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1

Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules Contents * Introduction o Table 1. History of Foreign Refiner Regulations * Foreign Refinery Baseline * Monitoring Imported Conventional Gasoline * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 Introduction On August 27, 1997, the EPA promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an

2

23 Reformulated Fuels and Related Issues REFORMULATED FUELS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION Reformulated gasoline (RFG) is a cleaner burning fuel than conventional gasoline that will significantly improve air quality by reducing emissions from all gasoline-burning motor vehicles and engines. The chapter also includes a description of CARB's Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline Advisory Committee and its

3

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995 by Tancred Lidderdale* Provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 designed to reduce ground-level ozone will increase the demand for reformulated motor gaso- line in a number of U.S. metropolitan areas. Refor- mulated motor gasoline is expected to constitute about one-third of total motor gasoline demand in 1995, and refiners will have to change plant opera- tions and modify equipment in order to meet the higher demand. The costs incurred are expected to create a wholesale price premium for reformu- lated motor gasoline of up to 4.0 cents per gallon over the price of conventional motor gasoline. This article discusses the effects of the new regulations on the motor gasoline market and the refining

4

Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiners Switch to Reformulated Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model Contents * Summary * Introduction o Table 1. Comparison of Simple Model and Complex Model RFG Per Gallon Requirements * Statutory, Individual Refinery, and Compliance Baselines o Table 2. Statutory Baseline Fuel Compositions * Simple Model * Complex Model o Table 3. Complex Model Variables * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * RFG Simple and Complex Model Spreadsheets * Areas Particpating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 , (Adobe

5

Total Blender Net Input of Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Input Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquid Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Oxygenates/Renewables Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

6

Reformulated diesel fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reformulated diesel fuels for automotive diesel engines which meet the requirements of ASTM 975-02 and provide significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) and particulate matter (PM) relative to commercially available diesel fuels.

McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

7

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

8

,"Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0u_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0u_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

9

Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

10

Reformulated gasoline: Costs and refinery impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of reformulated gasoline (RFG) costs and refinery impacts have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model (ORNL-RYM), a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy emissions constraints defined by preliminary complex emissions models. Policy makers may use the reformulation cost knee (the point at which costs start to rise sharply for incremental emissions control) to set emissions reduction targets, giving due consideration to the differences between model representations and actual refining operations. ORNL-RYM estimates that the reformulation cost knee for the US East Coast (PADD I) is about 15.2 cents per gallon with a 30 percent reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The estimated cost knee for the US Gulf Coast (PADD III) is about 5.5 cents per gallon with a VOC reduction of 35 percent. Reid vapor pressure (RVP) reduction is the dominant VOC reduction mechanism. Even with anti-dumping constraints, conventional gasoline appears to be an important sink which permits RFG to be blended with lower aromatics and sulfur contents in PADD III. In addition to the potentially large sensitivity of RFG production to different emissions models, RFG production is sensitive to the non-exhaust VOC share assumption for a particular VOC model. ORNL-RYM has also been used to estimate the sensitivity of RFG production to the cost of capital; to the RVP requirements for conventional gasoline; and to the percentage of RFG produced in a refining region.

Hadder, G.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

12

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

13

Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CAROB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4 %, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6 %. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CAROB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.

Aceves, S.; Glaser, R.; Richardson, J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CARB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4%, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6%. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CARB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.

Aceves, S., LLNL

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A Reformulation of Newtonian Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is postulated that all dynamical laws must be formulated in terms of variables measured relative to interacting particles. This implies that the two-particle system is the fundamental interaction unit. When this postulate is applied to Newtonian mechanics a radically new conceptual structure is revealed. The two major changes which result are the absence of the law of inertia and a broadening of the space and time invariance to include accelerated observers. Although energy and angular momentum remain conserved in this reformulation the usual linear momentum theorem does not appear. It is further shown that the theory can be expressed in the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms in a straightforward manner. Finally applications are made to several simple two-body and three-body systems which demonstrate that many-particle interactions can be formulated without reference to the dynamics of a single particle.

C. Gregory Hood

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reformulated Gasoline Program Reformulated Gasoline Program Contents * Introduction * Mandated RFG Program Areas o Table 1. Mandated RFG Program Areas * RFG Program Opt-In Areas o Table 2. RFG Program Opt-In Areas * RFG Program Opt-Out Procedures and Areas o Table 3. History of EPA Rulemaking on Opt-Out Procedures o Table 4. RFG Program Opt-Out Areas * State Programs o Table 5. State Reformulated Gasoline Programs * Endnotes Spreadsheets Referenced in this Article * Reformulated Gasoline Control Area Populations Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000 * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Areas Participating in Oxygenated Gasoline Program

17

1995 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected 5 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently by John Zyren, Charles Dale and Charles Riner Introduction The United States has completed its first summer driving season using reformulated gasoline (RFG). Motorists noticed price increases at the retail level, resulting from the increased cost to produce and deliver the product, as well as from the tight sup- ply/demand balance during the summer. This arti- cle focuses on the costs of producing RFG as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate. RFG Regulatory Requirements The use of RFG is a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). The CAAA cover a wide range of programs aimed at improving air qual-

18

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

19

Interaction blending equations enhance reformulated gasoline profitability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction approach to gasoline blending gives refiners an accurate, simple means of re-evaluating blending equations and increasing profitability. With reformulated gasoline specifications drawing near, a detailed description of this approach, in the context of reformulated gasoline is in order. Simple mathematics compute blending values from interaction equations and interaction coefficients between mixtures. A timely example of such interactions is: blending a mixture of catalytically cracked gasoline plus light straight run (LSR) from one tank with alkylate plus reformate from another. This paper discusses blending equations, using interactions, mixture interactions, other blending problems, and obtaining equations.

Snee, R.D. (Joiner Associates, Madison, WI (United States)); Morris, W.E.; Smith, W.E.

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Blender Net Production & Blender Net Production Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha For Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils For Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

22

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

23

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

24

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

25

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

26

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

27

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

28

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

29

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

30

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

31

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

32

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

33

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

34

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

35

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

36

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

37

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

38

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

39

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

40

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 2: appendices A-D to technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline- powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume II contains additional details on the vehicle, utility, and materials analyses and discusses several details of the methodology.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 4: peer review comments on technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume IV includes copies of all the external peer review comments on the report distributed for review in July 1997.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

43

On the Reformulation of Vehicle Routing Problems and Scheduling Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beck,J.C. Prosser,P. Selensky,E. Proceedings of SARA 2002, Symposium on Abstraction, Reformulation and Approximation pp 282 - 289 LNCS, Springer

Beck, J.C.; Prosser, P.

44

Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding...

45

DOE Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel DOE Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel May 19, 2006 - 10:46am Addthis Available free of Licensing Fees, Cleaner for the Environment WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that it has developed, patented, and made commercially available reformulated diesel fuels which when used can reduce nitrogen oxides up to 10% and particulate matter up to 22% compared to those currently available. The diesel fuel formulations covered under this patent will be commercially available for use without licensing or royalty fees. This reformulated diesel fuel patent resulted from research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and its subcontractors. "DOE's personnel continue to bring to the forefront technologies and

46

Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Conventional Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reformulated Gasoline Blend. Comp. Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

47

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted query reformulation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

query reformulation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Predicting Query Reformulation During Web Searching Summary: and Assistance account for approximately 45 percent of all query...

48

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports Exports Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

49

0101,"SPRAGUE ENERGY CORP",1,150,"MOGAS, REFORMULATED",0131,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

101,"SPRAGUE ENERGY CORP",1,150,"MOGAS, REFORMULATED",0131,"PORTSMOUTH, NH","NH",100,260,"CANADA",240,0,0 0101,"SPRAGUE ENERGY CORP",2,462,"DIST, > 0.05% SUL (DOM.)",0401,"BOSTON,...

50

Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

70.8 92.7 90.7 81.5 72.8 - 78.0 See footnotes at end of table. 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 146 Energy Information...

51

Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

71.7 92.3 89.9 82.6 72.7 - 78.2 See footnotes at end of table. 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 146 Energy Information...

52

Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand and Price Outlook for Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000 Tancred Lidderdale and Aileen Bohn (1) Contents * Summary * Introduction * Reformulated Gasoline Demand * Oxygenate Demand * Logistics o Interstate Movements and Storage o Local Distribution o Phase 2 RFG Logistics o Possible Opt-Ins to the RFG Program o State Low Sulfur, Low RVP Gasoline Initiatives o NAAQS o Tier 2 Gasoline * RFG Production Options o Toxic Air Pollutants (TAP) Reduction o Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Reduction o Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Reduction o Summary of RFG Production Options * Costs of Reformulated Gasoline o Phase 1 RFG Price Premium o California Clean Gasoline Price Premium o Phase 2 RFG Price Premium o Reduced Fuel Economy

53

Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petro. Feed Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Petroleum Coke - Marketable Petroleum Coke - Catalyst Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

54

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Area of Entry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Area of Entry by Area of Entry Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Ethylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Bonded Aircraft Fuel Other Bonded Aircraft Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Bonded, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Other, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 2000 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

55

AN EFFICIENT REFORMULATION BASED VLSI ARCHITECTURE FOR ADAPTIVE VITERBI DECODING IN WIRELESS APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EFFICIENT REFORMULATION BASED VLSI ARCHITECTURE FOR ADAPTIVE VITERBI DECODING IN WIRELESS dictated the need for dynamical adaptation of communication sys- tems in order to suit enviromental requirements. The au- thors present a reformulation based VLSI architecture for threhold selection for Adaptive

Arslan, Tughrul

56

Multiperiod Competitive Supply Chain Networks with Inventorying and A Transportation Network Equilibrium Reformulation Multiperiod Competitive Supply Chain Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiperiod Competitive Supply Chain Networks with Inventorying and A Transportation Network Equilibrium Reformulation Multiperiod Competitive Supply Chain Networks with Inventorying and A Transportation Competitive Supply Chain Networks with Inventorying and A Transportation Network Equilibrium Reformulation

Nagurney, Anna

57

Reformulation of nonperturbative density-functional theories of classical nonuniform systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that most nonperturbative density-functional theories of classical systems can be reformulated as second-order truncations of exact perturbative expansions, thus eliminating the ad hoc nature of such theories. This reformulation is used as a basis for discussion as to why some theories work better than others when applied to hard spheres, why most theories perform poorly for continuous potentials, and in what direction they might be modified so as to improve their performance.

J. F. Lutsko

1991-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

,"U.S. Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0r_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0r_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

59

,"U.S. Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0r_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0r_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

60

Automatic Reformulation of Children's Search Queries Maarten van Kalsbeek, Joost de Wit, Dolf Trieschnigg,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Terms Algorithms, Human Factors, Design Keywords Automatic Query Expansion, Search Behavior, 1 children may make. Most of the search engines offer only the possibility to enter a Boolean queryAutomatic Reformulation of Children's Search Queries Maarten van Kalsbeek, Joost de Wit, Dolf

Hiemstra, Djoerd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Efficient Reformulation of Solid-Phase Diffusion in Physics-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Reformulation of Solid-Phase Diffusion in Physics-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models or approximation for the solid phase. One of the major difficulties in simulating Li-ion battery models is the need typically solve electrolyte con- centration, electrolyte potential, solid-state potential, and solid-state

Subramanian, Venkat

62

PRESY: A Context Based Query Reformulation Tool for Information Retrieval on the Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Problem Statement: The huge number of information on the web as well as the growth of new inexperienced users creates new challenges for information retrieval. It has become increasingly difficult for these users to find relevant documents that satisfy their individual needs. Certainly the current search engines (such as Google, Bing and Yahoo) offer an efficient way to browse the web content. However, the result quality is highly based on uses queries which need to be more precise to find relevant documents. This task still complicated for the majority of inept users who cannot express their needs with significant words in the query. For that reason, we believe that a reformulation of the initial user's query can be a good alternative to improve the information selectivity. This study proposes a novel approach and presents a prototype system called PRESY (Profile-based REformulation SYstem) for information retrieval on the web. Approach: It uses an incremental approach to categorize users by constructing a c...

Bouramoul, Abdelkrim; Doan, Bich-Lien; 10.3844/jcssp.2010.470.477

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nonsingular Collapse of a Perfect Fluid Sphere Within a Dilaton-Gravity Reformulation of the Oppenheimer Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generic four-dimensional dilaton gravity is considered as a basis for reformulating the paradigmatic Oppenheimer–Synder model of a gravitationally collapsing star ... Einstein–Langevin equations, a modification...

Steven David Miller

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

2014 Annual AFN Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AFN Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. In addition to the memorable keynote speeches, the expert panels and special reports, the Convention features several evenings of cultural performances known as Quyana Alaska.

65

The Energy Information Administration`s assessment of reformulated gasoline. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains EIA`s findings and analyses on reformulated gasoline as it affects the petroleum industry. The data contained herein should assist members of the Congress, Federal, State and local governments, analysts, researchers, the media and academia to understand the RFG program and the current status of implementation. The second volume contains 10 appendices that include letter from Congressman Dingell, survey results, survey forms, and historical summary data. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are printed in Volumes 1 and 2.

NONE

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Energy Information Administration`s assessment of reformulated gasoline. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains EIA`s findings and analyses on reformulated gasoline as it affects the petroleum industry. The data contained herein should assist members of the Congress, Federal, State and local governments, analysts, researchers, the media and academia to understand the RFG program and the current status of implementation. This second volume contains 10 appendices that include letter from Congressman Dingell, survey results, survey forms, and historical summary data. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are printed in Volumes 1 and 2.

NONE

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

16,716.2 14,277.3 13,878.1 13,588.6 14,053.9 13,516.9 1994-2013 16,716.2 14,277.3 13,878.1 13,588.6 14,053.9 13,516.9 1994-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) W W W 3,727.8 W 3,676.1 1994-2013 New England (PADD 1A) - - - - - - 1994-2013 Connecticut - - - - - - 1994-2013 Maine - - - - - - 1994-2013 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1994-2013 New Hampshire - - - - - - 1994-2013 Rhode Island - - - - - - 1994-2013 Vermont - - - - - - 1994-2013 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) W W W W W W 1994-2013 Delaware - - - - - - 1994-2013 District of Columbia - - - - - - 1994-2013 Maryland - - - - - - 1994-2013 New Jersey - - - - - - 1994-2013 New York W W W W W W 1994-2013 Pennsylvania W W W W W W 1994-2013 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2,437.3 2,438.9 2,168.5 W 2,124.4 W 1994-2013

68

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

34,966.5 33,853.0 31,513.3 29,499.2 25,064.8 17,695.8 1994-2012 34,966.5 33,853.0 31,513.3 29,499.2 25,064.8 17,695.8 1994-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 11,833.0 11,488.6 10,553.5 9,423.6 7,778.2 5,183.5 1994-2012 New England (PADD 1A) W W W W W W 1994-2012 Connecticut - - - - - - 1994-2012 Maine W W W W W W 1994-2012 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1994-2012 New Hampshire - - - - W W 1994-2012 Rhode Island - - - - - - 1994-2012 Vermont W W W W W W 1994-2012 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) W W W 2,592.4 2,527.8 2,297.8 1994-2012 Delaware - - - - - - 1994-2012 District of Columbia - - - - - - 1994-2012 Maryland W - - - - - 1994-2012 New Jersey - - - - - - 1994-2012 New York 1,592.0 1,497.3 1,529.5 1,448.1 1,447.5 W 1994-2012 Pennsylvania 1,497.8 W W 1,144.3 1,080.3 W 1994-2012

69

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued Geographic Area Month Premium All Grades Conventional Oxygenated Reformulated Total Conventional...

70

FEAST fundamental framework for electronic structure calculations: Reformulation and solution of the muffin-tin problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a recent article Polizzi (2009) [15], the FEAST algorithm has been presented as a general purpose eigenvalue solver which is ideally suited for addressing the numerical challenges in electronic structure calculations. Here, FEAST is presented beyond the “black-box” solver as a fundamental modeling framework which can naturally address the original numerical complexity of the electronic structure problem as formulated by Slater in 1937 [3]. The non-linear eigenvalue problem arising from the muffin-tin decomposition of the real-space domain is first derived and then reformulated to be solved exactly within the FEAST framework. This new framework is presented as a fundamental and practical solution for performing both accurate and scalable electronic structure calculations, bypassing the various issues of using traditional approaches such as linearization and pseudopotential techniques. A finite element implementation of this FEAST framework along with simulation results for various molecular systems is also presented and discussed.

Alan R. Levin; Deyin Zhang; Eric Polizzi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Conventional Strategic Deterrence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bush Administration argues that the US, as the world's only remaining superpower, must be prepared to intervene militarily in regional conflicts. However, the traditional American way of fighting-relying on ground forces with heavy equipment, supported by naval and air forces--could prove too expensive, both monetarily and in terms of expected American casualties, to garner the support of the American public or Congress. This paper argues that the revolution in conventional weaponry demonstrated in the Persian Gulf War opens up the possibility of a new strategy--called Conventional Strategic Deterrence--that could reduce both financial costs and casualties (if it were necessary to implement the strategy) while still being a strong and credible deterrent to regional conflict.

Latter, A.L.; Martinelli, E.A.; Speed, R.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Conventional Strategic Deterrence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bush Administration argues that the US, as the world`s only remaining superpower, must be prepared to intervene militarily in regional conflicts. However, the traditional American way of fighting-relying on ground forces with heavy equipment, supported by naval and air forces--could prove too expensive, both monetarily and in terms of expected American casualties, to garner the support of the American public or Congress. This paper argues that the revolution in conventional weaponry demonstrated in the Persian Gulf War opens up the possibility of a new strategy--called Conventional Strategic Deterrence--that could reduce both financial costs and casualties (if it were necessary to implement the strategy) while still being a strong and credible deterrent to regional conflict.

Latter, A.L.; Martinelli, E.A.; Speed, R.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total 1993 January...

74

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

75

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the DOE Water Power Program's conventional hydropower research and development efforts.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Experimental Stability of SDMs AES 124th Convention, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2008 May 17­20 Page 2 of 15­20 Amsterdam, The Netherlands The papers at this Convention have been selected on the basis of a submitted

Reiss, Josh

77

ConventionConventionConventionConvention InformaInformaInformaInformation Guidetion Guidetion Guidetion Guide International Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternatio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidetion Guide International Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and Solids 13131313----17 June 2005, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA #12;Information Guide International Convention

Reuter, Martin

78

ATNI Mid-year Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

79

NCAI 71st Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Save the date for the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) 71st Annual Convention at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta.

80

A reformulated, reconstituted water for testing the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Toxicity testing with the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, has routinely been conducted using nonstandard waters. Four waters were tested for acceptability for aqueous reference toxicant testing with H. azteca. These included three formulated (standardized) waters: moderately hard reconstituted water (MHRW), reformulated moderately hard reconstituted water (RMHRW), and 25% dilute mineral water (DMW). The water used for comparison was a nonstandard, in-house culture water mixture of well water and dechlorinated tap water, diluted with Super-Q{reg_sign} deionized water to a hardness of 100 mg/L, as CaCO{sub 3} (LL/SQ). Control survival was less than the 90% minimum control survival criteria in all tests with MHRW. Two of five tests with DMW also failed to pass the minimum control survival criteria. All five tests with the RMHRW passed the control survival criteria. The mean 50% lethal concentration (LC50) for the tests in RMHRW was 320 mg/L KCl, with a coefficient of variation of 8.5%. Concurrent tests with the in-house water yielded control survival greater than 90% and a mean LC50 of 216 mg/L KCl with a coefficient of variation of 13.4%. Tests in an interlaboratory study yielded similar results. Whole-sediment toxicity tests conducted using RMHRW as the overlying water routinely exceed the 80% minimum survival criteria in the control and reference sediments. The failure of MHRW and DMW to produce acceptable results, as well as the inability of other laboratories to produce LL/SQ, makes RMHRW the best candidate for a standard water for H. azteca testing.

Smith, M.E.; Herrin, L.E.; Thoeny, W.T. [SBI Environmental, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lazorchak, J.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Brewer-Swartz, S. [EMPE, Nashville, TN (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Tanana Chiefs Conference Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tanana Chiefs Conference is holding its annual convention to discuss issues in the region, hold elections, and adopt resolutions presented by Tribes.

82

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 120th Convention 2006 May 20­23 Paris. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. Parametric Representation of Multichannel Audio Based on Principal Component

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 114th Convention 2003 March 22 for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Real Time Object Based Coding Paul M. Brossier1 , Mark B. Sandler1 and Mark D

Plumbley, Mark

84

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 122nd Convention 2007 May 5­8 Vienna be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Plumbley, Mark

85

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 112th Convention 2002 May 10­13 Munich. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. Intelligent Audio Source Separation using Independent Component Analysis

Mitianoudis, Nikolaos

86

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 135th Convention 2013 October 17­20 New for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Sound identification from MPEG-encoded audio files Joseph G. Studniarz

Maher, Robert C.

87

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 127th Convention 2009 October 9­12 New be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Joseph Fourier Grenoble-I, Université

88

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 128th Convention 2010 May 22­25 London be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

89

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 117th Convention 2004 October 28­31 San for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. AES Technical Committee on Signal Processing Educational CD Project Robert C

Maher, Robert C.

90

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 134th Convention 2013 May 4­7 Rome. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. On the Informed Source Separation Approach for Interactive Remixing in Stereo

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

91

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 120th Convention 2006 May 20­23 Paris. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. Acoustic Rendering for Color Information Ludovico Ausiello1 , Emanuele

Ferri, Massimo

92

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 125th Convention 2008 October 2­5 San be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Jackson, Philip JB

93

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 129th Convention 2010 November 4­7 San be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

94

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 124th Convention 2008 May 17 be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Reiss, Josh

95

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 130th Convention 2011 May 13­16 London be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Reiss, Josh

96

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 119th Convention 2005 October 7­10 New for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Frequency-Based Coloring of the Waveform Display to Facilitate Audio Editing

Rice, Stephen V.

97

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 119th Convention 2005 October 7­10 New for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. A Web Search Engine for Sound Effects Stephen V. Rice1 and Stephen M. Bailey2

Rice, Stephen V.

98

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 116th Convention 2004 May 8­11 Berlin. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. MPEG-4 Audio Lossless Coding Tilman Liebchen1 , Yuriy Reznik2 , Takehiro

Wichmann, Felix

99

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 119th Convention 2005 October 7­10 New for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. The MPEG-4 Audio Lossless Coding (ALS) Standard - Technology and Applications

Wichmann, Felix

100

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 118th Convention 2005 May 28 for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Improved Forward-Adaptive Prediction for MPEG-4 Audio Lossless Coding Tilman

Wichmann, Felix

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 115th Convention 2003 October 10­13 New for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. MPEG-4 Lossless Coding for High-Definition Audio Tilman Liebchen1 1 Technical

Wichmann, Felix

102

NAIHC Convention and Trade Show  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHC) most longstanding Annual Event, the 39th Annual NAIHC Convention and Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about tribal housing, attend...

103

Indian Gaming 2013 Tradeshow & Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Indian Gaming Association will host its annual tradeshow and convention on March 24-27 in Phoenix, Arizona. Be sure to visit the DOE Office of Indian Energy booth at the event.

104

ITCN 49th Annual Convention  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Inc. will be hosting its 49th Annual Convention, themed "Making a Difference for Nevada Tribes," December 8-11, 2014 at John Ascuaga’s Nugget in Sparks, Nevada.

105

Hydroelectric Conventional | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydroelectric Conventional Hydroelectric Conventional Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

106

Electromagnetism 70006 Answers to Problem Set 9 Spring 2006 1. Jackson Prob. 5.1: Reformulate the Biot-Savart law in terms of the solid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetism 70006 Answers to Problem Set 9 Spring 2006 1. Jackson Prob. 5.1: Reformulate series by the replacement d |z|. (e) For a Helmholtz coil one sets b = a. With this choice the terms-2 the limit is 0.305. Below is a figure showing the variation of Bz on the axis between two coils located

Johnson, Walter R.

107

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_________________________________ Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 114th and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New York 10165-2520, USA; also see without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society

Monteiro, Edmundo

108

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

___________________________________ Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 111 and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New York 10165-2520, USA; also see without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society

Reiss, Josh

109

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

110

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels...

111

ISG X-Conventional Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WG-4 Conventional Facilities Home Conventional Facilities Conf. room (Bldg. 281) Corvin, Enomoto, Kuchler Tuesday, June 17 13:00 - 15:30 GM-Vibration WG1 & WG4 -TT Bldg 214 15:30 - 16:00 Break Orange Room 16:00 - 18:00 GM-Vibration WG1 & WG4 - FA, TM Bldg 214 18:00 Adjourn Wednesday, June 18 09:00 -12:00 Status - Japan, California, Illinois, HI CF Bldg 281 13:00 - 15:30 California Warm Mechanical Design CF Bldg 281 15:30 - 16:00 Break to Plenary Orange Room 18:00 Adjourn to BBQ Slac Cafeteria 18:30 BBQ Dinner Picnic Area Thursday, June 19 09:00 - 12:00 Drawing, Design & Cost Estimates CF Bldg 281 13:00 - 15:30 FY' 2004 Planning - Plans CF Bldg 281 15:30 - 16:00 Break to Plenary Orange Room 18:00 Adjourn

112

Conventional power sources for colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 ..mu..sec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 ..mu..sec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 ..mu..sec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths.

Allen, M.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE UNITED NATIONS 1992 FCCC/INFORMAL/84 GE.05-62220 (E) 200705 #12;UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE The Parties to this Convention in predictions of climate change, particularly with regard to the timing, magnitude and regional patterns thereof

Laughlin, Robert B.

114

Chapter 2 Conventional refining processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses conventional refining processes. Refining is a very elaborate operation by which crude oil is transformed into a series of products such as, gases, fuels, solvents, lube oils, etc. Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons (HC) of different C/H ratio and molecular structures. The different classes of HC molecules comprise paraffins, olefins, cycles, aromatics, resins, asphaltenes, and other poly-unsaturated molecules. In addition to hydrocarbons, crude oils also contain some other compounds composed by other atoms (heteroatoms) than carbon and hydrogen. Those moieties consist of sulfur (S), nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), and heavy metals. Crudes are usually classified in terms of their specific gravity as very light, light, median, heavy, and extra heavy. An empirical set of units for the crude gravity, defined by the American Petroleum Institute (API), is currently used in oil industry. Their appearance varies from transparent liquids to black solids, going from light to heavy. Light oils have lower specific gravity and larger API gravity, while for heavy oils vice versa. Their composition also changes, and so the concentration of those heteroatomic compounds typically increases from light to heavy. The crude oils are also categorized in terms of their chemical composition, as for instance, sour crude oils, those presenting high acidity, paraffinic, naphthenic, and aromatic.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Bunker Convention : International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollition Damage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of the thesis is to examine the International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage – the Bunker Convention – that… (more)

Ringås, Cassia Ribeiro Naegele

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

AFN Annual Convention | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFN Annual Convention AFN Annual Convention AFN Annual Convention October 23, 2014 8:00AM AKDT to October 25, 2014 5:00PM AKDT Anchorage, Alaska The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one representative per 25 Native residents in the area and delegate participation rates at the annual convention typically exceed 95%. Each year, the AFN Convention draws between 4,000-5,000 attendees. The proceedings are broadcast live via television, radio and webcast reaching a diverse audience from Barrow to Ketchikan, from the Aleutian Chain to the Canadian border. During the convention, the entire state of Alaska is blanketed with discussion on current events and issues. International

117

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locating–dominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater [186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locating–total dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

119

Considerations When Comparing LED and Conventional Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

When comparing LED lighting performance to conventional lighting, buyers will want to consider energy efficiency, operating life and lumen depreciation, light output/distribution, color quality,...

120

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Bruce Bunting, Sam Lewis, John Storey OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

122

Strengthening the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strengthening the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention: Countering the Threat from Biological Weapons Presented to Parliament by the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs By Command of Her Majesty April 2002 Cm 5484 £5.00 #12;3 STRENGTHENING THE BIOLOGICAL AND TOXIN WEAPONS CONVENTION

Sussex, University of

123

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 8648  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 8648 Presented at the 132nd Convention 2012 April 26 for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Time domain performance of decimation filter architectures for high

Reiss, Josh

124

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 9012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 9012 Presented at the 135th Convention 2013 October 17 for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Evaluating iBall - An intuitive interface and assistive audio mixing

Reiss, Josh

125

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 8892  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 8892 Presented at the 134th Convention 2013 May 4­7 Rome. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. Implementation of an intelligent equalization tool using Yule

Reiss, Josh

126

NCAI Annual Convention | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Annual Convention Annual Convention NCAI Annual Convention October 21, 2012 8:00AM PDT to October 26, 2012 5:00PM PDT Sacramento, California The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) and the California tribes will host the organization's 69th Annual Convention & Marketplace in Sacramento, California this October. The national meeting will serve as the beginning of a yearlong celebration of the organization's 70 years of work since it was founded in 1944. This year's Annual Convention will also host a Constitutional review. Over the course of six days, events and celebrations will focus on the rights and sovereignty of American Indian and Alaska Native tribes. Throughout the week NCAI will convene it's General Assembly, educational breakout sessions, and cultural celebrations, all with the purpose of

127

NREL: Energy Analysis: Impacts of Conventional Generators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts of Renewable Electricity Generation on Efficiency and Emissions of Conventional Generators With increasing penetration of wind and solar generation, conventional fossil-fired power plants may be required to adjust their output level, start up, or shut down more frequently to accommodate the variability and uncertainty of these technologies. These operational changes can negatively impact plant efficiency and emissions. NREL's analyses are focused on understanding and quantifying the emissions and costs associated with these operational changes. NREL's impacts of renewable electricity generation on conventional generators analyses show that: While the emissions impacts of generator cycling and part-loading can be significant (e.g., combined cycle generators), these impacts are

128

U.S. Total Weekly Refiner & Blender Net Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Area: U.S. PADD 1 New England Central Atlantic Lower Atlantic PADD 2 PADD 3 PADD 4 PADD 5 PADD's 4 & 5 Period: Weekly 4-Week Average Area: U.S. PADD 1 New England Central Atlantic Lower Atlantic PADD 2 PADD 3 PADD 4 PADD 5 PADD's 4 & 5 Period: Weekly 4-Week Average Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 12/06/13 12/13/13 12/20/13 12/27/13 01/03/14 01/10/14 View History Finished Motor Gasoline 8,982 9,311 9,715 9,078 9,120 8,325 1982-2014 Finished Motor Gasoline (less Adjustment) 9,428 9,376 9,916 9,002 8,782 8,874 1982-2014 Reformulated 2,891 2,983 3,163 2,871 2,634 2,781 1993-2014 Blended with Fuel Ethanol 2,891 2,983 3,163 2,871 2,634 2,781 2004-2014 Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004-2014 Conventional 6,537 6,393 6,752 6,131 6,148 6,093 1994-2014

129

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture Sina Adl , David Iron and Theodore Agriculture | Pathogen Dispersal Introduction Organic farming [1, 2] is gaining in popularity in Eu- rope, because or- ganic agriculture avoids using environmentally harmful chem- icals that pollute soil

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

130

2013 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

131

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) are hosting their 59th Annual Fall Convention in Pendleton, Oregon. The DOE Office of Indian Energy is sponsoring a workshop for tribal leaders and...

132

Alaska Federation of Natives Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

133

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a...

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The STCW Convention and related instruments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The initial instrument, i.e. the 1978 Convention, prescribed for the first time minimum standards on training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers in response to the need to have uniform rules at the ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 5484  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

___________________________________ Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 5484 Presented and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New York 10165-2520, USA; also see without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

Combining confinement and conventional beef production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMBINING CONFINEMENT AND CONVENTIONAL BEEF PRODUCTION A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael Ronald Gregg Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF AGRICULTURE December, 1985 Major Subject: Animal Science Department of Animal Science COMBINING CONFINEMENT AND CONVENTIONAL BEEF PRODUCTION A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael Ronald Gregg Approved as to style and content by: Chairman, Advzso ommit ee...

Gregg, Michael Ronald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

21 briefing pages total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

138

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

139

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

140

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

142

Improved outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with conventional radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe the outcome of patients with nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with conventional radiotherapy at a single institution. Methods and materials: From 1990 to 1999, 171 consecutive patients with NPC were treated with conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy. Tumor histology was undifferentiated in 82% of cases. Tumor-node-metastasis Stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer 1997 system) was I in 6%, II in 36%, III in 22%, and IV in 36% of patients. Mean total radiation dose was 68.4 Gy. Chemotherapy was given to 62% of the patients. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 6.3 years (range, 3.1-13.1 years). Results: The 5-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival rates were 72%, 74%, and 62%, respectively. The 5-year local, regional, and distant control rates were 84%, 80%, and 83% respectively. Late effects of radiotherapy were prospectively recorded in 100 patients surviving without relapse; 44% of these patients had Grade 3 xerostomia, 33% had Grade 3 dental damage, and 11% had Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusions: This analysis shows an improved outcome for patients treated from 1990 to 1999 compared with earlier retrospective series, despite the use of two-dimensional radiotherapy. Late toxicity, however, was substantial with conventional radiotherapy.

Palazzi, Mauro [Department of Radiotherapy, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Guzzo, Marco [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Tomatis, Stefano Ph.D. [Unit of Medical Physics, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cerrotta, Annamaria [Department of Radiotherapy, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Potepan, Paolo [Department of Radiology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Quattrone, Pasquale [Department of Pathology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cantu, Giulio [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Total U.S...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven.............................................................. 109.6 7.1 6.9 7.8 11.7 1............................................................................. 103.3 6.5 6.6 7.4 11.2 2 or More................................................................ 6.2 0.6 Q 0.4 0.5 Do Not Use an Oven.................................................. 1.5 Q Q Q 0.4 Most-Used Oven Fuel Electric.................................................................... 67.9 2.3 6.5 4.9 4.9 Natural Gas............................................................ 36.4 4.2 Q 2.6 6.6 Propane/LPG.......................................................... 5.2 0.6 Q 0.4 Q Self-Cleaning Oven Use a Self-Cleaning Oven......................................

144

Total U.S.....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven........................................................ 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 1....................................................................... 103.3 18.7 13.6 5.2 2 or More.......................................................... 6.2 1.6 1.4 0.2 Do Not Use an Oven............................................ 1.5 0.2 Q Q Most-Used Oven Fuel Electric.............................................................. 67.9 9.7 6.2 3.6 Natural Gas....................................................... 36.4 9.4 7.9 1.5 Propane/LPG.................................................... 5.2 1.2 0.9 0.3 Self-Cleaning Oven Use a Self-Cleaning Oven................................. 62.9 11.1 7.4 3.7 Continuous....................................................

145

Total U.S........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................................ 109.6 20.3 25.3 40.2 23.7 1........................................................................... 103.3 18.7 24.0 38.2 22.4 2 or More.............................................................. 6.2 1.6 1.3 2.1 1.3 Do Not Use an Oven................................................ 1.5 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.5 Most-Used Oven Fuel Electric................................................................. 67.9 9.7 14.7 30.1 13.4 Natural Gas.......................................................... 36.4 9.4 9.6 8.1 9.2 Propane/LPG....................................................... 5.2 1.2 1.1 2.0 1.0 Self-Cleaning Oven Use a Self-Cleaning Oven....................................

146

Total U.S........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................................ 109.6 46.2 18.8 22.5 22.1 1........................................................................... 103.3 44.1 17.8 21.2 20.2 2 or More.............................................................. 6.2 2.1 1.0 1.3 1.9 Do Not Use an Oven................................................ 1.5 1.0 Q 0.2 Q Most-Used Oven Fuel Electric................................................................. 67.9 26.8 11.5 14.4 15.1 Natural Gas.......................................................... 36.4 19.2 6.9 7.6 2.7 Propane/LPG....................................................... 5.2 0.2 0.4 0.4 4.2 Self-Cleaning Oven Use a Self-Cleaning Oven....................................

147

Total U.S.....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven........................................................ 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 1....................................................................... 103.3 22.4 6.8 15.6 2 or More.......................................................... 6.2 1.3 0.6 0.6 Do Not Use an Oven............................................ 1.5 0.5 Q 0.4 Most-Used Oven Fuel Electric.............................................................. 67.9 13.4 4.5 8.9 Natural Gas....................................................... 36.4 9.2 2.2 7.1 Propane/LPG.................................................... 5.2 1.0 0.7 0.3 Self-Cleaning Oven Use a Self-Cleaning Oven................................. 62.9 13.1 4.6 8.5 Continuous....................................................

148

Two techniques for verifying conventional reductions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional forces, long the forgotten stepchild of the arms control process, have recently taken on an unprecedented importance. In the United States, the Bush administration has placed the question of the conventional balance in Europe at the top of its negotiating agenda. And the NATO summit meeting in May 1989 resolved a difficult intra-alliance dispute on nuclear modernization by pledging to reach a conventional reductions agreement with the Eastern bloc in the short span of one year. The author attempt here to develop two approaches to minimize data exchanges - the envelope scheme and tagging - which could be applied in the event of conventional arms control agreements in Europe. In this context, they confine themselves to a scenario imposing restrictions on the levels of certain categories of weapon systems used for waging offensive warfare or mounting surprise attacks. NATO and the Warsaw Pact have already agreed at Negotiation Conventional armed Forced in Europe (CFE) that such treaty-limited items (TLIs) would include tanks, artillery, armored troop carries, combat aircraft, and helicopters, though precise definitions are still to be worked out. The emerging CFE agreement is expected to cover troop levels as well, but this article will focus on verification of armaments.

Maxfield, R.; Meerburg, A.J.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if conventional oil production was no longer able to satisfy demand? Fuels from non-conventional oil resources would then become the backstop fuel. These resources involve higher CO2 emissions per unit of energy produced than conventional oil as they require... ?EMUC ? GDPgrowth ?POPgrowth? ? (13) r is the consumption discount rate (% per year) EMUC is the elasticity of marginal utility of consumption (no unit) ptp is the pure time preference rate (% per year) GDPgrowth is the growth of GDP (% per year...

Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

150

Conventional Medical Screening Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conventional Medical Screening Program Conventional Medical Screening Program Conventional Medical Screening Program Medical screening is a strategy used to identify diseases or conditions in a select population at an early stage, often before signs and symptoms develop, and to refer individuals with suspicious findings to their personal physician or a specialist for further testing, diagnosis, and treatment. The program is not intended to serve as a substitute for routine medical exams through an individual's personal physician. The medical screening exam offered by the FWP evaluates an employee's health as it relates to their potential occupational exposures to hazardous agents. The FWP uses a customized medical screening protocol that was developed by a team of independent physicians specializing in occupational

151

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

October 1st Hamilton Convention Centre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 1st & 2nd , 2010 Hamilton Convention Centre 1 Summers Lane, Hamilton ON ANGELA SILLA, EventMaster University, Hamilton Brian Leber, MDCM, FRCPC Professor Division of Hematology & Thromboembolsim Department of Medicine McMaster University, Hamilton Peter Powers, MD, FRCPC Associate Professor Division of Hematology

Hitchcock, Adam P.

153

Policy message A narrow focus on conventional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

often prevents improvement of sanitation in poor settlements. n Simple, affordable, effective techPolicy message n A narrow focus on conventional sanitation technologies and top- down planning studies featured here were conducted in: Lao PDR, Tanzania, and Nepal Local solutions for sanitation Urban

Richner, Heinz

154

Audio Engineering Society Convention PaperPresented at the 111th Convention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention PaperPresented at the 111th Convention 2001 September 21 for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Bayesian Harmonic Analysis for Audio Testing and Measurement Thomas J. Loredo

Loredo, Thomas J.

155

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

156

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

157

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

158

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent...

159

Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention...

160

Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended Terranes Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended Terranes Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description The project group proposes to systematically assess the structural controls of geothermal systems in the Great Basin and adjacent regions. Phase I (Year 1) involves a broad inventory of structural settings of geothermal systems in the Great Basin, Walker Lane, and southern Cascades, with the aim of developing conceptual structural models and a structural catalogue of the most favorable structural environments. The regional stress field will be used to evaluate slip tendency on faults in the various tectonic provinces and thus determine which faults are most likely to accommodate dilation and slip in each setting. This overview will permit selection of representative sites (5 or 6 total) for more detailed studies in Phases II and III (Years 2-3). Sites will be selected on the basis of quality of exposure, apparent potential for geothermal development, and general type of system, so that all major types of systems can be evaluated and compared in this project (e.g., magmatic vs. nonmagmatic). The detailed investigations will include geologic mapping, kinematic analysis, stress determinations, gravity surveys, integration of available geophysical data, slip tendency analysis, and 3D modeling. In Year 3, the detailed studies will be completed and data synthesized to a) compare structural controls in various tectonic settings, b) complete the structural catalogue, and c) apply knowledge to exploration strategies and selection of drilling sites.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Non-Conventional Plasma Assisted Catalysts for Diesel Exhaust Treatment: A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the application of pulse discharges along with catalysts in treating the exhaust gas at higher temperatures. In the present work a plasma reactor, filled with catalysts, called as plasma catalytic reactor, is studied for removal of oxides of nitrogen, total hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The experiments are conducted on an actual diesel engine exhaust at no-load and at different temperatures starting from room temperature to 300°C. The removal efficiencies of these pollutants are studied. The experiments are carried out with both conventional and non-conventional catalysts. The idea is to explore the pollutant removal efficiency characteristics by non-conventional catalysts. The efficiency results are compared with that of conventional catalysts. The experiments are carried out at a constant pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. Both pellet and honeycomb type catalysts are used in the study.

B S Rajanikanth; P K Srinivas Kumar; V Ravi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Monitoring technologies in conventional arms control verification: The CFE (Conventional Armed Forces in Europe) context  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document discusses the challenges of evaluating conventional military capabilities during the rapidly changing political conditions in Europe. Recommendations are made for the implement new technology to require and process date about current military conditions. (FSD)

Pounds, T.J.

1990-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

163

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

164

Master EM Project Definition Rating Index - Traditional (Conventional) Definitions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

17 Master EM Project Definition Rating Index - Traditional (Conventional) Definitions The following definitions describe the criteria required to achieve a maximum rating or maturity value of 5. It should be assumed that maturity values of 1-5 represent a subjective assessment of the quality of definition and/or the degree to which the end-state or maximum criteria have been met, or the product has been completed in accordance with the definition of maturity values. Rating Element Criteria for Maximum Rating COST A1 Cost Estimate A cost estimate has been developed and formally approved by DOE and is the basis for the cost baselines. The cost estimate is a reasonable approximation of Total Project Costs, and covers all phases of the project. The estimate is prepared in

165

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

167

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

168

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

169

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

170

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

171

Non-conventional sources for ethylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two processes for conversion of methanol to ethylene are reviewed as to economic attractiveness at about 1990. The processes are homologation of methane to ethanol with dehydration to ethylene and direct catalytic cracking of methanol to ethylene using Mobil zeolite catalysts. For the economic projections, synthesis gas is assumed to be available from a large leverage-financed, synthetis gas unit based on a pressurized, entrained bed, coal-gasifier, built on the US Gulf Coast in 1990 at a cost of $0.19/m/sup 3/, and methane is valued at $650/metric ton in 1990 based on continuous operation of natural gas-based methanol plants in the US. The economics of ethylene production via conventional steam cracking of naphtha/gas oil are compared with those of the new technology. The methanol homologation/ethanol dehydration route to ethylene is more attractive than catalytic cracking at 40% carbon selectivity to ethylene. At higher selectivities, the methanol cracking scheme becomes economically competitive. However, with an assumption of a price of $650/metric ton for methanol in 1990, neiter methanol-based route is competitive with conventional steam cracking on the Gulf Coast in 1990. A methanol price of $500/metric ton would make the methanol-based oriduction routes attractive. 23 references.

Leonard, J.P.; Weiss, L.H.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Are cobaltates conventional? An ARPES viewpoint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently discovered class of cobaltate superconductors (Na{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) is a novel realization of interacting quantum electron system in a triangular network with low-energy degrees of freedom. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle parameters in the parent superconductors. Results reveal a large hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy quasiparticles. The measured quasiparticle parameters collectively suggest two orders of magnitude departure from the conventional weak coupling (such as Al) Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron dynamics paradigm and unveils cobaltates as a rather hidden class of relatively high temperature superconductors. These parameters also form the basis for a microscopic Hamiltonian of the system.

Hasan, M.Z. [Department of Physics, Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)]. E-mail: mzhasan@Princeton.edu; Qian, D. [Department of Physics, Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Foo, M.L. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Cava, R.J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010) and 75 Fed. Reg. 51986 (Aug. 24, 2010). Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting

174

Advances in the integration of solar thermal energy with conventional and non-conventional power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pollution and increasing fuel prices are the main focus for governments today. The main cause of pollution is existing electricity power plants that use huge quantities of fossil fuel. A new strategy should be applied in the coming decades based on the integration of existing power plants with renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind energy. Hybridization of existing power plants with solar energy is one proven option to overcome the problems of pollution and increasing fuel prices. In this paper, a review of the previous studies and papers for integrating solar thermal energy with conventional and non-conventional power plants was carried out. The focus on hybrid solar conventional power plants includes: the review of studies of hybrid solar–steam cycle power plants, integrated solar combined-cycle systems (ISCCS) and hybrid solar–gas turbine power plants, while for hybrid solar non-conventional power plants the focus of study is hybrid solar–geothermal power plants. The most successful option is ISCCS due to their advantages and the plans for implementation at various power plants in the world like in Tunisia, Egypt, Spain, and Iran.

M.S. Jamel; A. Abd Rahman; A.H. Shamsuddin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Reformulated diesel fuel and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for mathematically identifying at least one diesel fuel suitable for combustion in an automotive diesel engine with significantly reduced emissions and producible from known petroleum blendstocks using known refining processes, including the use of cetane additives (ignition improvers) and oxygenated compounds.

McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

Reformulations in Mathematical Programming: Symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 3, 2008 ... ... group where no AMPL presolved alternative is explicitly given might ..... fuel. 15

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

177

PERSPECTIVE REFORMULATION AND APPLICATIONS 1 ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ria and Soares characterize the closure of the convex hull of the union of ...... solve. We performed a small experiment designed to test the impact of the.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

179

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

180

Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and Engines Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

182

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

183

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

184

NCAI 71st Annual Convention | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NCAI 71st Annual Convention NCAI 71st Annual Convention October 26, 2014 12:00PM EDT to October 31, 2014 9:00PM EDT Atlanta, Georgia http:www.ncai.orgconferences-events...

185

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

186

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

187

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

188

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

189

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

190

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

191

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

192

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

193

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

194

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

195

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

196

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

197

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

198

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

199

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

200

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

202

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

203

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

204

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

205

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

206

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

207

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

208

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

209

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

210

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

211

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

212

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

213

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

214

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

215

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

216

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

217

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

218

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

219

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

220

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

222

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

223

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

224

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

225

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

226

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

227

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

228

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

229

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

230

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

231

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

232

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

233

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

234

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

235

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

236

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

237

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

238

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

239

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

240

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

242

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

243

Conventional arms control and East-West security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book addresses some of the key conceptual issues related to the NATO-Warsaw Pact Vienna talks on Conventional forces in Europe (CFE). The chapters presented include: Constraints in Europe, Nuclear weapons and conventional arms control, and Approaches to conventional arms reductions.

Blackwill, R.D.; Larrabee, F.S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Conventional coal preparation in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Processing of bituminous and anthracite coal is widely practiced in the United States and, as mentioned earlier, about 80 percent of the production of these coals is processed as clean coal in preparation plants. Subbituminous coal is not widely processed, primarily because these low rank raw coals are low in sulfur (0.5 to 1.0 percent) and relatively low in ash (8 to 15 percent). They are also relatively low in heat content due to their high inherent moisture. Lignite coals, to the best of the authors{close_quote} knowledge, are not presently being processed in Conventional Coal Preparation plants. This is due to their unstable nature and putting them in water in a coal preparation plant is likely to cause severe degradation in particle size and add to their already high inherent moisture content. The following are the benefits of clean coal processing: produces a uniform product which can be utilized more efficiently; produces a higher quality product which results in higher efficiency at the power station or the steel mill; reduces sulfur dioxide and other adverse stack emissions during coal firing which is a very important environmental consideration; reduces ash or slag handling costs by the user; reduces shipping costs; and reduces handling and storage costs. Processing any stable raw coal in a coal preparation plant will always produce a higher grade product which is a more efficient and a more environmentally acceptable fuel for use at power stations, steel mills, home heating or industrial boilers.

Beck, M.K.; Taylor, B.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

246

Total assessment audits (TAA) in Iowa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, energy, waste reduction and productivity audits are performed for a manufacturing facility independent of one another. Auditors generally deliver recommendations for improvement based on their specialized expertise (energy, waste reduction, productivity, etc.) without regard to how those recommendations may impact other, sometimes less obvious, subsystems or processes within the facility. The audits are typically performed in isolation from the plant upper management and commonly without adequate knowledge of how inherent interrelated operational constraints may directly or indirectly influence the success of audit recommendations. The Total Assessment Audit (TAA) concept originated from the belief that a manufacturing facility is better served using a holistic approach to problem solving rather than the more conventional isolated approach. The total assessment audit methodology partners the upper management team of a company with a multi-disciplined team of industry-specific specialists to collectively ascertain the core opportunities for improvement in the company and then to formulate a company oriented continuous improvement plan. Productivity, waste reduction, and energy efficiency objectives are seamlessly integrated into a single service delivery with the TAA approach. Nontraditional audit objectives that influence profitability and competitiveness such as business management practices, employee training, human resource issues, etc. are also subject to evaluation in a TAA. The underlying premise of this approach is that the objectives are interrelated and that simultaneous evaluation will province synergistic results. Ultimately, it is believed that the TAA approach can motivate a manufacturer to implement improvements it might not otherwise pursue if it were focused only on singular objectives.

Haman, W.G.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL Jump to: navigation, search Name Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL) Place Krishna Dist, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 521 157 Sector Biomass Product AP-based, biomass project developers References Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL) is a company located in Krishna Dist, Andhra Pradesh, India . References ↑ "Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Veeraiah_Non_Conventional_Power_Projects_Ltd_VNCPPL&oldid=352749"

248

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

249

Effective dose estimation during conventional and CT urography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Intravenous urography (IVU) and CT urography (CTU) are efficient radiological examinations for the evaluation of the urinary system disorders. However patients are exposed to a significant radiation dose. The objectives of this study are to: (i) measure and compare patient radiation dose by computed tomography urography (CTU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) and (ii) evaluate organ equivalent dose and cancer risks from CTU and IVU imaging procedures. A total of 141 patients were investigated. A calibrated CT machine (Siemens-Somatom Emotion duo) was used for CTU, while a Shimadzu X ray machine was used for IVU. Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used to measure patients' entrance surface doses (ESD). \\{TLDs\\} were calibrated under reproducible reference conditions. Patients radiation dose values (DLP) for CTU were 172±61 mGy cm, \\{CTDIvol\\} 4.75±2 mGy and effective dose 2.58±1 mSv. Patient cancer probabilities were estimated to be 1.4 per million per CTU examination. Patients \\{ESDs\\} values for IVU were 21.62±5 mGy, effective dose 1.79±1 mSv. CT involves a higher effective dose than IVU. In this study the radiation dose is considered low compared to previous studies. The effective dose from CTU procedures was 30% higher compared to IVU procedures. Wide dose variation between patient doses suggests that optimization is not fulfilled yet.

K. Alzimami; A. Sulieman; E. Omer; I.I. Suliman; K. Alsafi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail sales, and electrical system energy losses.

251

Selected alternatives to conventional chlorination. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was jointly funded by EPRI and five electric utility companies in New England (New England Power, Northeast Utilities, United Illuminating, Vermont Yankee Nuclear, and Public Service of New Hampshire). Previous investigations had identified three major areas for further study: continuous low-level chlorination, dechlorination, and condenser biofouling control. Continuous low-level chlorination, studied at two locations, one on open coastal water and the other in an industrialized estuarine area, showed that 0.1 ppM total residual oxidant (TRO) prevented attachment of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) to concrete surfaces. Chronic bioassays showed that 0.075 ppM TRO reduced biofouling by indigenous organisms; 0.1 ppM TRO slightly increased mortalities of the Atlantic silversides (Menidia menidia) but had no effect on the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Dechlorination investigations showed that threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), Atlantic silversides (Menidia menidia), larval bay scallops (Argopecten irradians), and the copepod Acartia tonsa exposed to water chlorinated to 0.5 ppM TRO for 10, 100, and 1000 seconds, followed by dechlorination with sodium thiosulfate, all suffered significant toxic effects. Condenser tube biofouling studies showed that there was a strong correlation between condenser performance and condenser tube biofouling; biofilm induction varied inversely with ambient water temperature, but orientation of the tubes had no effect on biofilm formation; and all chemicals tested (mono-, di-, and trisodium phosphate; Polident; and TRO at 0.1 ppM) reduced but did not remove biofilms.

Garey, J.F.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

ENERGY STAR Success Story San Diego Convention Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Success Story ENERGY STAR Success Story San Diego Convention Center Since opening 20 years ago, San Diego's bayside convention facility has been a green industry leader and continues to receive accolades for environmental stewardship. The San Diego Convention Center Corporation (SDCCC) joined the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ENERGY STAR program as a partner in 2008. Using the EPA's online energy management and tracking tool, Portfolio Manager, the SDCCC tracked its energy consumption and has improved the facility's overall performance. Since then, the San Diego Convention Center has become a model for other convention and meeting facilities demonstrating the value of benchmarking to improve efficiency and to save money. . The Convention Center is managed and marketed by the SDCCC, a non-profit public

254

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010) and 75 Fed. Reg. 51986 (Aug. 24, 2010). Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications CIGNLCommentsDOECSCRulemaking11-30-10.doc DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting

255

American Veterans 69th Annual National Convention | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

great organization. From electing new leaders to voting on resolutions that set the foundation of AMVETS, the National Convention sets the stage for the coming year. Contact...

256

SciTech Connect: Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

257

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results - Interim Report H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and...

258

,,,"with Any"," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,,"...

259

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding...

260

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- - - - W W - - - - - - See footnotes at end of table. 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 86 Energy Information...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding...

262

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- - - - 64.7 64.7 - - - - - - See footnotes at end of table. 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 86 Energy Information...

263

EM's Acting Assistant Secretary Selected to Lead Joint Convention...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

nuclear and non-nuclear, particularly South Asia, the Pacific Region, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East - to ratify the Joint Convention. There are currently 69...

264

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment Ankur Agarwala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment Ankur Agarwala Department plasma etching processes having atomic layer resolution. The basis of plasma atomic layer etching PALE will be discussed with the goal of demonstrating the potential of using conventional plasma etching equipment having

Kushner, Mark

265

Dekkera bruxellensis, a Non-conventional Ethanol Production Yeast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dekkera bruxellensis, a Non-conventional Ethanol Production Yeast Studies on Physiology Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2014 #12;Dekkera bruxellensis, a Non-conventional Ethanol Production in several ethanol production plants, which nevertheless had a high efficiency in one of the monitored

266

Computational Modeling of Conventionally Reinforced Concrete Coupling Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF CONVENTIONALLY REINFORCED CONCRETE COUPLING BEAMS A Thesis by AJAY SESHADRI SHASTRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2010 Major Subject: Civil Engineering Computational Modeling of Conventionally Reinforced Concrete Coupling Beams Copyright 2010...

Shastri, Ajay Seshadri

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

267

Hardwood Markets and Marketing AHEC American Hardwood in Europe Convention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hardwood Markets and Marketing AHEC American Hardwood in Europe Convention Venice, Italy 20-22 October 2004 Hardwood Markets in 2003-2005 American Hardwood Export Council 12th Annual Convention Venice, Italy 20-22 October 2004 by Ed Pepke, Project Leader Forest Products Marketing Programme UN Economic

268

Audio Engineering Society Convention e-Brief 151  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Engineering Society Convention e-Brief 151 Presented at the 136th Convention 2014 April 26. Reproduction of this paper, or any portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Audio Engineering Society. APE: Audio Perceptual Evaluation toolbox for MATLAB Brecht De Man, Joshua D. Reiss Centre

Reiss, Josh

269

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country March 1, 2012 Las Vegas, Nevada Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country" was held March 1, 2012, in Las Vegas, Nevada. The forum focused on recent trends, existing successful partnerships, and perspectives on the future of conventional energy and how tribal business interests are evolving to meet the interests and needs of new tribal energy economies. The forucm provided an opportunity for tribal

270

An integrated multivariate approach for optimisation of IT/IS investment in conventional power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several organisations are seeking to determine the impact of Information Technology (IT)/Information Systems (IS) investments on their performance measures. Industrial units such as power plants are not exempt from this issue. This paper presents an integrated multivariate approach for assessment and optimisation of IT/IS investment in conventional power plants. The Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) approach is used to assess the IT/IS investment impacts on the performance of power plants. Furthermore, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is used to verify and validate the findings of the DEA approach. IT/IS budget, number of IT/IS employees and number of PCs are used as input variables and total power generation and load factor are used as output variables. The proposed approach is applied to eight power plants and its advantages are discussed. This is the first study that presents a practical tool for policy making and optimisation with respect to IT/IS investment in conventional power plants.

A. Azadeh; A. Keramati; M. Jafari Songhori

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

272

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

273

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

274

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

275

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

276

Table A55. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Cogeneration Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"Steam Turbines",,,,"Steam Turbines" ,," ","Supplied by Either","Conventional",,,"Supplied by","One or More",," " " "," ",,"Conventional","Combustion ","Combined-Cycle","Internal Combustion","Heat Recovered from","Cogeneration",,"RSE" "SIC"," ",,"or Fluidized","Turbines with","Combustion","Engines with","High-Temperature","Technologies","None","Row"

277

Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public Comments Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public Comments In an effort to assist the Department of Energy in its development of regulations pursuant to section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), the DOE General Counsel's office issued a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) in July 2010. The Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) provides for a global nuclear liability regime assuring prompt and equitable compensation in the event of certain nuclear incidents, and features the creation of an international fund to supplement the amount of compensation available for nuclear damage resulting from such incidents. Section 934 of the EISA authorizes the Secretary of Energy to

278

2012 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alaska Federation of Natives Convention Alaska Federation of Natives Convention 2012 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention October 18, 2012 - 12:49pm Addthis Anchorage, Alaska October 18 - 20, 2012 During the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention held October 18-20 in Anchorage, the DOE Office of Indian Energy and the EERE Tribal Energy Program presented a preconference workshop entitled "Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Alaska Native Community Development." The workshop was designed to help tribal leaders and staff understand the range of energy efficiency and renewable energy opportunities that exist in their remote communities, and also covered project development and financing for clean energy projects. Download the Alaska workshop presentations. Addthis Related Articles

279

Atlantic City Convention Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Convention Center Solar Power Plant Convention Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Atlantic City Convention Center Solar Power Plant Facility Atlantic City Convention Center Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Pepco Energy Services Location Atlantic City, New Jersey Coordinates 39.3642834°, -74.4229266° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3642834,"lon":-74.4229266,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

280

Convention for Preservation of Man's Cultural Heritage in the Oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...special merit and may be enlarged if so required. The territorial ambit of the convention is prescribed with a view to avoiding any...convulsive, and divisive" events. Rampant inflation, the energy crisis, public mistrust of government, and unresolved racial...

F. M. Auburn

1974-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

AutoCAD discipline layering convention. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a user`s guide to establishing layering standards for drawing development. Uniform layering standards are established to exchange of AutoCAD datasets between organizations and companies. Consistency in the layering conventions assists the user through logical separation and identification of drawing data. This allows the user to view and plot related aspects of a drawing separately or in combination. The use of color and Linetype by layer is the preferred layering convention method, however to accommodate specific needs, colors and linetypes can also be assigned on an entity basis. New drawing setup files (also identified in AutoCAD documentation as Prototype drawings) use this layering convention to establish discipline drawing layers that are routinely used. Additions, deletions or revisions to the layering conventions are encourage.

Nielsen, B.L.

1995-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

282

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation Contingent Cost Allocation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE published a Notice of Inquiry in the Federal Register (75 Fed. Reg. 43,945) requesting public comment on issues related to the funding obligations under the Convention on Supplementary...

283

Actors, coalitions and the framework convention on climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines the political processes through which the Framework Convention on Climate Change was negotiated and the initial efforts of the United States, the Netherlands, and Japan to adopt national policies and ...

Sewell, Granville C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fact #648: November 8, 2010 Conventional and Alternative Fuel...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fuel Price Report is a quarterly report that tracks prices for conventional and alternative fuels in the U.S. The graph below shows the nationwide average price for each...

285

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention March 13, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis The National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) 2012 tradeshow and convention will take place April 1-4, 2012, in San Diego, California. The event features seminars and trainings and other activities. Be sure to visit the Office of Indian Energy booth! Learn more on the NIGA website. Addthis Related Articles Energy Savings Performance Contract Case Studies Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Byron Washom, Director of Strategic Energy Initiatives at the University of California at San Diego, poses with an electric vehicle and some of the solar panels that cover UCSD's campus.| Photo courtesy of UCSD Q&A With Byron Washom of the University of California at San Diego

286

Livermore team successfully leads important test of a conventional warhead  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

102813_dod 102813_dod 10/28/2013 Livermore team successfully leads important test of a conventional warhead for the DoD Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov LLNL served as technical lead and integrator on an important test to assess a new conventional warhead designed by the Lab. Dave Hare, Livermore's program manager of the test, called it an "unequivocal success." Below is the press release from the Department of Defense Defense Department successfully conducts warhead sled test The Defense Department announced recently the successful testing of an advanced conventional precision effects warhead, a critical part of a national effort to establish a conventional prompt strike capability. This capability will contribute to the country's ability to defend its interests

287

File:EIA-conventional-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conventional-gas.pdf conventional-gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Natural Gas Production in Conventional Fields, Lower 48 States Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 3.25 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Natural Gas Production in Conventional Fields, Lower 48 States Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2009-04-08 Extent National Countries United States UN Region Northern America File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:54, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 17:54, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (3.25 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

288

Determination of plate efficiencies for conventional distillation columns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF PLATE EFFICIENCIES FOR CONVENTIONAL DISTILLATION COIUMNS A Thesis By Thomas Raymond Harris Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1962 Ma)or Sub)ect t Chemical Engineering DETERMINATION OF PLATE EFFICIENCIES FOR CONVENTIONAL DISTILLATION COLUMNS A Thesis Thomas Raymond Harris Approred as to style and content bye Chairman of ommittee Head...

Harris, Thomas Raymond

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

Modelling the costs of non-conventional oil: A case study of Canadian bitumen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

90% of world extra-heavy oil resources in place occur in Venezuela. Major oil shale resources are in China, Estonia, the United States, Australia, and Jordan, (UNDP, 2000 p141). World coal resources in place are estimated at over 20 trillion barrels... than those which would be produced by burning the total estimated resource base of conventional oil and gas: “It implies that even the more ambitious targets for stabilising the atmosphere are not necessarily inconsistent with using all the gas and oil...

Méjean, A; Hope, Chris

290

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

291

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

292

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

293

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

294

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Special Naphthas Lubricants Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

297

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Conventional machining methods for rapid prototyping and direct manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The material and product accuracy limitations of rapid prototyped products can often prevent the use of rapid prototyping (RP) processes for production of final end-use products. Conventional machining processes are well-developed technologies with the capability of employing a wide range of materials in the creation of highly accurate components. This paper presents an overview of how conventional machining processes can be used for RP and direct manufacturing processes. The methodologies of computer numerical control machining for rapid prototyping (CNC-RP) and wire electronic discharge machining for rapid prototyping (WEDM-RP) are presented in this paper. A general discussion of selection criteria and cost comparisons among both current additive RP and conventional machining approaches to rapid manufacturing are also presented.

Zhi Yang; Richard A. Wysk; Sanjay Joshi; Matthew C. Frank; Joseph E. Petrzelka

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

DOE cost comparison study industrial fluidized bed combustion vs conventional coal technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compares the capital and operating costs of two different industrial boiler technologies, each producing 250,000 lbs steam/hr. These technologies are: Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) and Pulverized Coal (PC) combustion used in conjunction with a limestone Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Three separate turnkey plant designs have been completed. Two of these plant designs incorporate FBC technology and have been designated FBA-16 and FBV-16. The first FBC design (FBA-16) contains two shop assembled, rail shippable fluid bed boilers capable of producing 125,000 lbs/hr each. The second plant design (FBV-16) utilizes a single 250,000 lbs/hr fluid bed boiler shipped by rail in large sections for field assembly. The third plant design utilizes a conventional pulverized coal (PC) boiler in conjunction with a C-E Air Quality Control System (AQCS) limestone scrubber. Capital costs were generated for the three turnkey plant designs just described. The FBA-16, FBV-16, and Conventional Unit plant designs have associated capital costs of $24.4, $22.8, and $24.7 million, respectively. Comparisons between plant capital cost estimates are valid and informative. The total operational costs, which include contingencies on new product design for the Fluid Bed Units, were found to vary between four and seven percent higher than the Conventional Unit. When contingencies are not included, the operating costs were found to be between one and three percent higher than the Conventional Unit. As can be seen, the operating costs for the bed designs are close enough to be considered similar when considering the nature of the study. The efficiency of the fluid bed plant designs can be increased and required capital equipment reduced by improvements to the plant design with time and more development. Some potential design modifications are outlined.

Myrick, D.T.

1980-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

300

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

302

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

303

ENERGY STAR Success Story: San Diego Convention Center | ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

San Diego Convention Center San Diego Convention Center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

304

ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center | ENERGY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

305

Impact of force withdrawal on options for conventional defenses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soviet withdrawal from the Warsaw Treaty Organization (WTO) could open new defensive options. This report gives some background on those options from post-war nuclear and conventional strategies and the quantitative Soviet threat tot he role of firepower, close air support, and battlefield attrition. Withdrawal under the Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty could provide a buffer between opposing armies that aggressor armies drop the bridges and disrupt the roads and rails that would have to be used. If forces were brought into battle piecemeal, they would be annihilated. That would permit effective use of advanced and prepositioned weapons, which would favor the defense. 9 refs.

Canavan, G.H.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

307

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

From Conventional to Organic: Weed Management Principles for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Conventional to Organic: Weed Management Principles for the Transition Years Fabián Menalled weed management tool is located between your ears www.forages.oregonsate.edu #12;Today, we'll talk more about principles than specific practices #12;Outline for Today's Presentation Transitioning to organic

Maxwell, Bruce D.

310

PLANT RESISTANCE Conventional Screening Overlooks Resistance Sources: Rootworm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANT RESISTANCE Conventional Screening Overlooks Resistance Sources: Rootworm Damage of Diverse.g., landraces, populations, inbreds) for native resistance to western corn rootworm is labor.However,wehaverecentlyobservedthattopcrossed(hybrid) materials tend to have reduced western corn rootworm damage. To formally test whether rootworm damage

Flint-Garcia, Sherry

311

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: Justin Pollard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: A Proposal Justin Pollard April 2009) Introduction It seems counterintuitive to think that the spread of nuclear weapons could make the world a safer of ubiquitous nuclear armament is a more dangerous and unstable one. Certainly, a weapon of the nuclear

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

312

Japanese Ratify Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"The Japanese ratification of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) marks an important milestone towards creating a global nuclear liability regime that will assure prompt and meaningful compensation in the event of a nuclear accident and will facilitate international cooperation on nuclear projects such as ongoing clean-up work at the Fukushima site."

313

Appendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the addition of water/lixiviant is generally collected by air pollution control mechanisms, which return as in situ leaching (ISL) mining operations, to provide a more complete picture of uranium production. While this report focuses on the impacts associated with conventional surface and underground uranium mines

314

Nov/Dec 2006 2006 CSBA Convention Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the 2006 CSBA Convention Once, again, we cheated winter and had only a little rain water on the highway the opening ceremonies and committee reports, Keynote Speaker, Dr. Jamie Ellis, from the University of Florida be reused by forcefully washing off the slime and letting the combs dry out. Probably, the portion of t

Ferrara, Katherine W.

315

Successful Alternatives to Conventional Cement Designs in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since mid-1981, 36 wells have been cemented in the Williston Basin with a cementing system diametrically opposed to conventional cementing designs used for bonding across massive salt members. Since implementation, along with the use of relaxed invert emulsion oil mud, not one casing problem has arisen in the wells where these systems were used.

Bryant, G.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ocean Current Drifter CD-ROMs File Naming Conventions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Current Drifter CD-ROMs File Naming Conventions Surface Current · Data are located on disc 1 of which are located in the directory FLOATS on disc 1. In summary, the files included in this CD-ROM set on which that file resides.) #12;Technical questions regarding the CD-ROMs should be addressed to: National

317

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

318

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.PDF 5.PDF Table 35. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products by PAD District and State, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene Reformulated Conventional Total Reformulated Conventional Total PAD District 1 ............................................ 244 3,987 4,231 16,344 28,462 44,806 1,585 Connecticut ............................................. - - - 927 - 927 28 Delaware ................................................ - - - 887 652 1,539 148 District of Columbia ................................ - - - - - - - Florida ..................................................... - 978 978 - 5,532 5,532 - Georgia ................................................... - 370 370 - 2,767 2,767 20 Maine ......................................................

319

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products by PAD District and State, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene Reformulated Conventional Total Reformulated Conventional Total PAD District 1 ............................................ 28 3,485 3,513 12,415 24,530 36,945 1,158 Connecticut ............................................. - - - 1,075 - 1,075 5 Delaware ................................................ - - - 692 755 1,447 106 District of Columbia ................................ - - - - - - - Florida ..................................................... - 747 747 - 4,523 4,523 - Georgia ................................................... - 220 220 4 2,600 2,604 14 Maine ......................................................

320

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

ENERGY STAR Success Story VA Beach Convention Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STAR Success Story: STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center Located in Virginia's most populous city, the Virginia Beach Convention Center (VBCC) comprises more than 516,000 square feet and typically hosts 400 events a year. Fully opened in 2007, the VBCC has served as the anchor for the successful revitalization of Virginia Beach's old beach district. With historical references and maritime themes integrated into the structure's modern design, the Center features many technological advances that make it a prime location for meetings, conferences, and trade shows. However, even with a newly constructed building, the VBCC has demonstrated an important energy management principle: all buildings, regardless of their age and building systems they employ, can reduce energy consumption, save money, and offset greenhouse gas

323

Conventional Positron Target for a Tesla Formatted Beam  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 SLAC-TN-03-072 November 2003 Abstract This note documents a set of expressions used to explore the issue of whether or not it is reasonable to consider a conventional positron source for a Tesla formatted beam. The critical issue is that of energy deposition in the conversion target and the comparison of the induced stress with the ultimate tensile strength of the target material. Since the length of the incident beam pulse is large in comparison to the ratio of beam size to the speed of sound, the concurrent pressure pulse dissipates in a time short compared to the overall pulse duration and one is left with only the Conventional Positron Target for a Tesla Formatted Beam John C. Sheppard Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

324

Cost performance comparisons of equivalent conventional and 100% solar houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sixth design of ALL SOLAR HOUSE and the equivalent conventional house had detailed performance and item by item cost checks made. Surprisingly the active solar comes out to lower cost than the passive. A further suprise, the passive comes out as more efficient than the active. The conventional house has slightly more uniform temperature and has comparable cost. All these designs are thermostated to the 20+/sup 0/C (70+/sup 0/F) range. All have the same volumetric efficiency. The line of descent for ALL SOLAR HOUSE is: Experimental Manor, All glass house, Peterson's, Binghamton, Loraine, and now Keene. The last on speculation for the low cost market as a prototype for wide spread use. Several of the specially engineered components have been used that they are offered commercially.

Saunders, N.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Verifying conventional stability in Europe: An overview. Interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verifying the obligations in the prospective Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) treaty will be far harder and more expensive than verifying those in the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty, or in other previous arms control agreements. This Note presents a qualitative overview of conventional arms control verification issues, including (1) monitoring force levels calibrated in major items of equipment and personnel, in a large production area that makes concealment possible; (2) watching force withdrawals, restructuring, or disbandments involving removal, reexport, or destruction of thousands of heavy equipment items; (3) monitoring the post-agreement status of the largest and most complex force concentration in peacetime history; and (4) meshing these observations with the concurrent need to monitor unilateral Warsaw Pact force reductions and force changes on a massive scale.

Hirschfeld, T.J.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

327

Segmented vs conventional numerals: legibility and long term retention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the environmental chamber. Sub jects The subjects were thirty male students between the ages of 1g and 27 from the Industrial Engineering department at Texas A&M University. Subjects were divided into three groups of 10. Procedure Exposure time and number... December 1971 Ma]or Subject: Industrial Engineering SEGMENTED VS CONVENTIONAL NUMERALS: LEGIBILITY AND LONG TERM RETENTION A Thesis STEVE EDGAR HILL Approved as to style and content by: Elias Chairman of Committee) r. A. W. ortham (Head...

Hill, Steve Edgar

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On top of the tank are two thin pipes; one pipe is the hot water outlet, and the other is the cold water inlet. A large pipe in the middle is called a vent pipe. A pressure/temperature relief valve is also on top of the tank and is connected to an open pipe that runs down the side of the tank. Another valve near the bottom of the outside of the tank is the thermostat and gas valve. A cutout shows the parts inside the tank, which include a large tube called a flue tube/heat exchanger. Inside this tube is a jagged insert called a flue baffle. Beside the flue tube/heat exchanger is a thin tube called the anode rod. At the bottom of the tank is a gas burner, and beneath the burner are combustion air openings.

329

J-integral values for cracks in conventional fatigue specimens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive S-N fatigue data has been developed worldwide using conventional low-cycle fatigue tests. Such tests use smooth unnotched specimens subjected to controlled axial deflection or strain ranges. The tests must be run in the plastic regime in order to achieve the required cycles-to-failure. Recent developments have highlighted the need to understand and interpret the significance of the resulting strain range vs. cycles to failure data in terms of crack initiation and propagation. Since conventional fatigue tests are conducted in the plastic regime, linear elastic fracture mechanics cannot be used to accurately quantify crack growth in such tests. Elastic-plastic J-integral theory, however, has been shown to provide excellent correlations of crack growth in the elastic, elastic-plastic and grossly-plastic regimes for a wide range of geometric and loading conditions. The authors are applying this theory to the low-cycle fatigue specimen crack behavior. As cracks progress in conventional fatigue specimens, bending becomes significant. Since fatigue testing machines are quite stiff relative to the small fatigue specimens, the ends of the specimen are constrained to remain parallel, and this reduces bending in the cracked cross-section. Three-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic analyses are required to include these constraints in the J-integral solutions.

O`Donnell, T.P.; O`Donnell, W.J. [O`Donnell Consulting Engineers, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

331

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

332

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

333

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

334

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

335

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

336

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

337

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

338

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

339

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

340

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

342

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

343

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

344

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

345

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

346

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

347

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

348

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

349

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

350

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

351

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

352

A Comparison of Ten Different Methods for the Analysis of Saturates, Olefins, Benzene, Total Aromatics, and Oxygenates in Finished Gasolines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......overview of the changing European gasoline specifications with time...combined. These reformulated gasolines may now contain straight run naphtha, fluid catalytically...analysis of hydrocarbon types in gasoline is the fluorescent indi- cator......

Jan Beens; Hans Thomas Feuerhelm; Jörg-Christian Fröhling; Jerry Watt; Gertjan Schaatsbergen

353

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

354

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

355

Postacceleration Of Laser-Generated High Energy Protons Through Conventional Accelerator Linacs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The post-acceleration of laser-generated protons through conventional drift tube linear accelerators has been simulated with the particle code Parmela. The proton source is generated on the rear surface of a target irradiated by an high-intensity (10{sup 19} W{center_dot}cm{sup -2}) short-pulse (350 fs) laser and focused by a microlens that allows selecting collimated protons at 7{+-}0.1 MeV with rms unnormalized emittance of 0.180 mm.mrad. The simulations show that protons can be accelerated by one drift tube linac tank to more than 14 MeV with unnormalized emittance growth of 8 in x and 22.6 in y directions when considering a total proton charge of 0.112 mA. This result shows for the first time that coupling between laser-plasma accelerators with traditional accelerators is possible, allowing a luminosity gain for the final beam.

Fuchs, Julien; Audebert, Patrick [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique-Universite Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Antici, Patrizio [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique-Universite Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', Via Scarpa 14-16, 00165 Roma (Italy); Fazi, Mauro; Migliorati, Mauro; Palumbo, Luigi [Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', Via Scarpa 14-16, 00165 Roma (Italy); Lombardi, Augusto [ATreP via Perini 181, 38100, Trento (Italy)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

356

Energy Saving in Conventional and Unconventional Batch Reactive Distillation: Application to Hydrolysis of Methyl Lactate System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, energy consumption in a middle vessel batch reactive distillation (MVBRD) column is considered for the production of lactic acid via hydrolysis of methyl lactate. A dynamic optimization problem incorporating a process model is formulated to minimize the batch time which consequently minimizes the total energy consumption. The problem is subject to constraints on the amount and purity of lactic acid. The optimisation variables are reflux ratio and/or reboil ratio which are treated as piecewise constant. The earlier work of the authors on energy consumption in conventional batch reactive distillation column (CBRD) for the same reaction system is used for comparative analysis with the energy consumption in MVBRD. As an example, for a given separation task, the optimization results show that MVBRD is capable of saving over 23 % energy compared to energy consumption in CBRD column for the same task.

Elmahboub A. Edreder; Mansour Emtir; Iqbal M. Mujtaba

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Trade Associations - The Chemical Alliance; Dyestuff Convention; American Drug Manufacturers Association.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trade Associations - The Chemical Alliance; Dyestuff Convention; American Drug Manufacturers Association. ...

1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Prospects for conventional arms reduction in Europe: CFE and beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is an edited version of an address given by the Minister of Defence of the Netherlands to a symposium held by the Technological and Aerospace Committee of the Western European Union Assembly in Rome, 27 March 1990. The Minister argues that there is a role for a European satellite surveillance system to help verify adherence to conventional forces reduction agreements and to support United Nations peacekeeping efforts. If its technical and financial feasibility are demonstrated, further steps in the direction of an independent European system should be taken as quickly as possible.

A.L. ter Beek

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Demilitarization and disposal technologies for conventional munitions and energetic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies for the demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions and energetic materials are presented. A hazard separation system has been developed to remove hazardous subcomponents before processing. Electronic component materials separation processes have been developed that provide for demilitarization as well as the efficient recycling of materials. Energetic materials demilitarization and disposal using plasma arc and molten metal technologies are currently being investigated. These regulatory compliant technologies will allow the recycling of materials and will also provide a waste form suitable for final disposal.

Lemieux, A.A.; Wheelis, W.T.; Blankenship, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

362

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

363

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

364

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

365

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

366

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

367

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

368

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

369

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

370

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

371

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

372

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

373

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

374

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shadowband Spectroradiometer SPEC-TOTDN : Shortwave Total Downwelling Spectrometer UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett Value-Added Products VISST : Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst...

375

,"New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","12312014"...

376

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

377

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to...

378

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

379

Conventional and advanced exergoeconomic analyses of geothermal district heating systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study deals with analyzing, assessing and comparing conventional and advanced exergoeconomic analyses to identify the direction and potential for energy savings of a geothermal district heating system in future conditions/projections. As a real case study, the Afyon geothermal district heating system in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey, is considered while its actual operational thermal data on 8 February 2011 are utilized in the analysis, which is based on the specific exergy costing method. In this study for the first time, based on the concepts of avoidable/unavoidable and endogenous/exogenous parts, cost rates associated with both exergy destruction and capital investment of the geothermal district heating system are determined first, and the obtained results are then evaluated. The results indicate that the internal design changes play a more essential role in determining the cost of each component. The cost rate of unavoidable part within the components of the system is lower than that of the avoidable one. For the overall system, the value for the conventional exergoeconomic factor is determined to be 5.53% while that for the modified one is calculated to be 9.49%. As a result, the advanced exergoeconomic analysis makes more sense given the additional information in splitting process of the components.

Ali Keçeba?; Arif Hepbasli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin) Michael T. Crimmins,* Jason M. Stevens, and Gregory, North Carolina 27599 crimmins@email.unc.edu Received July 21, 2009 ABSTRACT The total synthesis of a hemiaminal and acid chloride to complete the synthesis. In 2004, Pettit and Crews independently reported

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S RENSEN a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for total re verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation generally is less energy e cient than

Skogestad, Sigurd

382

Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Reformulated Areas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

3 2.904 2.861 2.776 2.667 2.535 1994-2014 East Coast (PADD1) 2.935 2.889 2.864 2.776 2.677 2.565 1994-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 3.008 2.956 2.934 2.838 2.736 2.621 1994-2014...

383

Automatic Query Reformulation Based on Divergence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cai,D. van Rijsbergen,C.J. Jose,J.M. Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management (CIKM) editors: Pagues, H. Liu, L., and Grossman, D. pp 419-426 ACM

Cai, D.

384

Reformulated Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

94-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) - - - - - - 1994-2014 New England (PADD 1A) - - - - - - 1994-2014 Connecticut - - - - - - 1994-2014 Maine - - - - - - 1994-2014 Massachusetts - - - - -...

385

Abstraction and reformulation in artificial intelligence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...problem. In planning a trip from the Eiffel Tower to the Sydney Opera House, for example, one would work out the entire route from Paris to Sydney before considering the route to take within Paris...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Reformulated Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1.924 2.347 - - - 1994-2013 New England (PADD 1A) 2.807 1.952 2.374 - - - 1994-2013 Connecticut 2.804 1.944 2.415 - - - 1994-2013 Maine - - - - - - 1994-2013 Massachusetts 2.820...

387

mathematical programs with cardinality constraints: reformulation by ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 16, 2014 ... minimum can be computed by standard techniques. .... Example 2.3 Consider the two-dimensional optimization problem min ...... that is of some interest: S-

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Completely Positive Reformulations for Polynomial Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 ... J. C. Vera. Tilburg School of Economics and Management, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands. E-mail: j.c.veralizcano@tilburguniversity.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

389

S&TR | Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Staff Staff Article title: Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention; article blurb: A Livermore team has discovered plenty of surprises in the first samples captured from a comet. Graphic of artist's conception of Stardust spacecraft. Photo of John Bradley at the Johnson Space Center. An artist's conception shows the Stardust spacecraft approaching Comet Wild 2. The spacecraft's cometary particle collector, filled with lightweight aerogel glass foam, is shown extended. The spacecraft is flanked by two solar panels. (Image courtesy of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA].) In the lower right photo, John Bradley gives the thumbs-up sign after scientists opened the Stardust sample return capsule in the clean room facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

390

Characterization of Organic and Conventional Coffee Using Neutron Activation Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Countries importing organic coffee are facing the difficulty of assessing the quality of the product to distinguish original organic coffee from other coffees, thereby eliminating possible fraud. Many analytical methods are matrix sensitive and require matrix-matching reference materials for validation, which are currently nonexistent. This work aims to establish the trace element characterization of organic and conventional Brazilian coffees and to establish correlations with the related soil and the type of fertilizer and agrochemicals applied. It was observed that the variability in element concentrations between the various types of coffee is not so large, which emphasizes the need for analytical methods of high accuracy, reproducibility, and a well-known uncertainty. Moreover, the analyses indicate that sometimes the coffee packages may contain some soil remnants.

E. A. De Nadai Fernandes; P. Bode; F. S. Tagliaferro

2000-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

391

Improving Multigrid and Conventional Relaxation Algorithms for Propagators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Practical modifications of deterministic multigrid and conventional relaxation algorithms are discussed. New parameters need not be tuned but are determined by the algorithms themselves. One modification can be thought of as ``updating on a last layer consisting of a single site''. It eliminates critical slowing down in computations of bosonic and fermionic propagators in a fixed volume. Here critical slowing down means divergence of asymptotic relaxation times as the propagators approach criticality. A remaining volume dependence is weak enough in case of bosons so that conjugate gradient can be outperformed. However, no answer can be given yet if the same is true for staggered fermions on lattices of realizable sizes. Numerical results are presented for propagators of bosons and of staggered fermions in 4-dimensional $SU(2)$ gauge fields.

Thomas Kalkreuter

1992-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

Pseudogap in a thin film of a conventional superconductor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A superconducting state is characterized by the gap in the electronic density of states, which vanishes at the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}. It was discovered that in high-temperature superconductors, a noticeable depression in the density of states, the pseudogap, still remains even at temperatures above T{sub c}. Here, we show that a pseudogap exists in a conventional superconductor, ultrathin titanium nitride films, over a wide range of temperatures above T{sub c}. Our study reveals that this pseudogap state is induced by superconducting fluctuations and favoured by two-dimensionality and by the proximity to the transition to the insulating state. A general character of the observed phenomenon provides a powerful tool to discriminate between fluctuations as the origin of the pseudogap state and other contributions in the layered high-temperature superconductor compounds.

Sacepe, B.; Chapelier, C.; Baturina, T. I.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baklanov, M. R.; Sanquer, M. (Materials Science Division); (CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble); (A.V. Rzhanov Inst. Semiconductor Physics); (IMEC)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

394

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

395

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

396

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

397

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

398

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

399

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

400

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

402

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

403

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

404

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

405

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

406

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

407

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

408

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

409

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

410

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

411

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

412

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

413

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

414

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

415

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

416

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

417

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

418

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

419

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

420

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

422

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

423

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

424

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

425

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

426

Total synthesis and study of myrmicarin alkaloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations ...

Ondrus, Alison Evelynn, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Total synthesis of cyclotryptamine and diketopiperazine alkaloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Total Synthesis of the (+)-12,12'-Dideoxyverticillin A The fungal metabolite (+)-12,12'-dideoxyverticillin A, a cytotoxic alkaloid isolated from a marine Penicillium sp., belongs to a fascinating family of densely ...

Kim, Justin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Provides Total Tuition Charge to Source Contribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,262 1,938 TGR 4-20 0-3 2,871 2,871 - % of time appointed Hours of Work/Week Units TAL Provides Total

Kay, Mark A.

429

Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (?)-Acylfulvene and (?)- Irofulven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report our full account of the enantioselective total synthesis of (?)-acylfulvene (1) and (?)-irofulven (2), which features metathesis reactions for the rapid assembly of the molecular framework of these antitumor ...

Movassaghi, Mohammad

430

A GENUINELY HIGH ORDER TOTAL VARIATION DIMINISHING ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(TVD) schemes solving one-dimensional scalar conservation laws degenerate to first order .... where the total variation is measured by the standard bounded variation ..... interval Ij and into the jump discontinuities at cell interfaces, see [12].

431

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

432

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

433

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

434

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

435

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

436

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

437

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

438

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

439

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

440

CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION BULLETIN News, Background and Comment on Chemical and Biological Warfare Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION BULLETIN News, Background and Comment on Chemical and Biological DUPLICATION Graham S Pearson HSP Advisory Board The Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC) was opened biological weapons and prohibit their development, produc- tion, stockpiling, acquisition and retention

Sussex, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Conventional Septic Tank/Drain Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional septic systems have traditionally been the most commonly used technology for treating wastewater. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of conventional septic tank/drain fields, as well as estimated costs...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

442

Assessing performance : an analytical framework for the San José McEnery Convention Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study first outlines three major factors that limit the assessments of convention centers: high uncertainty in the convention industry, complex institutional structures and operational priorities, and plethora of ...

Lee, Kai-yan, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Rhetoric and heresthetic in the Mississippi Freedom Party controversy at the 1964 Democratic Convention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Democratic Convention. Specifically, the focus is on the rhetorical discourse presented by the members of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Fannie Lou Hamer in particular, at the Credentials Committee two days before the onset of the actual Convention...

Battaglia, Adria

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory | Total Scattering at the Lujan Center Neutron Powder Diffractometer (NPDF) High-Intensity Powder. Shoemaker, et al., Reverse Monte Carlo neutron scattering study of disordered crystalline materials neutron| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments

Magee, Joseph W.

445

A comparative study on conventional and advanced exergetic analyses of geothermal district heating systems based on actual operational data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper comparatively evaluates exergy destructions of a geothermal district heating system (GDHS) using both conventional and advanced exergetic analysis methods to identify the potential for improvement and the interactions among the components. As a real case study, the Afyon GDHS in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey, is considered based on actual operational data. For the first time, advanced exergetic analysis is applied to the GDHSs, in which the exergy destruction rate within each component is split into unavoidable/avoidable and endogenous/exogenous parts. The results indicate that the interconnections among all the components are not very strong. Thus, one should focus on how to reduce the internal inefficiency (destruction) rates of the components. The highest priority for improvement in the advanced exergetic analysis is in the re-injection pump (PM-IX), while it is the heat exchanger (HEX-III) in the conventional analysis. In addition, there is a substantial influence on the overall system as the total avoidable exergy destruction rate of the heat exchanger (HEX-V) has the highest value. On the overall system basis, the value for the conventional exergetic efficiency is determined to be 29.29% while that for the modified exergetic efficiency is calculated to be 34.46% through improving the overall components.

Arif Hepbasli; Ali Keçeba?

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Dietary fiber and cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in axenic (germfree) and holoxenic (conventional) rats. — III.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(conventional) rats. — III. Effect of non-sterilized pectin E. SACQUET, C. LEPRINCE, M. RIOTTOT P. RAIBAUD-en-Josas, France. Summary. Axenic (germfree) and holoxenic (conventional) rats were given a pectin- containing diet and large intestine of both germfree and conventional rats. Pectin decreased the absorption coefficient

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

447

Non-conventional passive sensors for monitoring tritium on surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe development of small passive, solid-state detectors for in-situ measurements of tritium, or other weak beta-emitting radionuclides, on surfaces. One form of detector operates on the principle of thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE), the other by discharge of an electret ion chamber (EIC). There are currently two specific types of commercially available detector systems that lend themselves to making surface measurements. One is the thin-film BeO on a graphite disc, and the other is the Teflon EIC. Two other types of TSEE dosimeters (ceramic BeO and carbon doped alumina) are described but lack either a suitable commercially available reader or standardized methods of fabrication. The small size of these detectors allows deployment in locations difficult to access with conventional windowless gas-flow proportional counters. Preliminary testing shows that quantitative measurements are realized with exposure times of 1--10 hours for the TSEE dosimeters (at the DOE release guideline of 5,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} for fixed beta contamination). The EIC detectors exhibit an MDA of 26,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} for a 24 hour exposure. Both types of integrating device are inexpensive and reusable. Measurements can, therefore, be made that are faster, cheaper, safer, and better than those possible with baseline monitoring technology.

Gammage, R.B.; Brock, J.L.; Meyer, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decrease in feature sizes in microelectronics fabrication will soon require plasma etching processes having atomic layer resolution. The basis of plasma atomic layer etching (PALE) is forming a layer of passivation that allows the underlying substrate material to be etched with lower activation energy than in the absence of the passivation. The subsequent removal of the passivation with carefully tailored activation energy then removes a single layer of the underlying material. If these goals are met, the process is self-limiting. A challenge of PALE is the high cost of specialized equipment and slow processing speed. In this work, results from a computational investigation of PALE will be discussed with the goal of demonstrating the potential of using conventional plasma etching equipment having acceptable processing speeds. Results will be discussed using inductively coupled and magnetically enhanced capacitively coupled plasmas in which nonsinusoidal waveforms are used to regulate ion energies to optimize the passivation and etch steps. This strategy may also enable the use of a single gas mixture, as opposed to changing gas mixtures between steps.

Agarwal, Ankur; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Use of plate efficiencies in the treatment of conventional columns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

17 ideal gas mixture and that the liquid obeys Raoult 's law. These assumptions lead to the following equations for the fugacity terms of Equation (17)t Qi (l9) 0 f&i - -Pixi, (zo) where 0 Pi -- vapor pressure of pure component i...) (&4) In view of the definitions given by Equations ($1) and (32), Equation ($4) becomes ~O. 4' (&5) Division of both sides of Equation ($5) by di gives 4i 4i (S6) For the case of a total condenser, the streams Vl, LO, and D ail have the same...

Taylor, Dan Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

450

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

451

Property:TotalValue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalValue TotalValue Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "TotalValue" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 3,088,007 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 22,888,360 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 2,661,650 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 37,400,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 40,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 451,814,234 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 177,642,503 +

452

ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Net broadband total irradiance The difference between upwelling and downwelling, covering longwave and shortwave radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

453

SolarTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarTotal SolarTotal Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarTotal Place Bemmel, Netherlands Zip 6681 LN Sector Solar Product The company sells and installs PV solar instalations Coordinates 51.894112°, 5.89881° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.894112,"lon":5.89881,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

454

Total Cross Sections for Neutron Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of neutron total cross-sections are both extensive and extremely accurate. Although they place a strong constraint on theoretically constructed models, there are relatively few comparisons of predictions with experiment. The total cross-sections for neutron scattering from $^{16}$O and $^{40}$Ca are calculated as a function of energy from $50-700$~MeV laboratory energy with a microscopic first order optical potential derived within the framework of the Watson expansion. Although these results are already in qualitative agreement with the data, the inclusion of medium corrections to the propagator is essential to correctly predict the energy dependence given by the experiment.

C. R. Chinn; Ch. Elster; R. M. Thaler; S. P. Weppner

1994-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Total Energy USA...

456

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This second National Report updates the first National Report published on May 3, 2003, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel (SF) and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel

457

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This is the first National Report prepared under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Managementi hereafter referred to as the "Joint Convention". This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management - May 2003

458

Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States 2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States Uranium Concentrate Processing Facilities End of 1996 End of 1997 End of 1998 End of 1999 End of 2000 End of 2001 End of 2002 End of 2003 End of 2004 End of 2005 End of 2006 End of 2007 End of 2008 End of 2009 End of 2010 End of 2011 End of 2012 End of 3rd Quarter 2013 Mills - conventional milling1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 Mills - other operators2 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 In-Situ-Leach Plants3 5 6 6 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 6 3 4 5 5 5 Byproduct Recovery Plants4 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 9 11 9 7 6 4 3 2 3 4 6 6 7 4 5 6 6 6

459

The Leica TCRA1105 Reflectorless Total Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster provides an overview of SLAC's TCRA1105 reflectorless total station for the Alignment Engineering Group. This instrument has shown itself to be very useful for planning new construction and providing quick measurements to difficult to reach or inaccessible surfaces.

Gaudreault, F.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

460

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA SÃ?RENSEN in this paper provides a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback been built and the experiments verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation

Skogestad, Sigurd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Total Solar Irradiance Satellite Composites and their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 12 Total Solar Irradiance Satellite Composites and their Phenomenological Effect on Climate. Phenomenological solar signature on climate 310 9. Conclusion 312 1. INTRODUCTION A contiguoustotal solar from each other, in particular about whether the TSI minimum during solar Cycles 22e23 (1995

Scafetta, Nicola

462

The midwest social society convention: Six years of meetings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was listed. 5. See Champion (1970:203-204) for a review of Fisher1 S£F transformation procedure. 6. To compute the standard error of the difference between tl^p's. the following equation was employed: 7.For a similar study of the American Sociological... SOCIOLOGICAL SOCIETY Yearly Participation Total Mean Rank 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1971* Minnesota1* 5 6 25 13 16 26 91 15.1 1 Missouri1* OA 8 h 10 10 2h 62 10.3 2 Iowa State13 2 1 U 5 18 28 58 9.7 3 Iowa0 7 3 2 9 13 20 51. 1. Kansas13 7 2 1 11 28 53 8...

Leonard, Wilbert M.

1975-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

464

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy that comes from some continuous range of directions, at wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, that is being emitted downwards. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component BSRN : Baseline Solar Radiation Network

465

Total Neutron Scattering in Vitreous Silica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of Corning superpure vitreous silica glass has been investigated with neutrons. A new method of analysis using variable neutron wavelengths and the measurement of total scattering cross sections from transmission experiments is developed and the results are compared with those from differential x-ray scattering. The total neutron scattering method permits a simple and direct structure analysis with resolution apparently superior to x-rays. The preliminary results compare well in a first approximation analysis with the basic structure model of Warren and others and in addition the neutron-determined atomic radial distribution curve exhibits some finer details than the x-ray results. Thermal inelastic scattering of neutrons was corrected for in an approximate way.

R. J. Breen; R. M. Delaney; P. J. Persiani; A. H. Weber

1957-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Forests (1980) Maximum Potential Biomass Density Land Use (1980) Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By County) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit)

467

Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

Kallman, Jeffrey S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Improved selection in totally monotone arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper's main result is an O(({radical}{bar m}lgm)(n lg n) + mlg n)-time algorithm for computing the kth smallest entry in each row of an m {times} n totally monotone array. (A two-dimensional A = a(i,j) is totally monotone if for all i{sub 1} < i{sub 2} and j{sub 1} < j{sup 2}, < a(i{sub 1},j{sub 2}) implies a(i{sub 2},j{sub 1})). For large values of k (in particular, for k=(n/2)), this algorithm is significantly faster than the O(k(m+n))-time algorithm for the same problem due to Kravets and Park. An immediate consequence of this result is an O(n{sup 3/2} lg{sup 2}n)-time algorithm for computing the kth nearest neighbor of each vertex of a convex n-gon. In addition to the main result, we also give an O(n lg m)-time algorithm for computing an approximate median in each row of an m {times} n totally monotone array; this approximate median is an entry whose rank in its row lies between (n/4) and (3n/4) {minus} 1. 20 refs., 3 figs.

Mansour, Y. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Aiken Computation Lab.); Park, J.K. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Schieber, B. (International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center); Sen, S. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

EQUUS Total Return Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EQUUS Total Return Inc EQUUS Total Return Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EQUUS Total Return Inc Place Houston, Texas Product A business development company and VC investor that trades as a closed-end fund. EQUUS is managed by MCC Global NV, a Frankfurt stock exchange listed management and merchant banking group. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

470

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Fourth United States of America (U.S.) National Report updates the Third Report published in October 2008, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the U.S. through June 2011. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the U.S.

471

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Third United States National Report updates the second National Report published in October 2005, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management 1(Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the United States through September 2008. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within

472

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE The adoption of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (Compensation Convention) opens a new chapter in international nuclear liability law. The Compensation Convention provides the world community with the opportunity to deal with legal liability and compensation for nuclear damage through a global regime that includes all countries that operate nuclear powerplants (nuclear power generating countries) and most countries that do not operate nuclear powerplants (nonnuclear power generating countries). Such a global regime can remove

473

In-Cylinder Imaging of Conventional and Advanced, Low-Temperature...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

vessels, which have been extensively modified for optical access. * Newly-developed laserimaging techniques in these facilities have provided new insight into conventional...

474

Fossil energy use in conventional and low-external-input cropping systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The production of fossil fuels will crest within the next decade and with reliance of modern conventional agriculture on fossil fuel energy inputs, food production… (more)

Cruse, Michael James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

National American Indian Housing Council 38th Annual Convention and Trade Show  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHC’s) most longstanding annual event, the Annual Convention & Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about Indian housing, attend training...

476

Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ENERGYSOLUTIONS' Comment in Response to Notice of Inquiry, Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation -75 FR 43945

477

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934

478

Conventional Hydropower Technologies, Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The US Department of Energy conducts research on conventional hydropower technologies to increase generation and improve existing means of generating hydroelectricity.

479

Million U.S. Housing Units Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.......................................... 8.2 1.0 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.6 2 Times A Day....................................................... 24.6 3.6 1.7 2.3 2.9 4.6 3.8 3.9 1.9 Once a Day............................................................ 42.3 5.4 2.5 4.7 4.5 7.0 7.9 6.6 3.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 3.6 1.6 3.4 2.8 4.7 4.5 4.4 2.3 About Once a Week............................................... 3.9 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.4 0.4 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 Q No Hot Meals Cooked............................................ 0.9 0.2 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven..........................................................

480

Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 0.4 1.7 2.1 2.2 1.7 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 2.3 6.0 5.9 5.5 5.0 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 5.6 10.3 9.7 8.1 8.7 A Few Times Each Week..................................... 27.2 2.1 6.1 7.2 6.0 5.7 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.3 0.7 1.0 1.1 0.8 Less Than Once a Week...................................... 4.1 Q 0.9 1.1 1.0 0.8 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 10.9 25.7 27.1 23.4 22.4 More Than Once a Day.....................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total conventional reformulated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Million U.S. Housing Units Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 4.7 3.8 Q Q Q 0.6 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 16.0 13.3 0.8 0.4 Q 1.3 Once a Day.................................................................. 42.3 32.1 26.5 1.6 0.7 1.1 2.2 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 19.3 15.8 1.3 0.4 0.6 1.3 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 2.8 2.2 Q N Q 0.3 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.7 2.3 Q Q Q Q No Hot Meals Cooked.................................................. 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................

482

Million U.S. Housing Units Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.4 1.0 0.4 0.6 1.2 Q 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 8.6 2.3 1.0 1.6 3.5 0.2 Once a Day.................................................................. 42.3 10.1 2.3 1.1 2.1 4.3 0.4 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 7.8 2.0 0.7 1.3 3.6 Q About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.1 Q Q Q 0.6 Q Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 1.4 Q Q Q 1.0 N No Hot Meals Cooked.................................................. 0.9 0.4 Q N Q 0.3 Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................

483

Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

72 Federal Register 72 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 181 / Wednesday, September 18, 2013 / Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 10,128. Abstract: Enrollment in the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) allows eligible entities to securely exchange Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) assistance programs data electronically with the Department of Education processors. Organizations establish Destination Point Administrators (DPAs) to transmit, receive, view and update student financial aid records using telecommunication software. Eligible respondents include the following, but are not limited to, institutions of higher education that participate in Title IV, HEA assistance programs, third-party servicers of eligible institutions,

484

Total solar house description and performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial attempt to apply the Total Solar concept to a residence in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, area is described. A very large storage capacity has made it possible to use only solar energy for meeting the heating, cooling and hot water needs for the entire year, with a parasitic power penalty of about 3500 kWh. Winter temperatures were maintained at 68/sup 0/F with 60/sup 0/F night setback, summer at 76/sup 0/F. Occupant intervention was negligible and passive overheat was minimized. The extra cost for the system, approximately $30,000 is readily amortized by the savings in purchased energy.

Starobin, L. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia); Starobin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Neutron Total Cross Sections at 20 Mev  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the T(d, n)He4 reaction as a monoenergetic source of neutrons of about 20 Mev, the total cross sections of 13 elements have been measured by a transmission experiment. These cross sections vary approximately as A23 as is to be expected from the continuum theory of nuclear reactions. The cross section for hydrogen at 19.93 Mev is 0.504±0.01 barn. This result, together with other results at lower energies, seems to require a Yukawa potential in both the singlet and triplet n-p states and a singlet effective range that is lower than that obtained from p-p scattering data.

Robert B. Day and Richard L. Henkel

1953-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

Total Pollution Effect and Total Energy Cost per Output of Different Products for Polish Industrial System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years a broad use has been made of the indices of total energy requirements in the whole large production system corresponding to unit output of particular goods (Boustead I., Hancock G.F., 1979). The...

Henryk W. Balandynowicz

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Blender Net Production of Petroleum Products by PAD Districts, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Finished Motor Gasoline ........................................... 936,493 70,515 1,007,008 407,288 81,490 33,114 521,892 Reformulated ........................................................ 417,619 3,229 420,848 100,812 17,921 11,111 129,844 Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol ......... 417,619 3,229 420,848 100,812 17,921 11,111 129,844 Reformulated Other .......................................... - - - - - - - Conventional ......................................................... 518,874 67,286 586,160 306,476

488

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.PDF 1.PDF Table 21. Blender Net Production of Petroleum Products by PAD Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Finished Motor Gasoline ........................................... 70,877 4,650 75,527 32,247 6,563 2,707 41,517 Reformulated ........................................................ 32,914 - 32,914 8,133 1,466 955 10,554 Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol ......... 32,914 - 32,914 8,133 1,466 955 10,554 Reformulated Other .......................................... - - - - - - - Conventional ......................................................... 37,963 4,650 42,613 24,114 5,097 1,752 30,963

489

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 December 2011 Table 33. Blender Net Production of Petroleum Products by PAD District, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Finished Motor Gasoline ........................................... 76,926 5,149 82,075 34,411 7,021 3,047 44,479 Reformulated ........................................................ 35,878 - 35,878 8,794 1,568 1,086 11,448 Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol ......... 35,878 - 35,878 8,794 1,568 1,086 11,448 Reformulated Other .......................................... - - - - - - - Conventional ......................................................... 41,048 5,149 46,197 25,617 5,453

490

Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 10,706,479 8,341,552 6,908,028 7,233,765 6,358,120 6,022,115 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 5,527,235 4,043,975 2,972,575 2,994,245 2,397,932 2,019,294 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 614,965 435,262 281,895 218,926 150,462 101,957 1984-2012 Connecticut 88,053 33,494 31,508 41,686 6,534 5,540 1984-2012 Maine 152,082 110,648 129,181 92,567 83,603 49,235 1984-2012 Massachusetts 300,530 230,057 59,627 52,228 34,862 30,474 1984-2012

491

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................... 1,870 1,276 322 138 133 43.0 29.4 7.4 3.2 3.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 243 151 34 40 18 78.7 48.9 11.1 13.0 5.7 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 202 139 31 29 Q 54.8 37.6 8.5 7.9 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 300 240 31 21 7 42.5 34.1 4.4 3.0 1.1 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 250 182 40 11 Q 41.5 30.2 6.6 1.9 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 236 169 41 8 19 35.4 25.2 6.2 1.2 2.8 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 241 165 54 7 16 36.3 24.8 8.1 1.0 2.4 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 199 130 42 11 16 35.0 22.8 7.5 1.9 2.8 Over 500,000 ............................. 198

492

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ............................. 2,037 1,378 338 159 163 42.0 28.4 7.0 3.3 3.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 156 35 41 18 78.6 49.1 11.0 12.9 5.6 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 218 147 32 31 7 54.8 37.1 8.1 7.9 1.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 343 265 34 25 18 43.8 33.9 4.4 3.2 2.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 270 196 41 13 Q 40.9 29.7 6.3 2.0 2.9 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 269 186 45 13 24 35.8 24.8 6.0 1.8 3.2 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 267 182 56 10 19 35.4 24.1 7.4 1.3 2.6 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 204 134 43 11 17 34.7 22.7 7.3 1.8 2.9 Over 500,000 .............................

493

Engineering process and cost model for a conventional corn wet milling facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional wet milling of corn is a process designed for the recovery and purification of starch and several coproducts (germ, gluten, fiber and steep liquor). The total starch produced by the wet milling industry in the USA in 2004 equaled 21.5 billion kg, including modified starches and starches used for sweeteners and ethanol production. Process engineering and cost models for a corn wet milling process (for steeping and milling facilities) have been developed for a “generic” processing plant with a capacity of 2.54 million kg of corn per day (100,000 bu/day). The process includes grain cleaning, steeping, germ separation and recovery, fiber separation and recovery, gluten separation and recovery and starch separation. Information for the development of the models was obtained from a variety of technical sources including commercial wet milling companies, industry experts and equipment suppliers. The models were developed using process and cost simulation software (SuperPro Designer®) and include processing information such as composition and flow rates of the various process streams, descriptions of the various unit operations and detailed breakdowns of the operating and capital cost of the facility. Based on the information from the model, we can estimate the cost of production per kilogram of starch using the input prices for corn and other wet milling coproducts. We have also used the model to conduct a variety of sensitivity studies utilizing modifications such as feedstock costs, corn compositional variations, and the sale of wet corn gluten feed. The model is also being used as a base-case for the development of models to test alternative processing technologies and to help in the scale-up and commercialization of new wet milling technologies. This model is available upon request from the authors for educational, non-commercial and research uses.

Edna C. Ramirez; David B. Johnston; Andrew J. McAloon; Winnie Yee; Vijay Singh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Fabrication of microstructures on glass by imprinting in conventional furnace for lab-on-chip application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Imprinting micro structures on glass in conventional furnace instead of vacuum chamber was carried out using a nickel alloy mold which was fabricated by diode-pumped solid state laser writing. The layout is designed to serve for DNA analysis. In the ... Keywords: Conventional furnace, Glass imprinting, Laser direct writing, Ni alloy mold

Qiuling Chen; Qiuping Chen; Gabriele Maccioni; Adriano Sacco; Sergio Ferrero; Luciano Scaltrito

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Aerodynamically Optimal Regional Aircraft Concepts: Conventional and Blended Wing-Body Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerodynamically Optimal Regional Aircraft Concepts: Conventional and Blended Wing-Body Designs aircraft such as those that serve regional routes. We thus explore the optimal aerodynamic shape of both a blended wing-body and conventional tube-and-wing regional aircraft through high-fidelity aerodynamic shape

Zingg, David W.

496

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture S. Adl a, , D. Iron b , T. Kolokolnikov b a Department of Biology, Dalhousie Fungal spores Organic agriculture Pathogen dispersal Conventional agriculture uses herbicides, pesticides

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

497

96 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Comparison Between Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

96 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Comparison Between Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures S ABSTRACT Cereal Chem. 76(1):96-99 A corn wet-milling process in which alkali was used was studied as an alternative to the conventional corn wet-milling procedure. In the alkali wet-milling process, corn was soaked

498

A Comparison of Wind Turbine Load Statistics for Inflow Turbulence Fields based on Conventional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison of Wind Turbine Load Statistics for Inflow Turbulence Fields based on Conventional for a utility-scale 5MW wind turbine. Load statistics, spectra, and time-frequency analysis representations utility-scale wind turbines. The present study takes on this question by making use of conventional

Manuel, Lance

499

Conventional Facilities Chapter 8: Fire Protection 8-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional Facilities Chapter 8: Fire Protection 8-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 8 FIRE of New York State National Institute of Standards and Technology National Fire Protection Association, corresponding to the ring pentants. 8.2.2 Fire Protection System #12;8-2 Part 3: Conventional Facilities Scope

Ohta, Shigemi

500

White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic resonance imaging findings and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic to evaluate white matter architecture after preterm birth. The goals were (1) to compare white matter if sex, gestational age, birth- weight, white matter injury score from conventional magnetic resonance

Grill-Spector, Kalanit