Travel patterns of those who work at home are examined and compared to those of conventional workers, as well as those who do not work. Focus is given to trip frequency, travel by time of day, trip purpose, and mode choice. For example, included in this analysis is the mobility of the elderly population in New York State. The American society is undergoing a major demographic transformation that is resulting in a greater percentage of older individuals in the population. In addition to demographic changes, recent travel surveys show that an increasing number of older individuals are licensed to drive and that they drive more than their same age cohort did a decade ago. Cohort differences in driving are particularly apparent - not only are more of today's elderly population licensed to drive than their age cohort two decades ago, they also drive more. Equally important are the increase in immigration and in racial and cultural diversity. This report also discusses vehicle availability, socioeconomic characteristics, travel trends (e.g., miles travelled, distance driven, commute patterns), and the transportation accessibility of these populations. Specifically, this report addresses in detail the travel behavior of the following special populations: (1) the elderly, defined as those who were 65 years old or older, (2) low-income households, (3) ethnic groups and immigrants, and (4) those who worked at home.

Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Travel Demand Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

d. volunteer leader travel policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the name of the event, who is attending, and a projected cost for budgetary purposes. The proposed volunteer leader travel budget will be approved by the...

51

PRICM 8: Housing and Travel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Please note that the Department of Homeland Security is implementing the Electronic System for Travel Authorization, which is expected to be mandatory for

52

1999 EMC: Travel Information - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 1999 ... Travel by Train: Amtrak provides daily service from San Francisco and Los Angeles. The station is located in downtown Santa Barbara.

53

Travel and Entertainment All Airlines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Flying Fields Travel Agencies and Tour Operators Bridge and Road Fees, Tolls Services (Utilities) Wire Institutions Securities Brokers /Dealers Insurance Sales, Underwriting and Premiums Lodging Hotels, Motels

Castillo, Steven P.

54

Developing a Total Travel Time Performance Measure A Concept Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that can be used to target improvements for future versions of the measure. Background Transportation and David Schrank Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) For Mobility Measurement in Urban Transportation the supply and demand for transportation services. Land use pattern and density are also used to provide

55

PMP-III 2008: Travel - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PMP-III: Travel. For Thailand and Bangkok travel information, visit the Tourism Authority of Thailand. AIRORT TRANSPORTATION. Public metered taxi is the...

56

TAKING A TRIP? Travel Management Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to airline/rail reservations, hotel lodging, airport transportation, and car rentals. #12;TRAVEL MGMT, car rentals, incidentals. Improper usage examples include movies, utility bills, alcohol. Non travel

Zobin, Nahum

57

Distance in architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The document which follows represents an exploration of distance and its connection to architecture. This exploration is threefold. On one level it regards distance as an ontological question, researching for precedent ...

Criparacos, George C

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Optimal distance separating halfspace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plastria & Carrizosa / Optimal distance separating halfspace. 2. 1 Gauge Distance to a Hyperplane. Let ? be a gauge on Rd with unit ball B, i.e. B is a compact...

59

Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A Quantum Mechanical Travelling Salesman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A quantum simulation of a travelling salesman is described. A vector space for a graph is defined together with a sequence of operators which transform a special initial state into a superposition states representing Hamiltonian tours. The quantum amplitude for any tour is a function of the classical cost of travelling along the edges in that tour. Tours with the largest quantum amplitude may be different than those with the smallest classically-computed cost.

Ravindra N. Rao

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Globular Cluster Distance Determinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present status of the distance scale to Galactic globular clusters is reviewed. Six distance determination techniques which are deemed to be most reliable are discussed in depth. These different techniques are used to calibrate the absolute magnitude of the RR Lyrae stars. The various calibrations fall into three groups. Main sequence fitting using Hipparcos parallaxes, theoretical HB models and the RR Lyrae in the LMC all favor a bright calibration, implying a `long' globular cluster distance scale. White dwarf fitting and the astrometric distances yield a somewhat fainter RR Lyrae calibration, while the statistical parallax solution yields faint RR Lyrae stars implying a `short' distance scale to globular clusters. Various secondary distance indicators discussed all favor the long distance scale. The `long' and `short' distance scales differ by (0.31+/-0.16) mag. Averaging together all of the different distance determinations yields Mv(RR) = (0.23+/-0.04)([Fe/H] + 1.6) + (0.56+/-0.12) mag.

Brian Chaboyer

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST AND AUTHORIZATION FOR OFFICIAL TRAVEL (Change of Station)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REQUEST AND AUTHORIZATION FOR OFFICIAL TRAVEL (Change of Station) REQUEST AND AUTHORIZATION FOR OFFICIAL TRAVEL (Change of Station) (Do Not Remove Carbons) DOE F 1510.9 (07-93) (Previously CR-279A) (07-89 edition may be used) 1. Amendment 2. Division/Office Code 3. (Leave Blank) Authorization Number 4. Employee's Name (First name, middle initial and last name) 5. Spouse Plans To: 6. No. of Dependents Age 12 and Over Traveling with Employee (excluding spouse) 7. No. of Dependents Under 12 Traveling with Employee 8. No. of Dependents Age 12 and Over Traveling Separately (excluding spouse) 9. No. of Dependents Under 12 Traveling Separately 10. Estimate in Whole Dollars (For Administrative Services Use) 11. Present Duty Station i. Total Items e. thru h. 12. Date 1 - Yr. Agreement

63

Solar Decathlon 2013: Going the Distance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Going the Distance Going the Distance Solar Decathlon 2013: Going the Distance September 17, 2013 - 4:26pm Addthis Toggle Routes on/off Return to map → Solar Decathlon Journeys Visualizing the distances that each Solar Decathlon house travelled Click competitors to toggle their journeys on and off. All routes and distances are approximate. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Solar Decathlon 2013: In our new blog series, we're going behind the scenes to show you what it takes to compete in the Solar Decathlon. First up: Meet the teams competing this year and learn how they were selected. Part two looks at how the teams must master the art of fundraising. What does it take to design an energy-efficient, solar-powered house? Part three looks at creating a winning design.

64

Evaluation of an Urban Travel Training for Older Adults  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of life. Travel training programs designed to increaseevaluation of a travel training program that educated olderservices. Travel training programs that instruct older

Babka, Rhianna JoIris; Cooper, Jill F.; Ragland, David R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

DOE Tribal Leader Solar Energy Forum - Travel Fact Sheet | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Leader Solar Energy Forum - Travel Fact Sheet DOE Tribal Leader Solar Energy Forum - Travel Fact Sheet Travel Fact Sheet Palm Springs Dec 2011.pdf More Documents &...

66

Traveling Between Iranian and American Identities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D aily life in Shiraz, Iran Traveling Between Iranian andpudding (samanu) symbolic of Irans 2000-year-old culturalwriters and my travels to Iran during the past summer. As an

Pazargadi, Leila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program  

SciTech Connect

OAK B188 Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program. The purpose of the Travel Grant Program is to increase the awareness of plasma research. The new results and techniques of plasma research in fusion plasmas, plasma processing space plasmas, basic plasma science, etc, have broad applicability throughout science. The benefits of these results are limited by the relatively low awareness and appreciation of plasma research in the larger scientific community. Whereas spontaneous interactions between plasma scientists and other scientists are useful, a focused effort in education and outreach to other scientists is efficient and is needed. The academic scientific community is the initial focus of this effort, since that permits access to a broad cross-section of scientists and future scientists including undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and research staff.

Hazeltine, R.D.

1998-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

68

Creating a Virtual HVAC Laboratory for Continuing/Distance Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facilities engineering is one technical field where lab-based continuing education programs can be delivered in a distance learning format. The widespread use of computer controls for optimizing the efficiency of a building's mechanical and electrical systems has made the "distance" element possible. Rather than traveling to individual buildings to make pressure, temperature, and flow measurements in person, facility engineers routinely access performance data over the Internet. This networking capability has been used in an educational setting to deliver interactive technical training to large numbers of undergraduate students and professional facilities engineers. Many students can access real time data from a single piece of HVAC equipment over the Internet.

William J. Hutzel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Travel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Train - Amtrak runs to the Rockville and Union Station stops, from which you can get on the Metro and take the Red line to Shady Grove, from which ...

2013-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

70

Approximating geodesic tree distance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Billera, Holmes, and Vogtmann introduced an intriguing new phylogenetic tree metric for weighted trees with useful properties related to statistical analysis. However, the best known algorithm for calculating this distance is exponential in the number ... Keywords: Analysis of algorithms, Phylogeny, Tree metric

Nina Amenta; Matthew Godwin; Nicolay Postarnakevich; Katherine St. John

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

72

Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition  

SciTech Connect

The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change.

Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Is Interstellar Space Travel Possible?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that space travel, even in the most distant future, will remain confined to our own planetary system, and a similar conclusion will hold forth for any other civilization, no matter how advanced it might be, unless those extra-terrestrial species have life spans order of magnitude longer than ours. Even in such a case it is unlikely that they will travel much farther than their immediate stellar neighbourhood, as each such excursion will exhaust the resources of their home planet so much that those will dwindle rather fast and there might not be much left for the further scientific and technological advancements. So the science-fiction fancy of a "Galactic Empire" may ever remain in our fantasies only. And as for the mythical UFOs, whose quiet appearances do get reported in the press once in a while, recent explorations have shown no evidence that any such thing could have an origination within our own solar system itself. And a "quiet trip" back and forth from a distant star is almost impossible a...

Singal, Tanmay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Structural Equation Modeling For Travel Behavior Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variables. However, car usage was found to be complementaryconcerning reductions in car usage, and feelings related toPre-commitment and usage: Season tickets, cars and travel.

Golob, Thomas F.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Structural Equation Modeling for Travel Behavior Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variables. However, car usage was found to be complementaryconcerning reductions in car usage, and feelings related toPre-commitment and usage: Season tickets, cars and travel.

Golob, Thomas F.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Structural Equation Modeling For Travel Behavior Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variables. However, car usage was found to be complementaryconcerning reductions in car usage, and feelings related toPre-commitment and usage: Season tickets, cars and travel.

Golob, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Travel Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Travel Resources Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing Institutional Research...

78

2003 TMS Annual Meeting: Travel Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This service accesses all major airlines and Amtrak. Public buses, trolleys, and coasters provide transportation throughout the city and county with travel to and...

79

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

80

Non-Motorized Travel Study.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Motorized Travel Study: Motorized Travel Study: Identifying Factors that Influence Communities to Walk and Bike and to Examine Why, or Why Not, Travelers Walk and Bike in Their Communities Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief T he idea of livable communities suggests that people should have the option to utilize non-motorized travel (NMT), specifically walking and bicycling, to conduct their daily tasks. Forecasting personal travel by walk and bike is necessary as part of regional transportation planning, and requires fine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

TRAVEL POLICY AND UMBC #VIII-11.00.01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be utilized whenever possible for airline, train or bus tickets as well as hotel accommodations and car Reimbursements Ticketing Hotel Reservations Meals Travel by Car Travel by Private Airplane Travel Advances

Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

82

Professional Preface, 8 (2): Traveling to Seattle! - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traveling to Seattle! TMS and its technical divisions are proud to again offer the Student Travel Scholarship Program. Three technical divisions, Electronic,...

83

Secretary Chu and Energy Department Officials to Travel Across...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Travel Across America to Discuss the Obama Administration's Commitment to Energy Innovation and Manufacturing Secretary Chu and Energy Department Officials to Travel Across America...

84

'Fun with Science' travels north to Alaska  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

312science 12132012 'Fun with Science' travels north to Alaska Linda A Lucchetti, LLNL, (925) 422-5815, lucchetti1@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Students in Noorvik, Alaska...

85

Travel Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Travel Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration Travel Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Travel Resources Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Russia Tri-Lab S&T Collaborations > Travel

86

TrojanTravel2014 Mystical Bhutan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCierge Service .....24 Attention Crystal Cruisers ..............24 University Travel Disclaimer ............ 25 in russia's Far east and the Aleutian Islands. our other trips include an Amazon river cruise, a month

Zhou, Chongwu

87

The domestic travel sector in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China is already the largest domestic tourism market in the world. Chinese citizens made as many as 800 million overnight domestic trips in 2005. While travel is not a new concept in China, the disposable income they wield, ...

Anders, Jeff, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

2002 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Travel Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is one of five stops along the electric bus tunnel that serves downtown Seattle. ... Washington State Convention & Trade Center (~1.11 Mb); Sheraton Seattle ... These special rates are applicable for travel from the continental United States.

89

Chapter 3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled 3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled Chapter 3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled Vehicle-miles traveled--the number of miles that residential vehicles are driven--is probably the most important information collected by the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. Using the data on vehicle-miles traveled allows analysts to answer such questions as: "Are minivans driven more than passenger cars?" "Do people in the West drive more than people elsewhere?" "Do people conserve their new cars by driving them less?" "Who drives more--people in households with children, or other people?" "At what ages do people drive the most?" "How does growing income affect the amount of driving?" In addition to answering those kinds of questions, analysts also use the number of vehicle-miles traveled to compute estimated, on-road vehicle fuel consumption, economy, and expenditures, all of which have important implications for U.S. energy policy and national security (see Chapter 4).

90

DOE O 551.1D, Official Foreign Travel  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes requirements and responsibilities governing official foreign travel by Federal and contractor employees.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 18% 42% 58% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 50 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

92

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 20% 47% 53% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 49 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

93

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 12% 52% 48% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 47 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

94

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 16% 46% 54% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 52 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

95

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 15% 49% 51% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 49 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

96

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 20% 48% 52% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 48 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

97

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 15% 47% 53% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 50 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

98

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 14% 51% 49% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 50 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

99

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 13% 51% 49% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 54 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

100

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 13% 50% 50% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 46 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 19% 46% 54% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 49 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

102

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 16% 46% 55% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 50 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

103

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 19% 49% 51% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 52 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

104

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 18% 53% 47% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 51 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

105

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 15% 48% 52% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 49 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

106

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 17% 50% 50% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 50 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

107

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 17% 47% 53% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 46 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

108

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 17% 50% 50% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 48 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

109

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 17% 52% 48% DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 49 6 Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Distance traveled...

110

Identify Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Identify Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 1:34pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE The tables below illustrate some of the more common strategies that can enable employees to travel less and travel more efficiently for business. The "Purpose of Travel" analysis in the previous step can be used with the guidance below to help determine what type of trips may be most appropriately substituted with each business travel alternative. Table 1. Strategies that Enable Employees to Travel Less Business Travel Strategy Best Potential Application Best Practices Web meetings/webinars, including option for video Purpose of travel: training, conferences.

111

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Employee Travel Policy  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Employee Travel State Employee Travel Policy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Employee Travel Policy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Employee Travel Policy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Employee Travel Policy on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Employee Travel Policy on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Employee Travel Policy on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Employee Travel Policy on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Employee Travel Policy All state agencies and institutions must develop and adopt travel policies that include strategies to reduce petroleum consumption, such as carpooling

112

Characteristics of Travellers from Bosnia and Herzegovina to Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: Travellers from Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) travel to different world countries. The awareness of people is changing every day and nowadays travellers seek advices related to their travel and destination more often than before. In the previous years, travellers came to Travel Clinics almost only to get the vaccines which were obligatory for entry into a country. In B&H travel clinics are a part of public health institutes. The largest Travel Clinic which provides service for the highest number of travellers is in the Public Health Institute of Sarajevo Canton, in the city of Sarajevo, which is the capital of B&H. In the last years we have seen an increasing interest for travel to Africa because the highest number of

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Rural Schools and Distance Education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the author began research on current issues in rural education in which teachers recounted narratives of teaching. As deficits, they spoke of an inability to retain teachers, too little diversity in student programming, and lack of access to ... Keywords: Distance Education, Distance Education Technologies, Educational Technology, Rural Schools, Teacher Practices

Barbara G. Barter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

About Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT) CWT is a global leader specialized in managing business travel and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AT&T network for consistent, high-quality voice and data communication. Home-based travel counselors&T remote access service connects home-based travel counselors to the CWT global network · Business Value Reliable connections enable cost-effective, customer- pleasing home-based work while handling traffic

Greenberg, Albert

115

Modal shifts in short-haul passenger travel and the consequent energy impacts. [Intercity travel under 500 miles  

SciTech Connect

A study was performed to evaluate the impacts of strategies to effect modal shifts in short-haul passenger travel (defined herein as intercity travel under 500 miles) from energy-intensive modes to those modes that are less energy-intensive. A series of individual strategies, ranging from incentives to the less energy-intensive modes (bus, rail) to penalties to the more energy-intensive modes (auto, air) was examined to determine energy saved and policy implications relative to strategy implementation. The most effective of the individual strategies were then combined in all permutations, and the analysis was repeated. As part of the analytical process, effects of factors other than energy (user cost and time, emissions, government subsidy, and travel fatailities) were examined in a benefit/cost analysis. Finally, energy savings, benefit/cost impacts, implementation considerations, and policy implications were evaluated to arrive at conclusions as to the effectiveness of the more-influential strategies and to the overall effectiveness of induced modal shifts. The principal conclusion of the study is that the maximum 1980 energy saving that might be realized by modal shifts, discounting the concurrent effects of demand suppression and improvement of mode efficiency, is approximately 83 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (46,500 bbl gasoline per day), 3.8% of the total projected 1980 energy consumption in the short-haul transportation sector and 0.23% of the total US petroleum use. It was also concluded that strategies to achieve these small savings by modal shifts would result in significant economic, social, and business disruptions.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Short communication Travelling salesman problem on dilute lattices : visit to a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cities P. Sen and B.K. Chakrabarti Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road the cities are represented by random lattice sites, occupied with concentration p, and the salesman intends to visit a finite fraction f of the total number of cities. The variation of the average optimal travel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

117

Enabling time travel for the scholarly web  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enabling time travel for the scholarly web Enabling time travel for the scholarly web Enabling time travel for the scholarly web An international team of information scientists has begun a study to investigate how web links in scientific and other academic articles fail to lead to the resources being referenced. July 16, 2013 Herbert Van de Sompel, a Los Alamos National Laboratory information scientist, describes the information pathway involved in preventing "reference rot" in scientific material linked to the web. Herbert Van de Sompel, a Los Alamos National Laboratory information scientist, describes the information pathway involved in preventing "reference rot" in scientific material linked to the web. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "Increasingly, scientific papers contain links to web pages containing,

118

Travelling waves in hybrid chemotaxis models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid models of chemotaxis combine agent-based models of cells with partial differential equation models of extracellular chemical signals. In this paper, travelling wave properties of hybrid models of bacterial chemotaxis are investigated. Bacteria are modelled using an agent-based (individual-based) approach with internal dynamics describing signal transduction. In addition to the chemotactic behaviour of the bacteria, the individual-based model also includes cell proliferation and death. Cells consume the extracellular nutrient field (chemoattractant) which is modelled using a partial differential equation. Mesoscopic and macroscopic equations representing the behaviour of the hybrid model are derived and the existence of travelling wave solutions for these models is established. It is shown that cell proliferation is necessary for the existence of non-transient (stationary) travelling waves in hybrid models. Additionally, a numerical comparison between the wave speeds of the continuum models and the hybr...

Franz, Benjamin; Painter, Kevin J; Erban, Radek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Nano Portfolio student travel award guidelines 1. Travel grants will be made up to $1,000 for conference travel, including  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano Portfolio student travel award guidelines 1. Travel grants will be made up to $1 for either a poster or oral presentation at the conference. 6. The research to be presented must be nano will not be considered. 10.Travel awards will be decided by a committee of CNM-affiliated faculty. #12;Nano Portfolio

Ben-Yakar, Adela

120

Nano Portfolio student travel award guidelines 1. Travel grants will be made up to $1,000 for conference travel, including  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano Portfolio student travel award guidelines 1. Travel grants will be made up to $1. The research to be presented must be nano-related. 7. The award cannot be used to subsidize conference travel: ____________________________ Department: ___________________ Years in graduate school: __________________ Years in Nano Doctoral Por

Ben-Yakar, Adela

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Road less traveled vital to operational success  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PNNL's Monthly Economic Diversity column for the Tri-City Herald Business section. Excerpt follows: Things aren't always what they seem. Sometimes the path less traveled--although it can be exhausting if not scary to think about navigating its unknowns--really is the best way to go. And not just because Robert Frost said so. Patric Sazama, Regional Project Director for Impact Washington, would agree as well. He recently spoke to the Three Rivers Entrepreneur Network about achieving operational success by addressing the less tangible elements of an organization, the company's own less traveled path.

Madison, Alison L.

2012-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Business Travel | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Travel Business Travel Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Business Travel October 7, 2013 - 1:20pm Addthis Business travel is among the largest sources of Scope 3 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions accounted for by Federal agencies. For some agencies, business travel can represent up to 60% of Scope 3 emissions, but represents about 20% of Scope 3 emissions for the Federal sector as whole. While other emissions categories have been the focus of efficiency improvements for several years, few agencies have been actively planning to manage business travel for GHG reduction purposes. Travel management due to budgetary constraints has typically been more common for Federal agencies in the past. Because air travel emissions are the biggest source of travel emissions for most agencies, this guidance focuses on planning for

123

Transmission line protection based on travelling waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major problem of tripping signal of a relay based on steady state component does not warranty faster tripping schemes for protection of extra high voltage transmission lines. Proposed work has made an attempt to find solution to the problem of fault ... Keywords: postfault voltage, relaying signals, surge impedence, transmission line protection, travelling waves

Anuradha S. Deshpande; Grishma S. Shah

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Forecasting 65+ travel : an integration of cohort analysis and travel demand modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the next 30 years, the Boomers will double the 65+ population in the United States and comprise a new generation of older Americans. This study forecasts the aging Boomers' travel. Previous efforts to forecast 65+ ...

Bush, Sarah, 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Review and Discussion of the Literature on Travel Time and Money Expenditures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expenditure of Time and Money on Travel. Transport RoadExpenditure of Time and Money on Travel. Transp. Research6 I.2.4.2. Travel Money Expenditure ..

Chen, Cynthia; Mokhtarian, Patricia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Advanced Information Techniques And Paratransit Services To Enhance Mobility Of Elderly And Disabled Travelers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobility of Elderly and Disabled Travelers: Initial SurveyKEYWORDS elderly and disabled travelers, transit,to Enhance Mobility of Disabled Travelers. Klaver, K, W.

Chen, Wan-Hui; Klaver, Kelley; Uwaine, Rochelle; Jovanis, Paul P.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Exact solutions to combinatorial optimizations and the traveling baseball fan problem.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The traveling baseball fan problem is an extension of the classic traveling salesman problem, in which a sports fan wishes to travel to the (more)

Terrell, Neal D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Implementing Innovation in Planning Practice: The Case of Travel Demand Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban Travel Demand Forecasting Project. Institute ofTRB. Metropolitan Travel Forecasting: Current Practice andPurvis. Regional Travel Forecasting Model System for the San

Newmark, Gregory Louis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel Questions and answers on issues that supplement the final regulations on compensatory time for travel issued by the Office of Personnel Management. In addition, a sample worksheet is attached to assist travelers in determining and documenting their travel time that may be credited for compensatory time for travel. This information will be incorporated in Appendix D of the DOE Handbook on Overtime when the handbook is updated. Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel Responsible Contacts Bruce Murray HR Policy Advisor E-mail bruce.murray@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-3372 More Documents & Publications DOE Handbook on Overtime

130

Quantum mechanics of time travel through post-selected teleportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the quantum mechanics of closed-timelike curves (CTCs) and of other potential methods for time travel. We analyze a specific proposal for such quantum time travel, the quantum description of CTCs based ...

Maccone, Lorenzo

131

Encoding network-constrained travel trajectories using routing algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study proposes a generic encoder for network-constrained travel trajectories, and it implements two encoders by combining the proposed generic encoder with two routing algorithms, which reduce the size of a travel trajectory's path along ...

Pablo Martinez Lerin; Daisuke Yamamoto; Naohisa Takahashi

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Miles Traveled Tax Feasibility  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Miles Traveled Vehicle Miles Traveled Tax Feasibility Evaluation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Miles Traveled Tax Feasibility Evaluation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Miles Traveled Tax Feasibility Evaluation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Miles Traveled Tax Feasibility Evaluation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Miles Traveled Tax Feasibility Evaluation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Miles Traveled Tax Feasibility Evaluation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Miles Traveled Tax Feasibility Evaluation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

133

Random Distances Associated with Rhombuses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallelograms are one of the basic building blocks in two-dimensional tiling. They have important applications in a wide variety of science and engineering fields, such as wireless communication networks, urban transportation, operations research, etc. Different from rectangles and squares, the coordinates of a random point in parallelograms are no longer independent. As a case study of parallelograms, the explicit probability density functions of the random Euclidean distances associated with rhombuses are given in this report, when both endpoints are randomly distributed in 1) the same rhombus, 2) two parallel rhombuses sharing a side, and 3) two rhombuses having a common diagonal, respectively. The accuracy of the distance distribution functions is verified by simulation, and the correctness is validated by a recursion and a probabilistic sum. The first two statistical moments of the random distances, and the polynomial fit of the density functions are also given in this report for practical uses.

Yanyan Zhuang; Jianping Pan

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Iterative method to compute the Fermat points and Fermat distances of multiquarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The multiquark confining potential is proportional to the total distance of the fundamental strings linking the quarks and antiquarks. We address the computation of the total string distance an of the Fermat points where the different strings meet. For a meson (quark-antiquark system) the distance is trivially the quark-antiquark distance. For a baryon (three quark system) the problem was solved geometrically from the onset, by Fermat and by Torricelli. The geometrical solution can be determined just with a rule and a compass, but translation of the geometrical solution to an analytical expression is not as trivial. For tetraquarks, pentaquarks, hexaquarks, etc, the geometrical solution is much more complicated. Here we provide an iterative method, converging fast to the correct Fermat points and the total distances, relevant for the multiquark potentials. We also review briefly the geometrical methods leading to the Fermat points and to the total distances.

P. Bicudo; M. Cardoso

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

135

Microsoft Word - Student Travel Request Form.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

neup@inl.gov | Fax: (208) 526-8076 | Phone: (208) 526-1336 neup@inl.gov | Fax: (208) 526-8076 | Phone: (208) 526-1336 FELLOWSHIP TRAVEL REQUEST FORM Student Name: _____________________________ Date of Request: _________________________ University: ________________________________ Email Address: ___________________________ Phone: ___________________________________ In-State Travel Out-of-State Travel Event Name: ___________________________________________________________________________ Destination: ___________________________________________________________________________ Justification: ___________________________________________________________________________ *Presentation/Poster Title: _______________________________________________________________ Departure Date: _________________________ Return Date: _________________________

136

TERMS FOR TRAVEL & EXCHANGE SCHOLARSHIPS As of December 3, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TERMS FOR TRAVEL & EXCHANGE SCHOLARSHIPS As of December 3, 2013 Q:\\Awards\\In-course\\Travel\\2013-14\\Travel Terms.docx Page 1 of 5 The University Senate, acting on behalf of generous benefactors and donors terms attached to individual academic awards. The general conditions and terms have been established

Thompson, Michael

137

Academic Strategies for Distance Education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Education all over the world is of paramount importance as it provides economies with opportunities for development and growth. Education is important for both-developed and developing economies-for the former to maintain their lead position and for ... Keywords: Academic, Distance Education, Education, Knowledge, Learning, Quality, Standards, Strategies

Neeta Baporikar

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Distance indexing on road networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The processing of kNN and continuous kNN queries on spatial network databases (SNDB) has been intensively studied recently. However, there is a lack of systematic study on the computation of network distances, which is the most fundamental difference ...

Haibo Hu; Dik Lun Lee; Victor C. S. Lee

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis Software. Description/Summary: ... Type of software: Analysis Software of Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis. ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

140

Travel Time Estimation Using Floating Car Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report explores the use of machine learning techniques to accurately predict travel times in city streets and highways using floating car data (location information of user vehicles on a road network). The aim of this report is twofold, first we present a general architecture of solving this problem, then present and evaluate few techniques on real floating car data gathered over a month on a 5 Km highway in New Delhi.

Sevlian, Raffi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

142

Going Green: Traveling in an Environmentally Responsible Manner |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green: Traveling in an Environmentally Responsible Manner Green: Traveling in an Environmentally Responsible Manner Going Green: Traveling in an Environmentally Responsible Manner September 27, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis John Lippert My wife and I recently took a trip to Virginia Beach. I wanted to visit a research center there. I spent a lot of time at the center, including attending a 3-hour conference session. So really-a main reason for the trip was not leisure. I do admit, however, that my wife and I couldn't go there over a long weekend without squeezing in some time for the ocean. Travel and tourism is one of America's largest industries, responsible for more than $1 trillion in the U.S. economy. According to the U.S. Travel Association, one out of every nine jobs in the United States depends on travel and tourism. The U.S. travel and tourism industry is made up of

143

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

144

Assess Potential Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions Assess Potential Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 For a Federal agency, changes in the demand for business travel can be difficult to predict. Changes in the nature of the agency's work may have a substantial impact on the demand for business travel. It is therefore important to account for these changes when planning for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction. Conditions that may contribute to a significant increase or decrease in the agency's business travel, beyond specific efforts to reduce business travel demand, include: Significant changes in the agency's budget Addition or completion of major program activities that require

145

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Business Travel |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Travel Business Travel Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Business Travel October 7, 2013 - 1:38pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Based on the guidance in steps 3 in evaluating strategies and step 4 in estimating the cost of implementing those strategies, the agency can define a program of communications, policy and management, and technological and infrastructure support activities that it believes are necessary to support travel reductions. Because business travel can be such a challenging areas to address, effective travel reduction programs will ensure that all of these elements are in place to enable the desired outcomes. Prioritization of those business travel management strategies will instead focus on how broadly the program can be deployed across the agency. The

146

Going Green: Traveling in an Environmentally Responsible Manner |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Going Green: Traveling in an Environmentally Responsible Manner Going Green: Traveling in an Environmentally Responsible Manner Going Green: Traveling in an Environmentally Responsible Manner September 27, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis John Lippert My wife and I recently took a trip to Virginia Beach. I wanted to visit a research center there. I spent a lot of time at the center, including attending a 3-hour conference session. So really-a main reason for the trip was not leisure. I do admit, however, that my wife and I couldn't go there over a long weekend without squeezing in some time for the ocean. Travel and tourism is one of America's largest industries, responsible for more than $1 trillion in the U.S. economy. According to the U.S. Travel Association, one out of every nine jobs in the United States depends on travel and tourism. The U.S. travel and tourism industry is made up of

147

Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wellness Programs » Foreign Travel Health Wellness Programs » Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information All travelers should take the following precautions, no matter the destination: Wash hands often with soap and water. Because motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury among travelers, walk and drive defensively; avoid travel at night if possible and always use seat belts. Don't eat or drink dairy products unless you know they have been pasteurized. Never eat undercooked ground beef and poultry, raw eggs, and unpasteurized dairy products; raw shellfish is particularly dangerous to persons who have liver disease or compromised immune systems. Don't eat food purchased from street vendors; do not drink beverages with ice. Don't handle animals, including dogs and cats, to avoid bites and

148

ADMF-007 EOTA Pre-Travel Authorization 11_0221  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 EOTA Pre-Travel Authorization 11_0221 7 EOTA Pre-Travel Authorization 11_0221 11_0221 Deleted extraneous redundant areas and updated chart. EOTA - Business Form Document Title: EOTA Pre-Travel Authorization Form Document Number: ADMF-007 Rev. 11_0221 Document Owner: Approvers: Elizabeth Sousa Melissa Otero Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Referenced Documents: N/A Parent Document: Notify of Changes: ADMP-004, Travel Process ADM MGT 08_0314 Changed name to EOTA Pre-Travel..., added area to identify if a detailed trip report is required, moved FMT signature block. 08_0523 Changed form to mirror the Prime Contractor form as all information is necessary for all authorized travel. Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release. 11_0105 Added a refundable/non-refundable approval 08_0606 Added Company Name to form. Merged cells to reveal required text for Yes/No approval.

149

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

document reviews with regulators instead of meeting in person and reduced rental car usage by standardizing travel arrangements so that only one rental car is necessary...

150

SFU Travel Claim Form - Burnaby - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Credit card slips will only be accepted for restaurant charges and gas. - List names of all travelers and/or guests for which expenses are claimed. - Foreign...

151

Traveling Salesman Problem Formulations with $N \\log N$ Number ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 13, 2013 ... Traveling Salesman Problem Formulations with $N \\log N$ Number of Binary Variables. Thomas A. Pogiatzis(tp309 ***at*** cam.ac.uk)

152

Traveling Wave Thermoacoustic-Piezoelectric Energy Harvester: Theory and Experiment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a theoretical and experimental investigation of a piezoelec- tric energy harvester coupled to a traveling wave thermoacoustic engine (TWTAE). By simplifying the (more)

Roshwalb, Andrew Zvi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Adaptive multi-stage distance join processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spatial distance join is a relatively new type of operation introduced for spatial and multimedia database applications. Additional requirements for ranking and stopping cardinality are often combined with the spatial distance join in on-line query ...

Hyoseop Shin; Bongki Moon; Sukho Lee

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Metrics and methods for social distance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distance measures are important for scientists because they illustrate the dynamics of geospatial topologies for physical and social processes. Two major types of distance are generally used for this purpose: Euclidean ...

Andris, Clio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development of Improved Traveler Survey Methods for High-Speed Intercity Passenger Rail Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-speed passenger rail is seen by many in the U.S. transportation policy and planning communities as an ideal solution for fast, safe, and resource-efficient mobility in high-demand intercity corridors. To expand the body of knowledge for high-speed intercity passenger rail in the U.S., the overall goal of this dissertation was to better understand the demand for high-speed intercity passenger rail services in small- or medium-sized intermediate communities and improve planners' ability to estimate such demand through traveler surveys; specifically, the use of different experimental designs for stated preference questions and the use of images to describe hypothetical travel alternatives in traveler surveys. In pursuit of this goal, an Internet-based survey was distributed to residents of Waco and Temple, two communities located along the federally-designated South Central High-Speed Rail Corridor in Central Texas. A total of 1,160 surveys were obtained from residents of the two communities. Mixed logit travel mode choice models developed from the survey data revealed valuable findings that can inform demand estimates and the design of traveler surveys for high-speed intercity passenger rail planning activities. Based on the analysis presented in this dissertation, ridership estimates for new high-speed intercity passenger rail lines that are planned to serve intermediate communities should not assume that residents of these communities have similar characteristics and values. The d-efficient stated preference experimental design was found to provide a mode choice model with a better fit and greater significance on key policy variables than the adaptive design and therefore is recommended for use in future surveys. Finally, it is recommended that surveys should consider the use of images of proposed train services to aid respondent decision-making for stated preference questions, but only if the images used in the survey depict equipment that could be realistically deployed in the corridor.

Sperry, Benjamin

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Normalized Compression Distance of Multiples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normalized compression distance (NCD) is a parameter-free similarity measure based on compression. The NCD between pairs of objects is not sufficient for all applications. We propose an NCD of finite multisets (multiples) of objacts that is metric and is better for many applications. Previously, attempts to obtain such an NCD failed. We use the theoretical notion of Kolmogorov complexity that for practical purposes is approximated from above by the length of the compressed version of the file involved, using a real-world compression program. We applied the new NCD for multiples to retinal progenitor cell questions that were earlier treated with the pairwise NCD. Here we get significantly better results. We also applied the NCD for multiples to synthetic time sequence data. The preliminary results are as good as nearest neighbor Euclidean classifier.

Cohen, Andrew R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Short-distance contribution to the spectrum of Hawking radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hawking effect can be rederived in terms of two-point functions and in such a way that it makes it possible to estimate, within the conventional semiclassical theory, the contribution of ultrashort distances to the Planckian spectrum. For Schwarzschild black holes of three solar masses the analysis shows that Hawking radiation is very robust up to frequencies of 96 T_H or 270 T_H for bosons and fermions, respectively. For primordial black holes (with masses around 10^{15} g) these frequencies turn out to be of order 52T_H and 142 T_H. Only at these frequencies and above do we find that the contribution of Planck distances is of order of the total spectrum itself. Below this scale, the contribution of ultrashort distances to the spectrum is negligible. This suggests that only above these frequencies could an underlying quantum theory of gravity potentially predict significant deviations from Hawking's semiclassical result.

I. Agullo; J. Navarro-Salas; Gonzalo J. Olmo; Leonard Parker

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Local discriminative distance metrics ensemble learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of distance metric learning is to incorporate abundant discriminative information to keep all data samples in the same class close and those from different classes separated. Local distance metric methods can preserve discriminative ... Keywords: Distance metrics learning, Local learning

Yang Mu; Wei Ding; Dacheng Tao

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

UNALLOWABLE EXPENSES Some common unallowable TRAVEL expenses on University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

travel agencies. Those agencies are knowledgeable of State airline contracts, available fares and billing of the State contracted rental car agencies is mandatory. Car rentals must be paid with the State Travel Card provides the list of awarded rental car agencies as well as a list of awarded cities by vendor: http://www.state

160

Maximal covering location problem (MCLP) with fuzzy travel times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a fuzzy maximal covering location problem (FMCLP) in which travel time between any pair of nodes is considered to be a fuzzy variable. A fuzzy expected value maximization model is designed for such a problem. Moreover, a hybrid algorithm ... Keywords: Credibility theory, Facility location, Fuzzy travel times, Maximal covering location problem (MCLP), Simulation

Soheil Davari; Mohammad Hossein Fazel Zarandi; Ahmad Hemmati

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A New Memetic Algorithm for the Asymmetric Traveling Salesman Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new memetic algorithm specialized for the asymmetric instances of the traveling salesman problem (ATSP). The method incorporates a new local search engine and many other features that contribute to its effectiveness, such as: ... Keywords: asymmetric traveling salesman problem, local search, memetic algorithms, metaheuristics

Luciana Buriol; Paulo M. Frana; Pablo Moscato

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE REGARDING COMPENSATORY TIME OFF FOR TRAVEL (Revised October 27, 2008) Following are questions and answers on issues that supplement the final regulations effective this date on compensatory time for travel issued by the Office of Personnel Management on April 17, 2007. In addition, a sample worksheet is attached to assist travelers in determining and documenting their travel time that may be credited for compensatory time for travel. This information will be incorporated in Appendix D of the DOE Handbook on Overtime when the handbook is updated. Q1. Who is eligible for this benefit? A1. All employees are eligible except the following: the Secretary, SESs, employees covered by other forms of overtime compensation, including law enforcement

163

Checklist for Medical Issues When Traveling Overseas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits » Wellness Programs » Foreign Travel Health Benefits » Wellness Programs » Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information » Checklist for Medical Issues When Traveling Overseas Checklist for Medical Issues When Traveling Overseas Before the Trip A written confirmation from an appropriate manager, i.e., a Travel Authorization or memorandum, that identifies the employee and country(ies) that will be visited should be provided the medical support staff 4-8 weeks prior to the trip or, if less than 4 weeks, as soon as management or the employee becomes aware of it. The medical staff will identify what vaccinations are recommended for each country and discuss the current health issues for each country with the employee. Some vaccinations take several weeks to become effective. The medical staff will review and update the employee's routine

164

Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled October 7, 2013 - 11:52am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to reduce vehicle miles traveled, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy. Table 1. Determining When and How to Promote the Use of Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled Strategy When Applicable Best Practices Consolidate trips Applicable to all vehicles, regardless of ownership or vehicle and fuel type Target vehicle operators who take longer trips Seek vehicle operator input and collaboration to identify regular or occasional trips that involve similar routes. Determine whether trips on multiple days or times can be consolidated into a single trip.

165

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Usage Number of trips 773,602 Total distance traveled (mi) 5,558,155 Avg trip distance (mi) 7.2 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was driven (mi) 30.2 Avg...

166

Increase in the period of waves traveling over large distances : with applications to tsunamis, swell, and seismic surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the tsunami from the Aleutian earthquake of 1st April,c ohhe tsunami Prom the Aleutian earthmake oi' 1st April

Munk, Walter H

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Storage assignment problem with travel distance and blocking considerations for a picker-to-part order picking system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Order picking is a key operation in managing a warehouse efficiently. Most previous studies on picking only considered single-picker operation; however, many pickers frequently work concurrently in the same region. Since congestion may occur in such ... Keywords: Multi-picker operations, Order picking, Storage assignment policy, Warehouse management

Jason Chao-Hsien Pan; Po-Hsun Shih; Ming-Hung Wu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Increase in the period of waves traveling over large distances : with applications to tsunamis, swell, and seismic surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

25) seduce to tho wall-horn Porn aoco~ding .to wkiieh the ~oan now be written in the Porn If the bottom profile along

Munk, Walter H

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hamiltonian Graphs and the Traveling Salesman Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new characterization of Hamiltonian graphs using f-cutset matrix is proposed. A new exact polynomial time algorithm for the traveling salesman problem (TSP) based on this new characterization is developed. We then define so called ordered weighted adjacency list for given weighted complete graph and proceed to the main result of the paper, namely, the exact algorithm based on utilization of ordered weighted adjacency list and the simple properties that any path or circuit must satisfy. This algorithm performs checking of sub-lists, containing (p-1) entries (edge pairs) for paths and p entries (edge pairs) for circuits, chosen from ordered adjacency list in a well defined sequence to determine exactly the shortest Hamiltonian path and shortest Hamiltonian circuit in a weighted complete graph of p vertices. The procedure has intrinsic advantage of landing on the desired solution in quickest possible time and even in worst case in polynomial time. A new characterization of shortest Hamiltonian tour for a weighted complete graph satisfying triangle inequality (i.e. for tours passing through every city on a realistic map of cities where cities can be taken as points on a Euclidean plane) is also proposed. Finally, we discuss a novel classical algorithm for unstructured search and its effect on any of the NP-Complete problems.

Dhananjay P. Mehendale

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

ITS Information And Services To Enhance The Mobility Of Disabled Travelers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobility of Elderly and Disabled Travelers: Initial Surveyto understand the needs of the disabled population, it isto Enhance the Mobility of Disabled Travelers Wan-Hui Chen,

Chen, Wan-hui; Uwaine, Rochelle; Klaver, Kelley; Kurani, Ken; Jovanis, Paul P.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

DOE O 552.1A Admin Chg 1, Travel Policy and Procedures  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order supplements the Federal Travel Regulation as principal source of policy for Federal employee travel and relocation and establishes DOE M 552.1-1A, ...

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

172

EUCLIDEAN DISTANCE MATRIX COMPLETION PROBLEMS June ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 6, 2010 ... part by NSF Grant CCF 0514213 and DOE Grant DESC0002218. REFERENCES . [1] A. Y. Alfakih, On the uniqueness of Euclidean distance...

173

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

174

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. WASHINGTON, D.C. - A representative of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., on Tuesday received the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award for her efforts to improve sustainability and reduce travel costs and the number of fleet vehicles. Judy A. McLemore, who works for URS Regulatory and Environmental Services, based in Carlsbad, was honored for helping advance DOE's management and

175

Researchers test novel power system for space travel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power system for space travel Power system for space travel Researchers test novel power system for space travel The research team recently demonstrated the first use of a heat pipe to cool a small nuclear reactor and power a Stirling engine. November 26, 2012 John Bounds of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Advanced Nuclear Technology Division makes final adjustments on the DUFF experiment, a demonstration of a simple, robust fission reactor prototype that could be used as a power system for space travel. DUFF is the first demonstration of a space nuclear reactor system to produce electricity in the United States since 1965. John Bounds of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Advanced Nuclear Technology Division makes final adjustments on the DUFF experiment, a demonstration of a simple, robust fission reactor prototype that could be used as a power

176

Deputy Secretary Poneman to Travel to Russia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poneman to Travel to Russia Poneman to Travel to Russia Deputy Secretary Poneman to Travel to Russia December 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Monday, December 6, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman will travel to Russia as part of the ongoing cooperation between the two countries on nuclear security and peaceful nuclear energy issues. On Tuesday, Deputy Secretary Poneman will co-chair the U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security Working Group Plenary Meeting with Director General of the State Atomic Energy Corporation "Rosatom" Sergei Kiriyenko. The Working Group was established under the U.S.-Russia Bilateral Presidential Commission at the July 2009 Presidential Summit. Last fall, Director Kiriyenko visited the United States for the first meetings of the

177

Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Novel power system demonstrated for space travel Novel power system demonstrated for space travel Posted By Office of Public Affairs John Bounds, Los Alamos National Laboratory

178

Sec. Chu Travels to Houston | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sec. Chu Travels to Houston Sec. Chu Travels to Houston Sec. Chu Travels to Houston February 2, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis The Houston Medical Center Thermal Energy Corporation Control Room. | Photo Courtesy of the Texas Medical Center The Houston Medical Center Thermal Energy Corporation Control Room. | Photo Courtesy of the Texas Medical Center Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs Secretary Chu traveled to Houston, Texas, today to meet with executives from various oil and gas companies, host a State of the Union Town Hall with students from Houston Community College, and tour the Texas Medical Center -- which recently completed a series of major energy efficiency upgrades. As part of his blueprint to build an economy to last, President Obama has

179

Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Novel power system demonstrated for space travel Novel power system demonstrated for space travel Posted By Office of Public Affairs John Bounds, Los Alamos National Laboratory

180

SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program Review 2013 - Travel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program Review 2013 April 23-25, 2013 Phoenix, Arizona Skip navigation to main content Menu Home About Agenda Register Venue Presentations Travel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

How ORISE is Making a Difference: Travelers' Health Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

online outreach. Campaign themes include "Prevention can be Travel-Sized" and "Stop, Wash and Go." Among THC's core messages, the CDC is urging people to take the following...

182

A Striking Example of the Atmosphere's Leading Traveling Pattern  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional and complex empirical orthogonal function (EOF) techniques show that for at least four months during the fall and winter of 1979/80 a large-amplitude, large-scale, traveling flow anomaly existed in the troposphere and stratosphere. ...

Grant Branstator

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Defining business strategy for development of travel and tourism industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many studies conducted on Travel and Tourism industry consider tourism an economic phenomenon. Providing a customer-satisfaction-based analysis, this thesis deals with both economic and social aspects. Economic data on ...

Davari, Dordaneh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Passenger travel behavior model in railway network simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation planners and public transport operators alike have become increasingly aware of the need to diffuse the concentration of the peak period travel. Differentiated pricing is one possible method to even out the demand and reduce peak load ...

Ting Li; Eric van Heck; Peter Vervest; Jasper Voskuilen; Freek Hofker; Fred Jansma

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Odometer Versus Self-Reported Estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The findings described here compare odometer readings with self-reported estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) to investigate to what extent self-reported VMT is a reliable surrogate for odometer-based VMT.

Information Center

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Understanding transit travel behavior : value added by smart cards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Travel behavior represents a particularly complex area of research in transportation given the interaction between transport supply characteristics and the user perceptions which guide his/her decisions. Thanks to the ...

Gupta, Saumya, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infect 2009, 11:1177-1185. 19. NaTHNaC Clinical Update: Tropical Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar - advice for relief workers and other travellers to affected areas. 2008 [http:// www.nathnac.org/pro/clinical_updates/cyclonemyanmar_070508.htm], (Accessed January... ://www.eurotravnet.eu, a network of clinical specialists in tropical and travel medicine was founded in 2008, to assist the European Centre for Dis- ease Prevention & Control (ECDC) for the detection, verification, assessment and communication of commu- nicable diseases...

Field, Vanessa; Gautret, Philippe; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Caumes, Eric; Jensenius, Mogens; Castelli, Francesco; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Weld, Leisa; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; de Vries, Peter; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Loutan, Louis; Parola, Philippe; Network, the EuroTravNet

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

188

The sources of e-business competitive advantages between travel agencies and online travel service firms in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge about the most important sources of e-business competitive advantages in the travel industry would help to focus efforts in both academic and practical areas. This study develops a framework based on the resource-based view (RBV) ...

Zhen Zhu; Jing Zhao

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

190

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

191

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

192

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

193

Calibration of the distance scale from galactic Cepheids: I Calibration based on the GFG sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New estimates of the distances of 36 nearby galaxies are presented based on accurate distances of galactic Cepheids obtained by Gieren, Fouque and Gomez (1998) from the geometrical Barnes-Evans method. The concept of 'sosie' is applied to extend the distance determination to extragalactic Cepheids without assuming the linearity of the PL relation. Doing so, the distance moduli are obtained in a straightforward way. The correction for extinction is made using two photometric bands (V and I) according to the principles introduced by Freedman and Madore (1990). Finally, the statistical bias due to the incompleteness of the sample is corrected according to the precepts introduced by Teerikorpi (1987) without introducing any free parameters (except the distance modulus itself in an iterative scheme). The final distance moduli depend on the adopted extinction ratio {R_V}/{R_I} and on the limiting apparent magnitude of the sample. A comparison with the distance moduli recently published by the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project (HSTKP) team reveals a fair agreement when the same ratio {R_V}/{R_I} is used but shows a small discrepancy at large distance. In order to bypass the uncertainty due to the metallicity effect it is suggested to consider only galaxies having nearly the same metallicity as the calibrating Cepheids (i.e. Solar metallicity). The internal uncertainty of the distances is about 0.1 magnitude but the total uncertainty may reach 0.3 magnitude.

G. Paturel; G. Theureau; P. Fouque; J. N. Terry; I. Musella; T. Ekholm

2002-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Optimal expected-distance separating halfspace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If a different norm is used for each data set in order to measure distances to ... In practical settings, one usually has a data set D = {(x1,y1),..., (xp,yp)} ?. Rd {?1

195

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

196

Sensor fault detection using the Mahalanobis distance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described by which a localized sensor abnormality can be detected using the Mahalanobis distance. The Mahalanobis distance is approximately the weighted distance from the hyperplane formed by the principal components to the particular observation. Qualitatively, the principal components correspond to the physical laws that govern the behavior of the systems and constraints placed on the system. If there are more sensors than principal components, there are redundant measurements. This redundancy can be used to detect abnormalities that are due either to sensor failure or a localized change in the system being measured. The method compares the distribution of the Mahalanobis distance during normal operation with the distribution during the current operation. A likelihood ratio test is then used to determine if a sensor has gone bad or if operations in the reactor are different from normal. The sensor whose value is not normal is identified by comparing Mahalanobis distances computed with one sensor masked. When the abnormal sensor is masked, the Mahalanobis distance for this subset of sensors will be within prespecified bounds. The method is demonstrated on 20 subassembly output thermocouples in the core of Experimental Breeder Reactor II.

White, A.M.; Gross, K.C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Kubic, W.L (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

198

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

199

Secretary Chu to Travel to Houston Today | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Travel to Houston Today to Travel to Houston Today Secretary Chu to Travel to Houston Today July 8, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - At the direction of President Obama, as part of the Administration's ongoing oil spill response efforts U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu is making his fifth trip to Houston today to continue to help identify strategies for containing the oil and ultimately killing the well. Secretary Chu and his scientific team are coordinating their work with National Incident Commander Admiral Thad Allen, who is leading the administration-wide response and directing all interagency activities. Information on the work that the Secretary, Department of Energy staff and independent scientists have done to date on the oil spill response can be found on DOE's BP Oil Spill page.

200

Have You Seen Renewable Energy Projects While Traveling? | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seen Renewable Energy Projects While Traveling? Seen Renewable Energy Projects While Traveling? Have You Seen Renewable Energy Projects While Traveling? July 7, 2011 - 8:32am Addthis Since we blog about energy efficiency and renewable energy, it seems fitting that we would notice it even when we're not at work. This past Tuesday, Chris shared his first-hand views of Hawaii's renewable energy efforts while on vacation, including wind and solar, and did some post-vacation research that revealed some great information about how Hawaii is using renewable resources to achieve 70% clean energy by 2030. We're curious: Have you ever been on vacation or a business trip and noticed how another state is using renewable energy? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

MONDAY: Secretary Chu Travels to New Jersey and Philadelphia | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MONDAY: Secretary Chu Travels to New Jersey and Philadelphia MONDAY: Secretary Chu Travels to New Jersey and Philadelphia MONDAY: Secretary Chu Travels to New Jersey and Philadelphia September 24, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - On Monday, September 27, 2010, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Representative Rush Holt will tour Applied Photovoltaics. With help from a Recovery Act-funded $1.1 million clean energy manufacturing tax credit, Applied Photovoltaics will manufacture solar energy modules for use in building-integrated photovoltaics. In the afternoon, Secretary Chu will tour the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and speak to employees. He will then join Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter and other officials in an event highlighting the Energy Innovation Hub for energy-efficient buildings

202

Secretary Chu Travels to Memphis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Travels to Memphis Travels to Memphis Secretary Chu Travels to Memphis January 31, 2011 - 2:33pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? The Sharp solar manufacturing plant has produced more than 2 million solar panels since 2002, increased its staff from 300 to 480 employees over the last year, and produces enough solar paneling to power more than 140,000 homes. Worldwide, FedEx Express is operating 329 hybrid and 19 all-electric vehicles, reducing fuel use by almost 300,000 gallons and carbon dioxide emissions by approximately 3,000 metric tons. Hero_CHU_Sharp Secretary Steven Chu with Sharp executive T.C. Jones, standing in front of some of Sharp's solar panels. Following the State of the Union on Tuesday and his online town hall on

203

Shortcut estimation of safety distances of pipelines from explosives  

SciTech Connect

Purposely or accidentally detonating explosives near pressurized gas pipelines may have severe consequences on them, ranging from permanent deformation to gas loss or even violent rupture. Owing to lack of analytical prediction models, a shortcut is proposed in this article by which conservative estimations can be obtained of the safety distance of a pipeline from an explosion source, when explosive quantity is known. Alternatively, the maximum allowable explosive quantity can be calculated, provided distance is given. If both explosive quantity and distance are given, stresses on the pipeline may be estimated. Experimentally determined ratios of circumferential to longitudinal strains found in the literature are used. This ratio depends on soil peak particle velocity in contact with the pipeline. For total stress estimations on the pipeline, either biaxial or Huber-Hencky-Mises stresses are used, the latter being more conservative. Validation of proposed method is obtained against experimental observations and results. In this prediction model the characteristics of the explosion source, of the soil, and of the pipeline are taken into account.

Rigas, F.; Sebos, I. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Department of Energy's Management of Foreign Travel, IG-0872  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department of Energy's Management of Foreign Travel DOE/IG-0872 October 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 16, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert: "The Department of Energy's Management of Foreign Travel" INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy and its workforce of 116,000 Federal and contractor personnel have numerous international exchanges and interactions at different levels and for a variety of important programmatic and other purposes. The Office of Inspector General is currently reviewing the Department's management of international offices and foreign assignments. As

205

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

206

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

207

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

208

Short-Distance Structure of Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of Jefferson Lab's original missions was to further our understanding of the short-distance structure of nuclei. In particular, to understand what happens when two or more nucleons within a nucleus have strongly overlapping wave-functions; a phenomena commonly referred to as short-range correlations. Herein, we review the results of the (e,e'), (e,e'p) and (e,e'pN) reactions that have been used at Jefferson Lab to probe this short-distance structure as well as provide an outlook for future experiments.

Douglas Higinbotham, Eliazer Piasetzky, Stephen Wood

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Exact graph search algorithms for generalized traveling salesman path problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Generalized Traveling Salesman Path Problem (GTSPP) involves finding the shortest path from a location s to a location t that passes through at least one location from each of a set of generalized location categories (e.g., gas stations, ...

Michael N. Rice; Vassilis J. Tsotras

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Travel Planning Online for Dummies, 2nd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Find out how you can quickly and easily book plane tickets, rent a car and find a hotel room -- all with a few clicks of the mouse! Whether you're going on a short business strip or planning your dream vacation, Travel Planning ...

Noah Vadnai; Julian Smith

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Building robust Reputation Systems for travel-related services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a serious robust issue of building Reputation Systems for travel-related services, such as hotel, restaurant, etc. This paper proposes an advanced clustering approach, Suspicion Degree Meter (SDM), to rank suspects with respect to manipulative ... Keywords: Silicon,Indexes,Robustness,Analytical models,Feature extraction,Buildings,Context

Huiying Duan; Peng Yang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Comparison of heuristics for the colourful travelling salesman problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the colourful travelling salesman problem CTSP, given a graph G with a not necessarily distinct label colour assigned to each edge, a Hamiltonian tour with the minimum number of different labels is sought. The problem is a variant of the well-known ...

J. Silberholz; A. Raiconi; R. Cerulli; M. Gentili; B. Golden; S. Chen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Bounds on distance distributions in codes of known size  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We treat the problem of bounding components of the possible distance distributions of codes given the knowledge of their size and possibly minimum distance. Using the Beckner inequality from harmonic analysis, we derive upper bounds on distance distribution ...

A. E. Ashikhmin; G. D. Cohen; M. Krivelevich; S. N. Litsyn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan...

215

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 4876 47783 Distance traveled (mi) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Number of trips 59 2317 11750 Percent of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 24.59% 81.00%...

216

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 3902 45779 Distance traveled (mi) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Number of trips 57 1758 8306 Percent of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 18.15% 85.00% 15.00%...

217

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

500 79963 Distance traveled (mi) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Number of trips 70 3596 17063 Percent of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 21.3% 86.4% 13.6% ...

218

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

731 77160 Distance traveled (mi) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Number of trips 69 3809 16711 Percent of trips city highway Percent of total distance traveled 21.7% 86.8% 13.2% ...

219

Semantic distances for technology landscape visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel approach to the visualization of research domains in science and technology. The proposed methodology is based on the use of bibliometrics; i.e., analysis is conducted using information regarding trends and patterns ... Keywords: Clustering, Data mining, Semantic distance, Technology forecasting

Wei Lee Woon; Stuart Madnick

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Sorting through the many total-energy-cycle pathways possible with early plug-in hybrids.  

SciTech Connect

Using the 'total energy cycle' methodology, we compare U.S. near term (to {approx}2015) alternative pathways for converting energy to light-duty vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT) in plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), hybrids (HEVs), and conventional vehicles (CVs). For PHEVs, we present total energy-per-unit-of-VKT information two ways (1) energy from the grid during charge depletion (CD); (2) energy from stored on-board fossil fuel when charge sustaining (CS). We examine 'incremental sources of supply of liquid fuel such as (a) oil sands from Canada, (b) Fischer-Tropsch diesel via natural gas imported by LNG tanker, and (c) ethanol from cellulosic biomass. We compare such fuel pathways to various possible power converters producing electricity, including (i) new coal boilers, (ii) new integrated, gasified coal combined cycle (IGCC), (iii) existing natural gas fueled combined cycle (NGCC), (iv) existing natural gas combustion turbines, (v) wood-to-electricity, and (vi) wind/solar. We simulate a fuel cell HEV and also consider the possibility of a plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicle (FCV). For the simulated FCV our results address the merits of converting some fuels to hydrogen to power the fuel cell vs. conversion of those same fuels to electricity to charge the PHEV battery. The investigation is confined to a U.S. compact sized car (i.e. a world passenger car). Where most other studies have focused on emissions (greenhouse gases and conventional air pollutants), this study focuses on identification of the pathway providing the most vehicle kilometers from each of five feedstocks examined. The GREET 1.7 fuel cycle model and the new GREET 2.7 vehicle cycle model were used as the foundation for this study. Total energy, energy by fuel type, total greenhouse gases (GHGs), volatile organic compounds (VOC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), fine particulate (PM2.5) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) values are presented. We also isolate the PHEV emissions contribution from varying kWh storage capability of battery packs in HEVs and PHEVs from {approx}16 to 64 km of charge depleting distance. Sensitivity analysis is conducted with respect to the effect of replacing the battery once during the vehicle's life. The paper includes one appendix that examines several recent studies of interactions of PHEVs with patterns of electric generation and one that provides definitions, acronyms, and fuel consumption estimation steps.

Gaines, L.; Burnham, A.; Rousseau, A.; Santini, D.; Energy Systems

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Solar Decathlon 2013: Going the Distance | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Going the Distance Solar Decathlon 2013: Going the Distance September 17, 2013 - 4:26pm Addthis Toggle Routes onoff Return to map Solar Decathlon Journeys Visualizing the...

222

The New Suburbs: Evolving travel behavior, the built environment, and subway investments in Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of built environment characteristics on householdTravel and the Built Environment -- A Meta-Analysis. Journalnon-work travel. Built Environment, 18(4), 253267. Hess, D.

Guerra, Erick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Enterprise design for services : a systems approach for the Boeing next generation corporate travel system architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Typically a company's second largest controllable expense, corporate travel affects many employees at Boeing. A challenge when implementing improvements in the travel and expense system, which is actually comprised of a ...

Silva, Hector E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Secretaries Chu and Locke to Travel to China Next Week | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretaries Chu and Locke to Travel to China Next Week Secretaries Chu and Locke to Travel to China Next Week July 6, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON -- Energy Secretary Steven...

225

Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight State of the Union Address, Commitment to Clean Energy Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight State of the...

226

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

227

Long working distance incoherent interference microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A full-field imaging, long working distance, incoherent interference microscope suitable for three-dimensional imaging and metrology of MEMS devices and test structures on a standard microelectronics probe station. A long working distance greater than 10 mm allows standard probes or probe cards to be used. This enables nanometer-scale 3-dimensional height profiles of MEMS test structures to be acquired across an entire wafer while being actively probed, and, optionally, through a transparent window. An optically identical pair of sample and reference arm objectives is not required, which reduces the overall system cost, and also the cost and time required to change sample magnifications. Using a LED source, high magnification (e.g., 50.times.) can be obtained having excellent image quality, straight fringes, and high fringe contrast.

Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM); De Boer, Maarten P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

228

Travelers Rest, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Travelers Rest, South Carolina: Energy Resources Travelers Rest, South Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.9676167°, -82.4434548° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9676167,"lon":-82.4434548,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Spent fuel utilization in a compact traveling wave reactor  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, several innovative designs of nuclear reactors are proposed. One of them is Traveling Wave Reactor (TWR). The unique characteristic of a TWR is the capability of breeding its own fuel in the reactor. The reactor is fueled by mostly depleted, natural uranium or spent nuclear fuel and a small amount of enriched uranium to initiate the fission process. Later on in the core, the reactor gradually converts the non-fissile material into the fissile in a process like a traveling wave. In this work, a TWR with spent nuclear fuel blanket was studied. Several parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, and fission power, were analyzed. The discharge burnup composition was also analyzed. The calculation is performed by a continuous energy Monte Carlo code McCARD.

Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Yonghee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology 373-1 Kusong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

230

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

231

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions. ...

232

OFA2013_Storage@Distance.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Storage Systems Group NERSC Storage Systems Group Storage at a Distance --- 1 --- Open F abrics A lliance U ser D ay What is storage at a distance? * Data i s n ot l ocal t o t he u ser/resource * Processing a nd w orkflow n eeds a re n ear r eal---7me - Don't w ant t o w ait u n9l d ata t ransfer i s c omplete - Need t o s ee r esults, m ake a djustments, a nd t ry a gain * Network w ill b ecome p art o f t he i nstruments - Telescopes a nd t heir d ata - Sequencers a nd t heir g enome d ata - Light s ources a nd t heir d ata * Is t here a n a rchitecture/protocol t hat i s n ecessary today for successfully providing storage at a distance? - Ethernet v s. I B - ROCE v s. R DMA v s. I P --- 2 --- Open F abrics A lliance U ser D ay Use case 1: Instruments (beam lines) * ShiB w ork ( 24hr c overage) - Scien9sts fl y i n a nd u se t he i nstrument

233

An accelerated zone 2 trip algorithm for non-pilot distance relays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an algorithm able to accelerate the zone 2 trip of non-pilot distance relays by detecting remote breaker operation following a zone 2 fault. It is based on monitoring changes in proposed composite signals. The performance of the proposed ... Keywords: accelerated trip (AT), real time digital simulator (RTDS), sequential accelerated trip (SAT), total fault clearing time (TFCT)

German Rosas Ortiz; Tarlochan S. Sidhu

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Dendritic Actin Filament Nucleation Causes Traveling Waves and Patches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The polymerization of actin via branching at a cell membrane containing nucleation-promoting factors is simulated using a stochastic-growth methodology. The polymerized-actin distribution displays three types of behavior: a) traveling waves, b) moving patches, and c) random fluctuations. Increasing actin concentration causes a transition from patches to waves. The waves and patches move by a treadmilling mechanism which does not require myosin II. The effects of downregulation of key proteins on actin wave behavior are evaluated.

Anders E. Carlsson

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

Inspection of the Secretary of Energy`s foreign travel  

SciTech Connect

On December 9, 1995, the Secretary of Energy requested that the Department`s Inspector General (IG) conduct a thorough examination of all Secretarial foreign travel from 1993 to December 1995 to include the purpose of each trip, the activities of each Federal participant in each trip, the funding of each trip, and claims for reimbursements for expenses by Federal trip participants. The Secretary also requested that the review include an assessment of travel authorization, voucher, traveler reimbursement, and auditing systems employed by the Department to identify steps that could be taken to reduce errors and improve accounting oversight. Additionally, the Secretary requested that the Inspector General conduct a thorough examination of the establishment and filling of the Department`s Ombudsman position. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) initiated a review into these matters and assigned primary responsibility for the review to the Office of Inspections. The purpose of this inspection was to conduct a thorough examination of the 16 Secretarial foreign trips from June 1993 to December 1995. This report focuses on the four trade missions because of their extent and cost. We examined a number of Departmental management systems and processes involved in planning and executing the 16 foreign trips. To determine the actual cost of the 16 trips, it was necessary to determine who participated in the trips and to identify the individual travel costs. We were required to perform extensive reviews of records and conduct a large number of interviews because the Department could not provide any specific documents that could accurately account for who actually participated on the 16 trips. Having identified who participated, it was then necessary to examine key aspects of the Department`s management systems. Our report contains 31 recommendations for corrective action.

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

Laboratory Evaluation of Fine-mesh Traveling Water Screens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final results of four years of laboratory evaluations on performance of fine-mesh traveling water screens to protect larval fish at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). Prior to this study, the biological effectiveness of fine-mesh screens was uncertain because performance data from the few existing facilities that use fine-mesh screens have been highly variable. This project is producing additional data necessary to determine biological efficacy of fine-mesh screens.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

237

Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous metal casting system in which the feed of molten metal is controlled by means of a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir so that p.sub.c =p.sub.g -p.sub.m where p.sub.c is the desired pressure in the caster, p.sub.g is the gravitational pressure in the duct exerted by the force of the head of molten metal in the reservoir, and p.sub.m is the electromagnetic pressure exerted by the force of the magnetic field traveling wave produced by the linear induction motor. The invention also includes feedback loops to the linear induction motor to control the casting pressure in response to measured characteristics of the metal being cast.

Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for controlling the feed of molten metal in a continuous metal casting system comprising a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir so that p{sub c} = p{sub g} {minus} p{sub m} where p{sub c} is the desired pressure in the caster, p{sub g} is the gravitational pressure in the duct exerted by the force of the head of molten metal in the reservoir, and p{sub m} is the electromagnetic pressure exerted by the force of the magnetic field traveling wave produced by the linear induction motor. The invention also includes feedback loops to the linear induction motor to control the casting pressure in response to measured characteristic of the metal being cast. 8 figs.

Praeg, W.F.

1989-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

Effect of distance to radiation treatment facility on use of radiation therapy after mastectomy in elderly women  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We sought to study the effect of distance to the nearest radiation treatment facility on the use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in elderly women. Methods and Materials: Using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we analyzed 19,787 women with Stage I or II breast cancer who received mastectomy as definitive surgery during 1991 to 1999. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate the association of distance with receipt of PMRT after adjusting for clinical and sociodemographic factors. Results: Overall 2,075 patients (10.5%) treated with mastectomy received PMRT. In addition to cancer and patient characteristics, in our primary analysis, increasing distance to the nearest radiation treatment facility was independently associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving PMRT (OR 0.996 per additional mile, p = 0.01). Secondary analyses revealed that the decline in PMRT use appeared at distances of more than 25 miles and was statistically significant for those patients living more than 75 miles from the nearest radiation facility (odds of receiving PMRT of 0.58 [95% CI 0.34-0.99] vs. living within 25 miles of such a facility). The effect of distance on PMRT appeared to be more pronounced with increasing patient age (>75 years). Variation in the effect of distance on radiation use between regions of the country and nodal status was also identified. Conclusions: Oncologists must be cognizant of the potential barrier to quality care that is posed by travel distance, especially for elderly patients; and policy makers should consider this fact in resource allocation decisions about radiation treatment centers.

Punglia, Rinaa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: rpunglia@lroc.harvard.edu; Weeks, Jane C. [Division of Medical Oncology, Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Neville, Bridget A. [Division of Medical Oncology, Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Earle, Craig C. [Division of Medical Oncology, Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Travel determinants and multi-scale transferability of national activity patterns to local populations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to transfer national travel patterns to a local population is of interest when attempting to model megaregions or areas that exceed metropolitan planning organization (MPO) boundaries. At the core of this research are questions about the connection between travel behavior and land use, urban form, and accessibility. As a part of this process, a group of land use variables have been identified to define activity and travel patterns for individuals and households. The 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) participants are divided into categories comprised of a set of latent cluster models representing persons, travel, and land use. These are compared to two sets of cluster models constructed for two local travel surveys. Comparison of means statistical tests are used to assess differences among sociodemographic groups residing in localities with similar land uses. The results show that the NHTS and the local surveys share mean population activity and travel characteristics. However, these similarities mask behavioral heterogeneity that are shown when distributions of activity and travel behavior are examined. Therefore, data from a national household travel survey cannot be used to model local population travel characteristics if the goal to model the actual distributions and not mean travel behavior characteristics.

Henson, Kriste M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gou; ias, Konstadinos G [UCSB

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

242

How Do You Go Green When You Travel? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Go Green When You Travel? Go Green When You Travel? How Do You Go Green When You Travel? September 30, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, John told you about green travel and a program in his area that allows lodging facilities to verify that they are practicing green activities. Many of the activities, however, require that travelers take the step to be green. Choices such as less frequent linen service are opportunities to save water and energy while traveling. How do you go green when you travel? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles How Do You Reduce the Amount of Energy Used by Your Televisions? How Would You Use a Smart Meter to Manage Your Energy Use? How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home

243

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

244

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

245

Job Access, Commute, and Travel Burden Among Welfare Recipients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Single Mothers after AFDC? Focus, 17(2), pp. 13-15.access on commute distance among AFDC recipients and furtherlabor market where most AFDC recipients are located. Given

Ong, Paul M.; Blumenberg, Evelyn

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

247

EnergyCS Prius Altairnano 2009 Report.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

period: All trips combined Overall gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 2 Total number of trips Total distance traveled (mi) Trips...

248

EnergyCS Prius Valence 2009 Report.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

period: All trips combined Overall gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 2 Total number of trips Total distance traveled (mi) Trips...

249

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

250

Solar Decathlon: How far did they travel? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Person Solar Energy Potential Solar Energy Potential Renewable Energy Production By State Renewable Energy Production By State 2009 Total Energy Production by State 2009 Total...

251

www.elsevier.com/locate/trc Willingness to pay for travel information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved travel information received via electronic sources can inform people about travel conditions and help them make travel decisions. The personal benefits of high quality travel information may motivate individuals to pay for information. This study analyzes travelers willingness to pay for better quality information received from a traveler information system offered through a publicprivate partnership in the San Francisco Bay Area. The data were collected in 1997 through a computer-aided telephone interview of individuals who called traveler advisory telephone system (TATS) and were willing to be interviewed (N 511). The survey results indicate that the average number of times per month the respondents called TATS was 4.80 (TATS was a free service at the time). The average use of the system would decline if the service was not improved but a service charge was initiated. People indicated that they were more willing to pay for a customized service. The impacts of travel information, travel context and socioeconomic variables on willingness to pay for information were analyzed by estimating a random-effects negative binomial regression model of revealed and stated TATS calling frequency. The results indicate that customized travel information, longer trips, worktrips, and listening to radio trafficreports are associated with higher TATS calling frequency and with greater willingness to pay for information. Overall, the consumer response to

Asad J. Khattak A; Youngbin Yim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Award Number: Federal Non-Federal Federal Non-Federal Total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

j. Indirect Charges j. Indirect Charges k. Totals (sum of 6i-6j) Program Income Applicant Name: Budget Information - Non Construction Programs OMB Approval No. 0348-0044 New or Revised Budget Section A - Budget Summary i. Total Direct Charges (sum of 6a-6h) Grant Program, Function or Activity Object Class Categories Authorized for Local Reproduction h. Other a. Personnel b. Fringe Benefits c. Travel d. Equipment 6. Total (5) f. Contractual g. Construction Section B - Budget Categories Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number Grant Program Function or Activity Estimated Unobligated Funds e. Supplies Prescribed by OMB Circular A-102 Previous Edition Usable

253

Award Number: Federal Non-Federal Federal Non-Federal Total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prescribed by OMB Circular A-102 Prescribed by OMB Circular A-102 Previous Edition Usable Total (5) f. Contractual g. Construction Section B - Budget Categories Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number Grant Program Function or Activity Estimated Unobligated Funds e. Supplies i. Total Direct Charges (sum of 6a-6h) Grant Program, Function or Activity Object Class Categories Authorized for Local Reproduction h. Other a. Personnel b. Fringe Benefits c. Travel d. Equipment 6. j. Indirect Charges k. Totals (sum of 6i-6j) Program Income Applicant Name: Budget Information - Non Construction Programs OMB Approval No. 0348-0044 New or Revised Budget Section A - Budget Summary

254

Combinatorial aspects of total positivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I study combinatorial aspects of an emerging field known as total positivity. The classical theory of total positivity concerns matrices in which all minors are nonnegative. While this theory was pioneered ...

Williams, Lauren Kiyomi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

2D Euclidean distance transform algorithms: A comparative survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distance transform (DT) is a general operator forming the basis of many methods in computer vision and geometry, with great potential for practical applications. However, all the optimal algorithms for the computation of the exact Euclidean DT (EDT) ... Keywords: Dijkstra's algorithm, Distance transform, computational geometry, exact Euclidean distance map, performance evaluation, shape analysis

Ricardo Fabbri; Luciano Da F. Costa; Julio C. Torelli; Odemir M. Bruno

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Highway travel and fuel comsumption from 1970 to 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The change in fuel price and availability (1970-80) has had a profound impact on the way and the extent of travel. Within the decade there were two precipitous increases in fuel price among a posture of steadily rising energy costs. In response to these price increases, a number of public policies were enacted. For instance, the 55-mph speed limit was imposed in 1974. At the end of that same year, the Federal Energy Administration and the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) were formulated to prescribe certain conservation guidelines for states to follow in formulating their own programs. Specifically, EPCA established a program for the development of plans designed for the promotion of energy conservation and a reduction of the energy demand growth rate. Parallel to the conservation measures are technological improvements in vehicle fuel consumption. EPCA mandated that automobile manufacturers achieve fuel efficiency incrementally through 1985 to reach an average fuel economy of 27.5 mpg. This article reviews the historical impact of these factors from 1970 through 1980. Its objective is to observe the relative significance of each of these energy-saving alternatives on the growth rate of travel and fuel use. This historical perspective is particularly interesting since it presents the before-and-after effects of two ''crises'' occurring during this 10-year period. 1 figure, 10 tables.

Chan, Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Time--Distance Helioseismology Data Analysis Pipeline for Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/HMI) and Its Initial Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/HMI) provides continuous full-disk observations of solar oscillations. We develop a data-analysis pipeline based on the time-distance helioseismology method to measure acoustic travel times using HMI Doppler-shift observations, and infer solar interior properties by inverting these measurements. The pipeline is used for routine production of near-real-time full-disk maps of subsurface wave-speed perturbations and horizontal flow velocities for depths ranging from 0 to 20 Mm, every eight hours. In addition, Carrington synoptic maps for the subsurface properties are made from these full-disk maps. The pipeline can also be used for selected target areas and time periods. We explain details of the pipeline organization and procedures, including processing of the HMI Doppler observations, measurements of the travel times, inversions, and constructions of the full-disk and synoptic maps. Some initial results from the pipeline, includin...

Zhao, J; Bogart, R S; Parchevsky, K V; Birch, A C; Duvall, T L; Beck, J G; Kosovichev, A G; Scherrer, P H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Total correlations and mutual information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In quantum information theory it is generally accepted that quantum mutual information is an information-theoretic measure of total correlations of a bipartite quantum state. We argue that there exist quantum states for which quantum mutual information cannot be considered as a measure of total correlations. Moreover, for these states we propose a different way of quantifying total correlations.

Zbigniew Walczak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

The New Suburbs: Evolving travel behavior, the built environment, and subway investments in Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of built environment characteristics on householdand public policies. Environment and Planning A, 39(9),Travel and the Built Environment -- A Meta-Analysis. Journal

Guerra, Erick Strom

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The New Suburbs: Evolving travel behavior, the built environment, and subway investment in Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of built environment characteristics on householdand public policies. Environment and Planning A, 39(9),Travel and the Built Environment -- A Meta-Analysis. Journal

Guerra, Erick Strom

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Design of traveling wave windows for the PEP-II RF coupling network  

SciTech Connect

The waveguide windows in the PEP-II RF coupling network have to withstand high power of 500 kW. Traveling wave windows have lower power dissipation than conventional self-matched windows, thus rendering the possibility of less stringent mechanical design. The traveling wave behavior is achieved by providing a reflecting iris on each side of the window, and depending on the configuration of the irises, traveling wave windows are characterized as inductive or capacitive types. A numerical design procedure using MAFIA has been developed for traveling wave windows. The relative advantages of inductive and capacitive windows are discussed. Furthermore, the issues of bandwidth and multipactoring are also addressed.

Kroll, N.M.; Ng, C.K.; Judkins, J.; Neubauer, M.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Video Transit Training for Older Travelers: A Case Study of the Rossmoor Senior Adult Community, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Video Transit Training for Older Travelers Case Study of theto develop a transit training video for residents of themunity in California. The video features familiar community

Shaheen, Susan A; Rodier, Caroline J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Video Transit Training for Older Travelers: A Case Study of the Rossmoor Senior Adult Community, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Video Transit Training for Older Travelers Case Study of theto develop a transit training video for residents of themunity in California. The video features familiar community

Shaheen, Susan; Rodier, Caroline J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Urban Flooding: Implications for Transportation Infrastructure and Travel Disruption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrology. Transportation infrastructure and travel patternsnot only damaged various infrastructures but also disruptednot hold true in new infrastructure design and management (

Chang, Heejun; Lafrenz, Martin; Jung, II-Won; Figliozzi, Miguell; Platman, Deena

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A California Statewide Exploratory Analysis Correlating Land Use Density, Infrastructure Supply and Travel Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Use Density, Infrastructure Supply and Travel Behaviorof employment and infrastructure supply are used togetherCalifonia. Land use and infrastructure have a significant,

Yoon, Seo Youn; Golob, Thomas F.; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Preference accommodating and preference shaping : incorporating traveler preferences into transportation planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the psychological factors that influence travel behavior such as people's personality traits, environmental attitudes, car pride and perceptions of convenience and comfort. Despite the recognition ...

Zhao, Jinhua, 1977-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Secretary Bodman to Travel to the Middle East to Advance International...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

efficiency. Secretary Bodman will depart on Monday, January 14, 2008 and travel to Jordan, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Egypt. "To increase global energy...

268

KCP installs steel cable mesh that can stop a 20 pound item traveling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

item traveling 240 mph Posted By Office of Public Affairs Construction of the Kansas City Plant at the new National Security Campus has included some unique building...

269

DOE M 552.1-1A, U.S. Department of Energy Travel Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Manual supplements information in the Federal Travel Regulation (FTR) by providing further clarification and establishing Department of Energy (DOE) policy ...

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

270

Journeys in the Palimpsest: British women's travel to Greece,1840-1914.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Discussions of British travel to Greece in the nineteenth century have been dominated by the work of Lord Byron. Byrons contemporary Greeks were Orientalised, while (more)

Mahn, Churnjeet Kaur

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

272

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

273

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

274

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

275

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

276

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

277

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

278

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

279

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

280

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

282

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

283

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

284

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

285

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

286

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

287

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

288

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

289

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

290

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

291

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

292

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

293

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

294

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

295

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

296

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

297

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

298

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

299

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

300

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

302

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

303

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,000 to 79,999 80,000 or More Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

304

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators U.S. Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Energy Information...

305

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.7...

306

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC4.7...

307

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC8.7...

308

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East North Central West North Central Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

309

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

310

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

311

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

312

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump... 53.5...

313

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

314

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

315

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

m... 3.2 0.2 Q 0.1 Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 14.9 11.1 3.9 Cordless...

316

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

m... 3.2 0.9 0.7 Q Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 19.3 13.2 6.1 Cordless...

317

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q 0.5 Q Q Monitor is Turned Off... 0.5 N Q Q Q Q N Q Use of Internet Have Access to Internet Yes... 66.9...

318

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Four Most Populated States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four...

319

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

320

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer......

322

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 25.8 2.8 5.8 5.5 3.8 7.9 1.4 5.1 Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan Used All Summer... 18.7 4.2 4.9 4.1 2.1 3.4 2.4 6.3...

323

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Characteristics Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC5.4 Space Heating...

324

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.1 0.5 Q 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

325

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.3 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.7 0.5 Q Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

326

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.8 0.3 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

327

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.1 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.4 Q 0.2 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

328

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.4 0.4 0.4 0.7 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

329

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

330

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 34.3 1.2 0.9 2.2 2.9 5.4 7.0 8.2 6.6 Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated... 29.5 1.5 0.9 2.3 2.7 4.1...

331

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

332

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

333

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

334

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

335

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

336

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

337

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

338

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

339

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

340

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

342

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

343

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

344

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

345

Distance Is Not Dead: Social Interaction and Geographical Distance in the Internet Era  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Internet revolution has made long-distance communication dramatically faster, easier, and cheaper than ever before. This, it has been argued, has decreased the importance of geographic proximity in social interactions, transforming our world into a global village with a borderless society. We argue for the opposite: while technology has undoubtedly increased the overall level of communication, this increase has been most pronounced for local social ties. We show that the volume of electronic communications is inversely proportional to geographic distance, following a Power Law. We directly study the importance of physical proximity in social interactions by analyzing the spatial dissemination of new baby names. Counter-intuitively, and in line with the above argument, the importance of geographic proximity has dramatically increased with the internet revolution.

Goldenberg, Jacob

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Number of trips 1,610 Distance traveled (mi) 372 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 72% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.2 Average Driving Speed (mph) 5.2 Average Stops per mile 32.1 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 13% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 383 Number of trips 114 Distance traveled (mi) 144 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 28% Average Trip Distance (mi) 1.3 Average Driving Speed (mph) 18.3 Average Stops per mile 3.8 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 16% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 549 Number of trips 5 Distance traveled (mi) 2 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 0% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.4 Average Driving Speed (mph)

347

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

530 530 Number of trips 1,308 Distance traveled (mi) 495 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 69% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.4 Average Driving Speed (mph) 5.6 Average Stops per mile 31.4 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 471 Number of trips 91 Distance traveled (mi) 175 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 24% Average Trip Distance (mi) 1.9 Average Driving Speed (mph) 16.6 Average Stops per mile 3.8 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 13% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 357 Number of trips 2 Distance traveled (mi) 49 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 7% Average Trip Distance (mi) 24.7 Average Driving Speed (mph)

348

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

74 74 Number of trips 399 Distance traveled (mi) 148 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 73% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.4 Average Driving Speed (mph) 6.3 Average Stops per mile 35.5 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 11% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 423 Number of trips 27 Distance traveled (mi) 54 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 27% Average Trip Distance (mi) 2.0 Average Driving Speed (mph) 20.7 Average Stops per mile 3.5 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 0 Number of trips 0 Distance traveled (mi) 0 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 0% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.0 Average Driving Speed (mph)

349

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Number of trips 493 Distance traveled (mi) 189 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 38% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.4 Average Driving Speed (mph) 4.9 Average Stops per mile 28.7 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 377 Number of trips 67 Distance traveled (mi) 275 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 56% Average Trip Distance (mi) 4.1 Average Driving Speed (mph) 17.9 Average Stops per mile 3.7 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 13% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 438 Number of trips 1 Distance traveled (mi) 29 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 6% Average Trip Distance (mi) 28.7 Average Driving Speed (mph)

350

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

505 505 Number of trips 601 Distance traveled (mi) 245 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 62% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.4 Average Driving Speed (mph) 5.4 Average Stops per mile 34.8 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 373 Number of trips 35 Distance traveled (mi) 124 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 31% Average Trip Distance (mi) 3.5 Average Driving Speed (mph) 23.0 Average Stops per mile 3.7 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 13% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 319 Number of trips 3 Distance traveled (mi) 25 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 6% Average Trip Distance (mi) 8.5 Average Driving Speed (mph)

351

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

613 613 Number of trips 89 Distance traveled (mi) 9 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 30% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.1 Average Driving Speed (mph) 7.0 Average Stops per mile 44.5 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 9% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 487 Number of trips 8 Distance traveled (mi) 5 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 16% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.6 Average Driving Speed (mph) 25.0 Average Stops per mile 3.8 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 6% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 487 Number of trips 7 Distance traveled (mi) 16 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 54% Average Trip Distance (mi) 2.3 Average Driving Speed (mph)

352

Brain teasers traveling exhibit opens at Los Alamos National Laboratory's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brain teasers exhibit opens at museum Brain teasers exhibit opens at museum Brain Teasers traveling exhibit opens at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum The interactive exhibit is a collection of more than 20 puzzles and mind benders. December 4, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact

353

Tiny travelers from deep space could assist in healing Fukushima's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors Tiny travelers from deep space could assist in healing Fukushima's nuclear scar Researchers have devised a method to use cosmic rays to gather detailed information from inside the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors. October 17, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory Muon Radiography team members stand in front of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi reactor complex during a visit to determine evaluate whether Los Alamos' Scattering Method for cosmic-ray radiography could be used to image the location of nuclear materials within the reactor buildings. Los Alamos National Laboratory Muon Radiography team members stand in front of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi reactor complex during a visit to determine evaluate whether Los Alamos' Scattering Method for cosmic-ray

354

Secretary Bodman Travels to Russia to Advance Energy Security | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Russia to Advance Energy Security Russia to Advance Energy Security Secretary Bodman Travels to Russia to Advance Energy Security March 15, 2006 - 12:20pm Addthis Promotes Transparent Markets and Clean Energy Technologies; Participates in G8 Energy Ministerial and Delivers Remarks on the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership MOSCOW, RUSSIA-U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today began a two-day visit to Russia where he will lead the U.S. delegation to the G8 Energy Ministerial. During his visit the Secretary will promote greater energy security through the use of advanced energy technologies, the promotion of stable and transparent investment climates, and increased conservation and energy efficiency. Secretary Bodman will also deliver remarks to the Carnegie Center on the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

355

Neutron damage reduction in a traveling wave reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traveling wave reactors are envisioned to run on depleted or natural uranium with no need for enrichment or reprocessing, and in a manner which requires little to no operator intervention. If feasible, this type of reactor has significant advantages over conventional nuclear power systems. However, a practical implementation of this concept is challenging as neutron irradiation levels many times greater than those in conventional reactors appear to be required for a fission wave to propagate. Radiation damage to the fuel and cladding materials presents a significant obstacle to a practical design. One possibility for reducing damage is to soften the neutron energy spectrum. Here we show that using a uranium oxide fuel form will allow a shift in the neutron spectrum that can result in at least a three fold decrease in dpa levels for fuel cladding and structural steels within the reactor compared with the dpa levels expected when using a uranium metal fuel. (authors)

Osborne, A. G.; Deinert, M. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Traveling-wave device with mass flux suppression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A traveling-wave device is provided with the conventional moving pistons eliminated. Acoustic energy circulates in a direction through a fluid within a torus. A side branch may be connected to the torus for transferring acoustic energy into or out of the torus. A regenerator is located in the torus with a first heat exchanger located on a first side of the regenerator downstream of the regenerator relative to the direction of the circulating acoustic energy; and a second heat exchanger located on an upstream side of the regenerator. The improvement is a mass flux suppressor located in the torus to minimize time-averaged mass flux of the fluid. In one embodiment, the device further includes a thermal buffer column in the torus to thermally isolate the heat exchanger that is at the operating temperature of the device.

Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Backhaus, Scott N. (Los Alamos, NM); Gardner, David L. (White Rock, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Secretary Bodman Travels to Saudi Arabia to Discuss Global Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saudi Arabia to Discuss Global Energy Saudi Arabia to Discuss Global Energy Investments Secretary Bodman Travels to Saudi Arabia to Discuss Global Energy Investments January 19, 2007 - 10:38am Addthis Furthers Strategic Energy Dialogue between the Nations and Highlights U.S. - Saudi Scientific Innovation RIYADH, SAUDI ARABIA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today continued his six-nation visit to the Middle East and Europe with a two-day stop in Saudi Arabia where he met with Saudi Arabia's Minister of Petroleum and Mineral Resources Ali Ibrahim Al-Naimi to discuss joint energy cooperation. Secretary Bodman also toured the King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and will tour the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology during his visit. "The United States and Saudi Arabia enjoy a relationship of global

358

Secretary Bodman Travels to the Middle East | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Middle East the Middle East Secretary Bodman Travels to the Middle East November 10, 2005 - 2:22pm Addthis Four-nation swing to emphasize domestic energy needs and goals WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman embarked upon a four-nation tour through the Middle East to enhance the United States' relationship with major oil-producing nations, promote economic liberalization and increased foreign investment in the region, and reaffirm U.S. energy policy goals. "Both consumers and producers of energy depend on a vibrant, growing world economy. By working together we can increase the energy and economic security of the United States and our international partners and pursue continued growth and prosperity in developed and developing nations," Secretary Bodman said.

359

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

360

China Total Cloud Amount Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Total Cloud Amount Over China DOI: 10.3334CDIACcli.008 data Data image Graphics Investigator Dale P. Kaiser Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Measurements of the travel?time bias caused by internal waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical work and computer simulations predict that the travel?time of acoustic signals is biased by the ocean internal wave field. The path integral theory for scattering predicts that the size of the travel time bias depends on the logarithm of the center frequency of the acoustic signal. A recent experiment

Matthew Dzieciuch; the AST Group

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

363

On electric resistances for distance-regular graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the behavior of electric potentials on distance-regular graphs, and extend some results of a prior paper. Our main result, Theorem 4, shows(together with Corollary 3) that if distance is measured by the electric resistance between points then all points are close to being equidistant on a distance-regular graph with large valency. A number of auxiliary results are also presented.

Koolen, Jack; Park, Jongyook

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste

365

Spatial chemical distance based on atomic property fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-9316-x Spatial chemical distance based on atomicSimilarity of compound chemical structures often leads tonot always true, as distinct chemical scaffolds can exhibit

Grigoryan, A. V.; Kufareva, I.; Totrov, M.; Abagyan, R. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Consumer Adoption of Online Banking: Does Distance Matter?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adoption of Online Banking: Does Distance Matter? Beethikaand Goolsbee, Austan (2002). "Does the Internet Make Marketsto the closest bank branch does not affect the likelihood of

Khan, Beethika S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study  

SciTech Connect

The Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Mining, Land, and Water manages cross-country travel, typically associated with hydrocarbon exploration and development, on Alaska's arctic North Slope. This project is intended to provide natural resource managers with objective, quantitative data to assist decision making regarding opening of the tundra to cross-country travel. DNR designed standardized, controlled field trials, with baseline data, to investigate the relationships present between winter exploration vehicle treatments and the independent variables of ground hardness, snow depth, and snow slab thickness, as they relate to the dependent variables of active layer depth, soil moisture, and photosynthetically active radiation (a proxy for plant disturbance). Changes in the dependent variables were used as indicators of tundra disturbance. Two main tundra community types were studied: Coastal Plain (wet graminoid/moist sedge shrub) and Foothills (tussock). DNR constructed four models to address physical soil properties: two models for each main community type, one predicting change in depth of active layer and a second predicting change in soil moisture. DNR also investigated the limited potential management utility in using soil temperature, the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants, and changes in microphotography as tools for the identification of disturbance in the field. DNR operated under the assumption that changes in the abiotic factors of active layer depth and soil moisture drive alteration in tundra vegetation structure and composition. Statistically significant differences in depth of active layer, soil moisture at a 15 cm depth, soil temperature at a 15 cm depth, and the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation were found among treatment cells and among treatment types. The models were unable to thoroughly investigate the interacting role between snow depth and disturbance due to a lack of variability in snow depth cover throughout the period of field experimentation. The amount of change in disturbance indicators was greater in the tundra communities of the Foothills than in those of the Coastal Plain. However the overall level of change in both community types was less than expected. In Coastal Plain communities, ground hardness and snow slab thickness were found to play an important role in change in active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. In the Foothills communities, snow cover had the most influence on active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. Once certain minimum thresholds for ground hardness, snow slab thickness, and snow depth were attained, it appeared that little or no additive effect was realized regarding increased resistance to disturbance in the tundra communities studied. DNR used the results of this modeling project to set a standard for maximum permissible disturbance of cross-country tundra travel, with the threshold set below the widely accepted standard of Low Disturbance levels (as determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). DNR followed the modeling project with a validation study, which seemed to support the field trial conclusions and indicated that the standard set for maximum permissible disturbance exhibits a conservative bias in favor of environmental protection. Finally DNR established a quick and efficient tool for visual estimations of disturbance to determine when investment in field measurements is warranted. This Visual Assessment System (VAS) seemed to support the plot disturbance measurements taking during the modeling and validation phases of this project.

Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports...

369

A Collaborative Case Study System for Distance Learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distance Learning from Case Studies involves enabling collaboration between two or more learners at a distance on a case study activity. In this paper we present an empirical qualitative study that simulates a learning scenario in which a pair of subjects ...

Marta C. Rosatelli; John A. Self

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Measuring Dialect Distance Phonetically John Nerbonne and Wilbert Heeringa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- tance, both simple (based on atomic char- acters) and complex (based on feature vec- tors). The measurements using feature vec- tors varied according to whether city-block distance, Euclidean distance or (a sensitive, that city-block dis- tance is a good measure of phonetic over- lap of feature vectors

371

Computing the Frchet distance between piecewise smooth curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the Frechet distance between two curves which are given as a sequence of m+n curved pieces. If these pieces are sufficiently well-behaved, we can compute the Frechet distance in O(mnlog(mn)) time. The decision version of the problem can be ... Keywords: Shape matching

Gnter Rote

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A Novel Distributed Simulation Approach in Adaptive Distance Relaying  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an adaptive distance relaying strategy based on the global network simulation (GNS) concept is presented. The GNS concept is actually a distributed simulation approach (DSA) for piecewise analysis of large-scale power grids using diakoptics ... Keywords: adaptive distance relaying, coordination rules, diakoptics, distributed simulation approach (DSA), global network simulation (GNS), large change sensitivity (LCS), mutually coupled lines

V. Gohari Sadr; S.M. Kouhsari

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Optimal selection of robots by using distance based approach method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deterministic quantitative model based on Distance Based Approach (DBA) method has been developed for evaluation, selection and ranking of robots, which is a concept hitherto not employed in selection problem of this kind. As a significant development ... Keywords: Distance based approach, Optimized selection, Ranking, Robots

Rishi Kumar; R. K. Garg

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

An extreme-distance approach to multiple criteria ranking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A distance approach based on extreme points, or predefined ideal and anti-ideal points, is proposed to improve on the TOPSIS (Technique for Order Performance [or Ordered Preference] by Similarity to Ideal Solution) method of multiple criteria ranking. ... Keywords: Comparative study, Distance-based ranking, Multiple criteria decision analysis, Multiple criteria ranking, TOPSIS

Ye Chen; D. Marc Kilgour; Keith W. Hipel

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Three-cell traveling wave superconducting test structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell rather than a standing wave structure may provide a significant increase of the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing wave cavities. The STWA allows also longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed, manufactured and successfully tested demonstrating the possibility of a proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. These results open way to take the next step of the TW SC cavity development: to build and test a travelingwave three-cell cavity with a feedback waveguide. The latest results of the single-cell cavity tests are discussed as well as the design of the test 3-cell TW cavity.

Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; /Euclid Techlabs, Solon; Kazakov, Sergey; Solyak, Nikolay; Wu, Genfa; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

PARTICLE ENERGY SPECTRA AT TRAVELING INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have searched for evidence of significant shock acceleration of He ions of {approx}1-10 MeV amu{sup -1} in situ at 258 interplanetary traveling shock waves observed by the Wind spacecraft. We find that the probability of observing significant acceleration, and the particle intensity observed, depends strongly upon the shock speed and less strongly upon the shock compression ratio. For most of the 39 fast shocks with significant acceleration, the observed spectral index agrees with either that calculated from the shock compression ratio or with the spectral index of the upstream background, when the latter spectrum is harder, as expected from diffusive shock theory. In many events the spectra are observed to roll downward at higher energies, as expected from Ellison-Ramaty and from Lee shock-acceleration theories. The dearth of acceleration at {approx}85% of the shocks is explained by (1) a low shock speed, (2) a low shock compression ratio, and (3) a low value of the shock-normal angle with the magnetic field, which may cause the energy spectra that roll downward at energies below our observational threshold. Quasi-parallel shock waves are rarely able to produce measurable acceleration at 1 AU. The dependence of intensity on shock speed, seen here at local shocks, mirrors the dependence found previously for the peak intensities in large solar energetic-particle events upon speeds of the associated coronal mass ejections which drive the shocks.

Reames, Donald V., E-mail: dvreames@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

On some essential peculiarities of the traveling wave reactor operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of conditions for existence of nuclear burning wave in neutron-multiplicating media (U-Pu and Th-U cycles) we show the possibility of surmounting so-called dpa-parameter problem, or in other words, an algorithm of optimal nuclear burning wave mode is proposed yielding parameters of the wave (fluence/neutron flux, width and speed of nuclear burning wave) satisfying the dpa-condition, characterizing the tolerable level of radioactive stability of reactor materials, in particular the cladding materials. It is shown for the first time that capture and fission cross-sections of 238U and 239Pu increase with temperature within 1000-3000K range, that under certain conditions may lead to global loss of stability of nuclear burning wave. Some variants of possible stability loss due to so-called blow-up modes, or in other words, anomalous nuclear fuel temperature and neutron flow evolution are discussed and are found to possibly become a reason for trivial violation of internal safety of traveling wave reac...

Rusov, V D; Sharf, I V; Vaschenko, V M; Linnik, E P; Zelentsova, T N; Beglaryan, M E; Chernegenko, S A; Kosenko, S I; Molchinikolov, P A; Smolyar, V P; Grechan, E V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

On some essential peculiarities of the traveling wave reactor operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of conditions for existence of nuclear burning wave in neutron-multiplicating media (U-Pu and Th-U cycles) we show the possibility of surmounting so-called dpa-parameter problem, or in other words, an algorithm of optimal nuclear burning wave mode is proposed yielding parameters of the wave (fluence/neutron flux, width and speed of nuclear burning wave) satisfying the dpa-condition, characterizing the tolerable level of radioactive stability of reactor materials, in particular the cladding materials. It is shown for the first time that capture and fission cross-sections of 238U and 239Pu increase with temperature within 1000-3000K range, that under certain conditions may lead to global loss of stability of nuclear burning wave. Some variants of possible stability loss due to so-called blow-up modes, or in other words, anomalous nuclear fuel temperature and neutron flow evolution are discussed and are found to possibly become a reason for trivial violation of internal safety of traveling wave reactor.

V. D. Rusov; V. A. Tarasov; I. V. Sharf; V. M. Vaschenko; E. P. Linnik; T. N. Zelentsova; M. E. Beglaryan; S. A. Chernegenko; S. I. Kosenko; P. A. Molchinikolov; V. P. Smolyar; E. V. Grechan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)¹ 64 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 31 Total number of trips 831 Total distance traveled (mi) 7,559 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 54 Number of trips 541 Percent of trips city | highway 79% | 21% Distance traveled (mi) 3,402 Percent of total distance traveled 45%

380

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)¹ 45 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 22 Total number of trips 1,585 Total distance traveled (mi) 14,910 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 34 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 49 Number of trips 883 Percent of trips city | highway 81% | 19% Distance traveled (mi) 4,778 Percent of total distance traveled 32%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Incident detection using the Standard Normal Deviate model and travel time information from probe vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One application of travel time information explored in this thesis is freeway incident detection. It is vital to develop reliable methods for automatically detecting incidents to facilitate the quick response and removal of incidents before they cause breakdowns in traffic flow. The use of real-time travel time data to monitor freeway conditions has the advantages over conventional loop detectors of taking into account the dynamic, longitudinal nature of traffic flow and requiring data from only a portion of the traffic stream. This study employed the Standard Normal Deviate (SND) Model to test the feasibility of using travel time data to detect lane blocking incidents. The fundamental concept of the SND Model was based on the comparison of real-time travel time data to historical travel time data for given freeway segments during specified times. The travel time and incident reports used were collected through the Real-Time Traffic Information System (RTTIS) in the north freeway corridor of Houston, Texas using probe vehicles equipped with cellular telephones. The data were compiled on 39 freeway links from October 1991 through August 1992 on weekdays during morning and afternoon data collection periods. The results of incident detection tests, applying the SND Model to incident and travel time me data from the North Freeway, indicated high successful incident detection rates. However, high false alarm rates also resulted from the SND Model test applications. An optimum SND value of 2.0 was observed for the North Freeway test data. At this value the SND tests produced successful incident detection rates of 70 percent and higher during both the morning and afternoon periods. False alarm rates were also 70 percent. The best results were achieved on those freeway sections where the most incident and travel time data had been collected. The overall results of the incident detection tests on the North Freeway demonstrated that the SND Model was a feasible incident detection algorithm, but required an extensive historical travel time data base.

Mountain, Christopher Eugene

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

TTB or not TTB, that is the question: a review and analysis of the empirical literature on travel time (and money) budgets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Allocation of Time and Money. Unpublished Ph.D.Expenditure of Time and Money on Travel. Transportationin Travel Time and Money Expenditures. Transportation

Mokhtarian, Patricia L; Chen, C

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total number of trips 46 17088 152906 Distance traveled (mi) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Number of trips 61 9239 47037 Percent of trips city highway Percent of total distance...

384

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total number of trips 50 8833 73569 Distance traveled (mi) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Number of trips 70 4028 16574 Percent of trips city highway Percent of total distance...

385

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total number of trips 52 6728 59423 Distance traveled (mi) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Number of trips 67 3472 16226 Percent of trips city highway Percent of total distance...

386

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total number of trips 47 5791 60007 Distance traveled (mi) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Number of trips 55 2858 14977 Percent of trips city highway Percent of total distance...

387

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Total number of trips 51 15726 143695 Distance traveled (mi) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Number of trips 66 8674 38188 Percent of trips city highway Percent of total distance...

388

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total number of trips 52 6894 62248 Distance traveled (mi) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) Number of trips 68 3685 15315 Percent of trips city highway Percent of total distance...

389

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through December 2012 Vehicle Usage Overall fuel economy (mpg) 126 Overall electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 229 Number of trips 369,118 Total distance traveled (mi)...

390

Secretary Chu will Travel to China to Highlight Clean Energy Partnerships |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu will Travel to China to Highlight Clean Energy Chu will Travel to China to Highlight Clean Energy Partnerships Secretary Chu will Travel to China to Highlight Clean Energy Partnerships April 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will travel to China from May 24th to 28th to highlight the benefit of U.S.-China partnerships and cooperation in the clean energy sector. He will visit with government officials, academia and members of the private sector in both Beijing and Shanghai to learn more about ways in which the two countries can work together on clean energy research and technology development. "As the world's two top energy consumers, energy producers and greenhouse gas emitters, the United States and China have already begun to look at innovative ways our two countries can benefit from working together and

391

Secretaries Chu and Locke to Travel to China Next Week | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Locke to Travel to China Next Week Locke to Travel to China Next Week Secretaries Chu and Locke to Travel to China Next Week July 6, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON -- Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Commerce Secretary Gary Locke will travel to China from July 14 to 17. The two secretaries will highlight the tremendous potential for mutually beneficial relationships in the clean energy sector. "Clean energy will drive the economy of the future, both in the United States and around the world," Chu said. "From renewable energy to more efficient buildings to carbon capture and storage, clean energy technologies can create millions of jobs. Working together, we can accomplish more than acting alone. It's in our interest and China's to explore ways to cooperate for our mutual benefit -- by promoting renewable

392

Assessing the Benefits and Costs of Intelligent Transportation Systems: The Value of Advanced Traveler Information Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Navigation, Full Cost of Transportation, Social CostsThe Social Costs of Intercity Passenger Transportation: ATransportation, Advanced Traveler Information Systems Introduction Recent literature has extensively discussed the social costs

Levinson, David; Gillen, David; Chang, Elva

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Statement on U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz's Travel to Istanbul,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz's Travel to on U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz's Travel to Istanbul, Turkey Statement on U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz's Travel to Istanbul, Turkey November 19, 2013 - 9:48am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 "U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz will travel to Istanbul, Turkey November 20 to 23 and give opening remarks at the 5th Atlantic Council Energy Summit. Secretary Moniz will also attend the Ministerial meeting on 'Energy Efficiency for Economic Growth' with industry leaders, experts, and other government representatives. "During his stay in Istanbul, Secretary Moniz will meet with senior Turkish officials on a broad range of issues including clean energy, energy efficiency, and energy security. "Secretary Moniz is committed to maintain and grow the strong trade and

394

Secretary Bodman to Travel to the Middle East to Advance International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Travel to the Middle East to Advance to Travel to the Middle East to Advance International Energy Cooperation Secretary Bodman to Travel to the Middle East to Advance International Energy Cooperation January 10, 2008 - 10:23am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman next week will embark on a five-nation tour through the Middle East to enhance the United States' relationship with oil-producing nations, promote sustained investment in conventional and alternative energy sources, and encourage improvements in global energy efficiency. Secretary Bodman will depart on Monday, January 14, 2008 and travel to Jordan, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Egypt. "To increase global energy security, producing and consuming nations alike must make robust investments in a diversity of energy sources, accelerate

395

Secretary Bodman To Travel to Vienna, Austria for Second GNEP Ministerial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Bodman To Travel to Vienna, Austria for Second GNEP Secretary Bodman To Travel to Vienna, Austria for Second GNEP Ministerial and IAEA General Conference Secretary Bodman To Travel to Vienna, Austria for Second GNEP Ministerial and IAEA General Conference A letter issued by the Department of Energy's Office of Public Affairs detailling the mission behind the U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman's trip to Vienna, Austria, to chair the second Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Ministerial on Sunday, September 16, 2007, with partner countries: China, France, Japan, and Russia. Secretary Bodman To Travel to Vienna, Austria for Second GNEP Ministerial and IAEA General Conference More Documents & Publications GNEP-IAEA_Conference_Announcement.pdf Senior Delegation Officials From All GNEP Participants

396

Secretary Chu to Travel to India and China to Promote Clean Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu to Travel to India and China to Promote Clean Energy Secretary Chu to Travel to India and China to Promote Clean Energy Partnerships Secretary Chu to Travel to India and China to Promote Clean Energy Partnerships November 10, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy announced today that Energy Secretary Steven Chu will travel to India and China from Thursday, November 12 to Wednesday, November 18 as part of the Department's efforts to advance opportunities for international clean energy cooperation. During the China portion of the visit, Secretary Chu will join with President Barack Obama as part of the official White House delegation. "China and India will play central roles in the world's energy future." Secretary Chu said. "By working together we can promote clean energy

397

Secretary Chu to Travel to Russia Next Week | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Travel to Russia Next Week to Travel to Russia Next Week Secretary Chu to Travel to Russia Next Week June 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will travel to Russia from June 6-11 where he will highlight the tremendous potential for mutually beneficial cooperation and shared economic opportunities with Russia in the areas of innovative clean energy technology, safe and reliable civilian nuclear power, best practices in energy efficiency, and nuclear non-proliferation. The visit will promote continued collaboration between U.S. and Russian scientists, technical experts, and energy sector businesses. It will also pave the way for U.S. investment and clean technology exports to Russia. "From clean energy to nuclear security, the United States and Russia have a

398

Energy Secretary Bodman Travels to Moscow, Baku, Kiev to Discuss Energy and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Travels to Moscow, Baku, Kiev to Discuss Travels to Moscow, Baku, Kiev to Discuss Energy and Nuclear Security Energy Secretary Bodman Travels to Moscow, Baku, Kiev to Discuss Energy and Nuclear Security May 20, 2005 - 12:49pm Addthis Trip Will Focus on World Energy Security, Energy Resource Development, and Nuclear Nonproliferation WASHINGTON, DC -- Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman next week will travel to Moscow, Russia; Baku, Azerbaijan; and Kiev, Ukraine, where he will hold discussions with senior officials on a variety of energy and nuclear safety issues, including encouraging the development of diverse energy resources, promoting market transparency and investment, and advancing nuclear nonproliferation. "A healthy, vibrant and transparent global energy market is critical to the economic success of America and all nations," Secretary Bodman said.

399

Secretary Chu To Travel to Scotland and Ireland | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

To Travel to Scotland and Ireland To Travel to Scotland and Ireland Secretary Chu To Travel to Scotland and Ireland November 1, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - This week, Secretary Chu will travel to Scotland and Ireland where he will meet with government and academic leaders, as well as American and Irish business leaders who are engaged in clean energy industries. Both Scotland and Ireland share similar energy challenges and resources with the United States, including significant offshore wind energy potential. These countries have set rigorous renewable energy goals, including wind and water power, towards meeting the European Union's target of 20 percent energy from renewable sources by 2020. Glasgow, Scotland On Tuesday, November 2, Secretary Chu will deliver a keynote address at the

400

Secretary Chu and Energy Department Officials to Travel Across America to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu and Energy Department Officials to Travel Across Secretary Chu and Energy Department Officials to Travel Across America to Discuss the Obama Administration's Commitment to Energy Innovation and Manufacturing Secretary Chu and Energy Department Officials to Travel Across America to Discuss the Obama Administration's Commitment to Energy Innovation and Manufacturing January 24, 2012 - 3:47pm Addthis Washington D.C. - This week, Energy Secretary Steven Chu, Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman and other senior Energy Department officials will participate in events across the country to highlight President Obama's State of the Union address and discuss the Obama Administration's commitment to energy innovation and advanced manufacturing. On Thursday, January 26, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to Albuquerque, N.M., to tour renewable energy research facilities at Sandia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

On complexity of the optimal recombination for the travelling salesman problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computational complexity of the optimal recombination for the Travelling Salesman Problem is considered both in the symmetric and in the general cases. Strong NP-hardness of these optimal recombination problems is proven and solving approaches are ...

Anton V. Eremeev

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Dynamics of Household Travel Time Expenditures and Car Ownership Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or more of the others (say, car usage as a function of carnumberof workers, explains car usage, but not car ownership;locations imply higher car usage in terms of travel times

Golob, Thomas F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Electronically controllable transmission line design for traveling wave array antenna feed network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, an electronically controllable transmission line (ECTL) is presented. By modulating the conductivity of a doped Si modulator in the ECTL, the wave propagation constant in the ECTL is controlled. Measured results show a phase change in the ECTL at a single frequency when non-zero bias voltage is applied. This ECTL is implemented in order to feed a traveling wave array antenna, which is composed of 8 aperture-coupled microstrip antenna elements. It is demonstrated that phase change in an ECTL feed line has applications as a traveling wave array antenna with beam steering. S-parameter measurements are presented which demonstrate phase change in an ECTL and main beam steering of an 8-element traveling wave array antenna. The design procedure for an aperture-coupled microstrip antenna with a specific input impedance at the resonant frequency and a matching circuit design for a traveling wave array antenna are discussed in detail.

Shin, Chang-Seok

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A needs-based approach to activity generation for travel demand analysis/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a needs-based framework for behavioral enhancement of conventional activity-based travel demand models. Operational activity-based models specify activity generation models based on empirical considerations ...

Pattabhiraman, Varun R. (Varun Ramakrishna)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Grouping Travelers on the Basis of their Different Car and Transit Levels of Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elgar, A. , Bekhor, S. : Car-rider segmentation according tostatus and investment in car mobility. Transp. Res. Rec.people talk about bus and car travel. Transp. Res. A Jensen,

Diana, Marco; Mokhtarian, Patricia L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Grouping travelers on the basis of their different car and transit levels of use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elgar, A. , Bekhor, S. : Car-rider segmentation according tostatus and investment in car mobility. Transp. Res. Rec.people talk about bus and car travel. Transp. Res. A Jensen,

Diana, Marco; Mokhtarian, Patricia L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Figure 72. Vehicle miles traveled per licensed driver, 1970-2040 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 72. Vehicle miles traveled per licensed driver, 1970-2040 (thousand miles) History Reference case 1970.00 $8.69 1971.00 $9.01

408

Rebound 2007: Analysis of U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Travel Statistics  

SciTech Connect

U.S. national time series data on vehicle travel by passenger cars and light trucks covering the period 1966 2007 are used to test for the existence, size and stability of the rebound effect for motor vehicle fuel efficiency on vehicle travel. The data show a statistically significant effect of gasoline price on vehicle travel but do not support the existence of a direct impact of fuel efficiency on vehicle travel. Additional tests indicate that fuel price effects have not been constant over time, although the hypothesis of symmetry with respect to price increases and decreases is not rejected. Small and Van Dender (2007) model of a declining rebound effect with income is tested and similar results are obtained.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Report on Inspection of the Secretary of Energy's Foreign Travel, DOE/IG-0397  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Inspectorl General (IG) conduct a thorough examination of all Secretarial foreign travel from 1993 to December 1995 to include the purpose of each trip, the activities of each Federal participant...

410

Implementation of advanced transit traveler information systems in the United States and Canada : practice and prospects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past few years, public transit agencies across the United States and Canada have increasingly implemented methods for passengers to access traveler information using new media and personal mobile communications ...

Rizos, Anthony Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Secretary Chu To Travel to China and Japan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

To Travel to China and Japan To Travel to China and Japan Secretary Chu To Travel to China and Japan November 5, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. -U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will travel to China and Japan November 14 - 19 to meet with government officials, business leaders and others to discuss the Department's ongoing clean energy and scientific collaboration with both countries. More information about the trip is as follows: Shanghai, China On Sunday, November 14, Secretary Chu will tour clean energy businesses, including Huaneng Power's carbon capture and storage project. That evening, he will participate in a Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) Steering Committee meeting with senior government officials. On Monday, November 15, Secretary Chu will tour Tongji University and

412

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFORMATION FOR DVM AND GRADUATE STUDENTS TRAVELING ABROAD ON UNIVERSITY-RELATED ACTIVITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFORMATION FOR DVM AND GRADUATE STUDENTS TRAVELING ABROAD ON UNIVERSITY: ________________________________________________________________________ Emergency Contact Name: ___________________________________ Relationship: ________________________________________________________________________ I authorize the SVM to contact this person in the event of an emergency. Site Contact Organization

Sheridan, Jennifer

413

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 170 Average Trip Distance 12.4 Total distance traveled (mi) 2,041,556 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 64.4 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 345 Distance traveled (mi) 1,002,495 Percent of total distance traveled 49.1% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 80% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35.9 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 1,039,061 Percent of total distance traveled 50.9% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 78% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 66.2% 31.0% Percent Number of trips 86.0% 14.0% Average trip distance (mi)

414

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.1 1.1 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 182 Average Trip Distance 11.8 Total distance traveled (mi) 355,058 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 46.0 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 416 Distance traveled (mi) 155,080 Percent of total distance traveled 43.7% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 69% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 34.4 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 199,978 Percent of total distance traveled 56.3% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 74% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 60.5% 27.0% Percent Number of trips 86.3% 13.7% Average trip distance (mi)

415

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6.6 6.6 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 171 Average Trip Distance 11.9 Total distance traveled (mi) 370,316 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 53.8 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 371 Distance traveled (mi) 170,860 Percent of total distance traveled 46.1% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 75% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35.9 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 199,456 Percent of total distance traveled 53.9% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 77% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 63.2% 28.1% Percent Number of trips 86.7% 13.3% Average trip distance (mi)

416

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 157 Average Trip Distance 12.3 Total distance traveled (mi) 407,245 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 67.9 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 338 Distance traveled (mi) 189,426 Percent of total distance traveled 46.5% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 82% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36.5 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 217,819 Percent of total distance traveled 53.5% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 79% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 65.2% 28.3% Percent Number of trips 86.5% 13.5% Average trip distance (mi)

417

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 175 Average Trip Distance 12.2 Total distance traveled (mi) 272,366 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 54.1 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 368 Distance traveled (mi) 129,389 Percent of total distance traveled 47.5% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 75% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36.0 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 142,977 Percent of total distance traveled 52.4% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 77% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 65.1% 31.1% Percent Number of trips 85.5% 14.5% Average trip distance (mi)

418

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4.8 4.8 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 185 Average Trip Distance 13.1 Total distance traveled (mi) 208,165 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 77.6 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 369 Distance traveled (mi) 104,687 Percent of total distance traveled 50.3% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 87% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 37.2 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 103,478 Percent of total distance traveled 49.7% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 82% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 69.8% 33.9% Percent Number of trips 85.0% 15.0% Average trip distance (mi)

419

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.5 2.5 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 166 Average Trip Distance 12.1 Total distance traveled (mi) 385,849 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 78.2 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 332 Distance traveled (mi) 193,336 Percent of total distance traveled 50.1% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 85% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36.2 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 192,512 Percent of total distance traveled 49.9% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 79% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 67.2% 31.5% Percent Number of trips 86.7% 13.3% Average trip distance (mi)

420

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7.8 7.8 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 180 Average Trip Distance 12.8 Total distance traveled (mi) 346,409 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 51.5 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 384 Distance traveled (mi) 161,982 Percent of total distance traveled 46.8% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 74% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36.1 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 184,427 Percent of total distance traveled 53.2% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 76% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 63.8% 28.4% Percent Number of trips 85.7% 14.3% Average trip distance (mi)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 174 Average Trip Distance 12.6 Total distance traveled (mi) 1,243,988 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 63.2 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 352 Distance traveled (mi) 615,161 Percent of total distance traveled 49.5% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 80% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35.4 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 628,828 Percent of total distance traveled 50.5% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 78% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 66.8% 31.7% Percent Number of trips 85.5% 14.5% Average trip distance (mi)

422

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

71.0 71.0 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 169 Average Trip Distance 12.5 Total distance traveled (mi) 1,661,080 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 67.1 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 340 Distance traveled (mi) 826,775 Percent of total distance traveled 49.8% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 81% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35.7 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 834,306 Percent of total distance traveled 50.2% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 78% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 66.9% 31.6% Percent Number of trips 85.8% 14.2% Average trip distance (mi)

423

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

73.7 73.7 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 170 Average Trip Distance 12.6 Total distance traveled (mi) 370,987 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 71.0 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 341 Distance traveled (mi) 185,282 Percent of total distance traveled 49.9% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 83% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36.9 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 185,705 Percent of total distance traveled 50.1% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 79% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 68.0% 32.4% Percent Number of trips 85.4% 14.6% Average trip distance (mi)

424

Compact Totally Disconnected Moufang Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\Delta$ be a spherical building each of whose irreducible components is infinite, has rank at least 2 and satisfies the Moufang condition. We show that $\\Delta$ can be given the structure of a topological building that is compact and totally disconnected precisely when $\\Delta$ is the building at infinity of a locally finite affine building.

Grundhofer, T; Van Maldeghem, H; Weiss, R M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. Total 135,676 127,682 120,936 133,646 119,888 93,672 1936-2012 PAD District 1 78,197 73,348 69,886 88,999 79,188 59,594 1981-2012...

426

Distance visualization of ultrascale data with explorable images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This talk presents a new approach to distance visualization of very large data sets output from scientific supercomputing. The processing power of massively parallel supercomputers increases at a rather fast rate, about an order of magnitude faster every ...

Kwan-Liu Ma; Anna Tikhonova; Carlos D. Correa

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

53 53 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 34 Total number of trips 1,515 Total distance traveled (mi) 15,617 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 37 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 65 Number of trips 739 Percent of trips city | highway 74% | 26% Distance traveled (mi) 4,915 Percent of total distance traveled 31% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 38 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 58 Number of trips 93 Percent of trips city | highway 38% | 62% Distance traveled (mi) 2,842 Percent of total distance traveled 18% Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 33 Number of trips 683 Percent of trips city | highway 72% | 28% Distance traveled (mi)

428

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45 45 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 29 Total number of trips 1,839 Total distance traveled (mi) 21,089 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 39 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 61 Number of trips 654 Percent of trips city | highway 66% | 34% Distance traveled (mi) 5,717 Percent of total distance traveled 27% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 38 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 57 Number of trips 117 Percent of trips city | highway 39% | 62% Distance traveled (mi) 3,683 Percent of total distance traveled 17% Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 33 Number of trips 1,068 Percent of trips city | highway 71% | 30% Distance traveled (mi)

429

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36 36 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 18 Total number of trips 1,290 Total distance traveled (mi) 13,023 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 39 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 58 Number of trips 432 Percent of trips city | highway 75% | 25% Distance traveled (mi) 2,835 Percent of total distance traveled 22% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 41 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 48 Number of trips 52 Percent of trips city | highway 31% | 69% Distance traveled (mi) 1,613 Percent of total distance traveled 12% Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 34 Number of trips 806 Percent of trips city | highway 73% | 27% Distance traveled (mi)

430

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

49 49 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 27 Total number of trips 927 Total distance traveled (mi) 9,301 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 39 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 66 Number of trips 313 Percent of trips city | highway 68% | 32% Distance traveled (mi) 2,138 Percent of total distance traveled 23% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 41 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 63 Number of trips 46 Percent of trips city | highway 30% | 70% Distance traveled (mi) 1,462 Percent of total distance traveled 16% Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 34 Number of trips 568 Percent of trips city | highway 75% | 25% Distance traveled (mi)

431

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50 50 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 22 Total number of trips 730 Total distance traveled (mi) 9,164 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 40 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 61 Number of trips 225 Percent of trips city | highway 68% | 32% Distance traveled (mi) 1,768 Percent of total distance traveled 19% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 53 Number of trips 40 Percent of trips city | highway 23% | 78% Distance traveled (mi) 1,638 Percent of total distance traveled 18% Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35 Number of trips 465 Percent of trips city | highway 70% | 30% Distance traveled (mi)

432

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

433

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

434

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

435

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

436

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

437

Redshift-Independent Distances to Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a procedure for accurately determining luminosity distances to Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) without knowledge of redshift. This procedure, which may be used as an extension of any of the various distance determination methods currently in use, is based on marginalizing over redshift, removing the requirement of knowing $z$ a priori. We demonstrate that the Hubble diagram scatter of distances measured with this technique is approximately equal to that of distances derived from conventional redshift-specific methods for a set of 60 nearby SNe Ia. This indicates that accurate distances for cosmological SNe Ia may be determined without the requirement of spectroscopic redshifts, which are typically the limiting factor for the number of SNe that modern surveys can collect. Removing this limitation would greatly increase the number of SNe for which current and future SN surveys will be able to accurately measure distance. The method may also be able to be used for high-$z$ SNe Ia to determine cosmological density parameters without redshift information.

Brian J. Barris; John L. Tonry

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

438

SBF Distances to Leo and Virgo using the HST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used archive HST WFPC2 data for three elliptical galaxies (NGC 3379 in the Leo I group, and NGC 4472 and NGC 4406 in the Virgo cluster) to determine their distances using the Surface Brightness Fluctuation (SBF) method as described by Tonry and Schneider (1988). A comparison of the HST results with the SBF distance moduli of Ciardullo et al (1993) shows significant disagreement and suggests that the r.m.s. error on these ground-based distance moduli is actually as large as +-0.25 mag. The agreement is only slightly improved when we compare our results with the HST and ground-based SBF distances from Ajhar et al (1997) and Tonry et al (1997); the comparison suggests that a lower limit on the error of the HST SBF distance moduli is +-0.17 mag. Overall, these results suggest that previously quoted measurement errors may underestimate the true error in SBF distance moduli by at least a factor of 2-3.

P. W. Morris; T. Shanks

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

439

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

440

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

442

Combination of evidence in recommendation systems characterized by distance functions  

SciTech Connect

Recommendation systems for different Document Networks (DN) such as the World Wide Web (WWW), Digitnl Libarries, or Scientific Databases, often make use of distance functions extracted from relationships among documents and between documents and semantic tags. For instance, documents In the WWW are related via a hyperlink network, while documents in bibliographic databases are related by citation and collaboration networks.Furthermore, documents can be related to semantic tags such as keywords used to describe their content, The distance functions computed from these relations establish associative networks among items of the DN, and allow recommendation systems to identify relevant associations for iudividoal users. The process of recommendation can be improved by integrating associative data from different sources. Thus we are presented with a problem of combining evidence (about assochaons between items) from different sonrces characterized by distance functions. In this paper we summarize our work on (1) inferring associations from semi-metric distance functions and (2) combining evidence from different (distance) associative DN.

Rocha, L. M. (Luis Mateus)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Jump to: navigation, search Logo: FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Name FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Address 2890 Cherokee Lane Place Riverwoods, Illinois Zip 60015 Sector Vehicles Product Distance Measuring Instrument Year founded 2008 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number (888) 876-6050 Website http://www.fast-measure.com Coordinates 42.181686°, -87.898862° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.181686,"lon":-87.898862,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

444

Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1991-1992 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regression techniques were used to determine the effects of several biotic and abiotic variables on the migration rates of juvenile spring chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia and Snake rivers. Comparisons of the effects of river flow and smoltification, assessed using gill Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase activity, were of primary interest. Day of the year, water temperature, change in flow, condition factor, and fork length were also considered as independent variables. Groups of fish were sampled to assess smoltification 2-3 times per week during the spring outmigrations during 1989-1992. These groups were assumed to be representative of other fish which were PIT-tagged and released as a part of the Smolt Monitoring Program in the Columbia Basin. River flow, gill ATPase activity, condition factor, water temperature, and change in flow were significant variables in regressions predicting the time for juvenile spring chinook salmon to travel between specific points (travel time), whereas river flow was the only significant contributor to models describing travel times of steelhead. Predicted travel times of wild steelhead were shorter than those of hatchery steelhead. River flow was the only variable common to all regression equations. Based on the characteristic, changes in river flow would be the most logical means to decrease travel times of both juvenile spring chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia and Snake rivers.

Maule, Alec G.; Beeman, John W.; Schrock, Robin M. (Seattle National Fishery Research Center, Columbia River Field Station, Cook, WA)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

446

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

CAKE Goes 'The Distance' with Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAKE Goes 'The Distance' with Solar CAKE Goes 'The Distance' with Solar CAKE Goes 'The Distance' with Solar February 2, 2011 - 10:00am Addthis April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs CAKE. Whether it takes the form of cupcakes, birthday cake, the ever-popular cheesecake or even gluten-free - it unfailingly brightens up almost anyone's day. CAKE the band, however, has taken the sweetness to another level with their newest album Showroom of Compassion, which was produced using 100 percent solar energy. The group formed in 1991 and took the Northern California music scene by storm in the mid-nineties. Since then, they've become internationally renowned headliners. Earlier this month, CAKE released their sixth album, recorded in a studio in Sacramento powered entirely by solar power.

448

DIRECT Distances to Nearby Galaxies Using Detached Eclipsing Binaries and Cepheids. VI. Variables in the Central Part of M33  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The DIRECT project aims to determine direct distances to two important galaxies in the cosmological distance ladder - M31 and M33 - using detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) and Cepheids. We present the results of the first large-scale CCD-based search for variables in M33. We have observed two fields located in the central region of M33 for a total of 95 nights on the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.2-m telescope and 36 nights on the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 1.3-m telescope. We have found a total of 544 variables, including 251 Cepheids and 47 eclipsing binaries. The catalog of variables is available online, along with finding charts and BVI light curve data (consisting of 8.2x10^4 individual measurements). The complete set of CCD frames is available upon request.

Macri, L M; Sasselov, D D; Krockenberger, M; Kaluzny, J

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Using GPS Travel Data to Assess the Real World Driving Energy Use of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highlights opportunities using GPS travel survey techniques and systems simulation tools for plug-in hybrid vehicle design improvements, which maximize the benefits of energy efficiency technologies.

Gonder, J.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.; Thornton, M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Levenshtein Distance Technique in Dictionary Lookup Methods: An Improved Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dictionary lookup methods are popular in dealing with ambiguous letters which were not recognized by Optical Character Readers. However, a robust dictionary lookup method can be complex as apriori probability calculation or a large dictionary size increases the overhead and the cost of searching. In this context, Levenshtein distance is a simple metric which can be an effective string approximation tool. After observing the effectiveness of this method, an improvement has been made to this method by grouping some similar looking alphabets and reducing the weighted difference among members of the same group. The results showed marked improvement over the traditional Levenshtein distance technique.

Haldar, Rishin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A Set of Comparable Carbon Footprints for Auto, Truck and Transit Travel in Metropolitan America  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Set of Comparable Carbon Footprints for Highway Travel in Set of Comparable Carbon Footprints for Highway Travel in Metropolitan America by Frank Southworth* and Anthon Sonnenberg** August 31, 2009 *Corresponding author: Senior R&D Staff, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Principal Research Scientist Georgia Institute of Technology 790 Atlantic Drive SEB Building, Room 324 Atlanta, GA 30332-0355 E-mail: frank.southworth@ce.gatech.edu ** PhD Student, Georgia Institute of Technology School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology 1 Abstract The authors describe the development of a set of carbon dioxide emissions estimates for highway travel by automobile, truck, bus and other public transit vehicle movements within the nation's 100 largest metropolitan areas, in calendar year 2005. Considerable variability is found to exist

452

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips November 26, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Jason Lutterman Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Drive smart this holiday season and stay informed with tools such as the speed penalty calculator on fueleconomy.gov. Yesterday you learned from Becky about three tools to help you save on fuel

453

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips November 26, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Jason Lutterman Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Drive smart this holiday season and stay informed with tools such as the speed penalty calculator on fueleconomy.gov. Yesterday you learned from Becky about three tools to help you save on fuel

454

Evidence against correlations between nuclear decay rates and Earth-Sun distance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distance of the source to the Sun. This work was supportedNuclear Decay Rates and Earth-Sun Distance Eric B. Normanand 241 Am and the Earth-Sun distance. We find no evidence

Norman, Eric B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Map Data: Total Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total Production Map Data: Total Production totalprod2009final.csv More Documents & Publications Map Data: Renewable Production Map Data: State Consumption...

456

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

457

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

458

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

459

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

460

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

462

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

463

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

464

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

465

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

466

Auctions by price and distance via cellular phones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider e-commerce auctions via cellular phones in which the winner is selected based on two factors: the requested price and the promise to provide a service on time. The auctioneer can verify that the bidder intends to provide the service by tracking ... Keywords: Auctions, Cellular, Distance, Electronic commerce, Multi-attribute, Simulation, Strategies

Yosi Ben Asher; Mohsen Abu Saleh

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

A proposal for detecting hidden explosives to high distance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper author describes a proposal for an apparatus utilising o nuclear physics techniques to identify hidden explosives to a distance of several tenth of meters. The apparatus uses a modified PFNA (Pulsed Fast neutron Analysis) with the gamma ... Keywords: application of nuclear physics, electronic instrumentation, explosives detection, security apparatus

Carlo Artemi

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Weighted Distance Transforms for Images Using Elongated Voxel Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate weighted distance transforms in 3D images using elongated voxel grids. We use a local neighbourhood of size 3 3 3 and assume a voxel grid with equal resolution along two axes and lower along the third. The weights (local ...

Ida-Maria Sintorn; Gunilla Borgefors

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Computing the Edit-Distance between Unrooted Ordered Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ordered tree is a tree in which each node's incident edges are cyclically ordered; think of the tree as being embedded in the plane. Let A and B be two ordered trees. The edit distance between A and B is the minimum cost ...

Philip N. Klein

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

UHF measurement of breathing and heartbeat at a distance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection of breathing and heartbeat from a distance is important for medical triage and mass casualty events as well as routine monitoring of higher-risk patients. Typical approaches include wiring up patients to devices and wearable devices, but ... Keywords: UHF, breathing, heartbeat, radar

Jerry Silvious; David Tahmoush

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Move-to-Front, Distance Coding, and Inversion Frequencies revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Move-to-Front, Distance Coding and Inversion Frequencies are three simple and effective techniques used to process the output of the Burrows-Wheeler Transform. In this paper we provide the first complete comparative analyses of these techniques, establishing ... Keywords: Burrows-Wheeler Transform, Data Compression, Empirical entropy

Travis Gagie; Giovanni Manzini

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Free Energy Surfaces from Single-Distance Information Philipp Schuetz,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Surfaces from Single-Distance Information Philipp Schuetz, Rene´ Wuttke, Benjamin We propose a network-based method for determining basins and barriers of complex free energy surfaces for the iterative determination of individual basins by the minimum-cut-based free energy profile, a barrier

Caflisch, Amedeo

473

Distance between quantum states in the presence of initial qubit-environment correlations: A comparative study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time evolution of the trace distance between two states of an open quantum system may increase due to initial system-environment correlations, thus exhibiting a breakdown of distance contractivity of the reduced dynamics. We analyze how the time evolution of the distance depends on the chosen distance measure. Here we elucidate the behavior of the trace distance, the Hilbert-Schmidt distance, the Bures distance, the Hellinger distance, and the quantum Jensen-Shannon divergence for two system-environment setups, namely a qubit bilinearly coupled to an infinite and a finite-size environment with the latter composed of harmonic oscillators.

Dajka, Jerzy; Luczka, Jerzy; Haenggi, Peter [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

475

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with battery state of charge below 90% (for charging events with SOC reported) Vehicle Usage Number of trips 3,364 Total distance traveled (mi) 21,706 Avg trip distance (mi) 5.8...

476

Travel and Electricity Demand Analysis of Potential U.S. High-Speed Rail and Maglev Corridors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highway and air travel continue to increase steadily every year, with the number of air flights growing almost three times faster than automobile trips. High-speed rail trains and magnetically levitated vehicles can potentially provide viable intercity travel alternatives to airplanes and automobiles. This report assesses the possible ridership and the potential electrical loads created by these high-speed ground transportation systems.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Leaning-based travel interfaces revisited: frontal versus sidewise stances for flying in 3D virtual spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we revisit the design of leaning-based travel interfaces and propose a design space to categorize existing implementations. Within the design space, frontal and sidewise stances when using a flying surfboard interface were compared through ... Keywords: 3d virtual spaces., leaning-based travel interface, navigation, stance

Jia Wang; Rob Lindeman

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Total lightning observations of severe convection over North Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five severe convective cells over North Texas from three separate dates were examined to determine what three dimensional, or total lightning data can add to the understanding of a convective cells intensity, propagation, and severe weather potential. Total lightning data were obtained from Vaisala Inc.s Dallas/Fort Worth (D/FW) Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network. Radar data from two Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) sites were used for position data and information regarding the intensity and kinematic properties of each cell. Total lightning products used by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Fort Worth, Texas were compared to total lightning flash rate; a quantity that has been shown to be correlated to changes in cell intensity inferred from other sources, such as radar and satellite data. These products, specifically flash extent density (FED) were also compared to CG flash rate and radar derived measures from the WSR-88D sites. The results of this work show that FED and total flash rate are well correlated, with an average Pearson correlation value of 0.73, indicating that previous total flash rate results may also apply to FED. Lightning hooks, holes, and notches in FED displays indicated likely updraft regions, while appendages were observed to develop prior to deviant motion with two supercells. These results, combined with a greater update frequency provided a useful complement to radar data in the warning decision process. FED jumps were observed prior to several severe weather reports, indicating that total lightning activity may be related to updraft strength as found in past studies. However, FED jumps were sometimes observed without any associated severe event. More work is clearly needed to define what FED changes are of most importance in the short-term prediction of storm severity. The usefulness of the total lightning data on these dates was dependant upon LDAR network status and distance of the cell from the network center. The results of this study suggest that combining total flash rate trends with visual displays of FED provides the greatest added benefit to forecasters in maintaining situational awareness during warning operations.

McKinney, Christopher Michael

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

You Can Lead Travelers to the Bus Stop, But You Can't Make Them Ride  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

socioeconomic characteristics, such as gender, income, education, etc. Travel mode choices for work and non possession, and demographic characteristics denoting gender, marital status and parenthood. The proportion, 201-222. Davis, S. C., Diegel, S. W., and Boundy, R. G. (2011), "Transportation energy data book: 30th

Kammen, Daniel M.

480

Tangible interaction based on personal objects for collecting and sharing travel experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a case study which addresses the design of a system which supports the recollection of memories and the creation of storytelling by combining physical objects with digital resources. The purpose of our research is twofold. The first ... Keywords: RFID technology, case study, human-computer interaction, personal object, souvenir, tangible user interface, travel activity

Elena Mugellini; Elisa Rubegni; Omar Abou Khaled

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total distance traveled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Using Travel Time Reliability Measures to Improve Regional Transportation Planning and URS Corporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, connectivity, and safety to evaluate the transportation system's health and determine where future investmentsUsing Travel Time Reliability Measures to Improve Regional Transportation Planning and Operations of the Transportation Research Board January 13­17, 2008 Revised November 3, 2007 TRB 2008 Annual Meeting CD-ROM Paper

Bertini, Robert L.

482

Greening North Carolina Travel and Tourism Tips for Sustainable Practices in Tourism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the NC Division of Tourism, Film and Sports Development & Department of the Environment and Natural Out Of the Gas Sting Green Destinations Greening at a Destination Level It's Electric How does your travel market Green Lodging Examining Increased Guest Satisfaction at Green Hotels Linen Reuse might

483

Energy Flux from Traveling Hurricanes to the Oceanic Internal Wave Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of long interval waves by traveling hurricanes on an f plane is studied within the context of linear theory. The emphasis of the present work is on the interval wave power, that is, the fraction of the energy input from the ...

Johan Nilsson

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

SPECIAL REPORT 298: EFFECTS OF LAND DEVELOPMENT PATTERNS ON MOTORIZED TRAVEL, ENERGY, AND CO2 EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPECIAL REPORT 298: EFFECTS OF LAND DEVELOPMENT PATTERNS ON MOTORIZED TRAVEL, ENERGY, AND CO2 by significant fuel economy legislation, energy taxes, household-level carbon budgets, and cooperative behavior alternative to gasoline and diesel, achieving significant GHG and petroleum savings. However, biofuels

Kockelman, Kara M.

485

Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1993-1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The assessment of smolt condition for travel time analysis (ASCTTA) project provided information on the level of smoltification in Columbia River hatchery and wild salmonid stocks to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), for the primary purpose of in-river management of flows.

Schrock, Robin M; Beeman, John W; VanderKooi, Scott P [US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Beyond Travel & Tourism competitiveness ranking using DEA, GST, ANN and Borda count  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Travel & Tourism competitiveness rankings are helpful when we wish to consider the issue of how to enrich the global competitiveness of tourism destinations. However, even if a ranking is obtained from a highly reputed institute, it is important to evaluate ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Borda count, Data envelopment analysis, Grey system theory, Ranking trustworthiness

Wei-Wen Wu

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Using Social Networks for Exchanging Valuable Real Time Public Transport Information among Travellers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Public transport users are increasingly connected in real time through mobile devices to social networks, such as Twitter and Facebook. This allows them both to access and to provide valuable operational and emotional information from and to fellow travellers. ... Keywords: mobile, transport, social network, service science, innovation, business model, serious game

Antonio A. Nunes; Teresa Galvao; Joao Falcao e Cunha; Jeremy V. Pitt

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Luminosity distance and redshift in the Szekeres inhomogeneous cosmological models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Szekeres inhomogeneous models can be used to model the true lumpy universe that we observe. This family of exact solutions to Einstein's equations was originally derived with a general metric that has no symmetries. In this work, we develop and use a framework to integrate the angular diameter and luminosity distances in the general Szekeres models. We use the affine null geodesic equations in order to derive a set of first-order ordinary differential equations that can be integrated numerically to calculate the partial derivatives of the null vector components. These equations allow the integration in all generality of the distances in the Szekeres models and some examples are given. The redshift is determined from simultaneous integration of the null geodesic equations. This work does not assume spherical or axial symmetry, and the results will be useful for comparisons of the general Szekeres inhomogeneous models to current and future cosmological data.

Anthony Nwankwo; Mustapha Ishak; John Thompson

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

489

Weighted distance transforms generalized to modules and their computation on point lattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the generalization of weighted distances to modules and their computation through the chamfer algorithm on general point lattices. The first part is dedicated to formalization of definitions and properties (distance, metric, norm) ... Keywords: Chamfer algorithm, Distance transform, Non-standard grids, Weighted distance

Cline Fouard; Robin Strand; Gunilla Borgefors

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Understanding the differences in the development and use of advanced traveler information systems for vehicles (ATIS/V) in the U.S., Germany, and Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traffic congestion is becoming a serious problem. As a solution, advanced traveler information systems (ATIS) mitigate traffic congestion by providing real-time traffic information to travelers. ATIS includes various ...

Sugawara, Yoshihiko

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Extending the redshift-distance relation in Cosmological General Relativity to higher redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The redshift-distance modulus relation, the Hubble Diagram, derived from Cosmological General Relativity has been extended to arbitrarily large redshifts. Numerical methods were employed and a density function was found that results in a valid solution of the field equations at all redshifts. The extension has been compared to 302 type Ia supernova data as well as to 69 Gamma-ray burst data. The latter however do not not truly represent a `standard candle' as the derived distance modulii are not independent of the cosmology used. Nevertheless the analysis shows a good fit can be achieved without the need to assume the existence of dark matter. The Carmelian theory is also shown to describe a universe that is always spatially flat. This results from the underlying assumption of the energy density of a cosmological constant $\\Omega_{\\Lambda} = 1$, the result of vacuum energy. The curvature of the universe is described by a \\textit{spacevelocity} metric where the energy content of the curvature at any epoch is $\\Omega_K = \\Omega_{\\Lambda} - \\Omega = 1-\\Omega$, where $\\Omega$ is the matter density of the universe. Hence the total density is always $\\Omega_K + \\Omega = 1$

John G. Hartnett

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

492

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand total social cost of highway transportation Subtotal:of alternative transportation investments. A social-costtransportation option that has These costs will be inefficiently incurred if people do not fully lower total social costs.

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 2,550,203 FY2009 39,646,446 FY2010 64,874,187 FY2011 66,253,207 FY2012...

495

Fractionally total colouring Gn,p  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the fractional total chromatic number of G"n","p as p varies from 0 to 1. We also present an algorithm that computes the fractional total chromatic number of a random graph in polynomial expected time. Keywords: Fractional total colouring, Graph colouring, Random graphs

Conor Meagher; Bruce Reed

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

497

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

498

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

499

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

500

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28