National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for total delivered cost

  1. Table 1. Real Average Transportation and Delivered Costs of Coal...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Real Average Transportation and Delivered Costs of Coal, By Year and Primary Transport Mode" "Year","Average Transportation Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton)","Average Delivered Cost...

  2. Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 12.0 12.1

  3. Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9

  4. Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 29.4 29.6

  5. Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 29.3

  6. Barge Truck Total

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

  7. Delivering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Delivering Excellence in Science for Our Nation Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos National Security, LLC 2009 LANS Board of Governors Report Los Alamos National Security is dedicated to Laboratory's value as an engine of national security science and technology, one that benefits the nation and the world. Bearing oversight responsibility for such an institution is sobering, exciting, and

  8. Pump-and-Treat Systems Prove Effective, Deliver Cost Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Articles New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes ...

  9. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Total Fee Paid FY2008 $134,832 FY2009 $142,578 FY2010 $299,878 FY2011 $169,878 Cumulative Fee Paid $747,166 Contract Period: September 2007 - October 2012 $31,885,815 C/P/E Environmental Services, LLC DE-AM09-05SR22405/DE-AT30-07CC60011/SL14 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee $357,223 $597,797 $894,699 EM Contractor Fee Site: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Contract Name: SLAC Environmental Remediation December 2012 $1,516,646 Fee Available $208,620 Fee

  10. Delivering on Obama's renewables promise will cost billions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-15

    For wind energy in the eastern half of the U.S., costs would be $50 billion to $80 billion for transmission lines, in addition to the $700 billion to $1.1 trillion to build the wind farms to generate power.

  11. U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential Consumers Delivered for the Account

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Others (Percent) % of Total Residential Consumers Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential Consumers Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 9 10 11 2010's 12 12 13 14 14 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring

  12. ,"Alabama Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers",5,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016"

  13. Pump-and-Treat Systems Prove Effective, Deliver Cost Savings in Groundwater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cleanup | Department of Energy Pump-and-Treat Systems Prove Effective, Deliver Cost Savings in Groundwater Cleanup Pump-and-Treat Systems Prove Effective, Deliver Cost Savings in Groundwater Cleanup December 17, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis CH2M operates five pump and treat facilities along the Columbia River for EM's Richland Operations Office. CH2M operates five pump and treat facilities along the Columbia River for EM's Richland Operations Office. Ion exchange columns in the 100-DX

  14. Update of Hydrogen from Biomass - Determination of the Delivered Cost of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen: Milestone Completion Report | Department of Energy Update of Hydrogen from Biomass - Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen: Milestone Completion Report Update of Hydrogen from Biomass - Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen: Milestone Completion Report Milestone report summarizing the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via (1) gasification/reforming of the resulting syngas and (2) fast pyrolysis/reforming of the resulting bio-oil. PDF icon

  15. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fee Available (N/A) Total Fee Paid $23,179,000 $18,632,000 $16,680,000 $18,705,000 $25,495,000 $34,370,000 $32,329,000 $33,913,000 $66,794,000 $10,557,000 $3,135,000 $283,789,000 FY2015 FY2014 FY2013 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 Fee Information Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Dec 2015 Contract Number: Cost Plus Incentive Fee Contractor: $3,264,909,094 Contract Period: EM Contractor Fee s Idaho Operations Office - Idaho Falls, ID Contract Name: Idaho Cleanup Project $0 Contract Type: CH2M Washington Group

  16. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hanford Waste Treatment Plant | Department of Energy Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant September 7, 2006 - 8:53am Addthis Corps Report Validates Cost of $12.2 billion and Construction Completion in November 2019 WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) report

  17. Project Functions and Activities Definitions for Total Project Cost

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter provides guidelines developed to define the obvious disparity of opinions and practices with regard to what exactly is included in total estimated cost (TEC) and total project cost (TPC).

  18. U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Commercial Delivered for the Account of Others

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Percent) Commercial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Commercial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10.9 1990's 13.4 14.9 16.8 16.1 20.7 23.3 22.4 29.2 33.0 33.9 2000's 36.1 34.0 36.4 34.9 35.9 35.0 36.3 37.6 38.1 40.8 2010's 42.5 44.2 46.8 46.1 46.2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  19. U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Industrial Delivered for the Account of Others

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Percent) Industrial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Industrial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 63.1 1990's 64.8 67.3 69.7 70.7 74.8 76.0 80.6 81.9 83.9 81.3 2000's 80.2 79.2 77.3 77.9 76.3 75.9 76.6 77.8 79.6 81.2 2010's 82.8 83.7 83.8 83.4 84.1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  20. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY2012 Fee Information Minimum Fee Maximum Fee September 2015 Contract Number: Cost Plus Incentive Fee Contractor: 3,264,909,094 Contract Period: EM Contractor Fee s Idaho...

  1. "Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO

  2. "Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",10.31,10.36,10.36,10.37,10.38,10.4,10.4,10.41,10.43,10.43,10.44,10.45,10.46,10.49,10.51,10.53,10.56,10.6 "AEO 1995",,10.96,10.8,10.81,10.81,10.79,10.77,10.75,10.73,10.72,10.7,10.7,10.69,10.7,10.72,10.75,10.8,10.85 "AEO

  3. "Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO

  4. "Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO

  5. ,"U.S. Total Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil",3,"Annual",2014,"6301968" ,"Release Date:","212016" ,"Next Release Date:","312016" ,"Excel File...

  6. FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management’s (OCRWM) May 2007 total...

  7. NREL Reports Soft Costs Now Largest Piece of Solar Installation Total Cost

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - News Releases | NREL Reports Soft Costs Now Largest Piece of Solar Installation Total Cost December 2, 2013 Two detailed reports from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) find that solar financing and other non-hardware costs - often referred to as "soft costs" - now comprise up to 64% of the total price of residential solar energy systems, reflecting how soft costs are becoming an increasingly larger fraction of the cost of installing solar.

  8. CIGNA Study Uncovers Relationship of Disabilities to Total Benefits Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The findings of a new study reveal an interesting trend. Integrating disability programs with health care programs can potentially lower employers' total benefits costs and help disabled employees get back to work sooner and stay at work.

  9. Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup- Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is using a treatment material that has delivered more than $6 million in cost savings to date and is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiencies in treatment of contaminated groundwater near the Columbia River at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state.

  10. ORISE: Delivering Cost Savings and Customer Service with Off-the-Shelf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Cost Savings and Customer Service ORISE utilizes off-the-shelf software to provide peer review services at lower cost while meeting customer requirements The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education's (ORISE) Scientific Peer Review Program is no different than any other organization striving to do more with less in the current economy. With smaller budgets and faster turnaround needed for proposal reviews, utilizing Web-based collaboration tools to share information is

  11. An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling...

  12. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Contract Option Period: Maximum...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number: DE-AC30-11CC40015 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee EM Contractor Fee September 2015 Site: Portsmouth Paducah Project Office...

  13. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Contract Option Period: Performance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contractor: Bechtel National Inc. Contract Number: DE-AC27-01RV14136 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee NA Maximum Fee 599,588,540 Fee Available 102,622,325 10,868,785,789...

  14. Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.

    2013-04-01

    This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

  15. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Contract Option Period: Maximum Fee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Earned FY2011/2012 $4,059,840 FY2013 $2,928,000 FY2014 $3,022,789 FY2015 FY2016 Cumulative Fee $10,010,629 $19,878,019 $3,214,544 $5,254,840 $5,662,028 $1,421,695 Fee Available $4,324,912 $417,833,183 Contract Base Period: January 3, 2011 - September 2, 2016 (Extended) Fee Information Minimum Fee $0 N/A $19,878,019 Contractor: Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number: DE-AC30-11CC40015 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee EM Contractor Fee

  16. A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications | Department of Energy A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications This report prepared by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory describes a total cost of ownership model for emerging applications in stationary fuel cell systems. The

  17. An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report by NREL discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment.

  18. SU-E-T-515: Field-In-Field Compensation Technique Using Multi-Leaf Collimator to Deliver Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakeman, T; Wang, IZ

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) uses large parallel-opposed radiation fields to suppress the patient's immune system and eradicate the residual cancer cells in preparation of recipient for bone marrow transplant. The manual placement of lead compensators has been used conventionally to compensate for the varying thickness through the entire body in large-field TBI. The goal of this study is to pursue utilizing the modern field-in-field (FIF) technique with the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) to more accurately and efficiently deliver dose to patients in need of TBI. Method: Treatment plans utilizing the FIF technique to deliver a total body dose were created retrospectively for patients for whom CT data had been previously acquired. Treatment fields include one pair of opposed open large fields (collimator=45) with a specific weighting and a succession of smaller fields (collimator=90) each with their own weighting. The smaller fields are shaped by moving MLC to block the sections of the patient which have already received close to 100% of the prescribed dose. The weighting factors for each of these fields were calculated using the attenuation coefficient of the initial lead compensators and the separation of the patient in different positions in the axial plane. Results: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for evaluating the FIF compensation technique. The maximum body doses calculated from the DVH were reduced from the non-compensated 179.3% to 148.2% in the FIF plans, indicating a more uniform dose with the FIF compensation. All calculated monitor units were well within clinically acceptable limits and exceeded those of the original lead compensation plan by less than 50 MU (only ~1.1% increase). Conclusion: MLC FIF technique for TBI will not significantly increase the beam on time while it can substantially reduce the compensator setup time and the potential risk of errors in manually placing lead compensators.

  19. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500... 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999......

  20. DOE Project Number Project Name Site Critical Decision Total Project Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Number Project Name Site Critical Decision Total Project Cost Approved Project End Date 15-D-411 Underground Ventilation System (UVS) Carlsbad CD0 309,000,000 $ 01/01/21 CBC-ETEC-0040.C1 Energy Technology Engineering Center Demolition Project ETEC CD0 29,000,000 $ 09/30/19 RL-0041.C1 Nuclear Facility D&D - River Corridor Closure Project Hanford CD3 2,251,500,000 $ 09/30/19 RL-0011.C1 Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Decontamination and Dismantlement Hanford CD3 352,000,000 $ 11/30/17

  1. Total..........................................................

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999......

  2. Total..........................................................

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999......

  3. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999......

  4. Total..........................................................

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500... 3.2 0.5 0.3 Q 500 to 999......

  5. Total............................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592

  6. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending Components Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur

  7. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending Components Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur

  8. Total..........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7

  9. Total..........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1

  10. Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs...

  11. Total................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to

  12. Total..........................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7

  13. Total..........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4

  14. Total...........................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9

  15. Delivering safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, N.D.; Spooner, K.G.; Walkden, P.

    2007-07-01

    In the United Kingdom there have been significant recent changes to the management of civil nuclear liabilities. With the formation in April 2005 of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), ownership of the civil nuclear licensed sites in the UK, including the Magnox Reactor Stations, passed to this new organisation. The NDAs mission is to seek acceleration of the nuclear clean up programme and deliver increased value for money and, consequently, are driving their contractors to seek more innovative ways of performing work. British Nuclear Group manages the UK Magnox stations under contract to the NDA. This paper summarises the approach being taken within its Reactor Sites business to work with suppliers to enhance working arrangements at sites, improve the delivery of decommissioning programmes and deliver improvements in safety and environmental performance. The UK Magnox stations are 1. generation gas-graphite reactors, constructed in the 1950's and 1960's. Two stations are currently still operating, three are shut-down undergoing defueling and the other five are being decommissioned. Despite the distractions of industry restructuring, an uncompromising policy of demanding improved performance in conjunction with improved safety and environmental standards has been adopted. Over the past 5 years, this policy has resulted in step-changes in performance at Reactor Sites, with increased electrical output and accelerated defueling and decommissioning. The improvements in performance have been mirrored by improvements in safety (DACR of 0 at 5 sites); environmental standards (reductions in energy and water consumption, increased waste recycling) and the overall health of the workforce (20% reduction in sickness absence). These achievements have, in turn, been recognised by external bodies, resulting in several awards, including: the world's first ISRS and IERS level 10 awards (Sizewell, 2006), the NUMEX plant maintenance award (Bradwell, 2006), numerous RoSPA awards at site and sector level and nomination, at Company level, for the RoSPA George Earle trophy for outstanding performance in Health and Safety (Reactor Sites, 2006). After 'setting the scene' and describing the challenges that the company has had to respond to, the paper explains how these improvements have been delivered. Specifically it explains the process that has been followed and the parts played by sites and suppliers to deliver improved performance. With the experience of already having transitioned several Magnox stations from operations to defueling and then to decommissioning, the paper describes the valuable experience that has been gained in achieving an optimum change process and maintaining momentum. (authors)

  16. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2015-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the United States electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GW by 2030 and 2900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOE's more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050. Assessing the sustainability of such rapid growth of photovoltaics necessitates undertaking a careful analysis because PV markets largely are enabled by its promise to produce reliable electricity with minimum environmental burdens. Measurable aspects of sustainability include cost, resource availability, and environmental impact. The question of cost concerns the affordability of solar energy compared to other energy sources throughout the world. Environmental impacts include local-, regional-, and global-effects, as well as the usage of land and water, which must be considered in a comparable context over a long time, multigenerational horizon. As a result, the availability of material resources matters to current and future-generations under the constraint of affordability.

  17. Feasibility studies to improve plant availability and reduce total installed cost in IGCC plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Kevin; Anasti, William; Fang, Yichuan; Subramanyan, Karthik; Leininger, Tom; Zemsky, Christine

    2015-03-30

    The main purpose of this project is to look at technologies and philosophies that would help reduce the costs of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, increase its availability or do both. GE’s approach to this problem is to consider options in three different areas: 1) technology evaluations and development; 2) constructability approaches; and 3) design and operation methodologies. Five separate tasks were identified that fall under the three areas: Task 2 – Integrated Operations Philosophy; Task 3 – Slip Forming of IGCC Components; Task 4 – Modularization of IGCC Components; Task 5 – Fouling Removal; and Task 6 – Improved Slag Handling. Overall, this project produced results on many fronts. Some of the ideas could be utilized immediately by those seeking to build an IGCC plant in the near future. These include the considerations from the Integrated Operations Philosophy task and the different construction techniques of Slip Forming and Modularization (especially if the proposed site is in a remote location or has a lack of a skilled workforce). Other results include ideas for promising technologies that require further development and testing to realize their full potential and be available for commercial operation. In both areas GE considers this project to be a success in identifying areas outside the core IGCC plant systems that are ripe for cost reduction and ity improvement opportunities.

  18. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2015-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the United States electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GW bymore » 2030 and 2900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOE's more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050. Assessing the sustainability of such rapid growth of photovoltaics necessitates undertaking a careful analysis because PV markets largely are enabled by its promise to produce reliable electricity with minimum environmental burdens. Measurable aspects of sustainability include cost, resource availability, and environmental impact. The question of cost concerns the affordability of solar energy compared to other energy sources throughout the world. Environmental impacts include local-, regional-, and global-effects, as well as the usage of land and water, which must be considered in a comparable context over a long time, multigenerational horizon. As a result, the availability of material resources matters to current and future-generations under the constraint of affordability.« less

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  The 2007 total system life...

  20. Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen An analysis was performed to estimate the costs associated with storing and transporting hydrogen. These costs can be added to a hydrogen production cost to determine the total delivered cost of hydrogen. PDF icon 25106.pdf More Documents & Publications Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results -

  1. A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California, Berkeley; Wei, Max; Lipman, Timothy; Mayyas, Ahmad; Chien, Joshua; Chan, Shuk Han; Gosselin, David; Breunig, Hanna; Stadler, Michael; McKone, Thomas; Beattie, Paul; Chong, Patricia; Colella, Whitney; James, Brian

    2014-06-23

    A total cost of ownership model is described for low temperature proton exchange membrane stationary fuel cell systems for combined heat and power (CHP) applications from 1-250kW and backup power applications from 1-50kW. System designs and functional specifications for these two applications were developed across the range of system power levels. Bottom-up cost estimates were made for balance of plant costs, and detailed direct cost estimates for key fuel cell stack components were derived using design-for-manufacturing-and-assembly techniques. The development of high throughput, automated processes achieving high yield are projected to reduce the cost for fuel cell stacks to the $300/kW level at an annual production volume of 100 MW. Several promising combinations of building types and geographical location in the U.S. were identified for installation of fuel cell CHP systems based on the LBNL modelling tool DER CAM. Life-cycle modelling and externality assessment were done for hotels and hospitals. Reduced electricity demand charges, heating credits and carbon credits can reduce the effective cost of electricity ($/kWhe) by 26-44percent in locations such as Minneapolis, where high carbon intensity electricity from the grid is displaces by a fuel cell system operating on reformate fuel. This project extends the scope of existing cost studies to include externalities and ancillary financial benefits and thus provides a more comprehensive picture of fuel cell system benefits, consistent with a policy and incentive environment that increasingly values these ancillary benefits. The project provides a critical, new modelling capacity and should aid a broad range of policy makers in assessing the integrated costs and benefits of fuel cell systems versus other distributed generation technologies.

  2. Sandia-Developed LED Pulser Delivers Laser-Like Performance at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LED Pulser Delivers Laser-Like Performance at Fraction of the Cost - Sandia Energy Energy ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Sandia-Developed LED Pulser Delivers ...

  3. New Osage Nation Facilities Deliver High Energy Performance, Comfort, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Savings | Department of Energy New Osage Nation Facilities Deliver High Energy Performance, Comfort, and Cost Savings New Osage Nation Facilities Deliver High Energy Performance, Comfort, and Cost Savings December 29, 2015 - 5:32pm Addthis The Osage Nation’s new state-of-the-art Welcome Center is elegant, inviting, and highly energy efficient. The Osage Nation's new state-of-the-art Welcome Center is elegant, inviting, and highly energy efficient. The Osage Nation’s new

  4. Early Edison Users Deliver Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early Edison Users Deliver Results Early Edison Users Deliver Results January 31, 2014 Contact: Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 7421 Before any supercomputer is accepted at NERSC, scientists are invited to put the system through its paces during an "early science" phase. While the main aim of this period is to test the new system, many scientists are able to use the time to significantly advance their work. (»Related story: "Edison Electrifies Scientific

  5. Microsoft Word - IG Testimony - UCLANL Cost Incurred- Long9 delivered...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... concern was that the Laboratory's Business Operations Division made payments based ... inventory controls were followed when new computers were acquired using purchase cards. ...

  6. Incorporating psychological influences in probabilistic cost analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kujawski, Edouard; Alvaro, Mariana; Edwards, William

    2004-01-08

    Today's typical probabilistic cost analysis assumes an ''ideal'' project that is devoid of the human and organizational considerations that heavily influence the success and cost of real-world projects. In the real world ''Money Allocated Is Money Spent'' (MAIMS principle); cost underruns are rarely available to protect against cost overruns while task overruns are passed on to the total project cost. Realistic cost estimates therefore require a modified probabilistic cost analysis that simultaneously models the cost management strategy including budget allocation. Psychological influences such as overconfidence in assessing uncertainties and dependencies among cost elements and risks are other important considerations that are generally not addressed. It should then be no surprise that actual project costs often exceed the initial estimates and are delivered late and/or with a reduced scope. This paper presents a practical probabilistic cost analysis model that incorporates recent findings in human behavior and judgment under uncertainty, dependencies among cost elements, the MAIMS principle, and project management practices. Uncertain cost elements are elicited from experts using the direct fractile assessment method and fitted with three-parameter Weibull distributions. The full correlation matrix is specified in terms of two parameters that characterize correlations among cost elements in the same and in different subsystems. The analysis is readily implemented using standard Monte Carlo simulation tools such as {at}Risk and Crystal Ball{reg_sign}. The analysis of a representative design and engineering project substantiates that today's typical probabilistic cost analysis is likely to severely underestimate project cost for probability of success values of importance to contractors and procuring activities. The proposed approach provides a framework for developing a viable cost management strategy for allocating baseline budgets and contingencies. Given the scope and magnitude of the cost-overrun problem, the benefits are likely to be significant.

  7. Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – Workers recently completed a multiyear project that removed more than 33,000 gallons of non-radioactive chemical solvents from beneath a portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS), preventing those pollutants from entering the local water table and helping the site avoid costs of more than $15 million.

  8. Summary Max Total Units

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summary Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water

  9. Building America Expert Meeting: Delivering Better, Cheaper,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Better, Cheaper, and Faster Retrofits through Stakeholder-focused Research Building America Expert Meeting: Delivering Better, Cheaper, and Faster Retrofits through...

  10. Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    Federal buildings consumed over 392,000 billion Btu of site delivered energy for buildings during FY 2007 at a total cost of $6.5 billion. Earlier data indicate that about 10% of this is used to heat water.[2] Targeting energy consumption in Federal buildings, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires new Federal buildings and major renovations to meet 30% of their hot water demand with solar energy, provided it is cost-effective over the life of the system. In October 2009, President Obama expanded the energy reduction and performance requirements of EISA and its subsequent regulations with his Executive Order 13514.

  11. INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Report SOP Standard Operating Procedure TEC Total Estimated Cost TIPR Technical ... FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 Total PED Construction TEC OPC TPC Note: above values include MR...

  12. Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol April 19, 2013 - 11:24am Addthis In September 2012, scientists at DOE national laboratories successfully demonstrated technical advances required to produce cellulosic ethanol that is cost competitive with petroleum. Cellulosic ethanol is fuel produced from the inedible, organic material abundant in agricultural waste, including grasses, farm

  13. EERE Success Story-Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol EERE Success Story-Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol April 19, 2013 - 11:24am Addthis In September 2012, scientists at DOE national laboratories successfully demonstrated technical advances required to produce cellulosic ethanol that is cost competitive with petroleum. Cellulosic ethanol is fuel produced from the inedible, organic material abundant in

  14. Startup Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Staples Delivers on Fuel Efficiency

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Staples Delivers on Fuel Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Staples Delivers on Fuel Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Staples Delivers on Fuel Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Staples Delivers on Fuel Efficiency on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Staples Delivers on Fuel Efficiency on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Staples Delivers on Fuel Efficiency on Digg Find More

  16. Energy Systems Integration Facility Delivering on Promise to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Integration Facility Delivering on Promise to Strengthen America's Clean Energy Innovation Energy Systems Integration Facility Delivering on Promise to Strengthen America's ...

  17. Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES ...

  18. GTO Director Doug Hollett Delivers Keynote at the Nation's Largest...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GTO Director Doug Hollett Delivers Keynote at the Nation's Largest Industry Gathering, September 29, 2014 GTO Director Doug Hollett Delivers Keynote at the Nation's Largest...

  19. Smart Grid Update: Delivering More Reliable and Efficient Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Update: Delivering More Reliable and Efficient Power to the Nation's Capital Smart Grid Update: Delivering More Reliable and Efficient Power to the Nation's Capital March 6, 2014 - ...

  20. Texas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Texas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb...

  1. Texas Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet)...

  2. West Virginia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million...

  3. North Carolina Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million...

  4. New York Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic...

  5. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 269 277 185 R 159 170 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 127,417 112,268

  6. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil

  7. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  8. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 620 914 819 R 921 895 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 6,802 9,075

  9. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 8 9 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 43 34 44 32 20 From Oil

  10. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

  11. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil

  12. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 276 322 270 R 357 310 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 2,092 1,854

  13. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

  14. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

  15. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 188 239 211 200 200 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  16. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

  17. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Washington - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil

  18. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    80 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil

  19. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Choose a vehicle to compare fuel cost and emissions with a conventional vehicle. Select Fuel/Technology Electric Hybrid Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Propane (LPG) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle 0 City 0 Hwy (mi/gal) 0 City 0 Hwy (kWh/100m) Gasoline Vehicle 0 City 0 Hwy (mi/gal) Normal Daily Use 30.5 Total miles/day City 55 % Hwy 45 % Other Trips 3484 Total miles/year City 20 % Hwy 80 % Fuel Cost Emissions Annual Fuel Cost $ $/gal Annual

  20. LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anklam, T

    2011-04-14

    Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

  1. Sandia-Developed LED Pulser Delivers Laser-Like Performance at Fraction of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Cost LED Pulser Delivers Laser-Like Performance at Fraction of the Cost - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing

  2. Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    2002-05-10

    Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

  3. EECBG Success Story: New Sustainability Manager Delivers Savings for Delray Beach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delray Beach, Florida, had a good problem: Recovery Act funding to support the city's mission to reduce energy costs – but no seasoned pro to help realize those savings. Through an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG), the South Florida city hired a former city manager to oversee projects that would deliver both energy and financial savings. Learn more.

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Schools Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Trucks Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data

  6. Pennsylvania Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4.8 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.7 5.0 1993-2014 Commercial 4.6 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.6 1993-2014 Industrial 2.8 2.9 2.9 2.8 2.9 3.1 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1993-2014 Electric Power 3.1 3.3 4.0 4.3 4.4 4.8

  7. Rhode Island Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1993-2014 Commercial 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 1993-2014 Industrial 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.6

  8. South Carolina Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 1993-2014 Commercial 0.7 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 1993-2014 Industrial 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 1994-2014 Electric Power 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.1 1.1

  9. South Dakota Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1993-2014 Commercial 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.4 0.4 1993-2014 Industrial 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel -- 0.0 -- -- -- -- 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

  10. Tennessee Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1.4 1.6 1.4 1.3 1.5 1.5 1993-2014 Commercial 1.7 1.8 1.7 1.6 1.6 1.7 1993-2014 Industrial 1.4 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.3 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.1 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.4 0.6

  11. Texas Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4.0 4.7 4.2 4.1 4.2 4.6 1993-2014 Commercial 5.4 6.1 5.8 5.6 5.3 5.3 1993-2014 Industrial 19.4 20.8 20.9 21.1 20.8 20.5 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 8.0 8.1 7.3 7.4 10.0 10.0 1993-2014 Electric Power 20.2 18.3 19.2 16.6 17.4 17.5

  12. Kentucky Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1993-2014 Commercial 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1993-2014 Industrial 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.1 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.2

  13. Louisiana Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0.8 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.9 1993-2014 Commercial 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.9 0.9 0.9 1993-2014 Industrial 12.3 12.7 12.7 13.2 12.6 12.6 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.2 1993-2014 Electric Power 3.2 3.7 3.9 3.5 3.3 3

  14. Maine Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1993-2014 Commercial 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.2 0.3 1993-2014 Industrial 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.3 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1999-2014 Electric Power 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 1999

  15. Maryland Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1.7 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.8 1993-2014 Commercial 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.2 1993-2014 Industrial 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.3 0.3

  16. Michigan Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6.8 6.4 6.7 6.7 6.8 7.0 1993-2014 Commercial 5.2 4.9 5.2 5.0 5.2 5.4 1993-2014 Industrial 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.3 2.4 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.9 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1993-2014 Electric Power 1.2 1.5 1.5 2.0 1.4 1.3

  17. Minnesota Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8 2.6 2.7 2.6 2.9 2.9 1993-2014 Commercial 3.1 2.9 3.0 2.9 3.2 3.2 1993-2014 Industrial 2.1 2.3 2.3 2.2 2.2 2.3 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.3 0.5 0.4 0.6 0.6

  18. Mississippi Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 1993-2014 Commercial 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 1993-2014 Industrial 1.6 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.5 1.5 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 1994-2014 Electric Power 2.7 3.2 3.2 3.2 2.9 2.7

  19. Missouri Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2 2.2 2.2 2.0 2.2 2.3 1993-2014 Commercial 2.0 2.0 2.0 1.9 2.0 2.1 1993-2014 Industrial 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 1994-2014 Electric Power 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.5

  20. Montana Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.4 1993-2014 Commercial 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 1993-2014 Industrial 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1

  1. U.S. Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993-2014 Commercial 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1999-2014 Industrial 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1999-2014 Vehicle Fuel 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993-2014 Electric Power 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

  2. Utah Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4 1.4 1.5 1.4 1.4 1.2 1993-2014 Commercial 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.2 1.3 1.1 1993-2014 Industrial 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.5 0.7 1.0 1.0 0.7 0.7 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.7 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7

  3. Vermont Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Commercial 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Industrial 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1999-2014 Electric Power 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0

  4. Virginia Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.8 1993-2014 Commercial 2.2 2.2 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 1993-2014 Industrial 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.5 0.5 0.9 0.9 0.7 0.7 1993-2014 Electric Power 1.4 1.9 1.9 2.1 2.1 1.9

  5. Washington Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1.8 1.6 1.8 1.9 1.7 1.5 1993-2014 Commercial 1.8 1.7 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.6 1993-2014 Industrial 1.2 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 1.9 1.5 1.7 1.7 1.4 1.4 1993-2014 Electric Power 1.3 1.1 0.5 0.5 1.1 1

  6. Wisconsin Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2.8 2.6 2.7 2.7 2.9 3.0 1993-2014 Commercial 2.9 2.6 2.8 2.7 3.0 3.1 1993-2014 Industrial 1.9 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.8 1.9 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.6 0.6 0.6 1.0 0.7 0.7

  7. Wyoming Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1993-2014 Commercial 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1993-2014 Industrial 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

  8. Nebraska Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 1993-2014 Commercial 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 1.0 0.9 1993-2014 Industrial 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.1 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1

  9. Nevada Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8 0.8 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.7 1993-2014 Commercial 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.8 1993-2014 Industrial 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 2.8 2.9 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 1993-2014 Electric Power 2.8 2.4 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.1

  10. New Hampshire Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.2 1993-2014 Commercial 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1993-2014 Industrial 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 1994-2014 Electric Power 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4

  11. New Jersey Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4.7 4.6 4.5 4.6 4.6 4.9 1993-2014 Commercial 5.8 5.8 6.1 6.0 5.2 5.8 1993-2014 Industrial 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.8 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 1994-2014 Electric Power 2.4 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.6 3.0

  12. New Mexico Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    7 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.7 0.6 1993-2014 Commercial 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.7 1993-2014 Industrial 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.7 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.5 0.5 1993-2014 Electric Power 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.9 0.9

  13. North Dakota Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1993-2014 Commercial 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 1993-2014 Industrial 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.0 0.0 -- 0.0 0.0 0.0 1999

  14. Ohio Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6.1 5.9 6.1 6.0 6.1 6.3 1993-2014 Commercial 5.2 5.0 5.1 5.0 5.1 5.3 1993-2014 Industrial 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.7 4.0 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.3 1.0 1.0 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.9 2.0 2.2

  15. Oklahoma Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1.3 1.4 1.3 1.2 1.3 1.4 1993-2014 Commercial 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.2 1.3 1.4 1993-2014 Industrial 2.9 2.7 2.8 2.5 2.4 2.4 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.9 0.8 0.9 0.9 1.1 1.1 1993-2014 Electric Power 4.1 3.9 3.5 3.5 3.0 2.6

  16. Oregon Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.8 1993-2014 Commercial 1.0 0.9 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.8 1993-2014 Industrial 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 1993-2014 Electric Power 1.6 1.5 0.8 0.9 1.2 1.1

  17. Maine Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1993-2014 Commercial 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.2 0.3 1993-2014 Industrial 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.3 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1999-2014 Electric...

  18. Alabama Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.8 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.8 1993-2014 Commercial 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.8 0.8 1993-2014 Industrial 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.4 2.4 2.5 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 1993-2014 Electric Power 3.3 3.8 4.5 4.4 4.1 4.2

  19. Hawaii Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1993-2014 Commercial 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Industrial 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1997-2014 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- -- 0.0 0.0 1999-2014 Electric...

  20. Massachusetts Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.8 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.4 2.5 1993-2014 Commercial 2.3 2.3 2.6 2.5 3.0 3.1 1993-2014 Industrial 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 2.8 2.6 2.5 2.5 2.3 2.3 1993-2014 Electric...

  1. Washington Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1.8 1.6 1.8 1.9 1.7 1.5 1993-2014 Commercial 1.8 1.7 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.6 1993-2014 Industrial 1.2 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 1.9 1.5 1.7 1.7 1.4 1.4 1993-2014 Electric...

  2. California Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    10.1 10.3 10.9 11.5 9.8 7.8 1993-2014 Commercial 7.9 8.0 7.8 8.7 7.7 6.9 1993-2014 Industrial 11.4 10.3 10.1 10.2 10.5 10.3 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 47.0 47.3 48.9 49.0 47.0 47.0 1993-2014 Electric Power 11.8 10.0 8.1 9.4 10.1 10.1

  3. Colorado Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.7 2.7 2.8 2.8 2.8 2.6 1993-2014 Commercial 2.0 1.9 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.7 1993-2014 Industrial 1.8 1.7 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.0 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 1993-2014 Electric Power 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.9 1.1

  4. Delaware Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1993-2014 Commercial 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1993-2014 Industrial 0.3 0.1 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1994-2014 Electric Power 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.5 0.6

  5. District of Columbia Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1993-2014 Commercial 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 1993-2014 Industrial -- -- -- -- -- -- 2004-2014 Vehicle Fuel 3.0 3.1 2.9 2.9 2.9 2.9 1995-2014 Electric Power -- -- 0.0 -- -- -- 1999

  6. Florida Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1993-2014 Commercial 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.9 1.8 1.8 1993-2014 Industrial 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.2 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.4 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.6 1993-2014 Electric Power 13.3 13.3 13.8 12.5 12.6 12.9

  7. Georgia Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.5 2.9 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.6 1993-2014 Commercial 1.7 1.9 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.7 1993-2014 Industrial 2.3 2.1 2.1 2.0 2.1 2.1 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 3.9 3.2 3.7 3.7 3.3 3.3 1993-2014 Electric Power 2.1 2.4 2.6 3.4 3.4 3.6

  8. Hawaii Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1993-2014 Commercial 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Industrial 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1997-2014 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- -- 0.0 0.0 1999-2014 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- -- 1999

  9. Idaho Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.5 1993-2014 Commercial 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.5 1993-2014 Industrial 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.2 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1994-2014 Electric Power 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.2 1999

  10. Illinois Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9.2 8.7 8.9 8.7 9.2 9.4 1993-2014 Commercial 7.1 6.4 6.8 6.5 7.0 7.1 1993-2014 Industrial 3.8 4.1 4.0 3.8 3.9 3.9 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.9 1.0 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.5 0.6 0.6 1.0 0.6 0.5

  11. Indiana Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.9 2.9 2.8 2.8 3.0 3.1 1993-2014 Commercial 2.5 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.5 2.6 1993-2014 Industrial 4.0 4.2 4.7 4.8 4.8 4.9 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.3 1.0 1.0

  12. Iowa Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1.5 1.4 1.4 1.3 1.5 1.5 1993-2014 Commercial 1.8 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.7 1.7 1993-2014 Industrial 2.7 2.5 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.3 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- -- 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Electric Power 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 1993

  13. Kansas Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1.4 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.4 1993-2014 Commercial 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 1.0 1.1 1993-2014 Industrial 1.7 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1994-2014 Electric Power 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.3

  14. West Virginia Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 1993-2014 Commercial 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 1993-2014 Industrial 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1993-2014 Electric...

  15. Alaska Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.4 0.3 1993-2014 Commercial 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.5 1993-2014 Industrial 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1999-2014 Electric Power 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4

  16. Arizona Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 0.8 0.8 0.6 1993-2014 Commercial 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.0 0.9 1993-2014 Industrial 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 7.7 7.0 5.7 5.7 5.8 5.8 1993-2014 Electric Power 3.8 3.0 2.4 2.5 2.7 2.5

  17. Arkansas Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 0.6 0.7 0.7 1993-2014 Commercial 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5 1993-2014 Industrial 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.2 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1994-2014 Electric Power 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.1 0.9

  18. Connecticut Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0.9 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 1993-2014 Commercial 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.4 1.5 1993-2014 Industrial 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 1993-2014 Electric...

  19. North Carolina Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1.4 1.6 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5 1993-2014 Commercial 1.6 1.8 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.7 1993-2014 Industrial 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.5 1.4 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 1993-2014 Electric...

  20. New York Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8.5 8.2 8.4 8.6 8.5 9.0 1993-2014 Commercial 9.0 9.3 9.2 9.3 9.1 9.2 1993-2014 Industrial 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1993-2014 Vehicle Fuel 11.4 12.5 12.9 12.9 11.0 11.0 1993-2014...

  1. DARHT Delivers Cibola Takes Flight Plutonium Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    663 DARHT Delivers Cibola Takes Flight Plutonium Superconductivity Not for the Birds l o S a l a m o S N a T i o N a l l a B o r a T o r y loS alamoS SCieNCe aND TeChNology magaziNe may 2007 1 663 From Terry Wallace About Our Name: During World War II, all that the outside world knew of Los Alamos and its top-secret laboratory was the mailing address-P . O. Box 1663, Santa Fe, New Mexico. That box number, still part of our address, symbolizes our historic role in the nation's service. Located on

  2. New Sustainability Manager Delivers Savings for Delray Beach...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manager Delivers Savings for Delray Beach New Sustainability Manager Delivers Savings for Delray Beach July 30, 2010 - 3:13pm Addthis Metal halide light fixtures at Pompey Park are...

  3. U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress July 24, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. ...

  4. Working With PNNL Mentorees, Engineering Students Deliver Prototype...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    With PNNL Mentorees, Engineering Students Deliver Prototype Safeguards Fixtures | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission...

  5. Secretary Moniz's Remarks on a Major Supercomputing Announcement-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, on the CORAL supercomputing announcement in Washington D.C. on November 14, 2014.

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Foodliner Delivers Goods in Illinois With

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas Tractors Foodliner Delivers Goods in Illinois With Natural Gas Tractors to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Foodliner Delivers Goods in Illinois With Natural Gas Tractors on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Foodliner Delivers Goods in Illinois With Natural Gas Tractors on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Foodliner Delivers Goods in Illinois With Natural Gas Tractors on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Foodliner

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Schwan's Home Service Delivers With

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Propane-Powered Trucks Schwan's Home Service Delivers With Propane-Powered Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Schwan's Home Service Delivers With Propane-Powered Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Schwan's Home Service Delivers With Propane-Powered Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Schwan's Home Service Delivers With Propane-Powered Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Schwan's Home Service

  8. Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: 2010 LCLS Undulator 2 is envisioned to be a 0.2 - 2keV FEL x-ray source, capable of delivering x-rays to End Station A (ESA), located in the existing Research Yard at SLAC. It will also be configurable as a non- FEL hard x-ray source capable of delivering a chirped x-ray pulse for single-shot broad-spectrum measurements. The project would entail reconstruction of the electron beam transport to End Station A, construction and

  9. Operating Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

  10. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7,026 7,063 6,327 R 6,165 6,118 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  11. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7,397 8,388 8,538 R 9,843 10,150 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  12. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 California - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,580 1,308 1,423 R 1,335 1,118 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  13. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,813 30,101 32,000 R 32,468 38,346 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  14. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Florida - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 17,182 16,459 19,742

  15. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells

  16. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 50 40 40 R 34 36 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,697 2,114

  17. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Iowa - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0

  18. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,145 25,758 24,697 R 23,792 24,354 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  19. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,670 14,632 17,936 R 19,494 19,256 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  20. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,137 21,235 19,792 R 19,528 19,251 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  1. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Maine - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0

  2. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 10,100 11,100 10,900 R 10,550 10,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  3. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,979 5,732 1,669 R 1,967 1,645 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  4. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 53 100 R 26 28 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 R 8 8 From

  5. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Montana - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,059 6,477 6,240 5,754 5,754 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  6. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Nevada - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 R 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 3 From Oil Wells

  7. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil

  8. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 44,748 32,302 28,206 R 27,073 27,957 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From

  9. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 New York - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,736 6,157 7,176 R 6,902 7,119 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  10. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,931 46,717 35,104 R 32,664 32,967 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  11. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 44,000 41,238 40,000 39,776 40,070 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  12. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 26 24 27 R 26 28 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,407 1,344 770 770

  13. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 44,500 54,347 55,136 R 53,762 70,400 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals

  14. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From

  15. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 230 210 212 R 1,089 1,024 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,144

  16. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Texas - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 95,014 100,966 96,617 97,618 98,279 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  17. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Utah - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,075 6,469 6,900 R 7,030 7,275 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 328,135

  18. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Vermont - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells

  19. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7,470 7,903 7,843 R 7,956 7,961 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells

  20. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,498 56,813 50,700 R 54,920 60,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals

  1. Levelized Power Generation Cost Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-04-30

    LPGC is a set of nine microcomputer programs for estimating power generation costs for large steam-electric power plants. These programs permit rapid evaluation using various sets of economic and technical ground rules. The levelized power generation costs calculated may be used to compare the relative economics of nuclear and coal-fired plants based on life-cycle costs. Cost calculations include capital investment cost, operation and maintenance cost, fuel cycle cost, decommissioning cost, and total levelized power generationmore » cost. These programs can be used for quick analyses of power generation costs using alternative economic parameters, such as interest rate, escalation rate, inflation rate, plant lead times, capacity factor, fuel prices, etc. The two major types of electric generating plants considered are pressurized water reactor (PWR) and pulverized coal-fired plants. Data are also provided for the Large Scale Prototype Breeder (LSPB) type liquid metal reactor.« less

  2. Low Cost Heliostat Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost Heliostat Development Low Cost Heliostat Development This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon csp_review_meeting_042513_blackmon.pdf More Documents & Publications Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP - FY13 Q1 Low-Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems - FY13 Q1 Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP - FY13 Q2

  3. Price/Cost Proposal Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRICE/COST PROPOSAL FORM Page No. of NREL Solicitation Document Number: Offeror's Name and Address: Title of Proposed Effort and Task No., Phase No., or Project Total, As Applicable: Telephone Number: Total Amount of Task/Phase No. ___________ $ _______________________ Proposal Summary Total $ ________________________ DETAIL DESCRIPTION OF COST ELEMENTS 1. DIRECT MATERIALS (Attach Itemized Listing for all Purchased Parts, Purchased Items or Services, Raw Materials, Standard Commercial Items, or

  4. BPA's Costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings and Workshops Customer...

  5. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    past, current, and projected costs for delivering and dispensing hydrogen. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 13013 More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Delivery...

  6. Next Generation Logistics Systems for Delivering Optimal Biomass...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the supply chain of multiple, high- impact biomass sources, and to develop practices that manage biomass variability to deliver a consistent feedstock optimized for performance ...

  7. Senator Dorgan and Under Secretary Orr to Deliver Remarks at...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Under Secretary for Science and Energy Franklin Orr will deliver remarks at the 2015 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  8. Famur delivers longwall system to Russian coal mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-08-15

    The first complete Polish longwall system that was recently delivered to Russia for mining coal seams with a thickness exceeding 5 m is described. 2 photos.

  9. New York Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pages: Average Residential Price New York Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential and Commercial Consumers by Local Distribution and Market Average Residential...

  10. Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments within the vadose zone Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Geophysical monitoring of foam used to ...

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Carolina (Including...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Carolina (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

  12. District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per ...

  13. Research and Development of a Low Cost Solar Collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansari, Asif; Philip, Lee; Thouppuarachchi, Chirath

    2012-08-01

    This is a Final Technical Report on the Research and Development completed towards the development of a Low Cost Solar Collector conducted under the DOE cost-sharing award EE-0003591. The objective of this project was to develop a new class of solar concentrators with geometries and manufacturability that could significantly reduce the fully installed cost of the solar collector field for concentrated solar thermal power plants. The goal of the project was to achieve an aggressive cost target of $170/m2, a reduction of up to 50% in the total installed cost of a solar collector field as measured against the current industry benchmark of a conventional parabolic trough. The project plan, and the detailed activities conducted under the scope of the DOE Award project addressed all major drivers that affect solar collector costs. In addition to costs, the study also focused on evaluating technical performance of new collector architectures and compared them to the performance of the industry benchmark parabolic trough. The most notable accomplishment of this DOE award was the delivery of a full-scale integrated design, manufacturing and field installation solution for a new class of solar collector architecture which has been classified as the Bi-Planar Fresnel Collector (BPFC) and may be considered as a viable alternative to the conventional parabolic trough, as well as the conventional Fresnel collectors. This was in part accomplished through the design and development, all the way through fabrication and test validation of a new class of Linear Planar Fresnel Collector architecture. This architecture offers a number of key differentiating features which include a planar light-weight frame geometry with small mass-manufacturable elements utilizing flat mirror sections. The designs shows significant promise in reducing the material costs, fabrication costs, shipping costs, and on-site field installation costs compared to the benchmark parabolic trough, as well as the conventional Fresnel collector. The noteworthy design features of the BPFC architecture include the use of relatively cheaper flat mirrors and a design which allows the mirror support beam sections to act as load-bearing structural elements resulting in more than a 36% reduction in the overall structural weight compared to an optimized parabolic trough. Also, it was shown that the utilization of small mass-produced elements significantly lowers mass-production and logistics costs that can more quickly deliver economies of scale, even for smaller installations while also reducing shipping and installation costs. Moreover, unlike the traditional Fresnel trough the BPFC architecture does not require complex articulating drive mechanisms but instead utilizes a standard parabolic trough hydraulic drive mechanism. In addition to the development of the Bi-Planar Fresnel Collector, an optimized conventional space-frame type parabolic trough was also designed, built, analyzed and field-tested during the first phase of this award. The design of the conventional space-frame parabolic collector was refined with extensive FEA and CFD analysis to reduce material costs and re-designed for simpler fabrication and more accurate lower-cost field assembly. This optimized parabolic trough represented an improvement over the state-of-the art of the traditional parabolic trough architecture and also served as a more rigorous and less subjective benchmark that was used for comparison of new candidate design architectures. The results of the expanded 1st phase of the DOE award project showed that both the Optimized Parabolic Trough and the new Bi-Planar Fresnel Collector design concepts failed to meet the primary objectives for the project of achieving a 50% cost reduction from the industry reference total installed cost of $350/m2. Results showed that the BPFC came in at projected total installed cost of $237/m2 representing a 32% savings compared to the industry benchmark conventional parabolic trough. And the cost reduction obtained by the Optimized Parabolic Trough compared to the

  14. Future oil and gas: Can Iran deliver?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takin, M.

    1996-11-01

    Iran`s oil and gas production and exports constitute the country`s main source of foreign exchange earnings. The future level of these earnings will depend on oil prices, global demand for Iranian exports, the country`s productive capability and domestic consumption. The size of Iranian oil reserves suggests that, in principle, present productive capacity could be maintained and expanded. However, the greatest share of production in coming years still will come from fields that already have produced for several decades. In spite of significant remaining reserves, these fields are not nearly as prolific as they were in their early years. The operations required for further development are now more complicated and, in particular, more costly. These fields` size also implies that improving production, and instituting secondary and tertiary recovery methods (such as gas injection), will require mega-scale operations. This article discusses future oil and gas export revenues from the Islamic Republic of Iran, emphasizing the country`s future production and commenting on the effects of proposed US sanctions.

  15. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    validation of the project contractor, Bechtel National Inc.'s Estimate at Completion - ... of Energy and Bechtel National, Inc. that are improving project management processes. ...

  16. Total Crude by Pipeline

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign

  17. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  18. Obama Administration Delivers More than $63 Million for Weatherization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs in Indiana and New Mexico Obama Administration Delivers More than 63 Million for Weatherization Programs in Indiana and New Mexico July 21, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis ...

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Texas (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Texas (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul...

  1. 2005 CHP Action Agenda: Innovating, Advocating, and Delivering Solutions,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 2005 | Department of Energy 5 CHP Action Agenda: Innovating, Advocating, and Delivering Solutions, October 2005 2005 CHP Action Agenda: Innovating, Advocating, and Delivering Solutions, October 2005 More than five years since the CHP Challenge and Industry Roadmap was released, this document is intended to provide the situational context in which the annual roadmap workshop will set its priorities for the upcoming year and complete its goals. PDF icon 2005_nyc.pdf More Documents

  2. EM Delivers in Deactivation, Regulatory Milestones, Shipping Progress at

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Portsmouth Site | Department of Energy Delivers in Deactivation, Regulatory Milestones, Shipping Progress at Portsmouth Site EM Delivers in Deactivation, Regulatory Milestones, Shipping Progress at Portsmouth Site December 23, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers lower a compressor from Portsmouth’s X-326 process building, where it will be staged and prepared for shipping. Workers lower a compressor from Portsmouth's X-326 process building, where it will be staged and prepared for shipping.

  3. New Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy | Department of Energy Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the Department of Energy New Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the Department of Energy November 1, 2011 - 9:50am Addthis The Electricity Advisory Committee approved three new reports at their meeting on October 20, 2011. These reports include recommendations on cyber security, storage, and the interdependence of electricity and natural gas. Recommendations on U. S. Grid Security The

  4. Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility in Texas | Department of Energy Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the first shipment to WCS. Through a contract with DOE, WCS will treat and accept potentially hazardous waste that has been at the Portsmouth site for decades. Pictured (from left) are Scott

  5. Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications Agenda for the Delvering Renewable Hydrogen Workshop held Nov. 16, 2010, in Palm Springs, CA PDF icon renewable_hydrogen_workshop_nov16_agenda.pdf More Documents & Publications Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda, October 27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Agenda

  6. Building America Expert Meeting: Delivering Better, Cheaper, and Faster

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Retrofits through Stakeholder-focused Research | Department of Energy Delivering Better, Cheaper, and Faster Retrofits through Stakeholder-focused Research Building America Expert Meeting: Delivering Better, Cheaper, and Faster Retrofits through Stakeholder-focused Research This expert meeting was conducted by Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership and Gas Technology Institute on November 16, 2010, in Chicago, Illinois. Meeting objectives included: * Review Building America's

  7. Portsmouth, Paducah Project Leaps Past Shipment Milestone, Delivering

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Economic Benefit to U.S. | Department of Energy Portsmouth, Paducah Project Leaps Past Shipment Milestone, Delivering Economic Benefit to U.S. Portsmouth, Paducah Project Leaps Past Shipment Milestone, Delivering Economic Benefit to U.S. September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here are railcars carrying tanks of hydrofluoric acid for shipment from the Portsmouth site to Solvay Fluorides for industrial use. Pictured here are railcars carrying tanks of hydrofluoric acid for shipment from

  8. Cloud-Based Transportation Management System Delivers Savings | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Cloud-Based Transportation Management System Delivers Savings Cloud-Based Transportation Management System Delivers Savings October 21, 2014 - 1:53pm Addthis DOE's cloud based transportation management system (ATLAS) offers dramatically enhanced capabilities and modernization. ATLAS provides a powerful user-friendly system built to allow access to information to meet transportation needs. Its processes promote regulatory compliance, while providing access to qualified carriers and

  9. Delivering Innovations That Create Jobs: National Lab Ignites Business for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Entrepreneurs | Department of Energy Delivering Innovations That Create Jobs: National Lab Ignites Business for Entrepreneurs Delivering Innovations That Create Jobs: National Lab Ignites Business for Entrepreneurs November 17, 2011 - 1:59pm Addthis DEP Shape Memory Therapeutics, Inc. is working to treat aneurysms with exclusively licensed LLNL-developed polymer materials that "remember" their shape. LLNL is a leader in the development of shape memory polymers, for use in medical

  10. Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    American Center in Japan | Department of Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan December 15, 2011 - 1:57pm Addthis Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman spoke at the Tokyo American Center today about nuclear power after Fukushima. Excerpts and full text of remarks, as prepared for delivery, are below: "As two of the nations

  11. Solar Basics for Homebuilders: Reducing the Total Cost of Ownership

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) energy systems are new in many residential real estate markets, and a growing number of homebuilders are integrating PV into new homes to attract customers and increase...

  12. Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A...

  13. Total Estimated Contract Cost: Contract Option Period: Performance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Performance Period Fee Earned FY2000 thru 2008 $102,622,325 FY2009 $12,259,719 FY2010 $35,789,418 FY2011 $24,126,240 FY2012 $24,995,209 FY2013 $6,340,762 FY2014 $16,285,867 FY2015 $35,931,000 $8,595,000 FY2016 $25,181,000 FY2017 $24,849,000 FY2018 $99,100,000 FY2019 $129,700,000 Cumulative Fee $231,014,540 $599,588,540 $12,259,719 $35,789,418 $38,554,240 $41,785,209 $16,698,762 $37,117,867 Maximum Fee $599,588,540 Fee Available $102,622,325 $10,868,785,789 Completion Contract: December 11, 2000

  14. U.S. Total Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Composite 76.69 101.87 100.93 100.49 92.02 48.40 1968-2015 Domestic 78.01 100.71 100.72 102.91 94.05 49.95 1968-2015 Imported 75.86 102.63 101.09 98.11 89.56 46.39 1968-2015

  15. An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

    2004-06-01

    This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

  16. Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    within the vadose zone (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments within the vadose zone Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments within the vadose zone Authors: Wu, Y. ; Hubbard, S. S. ; Wellman, D. Publication Date: 2012-05-01 OSTI Identifier: 1212441 Report Number(s): LBNL-5702E Journal ID: ISSN 1539--1663 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231 Resource

  17. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the EE Global Forum -- As Delivered |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy the EE Global Forum -- As Delivered Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the EE Global Forum -- As Delivered May 21, 2014 - 2:19pm Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Well, thank you, Kateri. And, A, it's true that I was here within a few hours of being sworn in last year, but perhaps you've forgotten the date. It was May 21st, 2013. So today is also the one-year anniversary and I'm back. And you, I guess you always have meetings on May 21st so it's

  18. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Washington Auto Show -- As Delivered |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy at the Washington Auto Show -- As Delivered Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Washington Auto Show -- As Delivered January 22, 2015 - 1:12pm Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy It's a pleasure to be back again this year, as last year was terrific. And as I'll say later on, last year I saw my very first fuel-cell vehicle here. And, as we'll talk about, it was a pretty big year for progress in the fuel-cell world. I was thinking of my own earliest

  19. Estimating Specialty Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

  20. First Trinity supercomputer test beds delivered to Los Alamos, Sandia |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Trinity supercomputer test beds delivered to Los Alamos, Sandia | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets

  1. First wind turbine blade delivered to Pantex | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration wind turbine blade delivered to Pantex | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  2. LLNL to deliver next-generation supercomputer | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration LLNL to deliver next-generation supercomputer | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery

  3. Pantexans deliver 'sunshine' to single parents | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration Pantexans deliver 'sunshine' to single parents | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo

  4. President Eisenhower Delivers Atoms for Peace Speech | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration Eisenhower Delivers Atoms for Peace Speech | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo

  5. Working With PNNL Mentors, Engineering Students Deliver Prototype

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Safeguards Fixtures | National Nuclear Security Administration With PNNL Mentors, Engineering Students Deliver Prototype Safeguards Fixtures | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios

  6. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Release Date: November 16, 2012 Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments...

  7. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

  8. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per...

  9. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  10. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  11. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

  12. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

  13. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per...

  14. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  15. Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Revised and posted 2/10/2011 *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain $50,000 FONSI: uncertain Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $70,000 Attachment: Memo, Moody to Marcinowski, III, SUBJECT: NEPA 2011 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: Annual NEPA Planning Summary Environmental Assessments (EAs) Expected to be Initiated in the Next

  16. Parallel Total Energy

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-21

    This is a total energy electronic structure code using Local Density Approximation (LDA) of the density funtional theory. It uses the plane wave as the wave function basis set. It can sue both the norm conserving pseudopotentials and the ultra soft pseudopotentials. It can relax the atomic positions according to the total energy. It is a parallel code using MP1.

  17. Obama Administration Delivers More Than $66 Million for Weatherization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The Department of Social Services administers the Weatherization Program, assisting low-income persons in minimizing energy-related costs and fuel usage in their residences. Every ...

  18. EECBG Success Story: New Sustainability Manager Delivers Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EECBG Success Story: Ormond Beach Triples Energy Cost Savings Projections Ajani Stewart was close to losing his job as environmental coordinator for the city of Miami before...

  19. Mississippi Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 1990's 777 731 645 647 647 615 585 1,148 1,101 807 2000's 954 935 707 937 943 895 993 2,327 1,942 1,715 2010's 1,983 2,067 1,958 2,123 2,772 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  20. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,787 12,476 19,406 1990's 27,144 28,528 32,481 29,758 35,514 45,481 45,809 52,464 56,528 61,752 2000's 57,397 50,476 53,048 56,590 52,546 55,148 52,334 60,506 62,616 67,105 2010's 70,514 72,719

  1. Connecticut Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 533 513 2,680 1990's 1,169 1,887 1,037 602 7,455 6,836 5,193 7,709 13,270 17,692 2000's 10,509 9,953 11,188 12,350 11,013 10,606 9,458 10,252 11,032 12,324 2010's 14,068 15,519 14,774 19,561

  2. Massachusetts Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 36 14 1990's 32 96 140 1,625 20,132 12,453 24,311 39,539 37,931 26,186 2000's 23,577 23,386 27,605 19,588 16,331 16,693 15,377 21,341 30,435 30,850 2010's 34,058 40,562 37,545 60,474 61,073 -

  3. South Carolina Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 153 302 1990's 341 278 239 132 265 688 199 235 412 589 2000's 280 517 310 762 799 843 1,027 1,067 1,137 1,429 2010's 1,748 1,973 2,007 1,969 1,832 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  4. Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs in Guam and Pennsylvania | Department of Energy 1 Million for Weatherization Programs in Guam and Pennsylvania Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherization Programs in Guam and Pennsylvania August 25, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $101 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand weatherization

  5. Obama Administration Delivers More than $106 Million for Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Conservation Projects in 9 States | Department of Energy 6 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in 9 States Obama Administration Delivers More than $106 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in 9 States September 24, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that more than $106 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act is being awarded to 9 states to support energy efficiency and

  6. Obama Administration Delivers More than $288 Million for Weatherization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs in Seven States | Department of Energy 288 Million for Weatherization Programs in Seven States Obama Administration Delivers More than $288 Million for Weatherization Programs in Seven States July 6, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $288 million in Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance programs in Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts,

  7. Obama Administration Delivers More than $304 Million for Weatherization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs in Georgia, Illinois and New York | Department of Energy 04 Million for Weatherization Programs in Georgia, Illinois and New York Obama Administration Delivers More than $304 Million for Weatherization Programs in Georgia, Illinois and New York June 26, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $304 million in Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance

  8. Obama Administration Delivers More than $36 Million to Pennsylvania

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communities for Energy Efficiency Projects | Department of Energy 6 Million to Pennsylvania Communities for Energy Efficiency Projects Obama Administration Delivers More than $36 Million to Pennsylvania Communities for Energy Efficiency Projects September 17, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Bensalem, PA - At a Clean Energy Economy Forum with Governor Rendell in Bensalem today, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced that DOE is awarding more than $36 million in funding from the American Recovery

  9. Obama Administration Delivers More than $453 Million for Weatherization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs in 15 States | Department of Energy 53 Million for Weatherization Programs in 15 States Obama Administration Delivers More than $453 Million for Weatherization Programs in 15 States June 18, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis COLUMBUS, OHIO - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $453 million in Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance programs in 15 additional states. These funds, along with

  10. Obama Administration Delivers Nearly $72 Million for Energy Efficiency and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conservation Projects in 7 States and Territories | Department of Energy Nearly $72 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in 7 States and Territories Obama Administration Delivers Nearly $72 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in 7 States and Territories October 1, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that nearly $72 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act is being awarded to 7

  11. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  12. ARM - Measurement - Total carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total carbon The total concentration of carbon in all its organic and non-organic forms. Categories Aerosols, Atmospheric Carbon Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Trucks Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Delicious Rank

  15. Table 16. Natural gas delivered to consumers by sector, 2010-2014, and by state and sector, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Table 16. Natural gas delivered to consumers by sector, 2010-2014, and by state and sector, 2014 2010 Total 4,782,412 65,542,345 3,102,593 5,301,576 6,826,192 192,730 2011 Total 4,713,777 65,940,522 3,155,319 5,319,817 6,994,120 189,301 2012 Total 4,149,519 66,375,134 2,894,926 5,356,397 7,226,215 189,372 2013 Total R 4,897,372 R 66,812,393 R 3,295,301 R 5,372,522 R 7,425,452 R 192,288 2014 Total 5,087,314 67,227,762 3,466,600 5,418,986 7,623,826 192,135 Alabama 38,971 769,418 27,515 67,806

  16. Apparatus and method for delivering a fluid to a container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for delivering a fluid into a container has a carriage movably associated with a holding mechanism along an axis. A piston is attached to the carriage and a cylinder is slidably attached to the piston along the axis. The cylinder has a hole formed therein that extends along the axis. A needle extending along the axis is attached to the piston and passes through the cylinder hole. The needle has a first operative position relative to the piston when the needle is retracted within the cylinder and a second operative position relative to the piston when the needle extends from the cylinder.

  17. Yearly Energy Costs for Buildings

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-03-20

    COSTSAFR3.0 generates a set of compliance forms which will be attached to housing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) issued by Departments or Agencies of the Federal Government. The compliance forms provide a uniform method for estimating the total yearly energy cost for each proposal. COSTSAFR3.0 analyzes specific housing projects at a given site, using alternative fuel types, and considering alternative housing types. The program is designed around the concept of minimizing overall costs through energy conservationmore » design, including first cost and future utility costs, and estabilishes a standard design to which proposed housing designs are compared. It provides a point table for each housing type that can be used to determine whether a proposed design meets the standard and how a design can be modified to meet the standard.« less

  18. SU-E-T-371: Validation of Organ Doses Delivered During Craniospinal Irradiation with Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Andujar, A; Chen, J; Garcia, A; Haas-Kogan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: New techniques have been developed to deliver more conformal treatments to the craniospinal axis. One concern, however, is the widespread low dose delivered and implications for possible late effects. The purpose of this work is for the first time to validate the organ doses calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS), including out-of-field doses for a pediatric craniospinal treatment (CSI). Methods: A CSI plan prescribed to 23.4 Gy and a posterior fossa boost plan to 30.6 Gy (total dose 54.0 Gy) was developed for a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom representing a 13 yearold- child. For the CSI plan, the planning target volumes (PTV) consisted of the brain and spinal cord with 2 mm and 5 mm expansions, respectively. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured and included in the plan optimization. The plans were delivered on a helical tomotherapy unit. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the dose at 54 positions within the PTV and OARs. Results: For the CSI treatment, the mean percent difference between TPS dose calculations and measurements was 5% for the PTV and 10% for the OARs. For the boost, the average was 3% for the PTV. The percent difference for the OARs, which lie outside the field and received a small fraction of the prescription dose, varied from 15% to 200%. However in terms of absolute dose, the average difference between measurement and TPS per treatment Gy was 2 cGy/Gy and 3 mGy/Gy for the CSI and boost plans, respectively. Conclusion: There was good agreement between doses calculated by the TPS and measurements for the CSI treatment. Higher percent differences were observed for out-of-field doses in the boost plan, but absolute dose differences were very small compared to the prescription dose. These findings can help in the estimation of late effects after radiotherapy for pediatric patients.

  19. Development of surface mine cost estimating equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-26

    Cost estimating equations were developed to determine capital and operating costs for five surface coal mine models in Central Appalachia, Northern Appalachia, Mid-West, Far-West, and Campbell County, Wyoming. Engineering equations were used to estimate equipment costs for the stripping function and for the coal loading and hauling function for the base case mine and for several mines with different annual production levels and/or different overburden removal requirements. Deferred costs were then determined through application of the base case depreciation schedules, and direct labor costs were easily established once the equipment quantities (and, hence, manpower requirements) were determined. The data points were then fit with appropriate functional forms, and these were then multiplied by appropriate adjustment factors so that the resulting equations yielded the model mine costs for initial and deferred capital and annual operating cost. (The validity of this scaling process is based on the assumption that total initial and deferred capital costs are proportional to the initial and deferred costs for the primary equipment types that were considered and that annual operating cost is proportional to the direct labor costs that were determined based on primary equipment quantities.) Initial capital costs ranged from $3,910,470 in Central Appalachia to $49,296,785; deferred capital costs ranged from $3,220,000 in Central Appalachia to $30,735,000 in Campbell County, Wyoming; and annual operating costs ranged from $2,924,148 in Central Appalachia to $32,708,591 in Campbell County, Wyoming. (DMC)

  20. Georgia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Georgia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5.77 5.81 6.14 6.23 7.03 7.75 7.91 7.97 7.47 7.28 6.40 5.62 1990 6.37 6.81 6.67 6.30 7.31 7.69 8.05 8.13 7.80 7.27 6.99 6.37 1991 6.15 6.43 6.60 7.72 7.87 7.98 8.10 8.24 8.21 7.65 5.98 6.21 1992 6.08 6.51 6.25 6.29 6.96 7.88 8.30 8.38 3.87 7.64

  1. Delaware Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delaware Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6.06 6.10 6.06 6.33 6.81 7.52 7.96 7.49 7.48 7.38 6.76 6.16 1990 5.60 5.79 5.82 5.98 6.44 7.29 7.62 7.86 7.61 7.33 6.46 6.03 1991 5.90 5.00 5.89 5.63 6.25 7.24 7.50 6.47 7.42 6.86 5.99 5.49 1992 5.50 5.52 5.80 5.98 6.51 7.39 7.94 8.08 8.05 7.20

  2. District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7.49 7.43 7.72 7.50 7.13 5.91 7.11 6.70 8.60 8.04 7.61 7.31 1990 7.05 7.50 7.70 6.89 7.05 6.51 6.67 6.66 8.29 7.89 7.09 6.83 1991 7.04 7.22 6.90 7.22 7.31 5.96 6.30 6.28 8.31 7.95 7.17 6.93 1992 7.31 7.07 7.23 7.08

  3. Colorado Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Colorado Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4.30 4.30 4.33 4.54 4.82 5.20 5.70 6.07 5.81 5.27 4.75 4.49 1990 4.34 4.29 4.31 4.41 4.60 5.09 5.91 6.01 6.03 5.34 4.55 4.33 1991 4.23 4.29 4.39 4.51 4.68 5.42 5.92 6.21 6.14 5.43 4.62 4.35 1992 4.25 4.30 4.38 4.52 4.96 5.25 5.78 6.06 5.89 5.37

  4. Florida Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Florida Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7.26 7.55 7.12 7.92 8.91 9.31 9.41 9.67 9.39 9.52 8.34 7.18 1990 6.87 7.92 8.08 8.25 8.86 9.24 9.54 9.81 9.80 10.31 9.80 8.82 1991 8.42 8.02 8.08 8.86 9.95 10.22 10.18 10.71 10.60 10.72 9.00 8.10 1992 7.79 7.54 8.48 8.66 9.80 10.69 10.99 11.26

  5. Louisiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Louisiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5.40 5.23 4.90 5.78 6.43 7.11 7.23 7.65 7.63 7.36 6.83 6.01 1990 5.17 5.88 5.00 6.09 6.18 7.30 7.47 7.70 7.47 7.21 6.75 6.32 1991 5.37 5.03 5.18 5.55 6.57 6.75 6.99 7.33 7.29 7.34 5.86 5.60 1992 4.80 4.43 5.09 4.85 6.27 6.78 7.06 7.41 7.34 7.87

  6. Kentucky Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kentucky Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4.48 4.49 4.46 4.71 5.03 5.50 5.98 6.12 5.98 5.12 4.68 4.39 1990 4.71 4.76 4.62 4.79 5.51 5.86 6.48 6.29 5.94 5.21 4.67 4.75 1991 4.60 4.69 4.65 5.12 5.73 6.36 6.75 6.62 5.71 4.88 4.67 4.67 1992 4.67 4.46 4.54 4.69 4.98 5.79 6.25 6.42 6.96 6.34

  7. Illinois Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Illinois Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4.70 4.96 5.08 4.99 5.11 5.60 5.85 6.43 5.81 5.00 4.56 4.54 1990 4.79 5.30 5.02 4.92 5.22 5.84 6.21 6.20 5.71 4.93 4.73 4.84 1991 4.94 4.98 4.72 5.10 5.67 6.31 6.54 6.54 5.50 4.90 4.48 4.51 1992 4.66 4.76 4.33 4.68 5.52 6.45 6.91 6.87 6.37 5.60

  8. Indiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Indiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5.72 5.48 5.62 5.86 6.19 6.76 6.88 6.87 6.16 5.14 4.91 4.84 1990 5.59 5.39 5.35 5.41 5.81 6.42 6.58 6.36 6.05 4.65 5.01 4.93 1991 5.39 5.81 5.23 5.75 6.38 6.76 6.82 6.83 6.13 5.17 4.67 5.04 1992 5.11 5.40 4.79 5.30 5.93 6.42 6.87 6.97 6.85 5.44

  9. Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4.68 4.50 4.31 4.32 4.64 5.08 5.34 5.40 5.19 4.69 4.45 4.56 1990 4.98 4.57 4.23 4.12 4.40 4.77 5.07 4.63 4.55 4.56 4.75 4.85 1991 4.59 3.97 4.13 4.24 4.49 5.05 5.14 5.25 5.06 4.97 4.71 4.70 1992 4.58 4.15 4.17 4.34 4.85 5.51 5.56 5.98 5.93 6.04

  10. Mississippi Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Mississippi Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5.02 5.10 4.93 5.14 5.57 5.43 5.49 5.54 5.47 5.35 5.28 4.73 1990 5.09 5.38 5.43 5.14 5.71 5.50 5.57 5.66 5.74 5.65 5.42 5.19 1991 5.01 5.03 5.19 5.60 6.19 5.93 5.83 5.75 5.48 5.35 4.99 4.83 1992 4.54 4.46 4.52 4.62 5.45 5.51 5.64

  11. Missouri Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Missouri Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4.45 4.47 4.48 4.75 5.35 6.23 6.56 6.73 6.35 5.49 5.03 4.65 1990 4.73 4.99 5.02 5.07 5.30 6.11 6.65 7.06 7.14 6.04 5.21 5.02 1991 4.80 4.79 4.72 5.09 5.90 7.29 7.55 7.60 7.29 6.16 4.85 4.74 1992 4.65 4.61 4.60 4.60 5.32 6.24 6.99 7.40 7.23 6.59

  12. Montana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Montana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4.29 4.33 4.35 4.41 4.52 4.57 4.72 4.67 4.58 4.35 4.29 4.25 1990 4.26 4.27 4.36 4.48 4.65 4.97 5.79 5.95 5.75 5.15 4.69 4.50 1991 4.23 4.31 4.34 4.43 4.54 5.15 5.67 5.89 5.61 4.97 4.41 4.40 1992 4.47 4.53 4.66 4.73 5.06 5.57 5.78 6.02 5.45 5.14

  13. Maryland Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Maryland Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5.92 6.06 6.01 6.20 6.57 7.26 7.70 7.89 8.11 7.29 6.45 5.74 1990 5.85 6.33 6.21 6.15 6.83 7.45 7.99 8.22 8.12 7.41 6.46 6.02 1991 5.80 5.84 5.79 6.09 6.92 7.33 7.43 7.54 7.55 6.54 5.93 5.94 1992 5.91 5.89 5.66 5.40 6.26 7.58 8.17 8.51 8.80 7.43

  14. Massachusetts Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6.99 7.06 7.02 7.12 6.69 7.44 7.88 8.20 7.99 6.31 7.77 7.31 1990 7.23 8.00 8.10 8.36 6.71 6.93 7.85 8.27 8.09 7.22 8.50 8.27 1991 8.11 8.15 8.25 8.56 6.57 7.42 8.00 8.32 8.07 7.01 8.77 8.47 1992 8.11 8.04 8.05 8.32 6.12 6.95 7.61

  15. Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5.03 5.02 5.02 5.13 5.48 6.37 6.86 7.15 6.60 5.51 4.94 4.68 1990 4.69 4.75 4.79 4.89 5.29 5.91 6.69 6.60 6.28 5.42 4.97 4.77 1991 4.83 4.85 4.88 5.01 5.42 6.19 6.76 7.14 6.29 5.41 4.87 4.69 1992 4.80 4.82 4.83 4.89 5.28 6.02 6.58 6.71 6.45 5.39

  16. Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

  17. 21 briefing pages total

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law

  18. Low-Cost MHTES Systems for CSP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MHTES Systems for CSP Low-Cost MHTES Systems for CSP This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon csp_review_meeting_042313_motyka.pdf More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Metal Hydride TES Systems - FY13 Q1 Low-Cost Metal Hydride TES Systems - FY13 Q3 Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System - FY13 Q2

  19. Energy Management in Small Commercial Buildings: A Look at How HVAC Contractors Can Deliver Energy Efficiency to this Segment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hult, Erin; Granderson, Jessica; Mathew, Paul

    2014-07-01

    While buildings smaller than 50,000 sq ft account for nearly half of the energy used in US commercial buildings, energy efficiency programs to-date have primarily focused on larger buildings. Interviews with stakeholders and a review of the literature indicate interest in energy efficiency from the small commercial building sector, provided solutions are simple and low-cost. An approach to deliver energy management to small commercial buildings via HVAC contractors and preliminary demonstration findings are presented. The energy management package (EMP) developed includes five technical elements: benchmarking and analysis of monthly energy use; analysis of interval electricity data (if available), a one-hour onsite walkthrough, communication with the building owner, and checking of results. This data-driven approach tracks performance and identifies low-cost opportunities, using guidelines and worksheets for each element to streamline the delivery process and minimize the formal training required. This energy management approach is unique from, but often complementary to conventional quality maintenance or retrofit-focused programs targeting the small commercial segment. Because HVAC contractors already serve these clients, the transaction cost to market and deliver energy management services can be reduced to the order of hundreds of dollars per year. This business model, outlined briefly in this report, enables the offering to benefit the contractor and client even at the modest expected energy savings in small buildings. Results from a small-scale pilot of this approach validated that the EMP could be delivered by contractors in 4-8 hours per building per year, and that energy savings of 3-5percent are feasible through this approach.

  20. Activity Based Costing

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

  1. Development of Low Cost Industrially Scalable PCM Capsules for Thermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage in CSP Plants | Department of Energy Low Cost Industrially Scalable PCM Capsules for Thermal Energy Storage in CSP Plants Development of Low Cost Industrially Scalable PCM Capsules for Thermal Energy Storage in CSP Plants This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon csp_review_meeting_042413_goswami.pdf More Documents & Publications High Efficiency Thermal Energy

  2. Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2004 $294,316 FY2005 $820,074 FY2006 $799,449 FY2007 $877,898 FY2008 $866,608 FY2009 $886,404 FY2010 $800,314 FY2011 $871,280 FY2012 $824,517 FY2013 Cumulative Fee Paid $7,040,860 $820,074 $799,449 $877,898 $916,130 $886,608 Computer Sciences Corporation DE-AC06-04RL14383 $895,358 $899,230 $907,583 Cost Plus Award Fee $134,100,336 $8,221,404 Fee Available Contract Period: Fee Information Minimum

  3. Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Hydrogen Program Record number11007, Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation, documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost.

  4. Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. ... Calculation Methodology and Results: The consumer's cost per mile for the FCEV is set to ...

  5. Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2008

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY2008 $87,580 FY2009 $87,580 FY2010 $171,763 FY2011 $1,339,286 FY 2012 $38,126 FY 2013 $42,265 Cumulative Fee Paid $1,766,600 $42,265 Cost Plus Incentive Fee/Cost Plus Fixed Fee $36,602,425 Contract Period: September 2007 - November 30, 2012 Target Fee $521,595 Total Estimated Contract Cost Contract Type: Maximum Fee $3,129,570 $175,160 $377,516 $1,439,287 Fee Available $175,160 $80,871 Accelerated Remediation Company (aRc) DE-AT30-07CC60013 Contractor: Contract Number: Minimum Fee $2,086,380

  6. Electric Blanket Delivers K.O. to Space Heater During #EnergyFaceoff...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Blanket Delivers K.O. to Space Heater During EnergyFaceoff Round Three Electric Blanket Delivers K.O. to Space Heater During EnergyFaceoff Round Three November 19, 2014 ...

  7. Secretary Moniz's Remarks Presenting the Department’s FY 2016 Budget Request-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, presenting the Department’s FY 2016 Budget Request on February 2, 2015.

  8. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at he 2014 National Science Bowl-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary's remarks, as delivered, at the National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. on April 28, 2014.

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lee's Summit R-7 School District Delivers

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    with Electric Trucks Lee's Summit R-7 School District Delivers with Electric Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lee's Summit R-7 School District Delivers with Electric Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lee's Summit R-7 School District Delivers with Electric Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lee's Summit R-7 School District Delivers with Electric Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lee's

  10. Total Sales of Kerosene

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 79,674 137,928 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 61,327 106,995 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 15,991 27,500 1984-2014 Connecticut 8,800 7,437

  11. A chronicle of costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elioff, T.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains the history of all estimated costs associated with the superconducting super collider.

  12. Cost Estimation Package

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

  13. Life Cycle Cost Estimate

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

  14. INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

  15. Workplace Charging Equipment and Installation Costs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Equipment and Installation Costs Workplace Charging Equipment and Installation Costs The costs for a workplace charging program include the costs for charging equipment, installation, maintenance, and supplying electricity. Charging equipment costs depend on the type of charging station you decide to install in your workplace. Level 1 ($300-$1,500) and Level 2 ($400-$6,500) charging stations are commonly installed at workplaces. Explore how charging station equipment features affect the total

  16. Reducing Non-Hardware Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Costs » Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Reducing Non-Hardware Costs DOE supports efforts to dramatically reduce the non-hardware, balance of systems costs associated with solar energy systems. Representing as much as 64% of the total installed system price, these "soft costs" include: Customer Acquisition Financing and Contracting Permitting, Interconnection, and Inspection Installation and Performance Operations and Maintenance. To meet SunShot goals, the industry must innovate new

  17. TotalView Training 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TotalView Training 2015 TotalView Training 2015 NERSC will host an in-depth training course on TotalView, a graphical parallel debugger developed by Rogue Wave Software, on...

  18. Parametric Analysis of the Factors Controlling the Costs of Sedimentary Geothermal Systems - Preliminary Results (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies Several additional studies were conducted to explore the sensitivity of sedimentary geothermal system costs to key assumptions in the base case model. 1. Decreased Drilling Costs Assumed that drilling costs were 75% of those in the base case. * Total well field costs account for ~30%-50% of the total project costs in base case. * Assuming a 25% reduction in drilling costs reduces overall project capital costs by 8%-14%. * Impact increases with increasing reservoir depth (drilling costs

  19. New geothermal heat extraction process to deliver clean power generation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pete McGrail

    2012-12-31

    A new method for capturing significantly more heat from low-temperature geothermal resources holds promise for generating virtually pollution-free electrical energy. Scientists at the Department of Energys Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will determine if their innovative approach can safely and economically extract and convert heat from vast untapped geothermal resources. The goal is to enable power generation from low-temperature geothermal resources at an economical cost. In addition to being a clean energy source without any greenhouse gas emissions, geothermal is also a steady and dependable source of power.

  20. Clean Cities Case Study: UPS delivers with Alternative Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frailey, M.

    1999-08-30

    In the fall of 1994, the UPS fleet in Landover, Maryland, began operating 20 vehicles on CNG. UPS selected CNG because natural gas is an abundant domestic resource that is available in almost every city in the US, and it also generally costs less than other fuels. The UPS project, funded by DOE through NREL and managed by TRI, was designed to test the feasibility of using CNG in a medium-duty pick-up and delivery fleet. This study is intended only to illustrate approaches that organizations could use in adopting AFVs into their fleets.

  1. Final Scientific and Technical Report - Practical Fiber Delivered Laser Ignition Systems for Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yalin, Azer

    2014-03-30

    Research has characterized advanced kagome fiber optics for their use in laser ignition systems. In comparison to past fibers used in laser ignition, these fibers have the important advantage of being relatively bend-insensitivity, so that they can be bent and coiled without degradation of output energy or beam quality. The results are very promising for practical systems. For pulse durations of ~12 ns, the fibers could deliver >~10 mJ pulses before damage onset. A study of pulse duration showed that by using longer pulse duration (~20 – 30 ns), it is possible to carry even higher pulse energy (by factor of ~2-3) which also provides future opportunities to implement longer duration sources. Beam quality measurements showed nearly single-mode output from the kagome fibers (i.e. M2 close to 1) which is the optimum possible value and, combined with their high pulse energy, shows the suitability of the fibers for laser ignition. Research has also demonstrated laser ignition of an engine including reliable (100%) ignition of a single-cylinder gasoline engine using the laser ignition system with bent and coiled kagome fiber. The COV of IMEP was <2% which is favorable for stable engine operation. These research results, along with the continued reduction in cost of laser sources, support our commercial development of practical laser ignition systems.

  2. Direct/Indirect Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

  3. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  4. Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2001

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY2001 $4,547,400 FY2002 $4,871,000 FY2003 $6,177,902 FY2004 $8,743,007 FY2005 $13,134,189 FY2006 $7,489,704 FY2007 $9,090,924 FY2008 $10,045,072 FY2009 $12,504,247 FY2010 $17,590,414 FY2011 $17,558,710 FY2012 $14,528,770 Cumulative Fee Paid $126,281,339 Cost Plus Award Fee DE-AC29-01AL66444 Washington TRU Solutions LLC Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: $8,743,007 Contract Period: $1,813,482,000 Fee Information Maximum Fee $131,691,744 Total Estimated Contract Cost: $4,547,400

  5. U.S. Total Exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Egypt Freeport, TX Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Kenai, AK Port Nikiski, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Sasabe, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA San

  6. U.S. Total Exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Egypt Freeport, TX Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Sasabe, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass,

  7. Secretary Moniz to Deliver Keynote at Washington Auto Show | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy to Deliver Keynote at Washington Auto Show Secretary Moniz to Deliver Keynote at Washington Auto Show January 21, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Tomorrow, Wednesday, January 22, 2014, Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will deliver the government keynote address at the Washington Auto Show's Public Policy Day. His remarks will focus on the Energy Department's work with automakers, universities and national laboratories to put the United States in the

  8. Pollution prevention cost savings potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celeste, J.

    1994-12-01

    The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

  9. Delivered Energy Consumption Projections by Industry in the Annual Energy Outlook 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents delivered energy consumption and intensity projections for the industries included in the industrial sector of the National Energy Modeling System.

  10. Secretary Moniz's Remarks on Project Management Reform at the National Academy of Public Administration-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, on Project Management at the National Academy of Public Administration in Washington, DC on January 15, 2015.

  11. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the White House Tribal Nations Conference-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, at the White House Tribal Nations Conference on the panel on White House Council on Native American Affairs Energy and Climate Work Groups.

  12. Energy Secretary Moniz to Deliver Keynote Remarks at Powering Africa Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will deliver keynote remarks at the Powering Africa Summit in Washington, D.C.

  13. Total Eolica | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eolica Jump to: navigation, search Name: Total Eolica Place: Spain Product: Project developer References: Total Eolica1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  14. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

    2009-02-02

    The rapid development of wind power that the United States has experienced over the last several years has been coupled with a growing concern that wind development will require substantial additions to the nation's transmission infrastructure. Transmission is particularly important for wind power due to the locational dependence of wind resources, the relatively low capacity factor of wind plants, and the mismatch between the short lead time to build a new wind project and the longer lead time often needed to plan, permit, and construct transmission. It is clear that institutional issues related to transmission planning, siting, and cost allocation will pose major obstacles to accelerated wind power deployment, but also of concern is the potential cost of this infrastructure build out. Simply put, how much extra cost will society bear to deliver wind power to load centers? Without an answer to this question, there can be no consensus on whether or not the cost of developing transmission for wind will be a major barrier to further wind deployment, or whether the institutional barriers to transmission expansion are likely to be of more immediate concern. In this report, we review a sample of 40 detailed transmission studies that have included wind power. These studies cover a broad geographic area, and were completed from 2001-2008. Our primary goal in reviewing these studies is to develop a better understanding of the transmission costs needed to access growing quantities of wind generation. A secondary goal is to gain a better appreciation of the differences in transmission planning approaches in order to identify those methodologies that seem most able to estimate the incremental transmission costs associated with wind development. Finally, we hope that the resulting dataset and discussion might be used to inform the assumptions, methods, and results of higher-level assessment models that are sometimes used to estimate the cost of wind deployment (e.g. NEMS and WinDS). The authors and general location of the 40 detailed transmission studies included in our review are illustrated in Figure ES-1. As discussed in the body of the report, these studies vary considerably in scope, authorship, objectives, methodology, and tools. Though we recognize this diversity and are cognizant that comparisons among these studies are therefore somewhat inappropriate, we nonetheless emphasize such simple comparisons in this report. We do so in order to improve our understanding of the range of transmission costs needed to access greater quantities of wind, and to highlight some of the drivers of those costs. In so doing, we gloss over many important details and differences among the studies in our sample. In emphasizing simple comparisons, our analysis focuses primarily on the unit cost of transmission implied by each of the studies. The unit cost of transmission for wind in $/kW terms on a capacity-weighted basis is estimated by simply dividing the total transmission cost in a study by the total amount of incremental generation capacity (wind and non-wind) modeled in that study. In so doing, this metric assumes that within any individual study all incremental generation capacity imposes transmission costs in proportion to its nameplate capacity rating. The limitations to this approach are described in some detail in the body of the report.

  15. Heat Content of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Total Consumption Electric Power Other Sectors Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 1,023 1,022 1,024 1,027 1,030 1,037 2003-2015 Alabama 1,018 1,018 1,016 1,017 1,025 1,030 2007-2015 Alaska 1,005 1,013 1,012 1,002 1,002 1,001 2007-2015 Arizona 1,016 1,015 1,021 1,025 1,029 1,039 2007-2015 Arkansas 1,012 1,017 1,015

  16. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Projections - 2013 | Department of Energy 3013: H2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about past, current, and projected costs for delivering and dispensing hydrogen. PDF icon DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record # 13013 More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Delivery Roadmap US DRIVE Hydrogen

  17. Total........................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351

  18. Total...........................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space

  19. Total...........................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing

  20. Total............................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

  1. Total.............................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer....................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model.................................. 58.6 7.6 14.2 13.1 9.2 14.6 5.0 14.5 Laptop Model...................................... 16.9 2.0 3.8 3.3 2.1 5.7 1.3 3.5 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..............................

  2. Total..............................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269

  3. Total..............................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat

  4. Total...............................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs

  5. Total...............................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs

  6. Total...............................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2

  7. Total...............................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs

  8. Total.................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat

  9. Total.................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment........ 1.2 N Q Q 0.2 0.4 0.2 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment........... 109.8 14.7 7.4 12.4 12.2 18.5 18.3 17.1 9.2 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............. 109.1 14.6 7.3 12.4 12.2 18.2 18.2 17.1 9.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It............... 0.8 Q Q Q Q 0.3 Q N Q Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas................................................... 58.2 9.2 4.9 7.8 7.1 8.8 8.4 7.8 4.2 Central

  10. Total..................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat

  11. Total..................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat

  12. Total..................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central

  13. Total...................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing

  14. Total...................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 37.8 3.4 2.2 7.0 3.1 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 9.7 0.6 0.5 1.0 0.6 Window/Wall Units.......................................... 28.9 14.9 2.3 3.5 6.0 2.1 1 Unit........................................................... 14.5 6.6 1.0 1.6 4.2 1.2 2

  15. Total...................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 37.8 3.4 2.2 7.0 3.1 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 9.7 0.6 0.5 1.0 0.6 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 14.9 2.3 3.5 6.0 2.1 1 Unit........................................................... 14.5 6.6 1.0 1.6 4.2 1.2 2

  16. Total.......................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.6 15.1 5.5 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.9 5.3 1.6 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 13.7 9.8 3.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 9.3 6.8 2.5 2.................................................................. 16.2 2.9 1.9 1.0 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 1.5 1.1 0.4 Number of Laptop PCs

  17. Total.......................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.9 8.4 3.4 2.................................................................. 16.2 3.5 2.2 1.3 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.1 1.5 0.6 Number of Laptop PCs

  18. Total.......................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs

  19. Total........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1

  20. Total........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing

  1. Total........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing

  2. Total........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 40.1 21.2 6.9 12.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 Q Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 13.6 5.6 2.3 5.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.0 4.4

  3. Total........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One

  4. Total........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0

  5. Total........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7

  6. Total...........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat

  7. Total...........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat

  8. Total...........................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat

  9. Total.............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat

  10. Total.............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a

  11. Total.............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a

  12. Total.............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat

  13. Total.............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat

  14. Total.............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a

  15. Total.............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat

  16. Total.............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat

  17. Total..............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5

  18. Total..............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a

  19. Total..............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer .......................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer....................................... 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1......................................................................... 50.3 3.1 3.4 3.4 5.4 2......................................................................... 16.2 0.7 1.1 1.2 2.2 3 or More............................................................ 9.0 0.3

  20. Total..............................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5

  1. Total.................................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat

  2. Total.................................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................... 17.8 1.8 Q Q 4.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................................ 93.3 5.3 7.0 7.8 7.2 Use Cooling Equipment................................................. 91.4 5.3 7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................................. 65.9 1.1 6.4 6.4 5.4 Without a

  3. Total....................................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  4. Total....................................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  5. Total....................................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  6. Total....................................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  7. Total....................................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  8. Total.........................................................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less

  9. Total..........................................................

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 2.0 0.4 Q 0.3 Basements Basement in Single-Family Homes and Apartments in 2-4 Unit Buildings Yes......

  10. Total..........................................................

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

  11. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Living Space Characteristics Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 Million ... Living Space Characteristics Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 Million ...

  12. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 80,000 or More 60,000 to 79,999 ... Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 80,000 or More 60,000 to 79,999 ...

  13. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Table HC7.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line ... Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 80,000 or More Space Heating ...

  14. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line ... Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal Assistance 1 40,000 to 59,999 60,000 to 79,999 ...

  15. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent......1.3 1.2 0.8 0.4 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  16. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region Home Appliances Usage Indicators South Atlantic East ...

  17. Total..........................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported) Housing Units (millions) Home ...

  18. Total..............................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 14.8 10.5 2,263 1,669 1,079 1,312 1,019 507 N N N ConcreteConcrete Block... 5.3 3.4 2,393 1,660 1,614 Q Q Q Q Q Q Composition...

  19. COST BREAKDOWN AWARD NO: START DATE: EXPIRATION DATE: FISCAL YEAR BREAKDOWN OF FUNDS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COST BREAKDOWN AWARD NO: START DATE: EXPIRATION DATE: FISCAL YEAR BREAKDOWN OF FUNDS ELEMENTS FY FY FY FY FY TOTAL Direct Labor Overhead Materials Supplies Travel Other Direct Costs Subcontractors Total Direct Costs G&A Expense Total All Costs DOE Share* Awardee Share* Overhead Rate G&A Rate 1. The cost elements indicated are provided as an example only. Your firm should indicate the costs elements you have used on your invoices. 2. You should indicate the cost incurred for each of your

  20. Cree's High-Power White LED Delivers 121 lm/W

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cree's commercial high-power white LEDs can now deliver 121 lm/W at 35A/cm2 current density. These particular Cree XLamp® XP-G LEDs deliver 267 lumens at a drive current of 700 mA and an operating...

  1. High Energy Cost Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High Energy Cost Grant Program provides financial assistance for the improvement of energy generation, transmission, and distribution facilities servicing eligible rural communities with home...

  2. Workplace Charging Installation Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installation costs and services vary considerably, so employers are encouraged to obtain a number of quotes before moving forward with any installation. An initial site investigation should include:

  3. SOFT COST GRAND CHALLENGE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energycenter.org California Center for Sustainable Energy Soft Cost Grand Challenge May 22, 2014 Accelerating the transition to a sustainable world powered by clean energy 2...

  4. Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon csp_review_meeting_042313_stettenheim.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs - FY13 Q2 Advanced Low-Cost Recievers for Parabolic Troughs - FY13 Q3 Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs

  5. Transmission line capital costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

  6. Decommissioning Unit Cost Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

    2002-02-26

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

  7. Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-09-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

  8. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 1993 Family Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factor: Less than 5,000 5,000...

  9. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Annual GHG Emissions (lbs of CO2) Vehicle Cost Calculator See Assumptions and Methodology Back Next U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Get Widget Code...

  10. Workplace Charging Equipment Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Charging stations are available from a variety of manufacturers in a range of models for all charging applications. For a single port charging station, Level 1 hardware costs range from $300-$1,500...

  11. Estimating Renewable Energy Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Some renewable energy measures, such as daylighting, passive solar heating, and cooling load avoidance, do not add much to the cost of a building. However, renewable energy technologies typically...

  12. System Cost Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-03-27

    SCM is used for estimation of the life-cycle impacts (costs, health and safety risks) of waste management facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, and transuranic waste. SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing waste management facilities at Department of Energy (DOE) installations. SCM also provides transportation costs for intersite transfer of DOE wastes. SCM covers the entire DOE waste management complex tomore » allow system sensitivity analysis including: treatment, storage, and disposal configuration options; treatment technology selection; scheduling options; transportation options; waste stream and volume changes; and site specific conditions.« less

  13. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

  14. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates.

  15. ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a

  16. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Choose a vehicle to compare fuel cost and emissions with a conventional vehicle. Select Fuel/Technology Electric Hybrid Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator Update Your Widget Code This widget version will stop working on March 31. Update your widget code. × Widget Code Select All Close U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  17. CRADA final report: Technical assessment of roll-to-roll operation of lamination process, thermal treatment, and alternative carbon fiber precursors for low-cost, high-efficiency manufacturing of flow battery stacks and other energy devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Claus; Madden, Thomas; Wood, III, David L; Muth, Thomas R.; Warrington, Curtis; Ozcan, Soydan; Manson, Hunter; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Smith, Mark A.; Lu, Yuan; Loretz, Jeremy

    2015-09-23

    Among the various stationary-storage technologies under development, redox flow batteries (RFBs) offer the greatest potential to deliver inexpensive, scalable, and efficient grid-scale electrical-energy storage. Unlike traditional sealed batteries, in a flow battery power and energy are decoupled. Cell area and cell count in the stack determine the device power, and the chemical storage volume determines the total energy. Grid-scale energy-storage applications require megawatt-scale devices, which require the assembly of hundreds of large-area, bipolar cells per power plant. The cell-stack is the single system component with the largest impact on capital cost (due to the large number of highly engineered components) and operating costs (determined by overall round-trip efficiency).

  18. Strategic supply system design - a holistic evaluation of operational and production cost for a biorefinery supply chain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamers, Patrick; Tan, Eric C.D.; Searcy, Erin M.; Scarlata, Christopher J.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2015-08-20

    Pioneer cellulosic biorefineries across the United States rely on a conventional feedstock supply system based on one-year contracts with local growers, who harvest, locally store, and deliver feed-stock in low-density format to the conversion facility. While the conventional system is designed for high biomass yield areas, pilot scale operations have experienced feedstock supply shortages and price volatilities due to reduced harvests and competition from other industries. Regional supply dependency and the inability to actively manage feedstock stability and quality, provide operational risks to the biorefinery, which translate into higher investment risk. The advanced feedstock supply system based on a networkmore » of depots can mitigate many of these risks and enable wider supply system benefits. This paper compares the two concepts from a system-level perspective beyond mere logistic costs. It shows that while processing operations at the depot increase feedstock supply costs initially, they enable wider system benefits including supply risk reduction (leading to lower interest rates on loans), industry scale-up, conversion yield improvements, and reduced handling equipment and storage costs at the biorefinery. When translating these benefits into cost reductions per liter of gasoline equivalent (LGE), we find that total cost reductions between -$0.46 to -$0.21 per LGE for biochemical and -$0.32 to -$0.12 per LGE for thermochemical conversion pathways are possible. Naturally, these system level benefits will differ between individual actors along the feedstock supply chain. Further research is required with respect to depot sizing, location, and ownership structures.« less

  19. Strategic supply system design - a holistic evaluation of operational and production cost for a biorefinery supply chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamers, Patrick; Tan, Eric C.D.; Searcy, Erin M.; Scarlata, Christopher J.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2015-08-20

    Pioneer cellulosic biorefineries across the United States rely on a conventional feedstock supply system based on one-year contracts with local growers, who harvest, locally store, and deliver feed-stock in low-density format to the conversion facility. While the conventional system is designed for high biomass yield areas, pilot scale operations have experienced feedstock supply shortages and price volatilities due to reduced harvests and competition from other industries. Regional supply dependency and the inability to actively manage feedstock stability and quality, provide operational risks to the biorefinery, which translate into higher investment risk. The advanced feedstock supply system based on a network of depots can mitigate many of these risks and enable wider supply system benefits. This paper compares the two concepts from a system-level perspective beyond mere logistic costs. It shows that while processing operations at the depot increase feedstock supply costs initially, they enable wider system benefits including supply risk reduction (leading to lower interest rates on loans), industry scale-up, conversion yield improvements, and reduced handling equipment and storage costs at the biorefinery. When translating these benefits into cost reductions per liter of gasoline equivalent (LGE), we find that total cost reductions between -$0.46 to -$0.21 per LGE for biochemical and -$0.32 to -$0.12 per LGE for thermochemical conversion pathways are possible. Naturally, these system level benefits will differ between individual actors along the feedstock supply chain. Further research is required with respect to depot sizing, location, and ownership structures.

  20. Smart Grid Update: Delivering More Reliable and Efficient Power to the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nation's Capital | Department of Energy Update: Delivering More Reliable and Efficient Power to the Nation's Capital Smart Grid Update: Delivering More Reliable and Efficient Power to the Nation's Capital March 6, 2014 - 1:37pm Addthis Ryan Egidi Ryan Egidi Energy Delivery Technologies Technical Project Officer Smart grid investments are transforming power delivery in the nation's Capital and nearby states. I saw this first-hand when I visited Pepco Holdings Inc. (PHI) last month to mark the

  1. Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011

  2. Secretary Chu to Deliver Keynote on EV Everywhere Grand Challenge at

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington Auto Show | Department of Energy Keynote on EV Everywhere Grand Challenge at Washington Auto Show Secretary Chu to Deliver Keynote on EV Everywhere Grand Challenge at Washington Auto Show January 30, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Tomorrow, Thursday, January 31, 2013, Secretary Chu will deliver the government keynote address at the Washington Auto Show's Public Policy Day. His remarks will focus on the Energy Department's EV Everywhere Grand

  3. Senator Dorgan and Under Secretary Orr to Deliver Remarks at 2015 Fuel Cell

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review | Department of Energy Senator Dorgan and Under Secretary Orr to Deliver Remarks at 2015 Fuel Cell Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review Senator Dorgan and Under Secretary Orr to Deliver Remarks at 2015 Fuel Cell Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review June 2, 2015 - 10:52am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) and the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

  4. Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies | Department of Energy Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies January 25, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman will give the keynote address at the 4th annual IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies (ISGT 2013) on

  5. Recovery Act Investment Wraps Up, Delivering Major Benefits to the Nation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment Wraps Up, Delivering Major Benefits to the Nation Recovery Act Investment Wraps Up, Delivering Major Benefits to the Nation October 5, 2015 - 3:21pm Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability I am excited to announce that the more than 330 Recovery Act-funded projects that the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has been managing over the past five

  6. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2009-07-16

    The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates indoor air quality problems

  7. Cost Reductions with Multi-Megawatt Centralized Inverter Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC *99.1% Efficient Inverter System *Power Factor Control +- 0.9 *2,500VDC *LowZero Voltage Ride Through *Compact Design *Liquid Cooling *Hot-Swap Capability *Lower Total Cost...

  8. Factory Cost Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-12-17

    The Factory Cost Model (FCM) is an economic analysis tool intended to provide flat panel display (FPD) and other similar discrete component manufacturers with the ability to make first-order estimates of the cost of unit production. This software has several intended uses. Primary among these is the ability to provide first-order economic analysis for future factories. Consequently, the model requires a minimal level of input detail, and accomodates situations where actual production data are notmore » available. This software is designed to be activity based such that most of the calculated direct costs are associated with the steps of a manufacturibg process. The FCM architecture has the ability to accomodate the analysis of existing manufacturing facilities. The FCM can provide assistance with strategic economic decisions surrounding production related matters. For instance, the program can project the effect on costs and resources of a new product''s introduction, or it can assess the potential cost reduction produced by step yield improvements in the manufacturing process.« less

  9. Costs Associated With Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

    2014-09-01

    This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with fueling infrastructure for compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles. It provides estimated cost ranges for various sizes and types of CNG fueling stations and an overview of factors that contribute to the total cost of an installed station. The information presented is based on input from professionals in the natural gas industry who design, sell equipment for, and/or own and operate CNG stations.

  10. Technical approaches for reducing cost of power support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    Methods for reducing the cost of Chinese-made power supports are discussed. A reasonable selection of functions is proposed, including protection from side collapse, anti-sliding and anti-toppling, prop extension, loading capacity and hydraulic pressure. Material costs constitute 34-44% of the total cost, and so optimisation of design and materials is required. Standardisation of hydraulic components is recommended; and the use of appropriate and effective technological and managerial techniques is advocated. (In Chinese)

  11. QGESS: Capital Cost Scaling Methodology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the tonnes of CO2 utilized. The costs of the process are to include infrastructure, raw materials, processing, byproduct disposal, and utilities costs, as well as any other costs....

  12. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  13. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  14. Cost estimate for muddy water palladium production facility at Mound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAdams, R.K.

    1988-11-30

    An economic feasibility study was performed on the ''Muddy Water'' low-chlorine content palladium powder production process developed by Mound. The total capital investment and total operating costs (dollars per gram) were determined for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg in 1-kg increments. The report includes a brief description of the Muddy Water process, the process flow diagram, and material balances for the various production batch sizes. Two types of facilities were evaluated--one for production of new, ''virgin'' palladium powder, and one for recycling existing material. The total capital investment for virgin facilities ranged from $600,000 --$1.3 million for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg, respectively. The range for recycle facilities was $1--$2.3 million. The total operating cost for 100% acceptable powder production in the virgin facilities ranged from $23 per gram for a 1-kg production batch size to $8 per gram for a 10-kg batch size. Similarly for recycle facilities, the total operating cost ranged from $34 per gram to $5 per gram. The total operating cost versus product acceptability (ranging from 50%--100% acceptability) was also evaluated for both virgin and recycle facilities. Because production sizes studied vary widely and because scale-up factors are unknown for batch sizes greater than 1 kg, all costs are ''order-of-magnitude'' estimates. All costs reported are in 1987 dollars.

  15. Low-Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems - Presentation from SunShot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013 | Department of Energy Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems - Presentation from SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013 Low-Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems - Presentation from SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013 This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon

  16. H2A Delivery: Miscellaneous Cost and H2 Losses | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Miscellaneous Cost and H2 Losses H2A Delivery: Miscellaneous Cost and H2 Losses Presentation by Matt Ringer of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory at the Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007 PDF icon deliv_analysis_ringer.pdf More Documents & Publications H2A Delivery Models and Results Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Models H2A Delivery Components Model and Analysis

  17. Development of a High Efficiency Hot Gas Turbo-expander and Low Cost Heat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exchangers for Optimized CSP Supercritical CO2 Operation | Department of Energy a High Efficiency Hot Gas Turbo-expander and Low Cost Heat Exchangers for Optimized CSP Supercritical CO2 Operation Development of a High Efficiency Hot Gas Turbo-expander and Low Cost Heat Exchangers for Optimized CSP Supercritical CO2 Operation This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon

  18. Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film Solar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reflector | Department of Energy Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film Solar Reflector Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film Solar Reflector This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon csp_review_meeting_042313_jorgensen.pdf More Documents & Publications POLYMERIC MIRROR FILMS: DURABILITY IMPROVEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION IN NEW COLLECTOR DESIGNS

  19. Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Baseload Operation | Department of Energy Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon csp_review_meeting_042413_hoste.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008586: Categorical Exclusion Determination

  20. Heliostat cost reduction study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

    2007-06-01

    Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

  1. DEMONSTRATION OF THE VIABILITY AND EVALUATION OF PRODUCTION COSTS FOR BIOMASS-INFUSED COAL BRIQUETTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamshad, Kourosh

    2013-12-31

    This report is the final reporting installment of the DOE project titled DEMONSTRATION OF THE VIABILITY AND EVALUATION OF PRODUCTION COSTS FOR BIOMASS-INFUSED COAL BRIQUETTES. This rerport includes a summary of the work completed to date including the experimental methods used to acheive the results, discussions, conclusions and implications of the final product delivered by the project.

  2. DOE Issues 2 Requests for Information on Low-Cost Hydrogen Production and Delivery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The US DOE's FCTO has issued two RFIs seeking feedback from the research community and relevant stakeholders about hydrogen production and hydrogen delivery RD&D activities aimed at developing technologies that can ultimately produce and deliver low-cost hydrogen.

  3. INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operating Procedures | Department of Energy INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures PDF icon ICR_ICE SOP_Sep 2013_Final.pdf More Documents & Publications ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures (Update Sept 2013) Contractor SOW Template - ICR Contractor SOW Template - ICE

  4. Total Number of Operable Refineries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge

  5. Total Energy Outcome City Pilot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Total Energy Outcome City Pilot 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Targeted Energy Outcomes A New City Energy Policy for Buildings Ken Baker - kbaker@neea.org Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Project Summary Timeline: Key Partners: Start date: 09/01/2012 Planned end date: 08/31/2015 Key Milestones 1. Produce outcome based marketing collateral; 04/03/14 New Buildings Institute Two to three NW cities 2. Quantify and define participating city actions; 04/03/14 3. Quantify ongoing

  6. Oregon Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 14 221 353 1990's 464 477 433 504 430 419 431 378 254 337 2000's 336 201 366 428 372 391 418 445 443 479 2010's 707 790 895 1,044 1,129 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  7. Jefferson Lab Accelerator Delivers Its First 12 GeV Electrons | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Jefferson Lab Accelerator Delivers Its First 12 GeV Electrons On December 14, full-energy 12 GeV electron beam was provided for the first time, to the Experimental Hall D complex, located in the upper, left corner of this aerial photo of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. Hall D is the new experimental research facility - added to CEBAF as part of the 12 GeV Upgrade project. Beam was also delivered to Hall A (dome in the lower left). NEWPORT NEWS, VA, December 21, 2015 -

  8. Hydropower Generators Will Deliver New Energy from an Old Dam | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Hydropower Generators Will Deliver New Energy from an Old Dam Hydropower Generators Will Deliver New Energy from an Old Dam April 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The City of Tacoma, with EERE support, installed two Francis turbine/generator units to an existing dam, Cushman No. 2, which is part of the Cushman Hydroelectric Project owned by Tacoma Power. The new generating units added approximately 3.6 megawatts in generating capacity by using currently diverted, unutilized water flow.

  9. Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops May 24, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis The self-propelled baler collects and packages bales of feedstock on-site that can be immediately loaded and sent to a biorefinery for use. | Photo courtesy of Antares Group. The self-propelled baler collects and packages bales of feedstock on-site that can be immediately loaded and sent to a biorefinery for use. | Photo courtesy of Antares Group. The

  10. Technology advances keeping LNG cost-competitive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellow, E.J. Jr.; Ghazal, F.P.; Silverman, A.J.; Myers, S.D.

    1997-06-02

    LNG plants, often very expensive in the past, will in the future need to cost less to build and operate and yet maintain high safety and reliability standards, both during construction and operation. Technical advancements, both in the process and in equipment scaling, manufacturing, and metallurgy, will provide much of the impetus for the improved economics. Although world energy demand is predicted to grow on average of about 2% annually over the next decade, LNG is expected to contribute an increasing portion of this growth with annual growth rates averaging about 7%. This steep growth increase will be propelled mainly by the environmentally friendlier burning characteristics of natural gas and the strong industrial growth in Asian and pacific Rim countries. While LNG is emerging as the fuel of choice for developing economies, its delivered cost to consumers will need to stay competitive with alternate energy supplies if it is to remain in front. The paper discusses LNG process development, treating process, equipment developments (man heat exchanger, compressors, drivers, and pressure vessels), and economy of scale.

  11. Section L Attachment G - Management Team Cost Sheet.xlsx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    G Management Team Cost Sheet Definitions of items to be included in the worksheet Name Title Reimbursable* Annual Base Salary Reimbursable* Incentive Pay and bonuses Reimbursable* Deferred compensation Reimbursable* Employer contributions to Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOPs) Reimbursable* Employer Contributions to Defined Contribution Pension Plans Total Reimbursable* Annual Compensation Current Annual Base Salary Current Total Annual Compensation Benchmark job title/level Median Annual

  12. Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-11-02

    To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

  13. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-08-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

  14. substantially reduced production costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    production costs - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  15. Reducing Power Factor Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low power factor is expensive and inefficient. Many utility companies charge you an additional fee if your power factor is less than 0.95. Low power factor also reduces your electrical system's distribu- tion capacity by increasing current flow and causing voltage drops. This fact sheet describes power factor and explains how you can improve your power factor to reduce electric bills and enhance your electrical system's capacity. REDUCING POWER FACTOR COST To understand power factor, visualize a

  16. U.S. Total Stocks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Stock Type: Total Stocks Strategic Petroleum Reserve Non-SPR Refinery Tank Farms and Pipelines Leases Alaskan in Transit Bulk Terminal Pipeline Natural Gas Processing Plant Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Stock Type Area Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 1,968,618 1,991,182 2,001,135 2,009,097 2,021,553 2,014,788 1956-2015 Crude Oil

  17. U.S. Total Exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG

  18. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 7. Low-Cost Carbon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fiber | Department of Energy 7. Low-Cost Carbon Fiber FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 7. Low-Cost Carbon Fiber The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability. PDF icon 7_low-cost_carbon_fiber.pdf More Documents & Publications Low Cost Carbon Fiber Research in the LM Materials Program Overview FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting

  19. Monitored Geologic Repository Life Cycle Cost Estimate Assumptions Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sweeney

    2000-03-08

    The purpose of this assumptions document is to provide general scope, strategy, technical basis, schedule and cost assumptions for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) life cycle cost estimate and schedule update incorporating information from the Viability Assessment (VA), License Application Design Selection (LADS), 1999 Update to the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate and from other related and updated information. This document is intended to generally follow the assumptions outlined in the previous MGR cost estimates and as further prescribed by DOE guidance.

  20. MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY LIFE CYCLE COST ESTIMATE ASSUMPTIONS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.E. Sweeney

    2001-02-08

    The purpose of this assumptions document is to provide general scope, strategy, technical basis, schedule and cost assumptions for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) life cycle cost (LCC) estimate and schedule update incorporating information from the Viability Assessment (VA) , License Application Design Selection (LADS), 1999 Update to the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate and from other related and updated information. This document is intended to generally follow the assumptions outlined in the previous MGR cost estimates and as further prescribed by DOE guidance.

  1. Reported Energy and Cost Savings from the DOE ESPC Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A; Slattery, Bob S; Atkin, Erica

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the realization rate of energy and cost savings from the Department of Energy's Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) program based on information reported by the energy services companies (ESCOs) that are carrying out ESPC projects at federal sites. Information was extracted from 134 Measurement and Verification (M&V) reports to determine reported, estimated, and guaranteed cost savings and reported and estimated energy savings for the previous contract year. Because the quality of the reports varied, it was not possible to determine all of these parameters for each project. For 133 of the 134 projects, there was sufficient information to compare estimated, reported, and guaranteed cost savings. For this group, the total estimated cost savings for the reporting periods addressed were $95.7 million, total reported cost savings were $96.8 million, and total guaranteed cost savings were $92.1 million. This means that on average: ESPC contractors guaranteed 96% of the estimated cost savings, projects reported achieving 101% of the estimated cost savings, and projects reported achieving 105% of the guaranteed cost savings. For 129 of the projects examined, there was sufficient information to compare estimated and reported energy savings. On the basis of site energy, estimated savings for those projects for the previous year totaled 5.371 million MMBtu, and reported savings were 5.374 million MMBtu, just over 100% of the estimated energy savings. On the basis of source energy, total estimated energy savings for the 129 projects were 10.400 million MMBtu, and reported saving were 10.405 million MMBtu, again, just over 100.0% of the estimated energy savings.

  2. DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Cost-Effectiveness of Linear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    life-cycle cost simulations that compared a two-lamp troffer using LED lamps (38W total power draw) or fluorescent lamps (51W total power draw) over a 10-year study period. The LED...

  3. West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Delivers Food for 700 Families

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WEST VALLEY, N.Y. – EM employees at West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) helped collect and deliver 114,843 pounds of food, including 360 turkeys, to nine food pantries in the West Valley area, just in time to benefit about 700 families in need during the holidays.

  4. A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    model for emerging applications in stationary fuel cell systems. The analysis considers low temperature proton exchange membrane systems for use in combined heat and power ...

  5. Project Profile: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Dow Chemical Company, under the BOS-X funding opportunity, has launched a transformational product in the building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) industry: the Dow POWERHOUSE Solar Shingle.

  6. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    none,

    2015-04-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back in time, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the U.S. electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GWmoreby 2030, and 2,900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOEs more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050.less

  7. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-04-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back in time, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the U.S. electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GW by 2030, and 2,900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOEs more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

    2013-03-11

    The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a “bottom-up” costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

  9. Total Imports of Residual Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History U.S. Total 4,471 6,479 7,281 4,217 5,941 6,842 1936-2015 PAD District 1 1,854 1,956 4,571 2,206 2,952 3,174 1981-2015 Connecticut 1995-2015 Delaware 204 678 85 1995-2015 Florida 677 351 299 932 836 1995-2015 Georgia 232 138 120 295 1995-2015 Maine 50 1995-2015 Maryland 1995-2015 Massachusetts 1995-2015 New Hampshire 1995-2015 New Jersey 1,328 780 1,575 400 1,131 1,712 1995-2015 New York 7 6 1,475 998 350 322 1995-2015 North Carolina

  10. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Customers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Customers (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A, 4B, 4D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total New England 6,243,013 862,269 28,017 8 7,133,307 Connecticut 1,459,239 155,372 4,648 4 1,619,263 Maine 706,952 91,541 3,023 0 801,516 Massachusetts 2,720,128 398,717 14,896 3 3,133,744 New Hampshire 606,883 105,840 3,342 0 716,065 Rhode Island 438,879 58,346 1,884 1 499,110 Vermont 310,932 52,453 224 0 363,609 Middle Atlantic 15,806,914 2,247,455 44,397 17

  11. Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 79,674 137,928 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 61,327 106,995 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 15,991 27,500 1984-2014 Connecticut 8,800 7,437

  12. Total Imports of Residual Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. Total 133,646 119,888 93,672 82,173 63,294 68,265 1936-2015 PAD District 1 88,999 79,188 59,594 33,566 30,944 33,789 1981-2015 Connecticut 220 129 1995-2015 Delaware 748 1,704 510 1,604 2,479 1995-2015 Florida 15,713 11,654 10,589 8,331 5,055 7,013 1995-2015 Georgia 5,648 7,668 6,370 4,038 2,037 1,629 1995-2015 Maine 1,304 651 419 75 317 135 1995-2015 Maryland 3,638 1,779 1,238 433 938 539 1995-2015 Massachusetts 123 50 78 542 88 1995-2015 New

  13. Levelized cost and levelized avoided cost of new generation resources...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3 The importance of the factors varies among the technologies. For technologies such as solar and wind generation that have no fuel costs and relatively small variable O&M costs,...

  14. Facilitating Sound, Cost-Effective Federal Energy Management (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Federal Government, as the nation's largest energy consumer, has a tremendous opportunity and acknowledged responsibility to lead by example. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) plays a critical role in this effort. FEMP facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP does this by focusing on the needs of its Federal customers, delivering an array of services across a variety of program areas.

  15. "PART 1: ENERGY/WATER CONSUMPTION AND COST DATA"

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adjustment Data Report for Fiscal Years Prior to 2008" ,,,"FY","20XX" "Agency:","Department of X",,,"Prepared by:" "Date:",,,,"Phone:" "PART 1: ENERGY/WATER CONSUMPTION AND COST DATA" "1-1. NECPA/E.O. 13423 Goal Subject Buildings" "Energy Type","Consumption Units","Annual Consumption","Annual Cost (Thou. $)","Unit Cost ($)",,"Site-Delivered Btu

  16. Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Coatings for CSP Collectors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Self-Cleaning Coatings for CSP Collectors Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Coatings for CSP Collectors This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon csp_review_meeting_042413_hunter.pdf More Documents & Publications PowerPoint Presentation - FY13 Q1 Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors - FY13 Q2 Urban Heat Islands: Anti-Soiling Cool Roof Coatings

  17. High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical CO2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recompression Cycle | Department of Energy Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical CO2 Recompression Cycle High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical CO2 Recompression Cycle This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon csp_review_meeting_042313_sullivan.pdf More Documents & Publications High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a

  18. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 13013: Hydrogen Delivery Cost Projections - 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record Record #: 13013 Date: September 26, 2013 Title: H 2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 Originator: E. Sutherland, A. Elgowainy and S. Dillich Approved by: R. Farmer and S. Satyapal Date: December 18, 2013 Item: Reported herein are past 2005 and 2011 estimates, current 2013 estimates, 2020 projected cost estimates and the 2015 and 2020 target costs for delivering and dispensing (untaxed) H 2 to 10%- 15% of vehicles within a city population of 1.2M from a

  19. Total-derivative supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Uekusa, Nobuhiro

    2010-05-15

    On an interval compactification in supersymmetric theory, boundary conditions for bulk fields must be treated carefully. If they are taken arbitrarily following the requirement that a theory is supersymmetric, the conditions could give redundant constraints on the theory. We construct a supersymmetric action integral on an interval by introducing brane interactions with which total-derivative terms under the supersymmetry transformation become zero due to a cancellation. The variational principle leads equations of motion and also boundary conditions for bulk fields, which determine boundary values of bulk fields. By estimating mass spectrum, spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in this simple setup can be realized in a new framework. This supersymmetry breaking does not induce a massless R axion, which is favorable for phenomenology. It is worth noting that fermions in hyper-multiplet, gauge bosons, and the fifth-dimensional component of gauge bosons can have zero-modes (while the other components are all massive as Kaluza-Klein modes), which fits the gauge-Higgs unification scenarios.

  20. Cost | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cost Home Ocop's picture Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To...

  1. Remarks by Secretary Ernest Moniz at a U.S.-China Business Council Issues Luncheon-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Remarks, as delivered, by Secretary Moniz at a U.S.-China Business Council Issues Luncheon on April 7, 2015 in Washington, D.C.

  2. Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

    2013-10-01

    The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

  3. Check Estimates and Independent Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Check estimates and independent cost estimates (ICEs) are tools that can be used to validate a cost estimate. Estimate validation entails an objective review of the estimate to ensure that estimate criteria and requirements have been met and well documented, defensible estimate has been developed. This chapter describes check estimates and their procedures and various types of independent cost estimates.

  4. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing...

  5. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

  6. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  7. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

  8. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

  9. Hydropower Baseline Cost Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, Patrick W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; DeNeale, Scott T.; Chalise, Dol Raj; Centurion, Emma E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent resource assessments conducted by the United States Department of Energy have identified significant opportunities for expanding hydropower generation through the addition of power to non-powered dams and on undeveloped stream-reaches. Additional interest exists in the powering of existing water resource infrastructure such as conduits and canals, upgrading and expanding existing hydropower facilities, and the construction new pumped storage hydropower. Understanding the potential future role of these hydropower resources in the nation’s energy system requires an assessment of the environmental and techno-economic issues associated with expanding hydropower generation. To facilitate these assessments, this report seeks to fill the current gaps in publically available hydropower cost-estimating tools that can support the national-scale evaluation of hydropower resources.

  10. Minnesota Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,845 2,524 3,527 1990's 3,220 4,094 3,134 2,623 3,336 5,696 3,768 1,077 1,954 2,454 2000's 2,529 1,634 9,684 7,353 5,627 6,165 5,472 4,691 4,251 6,069 2010's 6,224 9,668 7,429 10,508 10,835 - = No

  11. Missouri Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 142 2,400 4,851 1990's 8,306 8,910 8,817 10,710 11,072 10,880 12,988 14,059 13,463 13,494 2000's 12,512 12,447 12,349 12,000 13,965 13,823 13,373 13,653 14,628 14,325 2010's 14,387 16,750 16,876 17,894

  12. Montana Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 41 13 242 1990's 261 327 533 939 1,070 1,131 1,247 1,181 2,957 2,436 2000's 3,582 3,166 3,657 4,714 3,212 2,974 3,045 2,843 2,932 11,972 2010's 9,281 10,426 9,055 9,785 10,021 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  13. Nebraska Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 786 894 571 1990's 2,231 3,294 4,063 3,142 7,726 9,181 12,247 8,738 7,941 9,227 2000's 11,235 10,083 10,230 9,820 10,892 9,728 9,795 10,851 14,792 12,292 2010's 12,664 12,649 11,723 13,748 14,128 - =

  14. Nevada Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 287 725 575 1990's 346 1,563 1,889 1,283 3,276 4,416 5,272 6,305 6,941 8,888 2000's 11,621 5,988 4,885 7,914 8,630 8,479 8,910 9,311 9,540 10,305 2010's 10,197 10,971 11,195 12,442 12,120 - = No Data

  15. New Hampshire Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 52 218 567 399 490 2000's 1,130 984 1,700 2,015 2,247 2,392 2,092 2,692 4,126 4,584 2010's 3,588 3,949 3,917 4,585 4,049 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  16. New Jersey Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) New Jersey Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,186 1,558 2,578 1990's 5,978 7,401 10,012 10,901 11,045 19,074 40,100 73,902 57,904 72,015 2000's 68,383 55,889 74,340 78,718 87,596 82,294 80,976 94,231 97,638 111,224 2010's 115,999 129,307

  17. New Mexico Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 2,280 3,386 1990's 4,008 5,570 8,361 10,459 9,395 9,520 9,351 7,959 8,981 10,033 2000's 10,212 8,878 6,993 7,055 7,903 7,501 8,195 8,901 9,425 10,328 2010's 9,875 10,062 10,698 11,511 11,704 - = No

  18. North Dakota Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 103 716 2,082 1990's 2,585 3,223 3,035 2,908 2,199 2,224 1,454 1,207 1,631 1,178 2000's 1,157 1,031 977 617 773 704 653 693 732 776 2010's 764 795 837 981 968 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  19. Ohio Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 18,861 20,433 21,903 1990's 18,258 20,033 23,188 25,345 30,807 41,569 53,609 63,352 70,543 89,746 2000's 97,516 100,462 101,500 109,479 108,693 104,551 95,316 108,943 115,050 119,827 2010's 124,231 132,566

  20. Oklahoma Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 12,217 3,988 1990's 2,944 3,445 4,052 4,095 4,214 5,894 7,165 8,204 11,752 11,218 2000's 11,920 10,549 11,682 10,755 14,253 18,468 17,798 21,216 19,870 22,220 2010's 21,966 21,697 21,258 24,494