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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand total social cost of highway transportation Subtotal:of alternative transportation investments. A social-costtransportation option that has These costs will be inefficiently incurred if people do not fully lower total social costs.

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Survey of nuclear power plant construction costs, 1983  

SciTech Connect

This report presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in the construction pipeline, collected on Form EIA-254. The information on US nuclear power plants in the construction pipeline is reported voluntarily each quarter by the electric utilities. This report presents the data collected in the first quarter of 1983 on the 71 nuclear units in the construction pipeline. Historical data on 73 units, totalling 57,287 net megawatts (MWe) of design capacity, in commercial operation as of March 31, 1983, are also given. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership, construction costs, and construction schedule or chronology. Summary statistics are presented on direct component costs and construction leadtimes for a sample of operating units and units in the construction pipeline. The reactor-specific cost data included in Chapter 4 are the estimated final nuclear production plant costs and, for units in the construction pipeline, the disbursed and sunk costs as of March 31, 1983. 7 figures, 5 tables.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Maglev guideway cost and construction schedule assessment  

SciTech Connect

A summary of construction cost and scheduling information is presented for four maglev guideway designs on an example route from Baltimore, MD to Newark, NJ. This work results from the National Maglev Initiative (NMI), a government-industry effort from 1989 to 1994. The system design concepts used as a basis for developing cost and construction scheduling information, were submitted by four industry consortia solely for this analysis, and represent their own unpublished designs. The detailed cost and construction schedule analyses cover the main guideway only. A summary estimate was made for stations, power distribution systems, maintenance facilities, and other types of infrastructure. The results of the analyses indicate a number of design aspects which must receive further consideration by future designers. These aspects will affect the practical and economic construction and long-term maintenance of a high-speed maglev guideway.

Plotkin, D.; Kim, S. [Army Construction Engineering Research Lab., Champaign, IL (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Construction Cost Analysis : Residential Construction Demonstration Project Cycle II.  

SciTech Connect

The Residential Construction Demonstration Project (RCDP) is designed to demonstrate new residential building techniques and product innovations which advance the stage-of-the-art in constructing energy-efficient electrically heated residences. A secondary purpose is to obtain documented cost and energy savings data from which to make accurate assessments of the cost-effectiveness of various conservation innovations. The project solicits participation of regional homebuilders by offering them financial incentives for constructing homes to the Model Conservation Standards (MCS) and including at least one innovation.'' The innovations are determined by BPA and the States prior to construction and represent construction techniques or energy saving products that might reduce the cost of building MCS homes, or expand the options available to builders in achieving MCS levels of energy efficiency in homes. Besides covering some of the additional risk for employing the innovation, the incentive payment guarantees that builders will provide certain amounts of information regarding the cost and acceptability of building the homes. In addition, an incentive is paid to homeowners for their participation in data collection efforts following construction. Several one-time'' tests were performed on the houses and homeowners were required to report energy consumption and temperature data on a weekly basis for approximately 18 months. BPA and the States compile the information obtained from the builders and homeowners. Access to this data is provided for the purpose of analyzing the cost and performance of the RCDP homes, as well as understanding the value of the various innovations that are tested. 25 tabs., 4 figs.

Barnett, Cole; Thor, Philip W.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

UCSC Major Capital Improvement Projects -Anticipated Construction Times Showing Total Project Costs 11/20/07 2007-8 July 2008-9 July 2009-10 July 2010-11 July 2011-12 July 2012-13 July 2013-14 July  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projects - Anticipated Construction Times Showing Total Project Costs 11/20/07 2007-8 July 2008-9 July 2009UCSC Major Capital Improvement Projects - Anticipated Construction Times Showing Total Project Costs 11/20/07 2007-8 July 2008-9 July 2009-10 July 2010-11 July 2011-12 July 2012-13 July 2013-14 July

California at Santa Cruz, University of

7

Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Total Cost and Measured Performance of Utility-Sponsored...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Total Cost and Measured Performance of Utility-Sponsored Energy Efficiency Programs Title The Total Cost and Measured Performance of Utility-Sponsored Energy Efficiency...

9

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fee 0 May 2011 - September 2015 June 2013 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Idaho Treatment Group LLC DE-EM0001467 Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Information 419,202,975...

10

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$ 3,422,994.00 $ 3,422,994.00 FY2011 4,445,142.00 $ FY2012 $ 5,021,951.68 FY2013 $ 3,501,670.00 FY2014 $0 FY2015 $0 FY2016 $0 FY2017 $0 FY2018 $0 FY2019 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $16,391,758 Wackenhut Services, Inc. DE-AC30-10CC60025 Contractor: Cost Plus Award Fee $989,000,000 Contract Period: Contract Type: January 2010 - December 2019 Contract Number: EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Contract Name: Comprehensive Security Services September 2013 Fee Information Maximum Fee $55,541,496 $5,204,095 $3,667,493 $5,041,415 Minimum Fee 0 Fee Available $5,428,947 $6,326,114

11

Developing a total replacement cost index for suburban office projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the components of replacement costs for office developments, and how these components combine to create total development costs is essential for success in office real estate development. Surprisingly, the ...

Hansen, David John, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant total capital cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed breakdown of the capital cost of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant located near Barstow, California is presented. The total capital requirements of the pilot plant are given in four cost breakdown structures: (1) project costs (research and development, design, factory, construction, and start-up); (2) plant system costs (land, structures and improvements, collector system, receiver system, thermal transport system, thermal storage system, turbine-generator plant system, electrical plant system, miscellaneous plant equipment, and plant level); (3) elements of work costs (sitework/earthwork, concrete work, metal work, architectural work, process equipment, piping and electrical work); and (4) recurring and non-recurring costs. For all four structures, the total capital cost is the same ($141,200,000); however, the allocation of costs within each structure is different. These cost breakdown structures have been correlated to show the interaction and the assignment of costs for specific areas.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 2007 total system life cycle cost estimate includes the cost to research, construct and operate Yucca Mountain during a period of 150 years, from the beginning of the program in 1983 through closure and decommissioning in 2133. The new cost estimate of $79.3 billion, when updated to 2007 dollars comes to $96.2 billion, a 38 percent

14

Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalProjectCost TotalProjectCost Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/TotalProjectCost Property Type Number Description Total Project Cost Pages using the property "Geothermal/TotalProjectCost" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 6,135,381 + A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project + 1,629,670 +

15

Uncertainty Quantification and Calibration in Well Construction Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility and success of petroleum development projects depend to a large degree on well construction costs. Well construction cost estimates often contain high levels of uncertainty. In many cases, these costs have been estimated using deterministic methods that do not reliably account for uncertainty, leading to biased estimates. The primary objective of this work was to improve the reliability of deterministic well construction cost estimates by incorporating probabilistic methods into the estimation process. The method uses historical well cost estimates and actual well costs to develop probabilistic correction factors that can be applied to future well cost estimates. These factors can be applied to the entire well cost or to individual cost components. Application of the methodology to estimation of well construction costs for horizontal wells in a shale gas play resulted in well cost estimates that were well calibrated probabilistically. Overall, average estimated well cost using this methodology was significantly more accurate than average estimated well cost using deterministic methods. Systematic use of this methodology can provide for more accurate and efficient allocation of capital for drilling campaigns, which should have significant impacts on reservoir development and profitability.

Valdes Machado, Alejandro

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

A Neural Network Model for Construction Projects Site Overhead Cost Estimating in Egypt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating of the overhead costs of building construction projects is an important task in the management of these projects. The quality of construction management depends heavily on their accurate cost estimation. Construction costs prediction is a very difficult and sophisticated task especially when using manual calculation methods. This paper uses Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approach to develop a parametric cost-estimating model for site overhead cost in Egypt. Fifty-two actual real-life cases of building projects constructed in Egypt during the seven year period 2002-2009 were used as training materials. The neural network architecture is presented for the estimation of the site overhead costs as a percentage from the total project price.

ElSawy, Ismaail; Razek, Mohammed Abdel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2009 Solar Decathlon House Construction Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

safety gear on the roof of a house. Above him is a large photovoltaic panel. safety gear on the roof of a house. Above him is a large photovoltaic panel. A member of Team Spain installs a portion of his house's roof during Solar Decathlon 2009. Solar Decathlon 2009 Solar Decathlon House Construction Costs The construction costs of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2009 team houses varied widely based on the technologies employed and the target market for which they were designed. In general, however, construction costs ranged from about $200,000 to more than $800,000. But it is important to remember that these houses were one-of-a-kind designs that incorporated bleeding-edge technologies. If they were to be mass-produced, as most residential homes are, their overall costs would likely decrease significantly. Specific construction cost ranges for each house as well as information

18

APS team works smarter, cuts substation construction costs by 36%  

SciTech Connect

An aggressive, cost-cutting, team of T D employees at Arizona Public Service Co (APS) is building a new distribution substation in Phoenix for less than half the original cost that APS planners had calculated for the project's land, labor and materials. Scheduled for service in June of this year, APS analysts had originally projected land, labor and materials costs for the 20-MVA Bell substation at nearly $1.7-million-not including major equipment such as transformers, circuit breakers, and switches. However, after studying the project, an empowered APS crew was able to slash 36% off the original estimate-more than $610,000. What's more, APS spokesmen say that its new approach to substation construction and design has given its engineers and construction crews a laundry list of additional ideas to try out on future substation ventures. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

LHC Civil Engineering Construction Contracts Cost Monitoring and Budget Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Civil Engineering project for the LHC is estimated at 350 MCHF, of which about 316 MCHF is for the construction contracts. These contracts are based on a system of remeasurement whereby the consultant estimates the quantities required for the construction of each structure and the contractor commits himself to the unit price, which define the initial tender price. There are many factors that affect the final price for these contracts, from increases or decreases in quantities of the estimated amounts in the original bill of quantities to variations to the contract. This paper will look at how these factors change costs at the individual level of a structure to the overall costs of the contract. It will look at how the Civil Engineering Group monitors these changes to calculate cash flows and final costs and how this information is used as a basis for budget forecasts.

Skelton, K

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development of a method for recording energy costs and uses during the construction process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising energy costs should be a concern to contractors, designers, and owners. It is difficult to make a quantity takeoff for energy usage because these costs are imbedded in the materials, equipment, or overhead costs. This research examines energy consumption during the construction process, sets forth methods for recording this energy consumption and establishes a program for the recording and analysis of this data. An energy study of electricity, gasoline, and diesel consumption was made for the construction of three buildings to determine what data was available. After available data was evaluated, and the Energy Data Analysis program developed, three other construction sites were visited to determine how readily energy data can be recorded using the program. Four construction energy phases were identified from this research. The four phases are: 1) site clearing and preparation, 2) building structure, 3) interior finishes, and 4) commissioning. The main type of energy consumption during Phase 1 is diesel fuel for earth moving equipment. The energy uses for Phases 2 and 3 varied considerably among the projects studied and were difficult to quantify. However, the energy use during these phases was low compared to other phases and for many projects may not be economical to evaluate. During Phase 4, electrical energy demand was high due to Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) commissioning requirements and power up of all electrical power uses including lighting. These few construction projects are not enough to make definitive conclusions about what percentage of the total project cost is spent on energy. This research found that construction energy costs vary during different phases of the building process and can be a significant part of that phase (as high as 5.7% of the cost). The Visual Basic program developed during this research will facilitate future energy studies on construction sites. When the program is applied to a project, it identifies and quantifies the energy use, and makes predictions as to which project tasks warrant further energy studies.

Arnold, Althea Gayle

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 16, Example Cost Codes for Construction Projects  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter provides an example outline of cost items and their corresponding cost codes that may be used for construction projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

5-Megawatt solar-thermal test facility: facility construction-cost analysis  

SciTech Connect

The appropriation analysis, cash flow analysis, monthly cash flow analysis and construction cost estimate are tabulated for the 1 MW And 5 MW test facilities based upon limited initial appropriations, including work sheets for the construction cost estimates. (LEW)

1975-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

24

Cost Comparison of Public Elementary School Construction Costs Based on Project Delivery System in the State of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If a correlation exists between cost and project delivery system then this is crucial knowledge for any group organizing a new construction project. It has been observed anecdotally that the construction cost per student of public elementary schools has been observed to continue to increase in the state of Texas, even with the recent downturn in the economy. The recent economic depression in the USA has seen construction material costs stagnate and construction costs dropping. This is a direct result of the competitive nature of a market that has a lack of business. The issue of a rising cost at the time of a falling market is of more than a passing research interest to school superintendents and the people of Texas. This study investigated the relationship between cost and project delivery systems. A survey was sent to all school superintendents in Texas requesting recent data on elementary school enrollment, project delivery type and construction costs. One hundred and thirty six responses were received from one thousand and seventy six Texas school districts. A comparative means test was used to determine if a relationship exists between construction cost per student and project delivery system for public elementary schools in Texas. The research shows that Texas school districts are primarily using two types of project delivery systems for their new school construction, Construction Management at Risk and Competitive Sealed Proposals. After comparing the average construction cost per student for these two project delivery systems, the statistical analysis showed that Competitive Sealed Proposals cost approximately four thousand dollar less per student than Construction Management at Risk. The clear question is then as to why are districts using Construction Management at Risk when the comparative benefits of the contract type are not worth this amount of money per student.

Reinisch, Ashley

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Benefits and Costs of Research: A Case Study of Construction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These procedures are derived and ... construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning. ... and Maintain Facility Decommission Facility ...

2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Benefits and Costs of Research: A Case Study of Construction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to statutory documents or procedures. ... construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning. ... and Maintain Facility Decommission Facility ...

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

29

Robust Optimization Strategies for Total Cost Control in Project ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 13, 2010 ... We describe robust optimization procedures for controlling total ... does not consider correlation between past and future performance ... probability of meeting the overall project budget, compared to less ... used in practice, Monte Carlo simulation is not (Schonberger 1981, Kwak and ...... given statistics.

30

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

31

Cost-driven octree construction schemes: an experimental study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many algorithmic problems are interesting to both theoreticians and practitioners, but in a different manner. While the theoreticians have traditionally focused on worst-case scenarios which is often not very useful in practice, the practitioners are ... Keywords: average performance, cost model, cost prediction, octree, ray shooting, space decomposition

Boris Aronov; Hervé Bronnimann; Allen Y. Chang; Yi-Jen Chiang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Cost-driven octree construction schemes: an experimental study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given a scene consisting of objects, ray shooting queries answer with the first object encountered by a given ray, and are used in ray tracing and radiosity for rendering photo-realistic images in graphics, radio propagation simulation, and many other ... Keywords: average performance, cost model, cost prediction, octree, ray shooting, space decomposition

Boris Aronov; Hervé Brönnimann; Allen Y. Chang; Yi-Jen Chiang

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Total capital cost data base: 10MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the total capital cost data base of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant. This Solar One cost data base was created using the computer code ''Cost Data Management System (CDMS)''. The cost data base format was developed to be used as a common method of presentation of capital costs for power plants. The basic format is a plant system cost breakdown structure. Major accounts are land; structures and improvements; collector, receiver, thermal transport, thermal storage, and stream generation systems; turbine plant; electrical plant; miscellaneous plant systems and equipment; and plant-level indirect costs. Each major account includes subaccounts to as many as nine level of detail. The data base can be accessed to provide elements-of-work costs at any subaccount level or at the plant level. The elements-of-work include sitework/earthwork; concrete work; metal work; architectural; process equipment; piping; electrical; and miscellaneous work. Each of these elements-of-work can be or are broken into finer detail and costs can be accumulated to identify more specific needs, e.g., pipe insulation or heat exchangers. The cost data base can be accessed and various reports can be generated. These vary from a single page summary to detailed listings of costs and notes. Reported costs can be stated in dollars, dollars per kilowatt or percentage of the total plant cost. Reports or samples of reports for the pilot plant capital cost are included.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

PVUSA construction and safety: Experience, lessons learned and costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the first of a series of PVUSA reports on PVUSA experiences and lessons learned at the demonstration sites in Davis and Kerman, California. During the course of approximately 6 years (1988--1993), nine PV systems have been installed ranging from 20 kW to 500 kW. Five 20-kW emerging module technology arrays were installed on universal project-provided structures, and four utility-scale systems (200 to 500 kW) were installed as turnkey (vendor designed and integrated) systems. The report emphasizes PVUSA construction and safety experience from the installation of these systems and is intended for use by utility personnel engaged in the construction of a photovoltaic (PV) power plant (e.g., engineers, construction supervisors, etc.).

Shipman, D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Shawmut hydroelectric redevelopment project. Final technical and construction cost report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the major steps undertaken by the Central Maine Power Company to redevelop an old existing lowhead (19 to 23 ft) hydroelectric station and, at the same time, demonstrate the commercial viability of such a venture. The report addresses the process of site selection, preliminary conceptual design for determining economic viability, licensing and the regulatory process, final design, and project construction with the objective of presenting to the reader a technical and economical guide useful for a similar undertaking.

None

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Power-installed streetlight foundations lower substation construction costs  

SciTech Connect

The Alabama Power Company's power-installed streetlight foundation (SLF) saves 85% of labor costs and is practical as well as economical. After several foundation designs were tried, the multi-helix proved best for swampy terrain. A test of substation structure support began with soil testing to locate any rock on the site. Standard tubular-steel structures with modified baseplates were used. A truck-mounted derrick proved better for installation than a drill rig. Slight corrosive currents are not expected to cause appreciable deterioration to the foundation. (DCK)

Beason, D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Comparing maintenance costs of geothermal heat pump systems with other HVAC systems: Preventive maintenance actions and total maintenance costs  

SciTech Connect

Total annual heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) maintenance costs were determined for 20 schools in the Lincoln, Nebraska, Public School District. Each school examined provides cooling to over 70% of its total floor area and relies on one of the following heating and cooling systems to provide the majority of space conditioning: vertical-bore, geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), air-cooled chiller with gas-fired hot water boiler (ACC/GHWB), or water-cooled chiller with gas-fired steam boiler (WCC/GSB). A precursor to this study examined annual costs associated with repair, service, and corrective maintenance activities tracked in a work order database. This follow-up study examines costs associated with preventive maintenance (PM) activities conducted by the district. Annual PM costs were 5.87 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (63.14 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 7.14 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (76.86 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 9.82 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (105.39 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/ GSB, and 12.65 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (136.30 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. The results of the two analyses are combined to produce an estimate of total annual maintenance costs, by system type, for the 20 schools. Total annual maintenance costs were 8.75 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (94.20 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 9.27 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (99.76 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 13.54 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (145.49 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GSB, and 18.71 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (201.61 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. It should be noted that these costs represent only the trends seen in the maintenance database of the Lincoln School District. Because of differences in the number of schools using each system type, varying equipment age, and the small total number of schools included in the study, the maintenance costs presented here may not be representative of the maintenance costs seen for similar equipment in other locations.

Martin, M.A.; Madgett, M.G.; Hughes, P.J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Comparative cost analyses: total flow vs other power conversion systems for the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource  

SciTech Connect

Cost studies were done for Total Flow, double flash, and multistage flash binary systems for electric Energy production from the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource. The purpose was to provide the Department of energy's Division of Geothermal Energy with information by which to judge whether to continue development of the Total Flow system. Results indicate that the Total Flow and double flash systems have capital costs of $1,135 and $1,026 /kW with energy costs of 40.9 and 39.7 mills/kW h respectively. The Total Flow and double flash systems are not distinguishable on a cost basis alone; the multistage flash binary system, with capital cost of $1,343 /kW and energy cost of 46.9 mills/kW h, is significantly more expensive. If oil savings are considered in the total analysis, the Total Flow system could save 30% more oil than the double flash system, $3.5 billion at 1978 oil prices.

Wright, G.W.

1978-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

40

Comparative cost analyses: total flow vs other power conversion systems for the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost studies were done for Total Flow, double flash, and multistage flash binary systems for electric Energy production from the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource. The purpose was to provide the Department of energy's Division of Geothermal Energy with information by which to judge whether to continue development of the Total Flow system. Results indicate that the Total Flow and double flash systems have capital costs of $1,135 and $1,026 /kW with energy costs of 40.9 and 39.7 mills/kW h respectively. The Total Flow and double flash systems are not distinguishable on a cost basis alone; the multistage flash binary system, with capital cost of $1,343 /kW and energy cost of 46.9 mills/kW h, is significantly more expensive. If oil savings are considered in the total analysis, the Total Flow system could save 30% more oil than the double flash system, $3.5 billion at 1978 oil prices.

Wright, G.W.

1978-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Hydroelectric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. Eighteenth annual supplement, 1974. [1974 data  

SciTech Connect

Tabulated data are presented on the generating capacity, construction costs, and production expenses for each of 432 conventional or pumped storage hydroelectric power plants in the U.S. (LCL)

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Complex and Multi-Faceted Nature of School Construction Costs: Factors Affecting California. A Report to the American Institute of Architects California Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

construction contract bid project costs comparable, below,of actual final project costs, and are highly applicable tothe construction project cost. The savings are realized over

Vincent, Jeffrey M; McKoy, Deborah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Cost of Radiotherapy Versus NSAID Administration for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification After Total Hip Arthroplasty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO), or abnormal bone formation, is a common sequela of total hip arthroplasty. This abnormal bone can impair joint function and must be surgically removed to restore mobility. HO can be prevented by postoperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use or radiotherapy (RT). NSAIDs are associated with multiple toxicities, including gastrointestinal bleeding. Although RT has been shown to be more efficacious than NSAIDs at preventing HO, its cost-effectiveness has been questioned. Methods and Materials: We performed an analysis of the cost of postoperative RT to the hip compared with NSAID administration, taking into account the costs of surgery for HO formation, treatment-induced morbidity, and productivity loss from missed work. The costs of RT, surgical revision, and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding were estimated using the 2007 Medicare Fee Schedule and inpatient diagnosis-related group codes. The cost of lost wages was estimated using the 2006 median salary data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Results: The cost of administering RT was estimated at $899 vs. $20 for NSAID use. After accounting for the additional costs associated with revision total hip arthroplasty and gastrointestinal bleeding, the corresponding estimated costs were $1,208 vs. $930. Conclusion: If the costs associated with treatment failure and treatment-induced morbidity are considered, the cost of NSAIDs approaches that of RT. Other NSAID morbidities and quality-of-life differences that are difficult to quantify add to the cost of NSAIDs. These considerations have led us to recommend RT as the preferred modality for use in prophylaxis against HO after total hip arthroplasty, even when the cost is considered.

Strauss, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)], E-mail: Jonathan_Strauss@rush.edu; Chen, Sea S.; Shah, Anand P.; Coon, Alan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Dickler, Adam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Little Company of Mary Hospital, Evergreen Park, IL (United States)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE`s Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billion cost savings for the single-repository system in comparison with the two-repository system is due to the elimination of $3 billion for second-repository development and $7 billion for the second-repository facility. These savings are offset by $2 billion in additional costs at the first repository and $1 billion in combined higher costs for the MRS facility and transportation. 55 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study provides economic justification for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management (TQM) program in a remanufacturing environment. One of the core principles of TQM is continuous improvement. A preferred metric for measuring quality improvement is the cost of quality. Traditionally, comprehensive quality cost reports have regularly been issued in a fixed format to identify opportunities for improvement and provide guidelines for improvement over time. However, current research has shown that continuous improvement is enhanced by a quality cost approach that is much more flexible [1]. This approach is based upon exposure of the cost savings directly related to quality improvement. in many cases a process-level engineer, who may not be trained in quality costing techniques, will be responsible for the economic analysis to justify a quality improvement initiative. Research has shown that most engineers, simply do not have the training or experience to adequately cost justify quality improvement. The results of this study provide process-level engineers with a cost/benefit model template, which can be used to cost justify technological improvement based upon total quality costs.

Ratliff, William L

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Investigation to Discover Most Effective Method of Teaching Target Costing to Construction-Minded Individuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The construction industry is in the midst of a progressive change in the way projects unfold from design and development to closeout and maintenance. There is a greater demand on contractors to build projects faster, with higher quality and an increased level of detail, while keeping costs lower than ever. Therefore, to meet such demands contractors must turn to an alternative approach of improving product and process with target costing. However, the adoption of target costing by the construction industry has been slow due to limitations in user understanding of the system. The objective of this paper is to identify an effective approach for teaching target costing to construction-focused individuals, by establishing improved user understanding with visual aids, and by determining if user comprehension is influenced by the complexity of the visual supports provided in the lessons. The study challenged the long-implied assumption that the construction community is composed of visual learners, while also differentiating between the levels of success for supporting figures based upon their degree of detail. Results of this study will provide the basis for the development of target costing material that is designed specifically for use in the education of construction industry professionals in Target Cost Estimating.

Hullum, Joshua James

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Total Cost Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408 April 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. HT12.8610 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408

48

Influence of Project Type and Procurement Method on Rework Costs in Building Construction Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: While it is widely recognized that additional costs due to rework can have an adverse effect on project performance, limited empirical research has been done to investigate the influencing factors. The research presented in this paper aims to determine the influence of different project types and procurement methods on rework costs in construction projects. Using a questionnaire survey, rework costs were obtained from 161 Australian construction projects. The direct and indirect consequences of rework are analyzed and discussed. It is shown that, contrary to expectation, rework costs do not differ relative to project type or procurement method. In addition, it was found rework contributed to 52 % of a project’s cost growth and that 26 % of the variance in cost growth was attributable to changes due to direct rework. To reduce rework costs and therefore improve project performance, it is posited that construction organizations begin to consider and measure them, so that an understanding of their magnitude can be captured, root causes identified, and effective prevention strategies implemented.

Peter E. D. Love

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Interim report on GAO's review of the total cost estimate for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following sctions discuss (1) the process used by the DOE to estimate CRBR project costs; (2) the inflation allowance used in DOE's cost estimate, which could overstate CRBR costs; (3) the cost of plutonium, revenue projections, and contingency allowances, which may understate the total cost estimate; and (4) several items which are not included in the cost estimate but which, in our view, either will or could result in cost to the Government.

Not Available

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

50

Effect of longer combination vehicles on the total logistic costs of truckload shippers  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the research described in this paper was to examine the effects of using longer and heavier tractor-trailer combinations from the standpoint of the individual firm or shipper rather than from the viewpoint of the motor carrier. The objective was to determine the effect of longer combination vehicles (LCVS) not only on shippers freight costs but on their inventory and other logistical costs as well. A sample of companies in selected industries provided data on their principal products, traffic flows, and logistics costs in a mail survey. These data were entered into a computer program called the Freight Transportation Analyzer (FTA) which calculated the component logistics costs associated with shipping by single trailers and by two alternative types of double trailer LCVS. A major finding of the study was that, given sufficient flows of a company`s product in a traffic lane, LCVs would in most cases greatly reduce the total logistics cost of firms that currently ship in single trailer truckload quantities. Annual lane volume, lane distance, and annual lane ton-mileage appeared to be good indicators of whether or not shipping by LCVs would benefit a company, whereas product value had surprisingly little influence on the cost-effectiveness of LCVS. An even better indicator was the ratio of current annual freight costs to current annual inventory carrying costs for a firm`s single trailer truckload shipments. Given the current trend toward maintaining small inventories and shipping in small quantities, it is not clear to what extent shippers will abandon single trailer transport to take advantage of the potential reduction in total logistics cost afforded by LCVS.

Middendorf, D.P.; Bronzini, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jacoby, J. [Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Coyle, J.J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1994-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

Cost effective analysis of recycled products for use in highway construction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Over 4.5 billion of non-hazardous wastes are generated in the United States each year. Out of these wastes over 200 million tons of post consumer waste is generated. The disposal of post consumer waste is the responsibility of municipality and society. Four waste materials glass, plastic, rubber tires and paper and paperboard were selected for the detail study. A questionnaire survey was conducted for obtaining input from all state Department of Transportation (DOT) Recyclers and solid waste management facilities in the state of Ohio. Responses received from state DOT stated that they use various recycled materials in highway construction but do not conduct cost-effectiveness analysis of recycle waste materials. The cost of disposal of post consumer waste is increasing, which requires an alternate use for these waste materials. One possible use of these post consumer waste materials is in highway construction. An economic analysis is needed for their cost-effectiveness before using these materials in highway construction. Though these recycled waste materials are expensive compared to virgin material, consideration of the savings in terms of societal cost make these materials cost-effective and attractive to use in highway construction.

Gupta, J.D.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Low-Cost Ash-Derived Construction Materials: State-of-the-Art Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing technologies have been successfully applied in the manufacturing of construction materials that incorporate coal combustion byproducts. This report describes an extensive literature review on coal ash use in low-cost building materials, including information on technical and economic feasibility.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Impacts of Rising Construction and Equipment Costs on Energy Industries (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Costs related to the construction industry have been volatile in recent years. Some of the volatility may be related to higher energy prices. Prices for iron and steel, cement, and concretecommodities used heavily in the construction of new energy projects rose sharply from 2004 to 2006, and shortages have been reported. How such price fluctuations may affect the cost or pace of new development in the energy industries is not known with any certainty, and short-term changes in commodity prices are not accounted for in the 25-year projections in AEO2007. Most projects in the energy industries require long planning and construction lead times, which can lessen the impacts of short-term trends.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

The effects of the implementation of grey water reuse systems on construction cost and project schedule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the factors emphasized by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), a national consensus-based standard under the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) for developing sustainable or high performance buildings, is water efficiency. A LEED registered project can attain up to five points under water efficiency upon successful integration of various techniques to conserve water. Many techniques are available to conserve water and grey water reuse is one option considered by many LEED registered projects. In spite of widespread popularity, some of the sustainable techniques including grey water reuse, which is recommended by the USGBC and various agencies engaged in green building constructions, are not viable in many parts of the United States due to their effects on construction cost and project schedules. Even though a project could get one or multiple points upon successful implementation of a grey water reuse system and conserving potable water, the following factors may have a positive or negative effect on the design team’s decision to implement a grey water reuse system: capital cost, maintenance cost, LEED credits, local plumbing codes, project schedule, local water conservation issues, complexity of the system, etc. Implementation of a grey water reuse system has a significant effect on the capital cost of a project. The increase in cost may be attributed to dual sanitary and grey water distribution piping which doubles construction piping costs. Disinfection treatment, filtration, overflow protection, grey water storage tanks, etc. also add to the cost of construction. Ninety percent of the projects claim that project schedule is not affected by the implementation of a grey water reuse system in a green building project. The factors which prevent the project team from implementing a grey water reuse system include capital cost, maintenance cost, local plumbing codes, local water conservation issues, complexity of the system, etc. LEED credits and the spirit of sustainability are the factors which have a positive effect on the design team’s decision to implement a grey water reuse system.

Kaduvinal Varghese, Jeslin

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

57

Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Audit Report Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project OAS-M-13-03 August 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 8, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SENIOR ADVISOR FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project" BACKGROUND In 2005, the Department of Energy (Department) awarded the Idaho Cleanup Project contract to CH2M ♦ WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) to remediate the Idaho National Laboratory. The Sodium

58

Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

Camillo A. DiNunzio Framatome ANP DE& S; Dr. Abhinav Gupta Assistant Professor NCSU; Dr. Michael Golay Professor MIT Dr. Vincent Luk Sandia National Laboratories; Rich Turk Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems; Charles Morrow, Sandia National Laboratories; Geum-Taek Jin, Korea Power Engineering Company Inc.

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Design Optimization and Construction of the Thyratron/PFN Based Cost Model Modulator for the NLC  

SciTech Connect

As design studies and various R and D efforts continue on Next Linear Collider (NLC) systems, much R and D work is being done on X-Band klystron development, and development of pulse modulators to drive these X-Band klystrons. A workshop on this subject was held at SLAC in June of 1998, and a follow-up workshop is scheduled at SLAC June 23-25, 1999. At the 1998 workshop, several avenues of R and D were proposed using solid state switching, induction LINAC principles, high voltage hard tubes, and a few more esoteric ideas. An optimized version of the conventional thyratron-PFN-pulse transformer modulator for which there is extensive operating experience is also a strong candidate for use in the NLC. Such a modulator is currently under construction for base line demonstration purposes. The performance of this ''Cost Model'' modulator will be compared to other developing technologies. Important parameters including initial capital cost, operating maintenance cost, reliability, maintainability, power efficiency, in addition to the usual operating parameters of pulse flatness, timing and pulse height jitter, etc. will be considered in the choice of a modulator design for the NLC. This paper updates the progress on this ''Cost Model'' modulator design and construction.

Koontz, Roland F

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Total Cost of Ownership for Current Plug-in Electric Vehicles: Fall 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dramatic growth over the last three years in the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market has resulted in many unanswered questions concerning total cost of ownership (TCO). In June 2013, EPRI released a public study that presented a new way of analyzing driving data for the purpose of calculating TCO for PEV ownership (EPRI report 3002001728). That study—which focused on the 2013 Chevrolet Volt and 2013 Nissan LEAF—used a full year’s worth of driving data to calculate the TCO of ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

62

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

63

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

64

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

65

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

66

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

67

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

68

Sustainable Transportation Decision-Making: Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) and Total Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a new infrastructure facility requires a significant amount of time and expense. This is particularly true for investments in transportation for their longstanding and great degree of impact on society. The scope of time and money involved does not mean, however, we only focus on the economies of scale and may ignore other aspects of the built environment. To this extent, how can we achieve a more balanced perspective in infrastructure decision-making? In addition, what aspects should be considered when making more sustainable decisions about transportation investments? These two questions are the foundations of this study. This dissertation shares its process in part with a previous research project – Texas Urban Triangle (TUT). Although the TUT research generated diverse variables and created possible implementations of spatial decision support system (SDSS), the methodology still demands improvement. The current method has been developed to create suitable routes but is not designed to rank or make comparisons. This is admittedly one of the biggest shortfalls in the general SDSS approach, but is also where I see as an opportunity to make alternative interpretation more comprehensive and effective. The main purpose of this dissertation is to develop a Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) that will lead to more balanced decision-making in transportation investment and optimize the most sustainable high-speed rail (HSR) route. The decision support system developed here explicitly elaborates the advantages and disadvantages of a transportation corridor in three particular perspectives: construction (fixed costs); operation (maintenance costs); and externalities (social and environmental costs), with a specific focus on environmental externalities. Considering more environmental features in rail routing will offset short-term economic losses and creates more sustainable environments in long-term infrastructure planning.

Kim, Hwan Yong

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

70

Analysis of refiners' total barrel costs and revenues from the sale of petroleum products, 1976 to 1979  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the Economic Regulatory Administration has evaluated refiners' costs and revenues from the sale of major petroleum products from July 1976 through December 1979. This report represents a continuing effort to assess No. 2 heating oil prices and margins in that it updates prior middle distillate studies through March 1980. The analysis examines selling prices and costs associated with each major petroleum product category and a combination of petroleum products (total barrel) from a sample of nine refiners. The total barrel approach was adopted to reduce distortions caused by varying methods of allocation of costs among regulated and unregulated products by refiners. This report determines the extent to which increased costs were recovered on controlled products and whether refiners obtained greater cost recoupment on decontrolled products than would have been allowed under continued controls. The principal methods of measurement used to evaluate product pricing levels for the nine refiners surveyed were cost recoupment (Chapter III), gross margins (Chapter IV), and net margins (Chapter V). Gross margins were derived by subtracting average crude oil costs from average product selling prices for individual product categories and the total barrel. Net margins were derived by subtracting average crude oil costs as well as average marketing, manufacturing, and purchased product costs from average selling prices for individual product categories and the total barrel.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

72

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

73

2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle SYNTHESIS ON CONSTRUCTION UNIT COST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Availability of historical unit cost data is an important factor in developing accurate project cost estimates. State highway agencies (SHAs) collect data on historical bids and/or production rates, crew sizes and mixes, material costs, and equipment costs, including contractor overhead and profit. The goal of this synthesis is to identify how state highway agencies develop unit prices for construction and maintenance projects. The synthesis approach consists of a comprehensive online survey, covering every aspect of unit cost development, to identify the state of practice in state highway agencies and interviews with several representative SHAs to gain a better understanding of the practices followed for unit cost development. This study finds that even though SHAs collect and store historical cost data, they do not have a formal and documented process for adjusting unit costs for project characteristics and market conditions. 17. Key Words

Stuart Anderson; Ivan Damnjanovic; Ali Nejat; Sushanth Ramesh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Sustainability and socio-enviro-technical systems: modeling total cost of ownership in capital facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investment in sustainability strategies and technologies holds promise for significant cost savings over the operational phase of a facility's life cycle, while more effectively meeting stakeholder needs. However, accurately estimating the first costs ...

Annie R. Pearce; Kristen L. Sanford Bernhardt; Michael J. Garvin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are artificially low and that these fake costs are used to 'sell'...

76

Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

Soli T. Khericha

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

78

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

79

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

80

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

82

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

83

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

84

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

85

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

86

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

87

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

88

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

89

Preliminary estimates of the total-system cost for the restructured program: An addendum to the May 1989 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 - a fee levied on electricity generated and sold by commercial nuclear power plants - is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The costs contained in this report represent a preliminary analysis of the cost impacts associated with the Secretary of Energy`s Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program issued in November 1989. The major elements of the restructured program announced in this report which pertain to the program`s life-cycle costs are: a prioritization of the scientific investigations program at the Yucca Mountain candidate site to focus on identification of potentially adverse conditions, a delay in the start of repository operations until 2010, the start of limited waste acceptance at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility in 1998, and the start of waste acceptance at the full-capability MRS facility in 2,000. Based on the restructured program, the total-system cost for the system with a repository at the candidate site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $26 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $34 to $35 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) requiring disposal. 17 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Tazimina Hydroelectric Project, Iliamna, Alaska Final Technical and Construction Cost Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Iliamna-Newhalen-Nondalton Electric Cooperative (INNEC) provides electrical power to three communities of the same names. These communities are located near the north shore of Iliamna Lake in south-central Alaska approximately 175 miles southwest of Anchorage. These communities have a combined population of approximately 600 residents. There is no direct road connection from these villages to larger population centers. Electric power has been generated by INNEC since 1983 using diesel generators located in the community of Newhalen. Fuel for these generators was transported up the Kvichak River, an important salmon river, and across Iliamna Lake. In dry years the river is low and fuel is flown into Iliamna and then trucked five miles into Newhalen. The cost, difficult logistics and potential spill hazard of this fuel was a primary reason for development of hydroelectric power in this area. A hydroelectric project was constructed for these communities, starting in the spring of 1996 and ending in the spring of 1998. The project site is at Tazimina Falls about 9 miles upstream of the confluence of the Tazimina River and the Newhalen River. The project has an installed capacity of 824 kilowatts (kW) and is expandable to 1.5 megawatts (MW). The project is run-of-the-river (no storage) and uses the approximately 100 feet of natural head provided by the falls. The project features include a channel control sill, intake structure, penstock, underground powerhouse, tailrace, surface control building, buried transmission line and communication cable, and access road.

HDR Alaska, Inc.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Using a total landed cost model to foster global logistics strategy in the electronics industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global operation strategies have been widely used in the last several decades as many companies and industries have taken advantage of lower production costs. However, in choosing a location, companies often only consider ...

Jearasatit, Apichart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Total System Cost Analysis of Master-Slave Multi-super-Hypercube DX-tree Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years the area of High Performance Computing (HPC) has received an outstanding support both from the users as well as the computer system designers. This support is mainly due to the increase of the complexity and density of the data processing ... Keywords: DX-Tree architecture, XTree architecture, cost analysis, high performance computing, super-hypercube architecture

Hamid Abachi

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The reliability of the government cost estimate as an evaluator of the low bid in US Air Force Construction Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study proposes to scientifically assess the reliability of previous government cost estimates in evaluating construction project bids and to examine the usefulness of discordancy testing methods as an alternative to the government estimate in evaluating the low bid. A random sample of US Air Force Military Construction (MILCON) projects bid between I Oct 92 and 30 Jun 95 are divided into four subgroups for examination. Sampling distributions are generated in order to determine the mean of the ratio difference between the low bid or median bid and the government cost estimate. A null hypothesis is tested for each comparison. Conclusions are drawn about government cost estimate accuracy, consistency, and reliability. Two discordancy testing methods are examined for their usefulness in evaluating a low bid. A null hypothesis is tested for the significance of detection rates. Conclusions are drawn about the performance of each discordancy test.

Strucely, Timothy David

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Total Cost of Ownership Model for Current Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market has grown dramatically in the past three years, but the central question concerning PEV acceptance in the marketplace still remains: When compared to a hybrid or conventional vehicle, is a PEV worth the additional up-front cost to consumers? Given the incomplete understanding of changes in driving patterns due to vehicle purchases, the baseline analysis described in this report does not model customer adaptation, nor does it attempt to address non-tangible ...

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

95

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

96

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups.

Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

98

Stochastic Modeling of Future Highway Maintenance Costs for Flexible Type Highway Pavement Construction Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transportation infrastructure systems in the United States were built between the 50's and 80's, with 20 years design life. As most of them already exceeded their original life expectancy, state transportation agencies (STAs) are now under increased needs to rebuild deteriorated transportation networks. For major highway maintenance projects, a federal rule enforces to perform a life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA). The lack of analytical methods for LCCA creates many challenges of STAs to comply with the rule. To address these critical issues, this study aims at developing a new methodology for quantifying the future maintenance cost to assist STAs in performing a LCCA. The major objectives of this research are twofold: 1) identify the critical factors that affect pavement performances; 2) develop a stochastic model that predicts future maintenance costs of flexible-type pavement in Texas. The study data were gathered through the Pavement Management Information System (PMIS) containing more than 190,000 highway sections in Texas. These data were then grouped by critical performance-driven factor which was identified by K-means cluster analysis. Many factors were evaluated to identify the most critical factors that affect pavement maintenance need. With these data, a series of regression analyses were carried out to develop predictive models. Lastly, a validation study with PRESS statistics was conducted to evaluate reliability of the model. The research results reveal that three factors, annual average temperature, annual precipitation, and pavement age, were the most critical factors under very low traffic volume conditions. This research effort was the first of its kind undertaken in this subject. The maintenance cost lookup tables and stochastic model will assist STAs in carrying out a LCCA, with the reliable estimation of maintenance costs. This research also provides the research community with the first view and systematic estimation method that STAs can use to determine long-term maintenance costs in estimating life-cycle costs. It will reduce the agency's expenses in the time and effort required for conducting a LCCA. Estimating long-term maintenance cost is a core component of the LCCA. Therefore, methods developed from this project have the great potential to improve the accuracy of LCCA.

Kim, Yoo Hyun

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Gas turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. First annual publication, 1972  

SciTech Connect

By the end of 1972, gas turbine power plants owned and operated by U.S. utilities had a capacity of 27,918 MW. Data from the 1972 annual reports filed with the Federal Power Commission by utility systems are presented which show the plant cost, generating expenses, capacity and generation, and plant and equipment characteristics of 299 gas turbine plants. (LCL)

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Pricing of automotive coiled spring steel...3 kg (20 tons) per car � Total $40.75 (a) 1989 prices...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Tazimina hydroelectric project, Iliamna, Alaska. Final technical and construction cost report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Iliamna-Newhalen-Nondalton Electric Cooperative (INNEC) provides electrical power to three communities of the same names. These communities are located near the north shore of Iliamna Lake in south-central Alaska approximately 175 miles southwest of Anchorage. A hydroelectric project was constructed for these communities, starting in the spring of 1996 and ending in the spring of 1998. The project site is on the Tazimina River about 12 miles northeast of Iliamna Lake. The taximina River flows west from the Aleutian Range. The project site is at Tazimina Falls about 9 miles upstream of the confluence of the Tazimina River and the Newhalen River. The project has an installed capacity of 824 kilowatts (kW) and is expandable to 1.5 megawatts (MW). The project is run-of-the-river (no storage) and uses the approximately 100 feet of natural head provided by the falls. The project features include a channel control sill, intake structure, penstock, underground powerhouse, tailrace, surface control building, buried transmission line and communication cable, and access road.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Virginia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Virginia Construction Code  

SciTech Connect

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Virginia homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current Virginia Construction Code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Virginia homeowners will save $5,836 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $388 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Constructing a coherent long-term global total ozone climatology from the BUV, MFR, and SBUV/TOMS data sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The backscatter ultraviolet spectrometer (BUV) aboard the NIMBUS 4 satellite provided global ozone data until mid-1977. The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet (SBUV) instrument aboard the NIMBUS 7 satellite began providing global ozone in November 1978. The only satellite derived global total ozone data available between the termination of the BUV data and the startup of the SBUV/TOMS data is that from the Multichannel Filter Radiometer (MFR) instrument aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) series of satellites. The MFR and the SBUV/TOMS data are compared during the data overlap period in order to determine how well the MFR data might be used to represent the SBUV/TOMS and BUV data during the data gap period. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Ellis, J.S.; Luther, F.M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 6, Project Functions and Activities Definitions for Total Project Cost  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter provides guidelines developed to define the obvious disparity of opinions and practices with regard to what exactly is included in total estimated ...

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

Incorporating uncertainty in the Life Cycle Cost Analysis of pavements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) is an important tool to evaluate the economic performance of alternative investments for a given project. It considers the total cost to construct, maintain, and operate a pavement over its ...

Swei, Omar Abdullah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Evaluation of The Thermal Performance and Cost Effectiveness of Radiant Barrier Thermal Insulation Materials In Residential Construction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Reducing heating and cooling systems loads in buildings is a cost effective way to decrease energy consumption in residential houses. This reduction can be achieved… (more)

Asadi, Somayeh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

PROJECT COST $53,108,617  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROJECT COST $53,108,617 CONSTRUCTION COST $42,730,152 FURNISHING & EQUIPMENT $1,671.580 TOTAL SPRING 2001 Review of Documents and Cost Estimate Reconciliation APRIL 20, 2001 Formal Ground Breaking of the Campus Intramural and Recreation Advisory Committee SPRING/SUMMER1998 Campus Needs Assessment Process

Bittner, Eric R.

108

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Constructed Costs of a Net-Zero Office Building Facility: Research Support Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado Operational: August 2010 Constructed cost: $259/ft2 to achieve 50% less energy use than code Constructed cost of similar office buildings in area: $225 to $300/ft2 Reaching Net-Zero: A 1.27 MW photovoltaic system was added to the project in two phases to bring the system to net-zero. This system was financed through a power purchase agreement and did not add to the constructed cost of the building. If those costs were included in the capital costs, the total constructed cost would have been 291/ft2 to reach net-zero energy use. Learn more about the Research Support

109

Evaluating Utility Executives' Perceptions of Smart Grid Costs, Benefits and Adoption Plans To Assess Impacts on Building Design and Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Grid technology is likely to be implemented in various magnitudes across utilities in the near future. To accommodate these technologies significant changes will have to be incorporated in building design construction and planning. This research paper attempts to evaluate public utility executives’ plans to adopt smart grid technologies and to assess timing of smart grid impacts on future design and construction practices. Telephone survey was the data collection method used to collect information from executives at cooperative and municipal utilities. The study focuses on small and medium utilities with more than five thousand customers and fewer than one hundred thousand customers. A stratified random sampling approach was applied and sample results for fifty-nine survey responses were used to predict the timing of smart grid implementation and the timing of smart grid impacts on future design and construction practices. Results of this research indicate that design and construction professionals should already be developing knowledge and experience to accommodate smart grid impacts on the built environment.

Rao, Ameya Vinayak

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Complex and Multi-Faceted Nature of School Construction Costs: Factors Affecting California. A Report to the American Institute of Architects California Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost (ln) and Cost per Square Foot (ln). The coefficientsdependent variable, Cost per Square Foot (ln). Consistentin our data. Measuring cost per square foot, however, yields

Vincent, Jeffrey M; McKoy, Deborah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

112

Total supply chain cost model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sourcing and outsourcing decisions have taken on increased importance within Teradyne to improve efficiency and competitiveness. This project delivered a conceptual framework and a software tool to analyze supply chain ...

Wu, Claudia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Relation between Lean Construction and Performance in the Korean Construction Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.Project cost growth = (Actual total project cost – Initialpredicted project cost)/Initialpredicted project cost. 2.Project budget factor = Actual

Cho, Seongkyun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Construction Spending | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spending Spending BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Construction Spending Dataset Summary Description Construction Spending provides monthly estimates of the total dollar value of construction work done in the U.S. Construction Spending covers the dollar construction work done each month on new structures or improvements to existing structures for private and public sectors. Data estimates include the cost of labor and materials, cost of architectural and engineering work, overhead costs, interest and taxes paid during construction, and contractor's profits. Tags {construction,spending,value,"put in place",private,residential,nonresidential,public,state,local,federal,lodging,office,commercial,"health care",educational,religious,safety,amusement,recreation,transportation,communication,power,highway,street,sewage,waste,disposal,water,supply,conservation,development,manufacturing,structure,building,single-family,multifamily,housing,new,improvement,existing,sectors,cost," labor",materials,architectural,engineering,overhead,interest,taxes,contractor,profit}

115

PHENIX Work Breakdown Structure. Cost and schedule review copy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Book begins with this Overview section, which contains the high-level summary cost estimate, the cost profile, and the global construction schedule. The summary cost estimate shows the total US cost and the cost in terms of PHENIX construction funds for building the PHENIX detector. All costs in the WBS book are shown in FY 1993 dollars. Also shown are the institutional and foreign contributions, the level of pre-operations funding, and the cost of deferred items. Pie charts are presented at PHENIX WBS level 1 and 2 that show this information. The PHENIX construction funds are shown broken down to PHENIX WBS level 3 items per fiscal year, and the resulting profile is compared to the RHIC target profile. An accumulated difference of the two profiles is also shown. The PHENIX global construction schedule is presented at the end of the Overview section. Following the Overview are sections for each subsystem. Each subsystem section begins with a summary cost estimate, cost profile, and critical path. The total level 3 cost is broken down into fixed costs (M&S), engineering costs (EDIA) and labor costs. Costs are further broken down in terms of PHENIX construction funds, institutional and foreign contributions, pre-operations funding, and deferred items. Also shown is the contingency at level 3 and the level 4 breakdown of the total cost. The cost profile in fiscal years is shown at level 3. The subsystem summaries are followed by the full cost estimate and schedule sheets for that subsystem. These detailed sheets are typically carried down to level 7 or 8. The cost estimate shows Total, M&S, EDIA, and Labor breakdowns, as well as contingency, for each WBS entry.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

PHENIX WBS notes. Cost and schedule review copy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Book begins with this Overview section, which contains the high-level summary cost estimate, the cost profile, and the global construction schedule. The summary cost estimate shows the total US cost and the cost in terms of PHENIX construction funds for building the PHENIX detector. All costs in the WBS book are shown in FY 1993 dollars. Also shown are the institutional and foreign contributions, the level of pre-operations funding, and the cost of deferred items. Pie charts are presented at PHENIX WBS level 1 and 2 that show this information. The PHENIX construction funds are shown broken down to PHENIX WBS level 3 items per fiscal year, and the resulting profile is compared to the RHIC target profile. An accumulated difference of the two profiles is also shown. The PHENIX global construction schedule is presented at the end of the Overview section. Following the Overview are sections for each subsystem. Each subsystem section begins with a summary cost estimate, cost profile, and critical path. The total level 3 cost is broken down into fixed costs (M&S), engineering costs (EDIA) and labor costs. Costs are further broken down in terms of PHENIX construction funds, institutional and foreign contributions, pre-operations funding, and deferred items. Also shown is the contingency at level 3 and the level 4 breakdown of the total cost. The cost profile in fiscal years is shown at level 3. The subsystem summaries are followed by the full cost estimate and schedule sheets for that subsystem. These detailed sheets are typically carried down to level 7 or 8. The cost estimate Total, M&S, EDIA, and Labor breakdowns, as well as contingency, for each WBS entry.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Estimation of ship construction costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the end of the Cold War naval procurement for the US Navy has seen a dramatic decrease. This decrease in defense spending has placed existing programs under more scrutiny than previous years. As a result there is ...

Miroyannis, Aristides

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Power plant construction: productivity and construction period. [Simulation with BOOM1 model  

SciTech Connect

Power plant capital costs become quite excessive with poor construction labor productivity. Building a power plant often creates a boom town or rapid-population-growth area. Rapid-growth conditions cause housing and service shortages, lowering the quality of living conditions in the area. One purpose for the research is to determine the effects of local living conditions on construction worker productivity. Results indicate the quality of local living conditions do not primarily affect construction worker productivity; other factors have greater influence. Research showed: (1) most construction workers can be induced to work in a boom-town situation, and (2) most construction workers will not become appreciably less productive in a situation of poor living conditions. If jobsite productivity does decrease, the decrease should be accredited to the poor-quality labor hired onto the jobsite. Results indicate that, for most power plant construction, productivity related cost decreases would be much less than interest and escalation cost increases when extending construction period. Power plant capital cost would increase when extending the construction schedule. However, under extreme conditions of very poor labor availability, extending the scheduled construction period may reduce total cost.

Schulte, S.C.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

OMB Approval No. 0348-0041 BUDGET INFORMATION - Construction Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OMB Approval No. 0348-0041 BUDGET INFORMATION - Construction Programs NOTE: Certain Federal assistance programs require additional computations to arrive at the Federal share of project costs eligible for participation. If such is the case, you will be notified. COST CLASSIFICATION a. Total Cost b. Costs Not Allowable for Participation c. Total Allowable Costs (Columns a-b) 1 Administrative and legal expenses $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 2 Land, structures, rights-of-way, appraisals, etc. $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 3 Relocation expenses and payments

120

The balancing act of template bank construction: inspiral waveform template banks for gravitational-wave detectors and optimizations at fixed computational cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational-wave searches for signals from inspiralling compact binaries have relied on matched filtering banks of waveforms (called template banks) to try to extract the signal waveforms from the detector data. These template banks have been constructed using four main considerations, the region of parameter space of interest, the sensitivity of the detector, the matched filtering bandwidth, and the sensitivity one is willing to lose due to the granularity of template placement, the latter of which is governed by the minimal match. In this work we describe how the choice of the lower frequency cutoff, the lower end of the matched filter frequency band, can be optimized for detection. We also show how the minimal match can be optimally chosen in the case of limited computational resources. These techniques are applied to searches for binary neutron star signals that have been previously performed when analyzing Initial LIGO and Virgo data and will be performed analyzing Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo data using the expected detector sensitivity. By following the algorithms put forward here, the volume sensitivity of these searches is predicted to improve without increasing the computational cost of performing the search.

Drew Keppel

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

122

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 8, Startup Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

124

Historical plant cost and annual production expenses for selected electric plants, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a composite of the two prior publications, Hydroelectric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses and Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses. Beginning in 1979, Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses contained information on both steam-electric and gas-turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. The summarized historical plant cost described under Historical Plant Cost in this report is the net cumulative-to-date actual outlays or expenditures for land, structures, and equipment to the utility. Historical plant cost is the initial investment in plant (cumulative to the date of initial commercial operation) plus the costs of all additions to the plant, less the value of retirements. Thus, historical plant cost includes expenditures made over several years, as modifications are made to the plant. Power Production Expenses is the reporting year's plant operation and maintenance expenses, including fuel expenses. These expenses do not include annual fixed charges on plant cost (capital costs) such as interest on debt, depreciation or amortization expenses, and taxes. Consequently, total production expenses and the derived unit costs are not the total cost of producing electric power at the various plants. This publication contains data on installed generating capacity, net generation, net capability, historical plant cost, production expenses, fuel consumption, physical and operating plant characteristics, and other relevant statistical information for selected plants.

1984-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

125

Construction design as a process for flow : applying lean principles to construction design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delays and cost overruns are the rule rather than the exception in the construction industry. Design changes due to lack of constructability late in the construction phase generating costly ripple effect which create delay ...

Soto, Leticia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15,763,807 Contractor: 93,591,118 Fee Available Contract Period: Contract Type: URSCH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) DE-SC-0004645 April 29, 2011 - July 13, 2016 Contract...

129

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fee September, 2013 Site: Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Contract Name: Operation of DUF6 Contractor: Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number:...

130

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

357,223 597,797 894,699 EM Contractor Fee Site: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Contract Name: SLAC Environmental Remediation December 2012 1,516,646 Fee Available...

131

College of Engineering Request for Institutional Waiver of Indirect Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigator Sponsor Project Title Total Direct Costs Total Modified Direct Costs Full Indirect Costs Rate Full Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with Full IDC) Requested Indirect Costs Rate Requested Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with req'd IDC) Principal Investigator's Justification for Indirect

Eustice, Ryan

132

Long-run incremental costs and the pricing of electricity. Part II. [Comparative evaluation of marginal cost pricing and average cost pricing  

SciTech Connect

Total costs have essentially the same cost components whether long-run average costs or long-run incremental costs are used. The variable components, chiefly fuel, may be somewhat different in the new incremental plant compared to the old average plant; where the difference is between nuclear fuel and fossil fuel, its size is substantial. However, given the same kind of plant, the current prices of materials and labor will be essentially the same whether used in the new or the old plant with long-run incremental costs (LRIC) or long-run average costs (LRAC). The lower cost of electricity produced in nuclear plants constructed today, as compared to fossil fuel plants constructed at the same time, is not to be confused with the relation between LRIC and LRAC. LRAC is the average cost of electricity from all existing plants priced at their historical costs, which were generally lower than current costs. These average historical costs per kilowatt are still likely to be lower than the current incremental cost per kilowatt of the newest nuclear plant built at present price levels. LRAC is, therefore, still likely to be lower than LRIC for either fossil or nuclear. Data from the Wisconsin Power and Light Company, the Madison Gas and Electric Company, and Tuscon Gas and Electric Company are examined to study some comparisons. Some pricing principles that vary seasonally for resort hotels are reviewed. (MCW)

Morton, W.A.

1976-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

133

Design and Construction of an Automated Community Bicycle Loan/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$20 Box $50 Solar Power Panels $50 CPU $200 Total Per Unit $432 #12;Conclusion and Future · Lessons design and construct an automated community bike share system in-house in a cost efficient manner/Closed? #12;The Circuit · Parallel Port · 1 bit input · 1 bit output · 12 V and 5 V power #12;The RFID Antenna

Goadrich, Mark

134

Construction Local engineering.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management processes such as cost estimating, accelerated construction, contracting, risk impacts to accurately estimate their useful service life is very important. Information gathered through this process. Constructed Facilities Division tti.tamu.edu #12;Expertise & Equipment ExpErtisE & EquipmEnt Created in 2005

135

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the use of Persian-Gulf oil by motor vehicles The sociallye r s i a n - G u l f Oil f o r Motor Vehicles 16. T h e C ofor motor vehicles: lost consumer surplus in other oil-

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

transportation Total Percent delivered cost transportation Percent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

$12.75 - - - - - 36.0% - 2005 $13.64 - $13.64 - - - - - 36.8% - 2006; $14.50 - $14.04 - - - - - 34.3% - 2007 $15 ...

137

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1988  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1988 presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1988. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1989-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Vectren Energy Delivery of Indiana (Electric) - Commercial New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vectren Energy Delivery of Indiana (Electric) - Commercial New Vectren Energy Delivery of Indiana (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebates (Indiana) Vectren Energy Delivery of Indiana (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebates (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Custom/HVAC Systems: $100,000 or 50% of the total project cost Incentive cannot buy down project below 1.5 years payback. Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount HVAC Systems (New Construction): $0.12/kWh reduced

139

Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maintaining Activity-based Cost Estimates with Feature-Based2004). “Effective Cost Estimate and Construction Processesof new designs. These cost estimates are inflated by the

Nguyen, Hung Viet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

AEP Ohio - Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AEP Ohio - Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate AEP Ohio - Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) AEP Ohio - Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Municipal Utility Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate General: 50% of total project cost; Contact AEP Ohio Design Incentives: 50% of cost up to $50,000 Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $0.08/kWh first year savings and $100/peak kW reduction

142

Transmission Line Design and Construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry wants to construct reliable and cost-effective overhead lines. A reliable and cost effective line requires not only that the line and structures meet design criteria for strength, clearances, and electrical considerations, but also that it be designed for safe and easy construction and maintenance. Design and construction practices should therefore go hand in hand. Information among various departments within a utility has to be shared for mutual benefit. Communication is a key ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sensitivity analysis of mobile home space conditioning energy requirements to selection of U-values in twelve climates and cost/benefit analysis of U-values proposed for the federal manufactured housing construction (FMHC) and safety standards (SS)  

SciTech Connect

This study determines the sensitivity of four suggested and existing building thermal performance standards to mobile home heating and cooling loads and to the seasonal energy consumption of the equipment meeting these loads. It also evaluates the net costs and benefits of an Office of Mobile Home Standards proposal to increase the level of stringency of the present regulation. Three mobile homes, each representing typical single - wide and double - wide homes, were selected to be simulated for 12 cities. The thermal resistance of the wall, roof, floor, door, and window components of the thermal envelope were chosen to reflect both common or potential construction methods and to obtain the overall U - value levels required by each standard level. The ''Hot House'' program was selected to determine seasonal energy consumption. Results indicate that seasonal loads decrease with decreasing U - values, although in some cases a decrease U - value resulted in a slight increase in the seasonal cooling load. The best standards for thermal performance and U - values are noted, as are sults of the cost - benefit analysis. Tables, eight references, and a ''Hot House'' program listing are included.

1981-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

145

TIBER-II cost models and estimates  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of a series of viewgraphs dealing with cost associated with construction of a thermonuclear power plant. (JDH)

Thomson, S.L.

1987-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

146

Percent of 2010 Luminaire Cost LED Luminaire Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEDs promise to change the world, and few doubt that they will, but a key limiter to more rapid adoption is the cost of the LED themselves. The cost breakdown of LED luminaires vary, but it is safe to put the cost of the LED at around 25% to 40 % of the total luminaire cost. It is projected to remain a significant cost of the total luminaire for many years.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Evaluation of I-15 Devore (08-0A4224) Long-Life Pavement Rehabilitation Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the expenditures for these projects, costs were divided intoemulsion. Table 1 Project Cost Breakdown Direct CostsTotal Cost)/(Lane Miles) Project Cost Breakdown Original Bid

Fermo, Mary G; Santero, Nicholas J; Nokes, William; Harvey, John T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A cost analysis model for heavy equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total cost is one of the most important factors for a heavy equipment product purchase decision. However, the different cost views and perspectives of performance expectations between the different involved stakeholders may cause customer relation problems ... Keywords: Cost responsibilities, Operating costs, Ownership costs, Post-Manufacturing Product Cost (PMPC), System life-cycle cost

Shibiao Chen; L. Ken Keys

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1986  

SciTech Connect

Cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1986, are presented. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

151

Electrochemical construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell construction features a novel co-extruded plastic electrode in an interleaved construction with a novel integral separator-spacer. Also featured is a leak and impact resistant construction for preventing the spill of corrosive materials in the event of rupture.

Einstein, Harry (Springfield, NJ); Grimes, Patrick G. (Westfield, NJ)

1983-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

152

Segmentally Constructed Prestressed Concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Segmentally Constructed Prestressed Concrete Hyperboloid Cooling Tower Saml H. Rizkalla Assistant large capacity power plant facilities, the natural draft cooling tower in the fonn of a thin shell concrete natural draft cooling towers is expensive and time-consuming. The cost of the structure

153

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 2009 Sales Price and Construction Cost Breakdown of an Average New Single-Family Home ($2010) (1) Function Finished Lot 20% Construction Cost 59% Financing 2% Overhead & General Expenses 5% Marketing 1% Sales Commission 3% Profit 9% Total 100% Function Building Permit Fees 2% Impact Fees 1% Water and Sewer Inspection 2% Excavation, Foundation, & Backfill 7% Steel 1% Framing and Trusses 16% Sheathing 2% Windows 3% Exterior Doors 1% Interior Doors & Hardware 2% Stairs 1% Roof Shingles 4% Siding 6% Gutters & Downspouts 0% Plumbing 5% Electrical Wiring 4% Lighting Fixtures 1% HVAC 4% Insulation 2% Drywall 5% Painting 3% Cabinets, Countertops 6% Appliances 2% Tiles & Carpet 5% Trim Material 3% Landscaping & Sodding 3% Wood Deck/Patio 1% Asphalt Driveway 1% Other 9% Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): NAHB, Breaking Down House Price and Construction Costs, 2010, Table 1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price

154

Nuclear Regulatory Commission approves construction of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... near Spring City, Tennessee after initial construction began in 1973. ...

155

Busting the Myth That Green Costs More Green  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings are one of the largest consumers of resources and energy in this country, and according to the AIA (American Institute of Architects) are responsible for almost half of all carbon emissions in the United States. Since Americans spend nearly 90 percent of their lives indoors, buildings are clearly important to our way of life. The most common misconception about green building is that these approaches cost more to implement than traditional strategies and techniques of design and construction. Any decision made in the early stages of programming and design will have economic impact on the overall building cost. How many floors will our building have? Will we use marble in the lobby? Can we use fancy fixtures in the bathrooms? But according to a Davis Langdon study, there was “…no significant difference in the construction costs for LEED®-seeking versus non- LEED® buildings…” In addition to this widely referenced report, other independent studies by the State of California and the GSA indicate that cost premiums are minimal. More importantly, first cost is only a small part of the total cost of building ownership. Cost-of-ownership studies agree that first cost only accounts for around 10 percent of all costs a building owner will spend over the life of the building. The other 90 percent comes in the form of operation and maintenance – two areas in which designing for LEED® certification can save enormously. Any additional costs for building green are recouped in one to two years on average, with exponential cost savings thereafter that leave traditional construction far behind.

Qualk, J. D.; McCown, P.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Anaheim Public Utilities- Commercial & Industrial New Construction Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Anaheim Public Utilities (APU) offers commercial, industrial, and institutional customers the New Construction Incentives Program to offset construction and installation costs of energy efficient...

157

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.3 Value of Construction and Research  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Number of Construction Employees and Total Employees for Select Building Envolope Industries (Thousand Employees) Poured Concrete Foundation and Structure Contractors (NAICS 238110) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations -Construction/Extraction % of Total Masonry Contractors (NAICS 238140) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations -Construction/Extraction % of Total Roofing Contractors (NAICS 238160) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations -Construction/Extraction % of Total Drywall and Insulation Contractors (NAICS 238310) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations -Construction/Extraction % of Total Painting and Wall Covering Contractors (NAICS 238320) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations

159

SOM ARRA Grant Activity Proposals Submitted as of 7-15-2010 Project Costs*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOM ARRA Grant Activity Proposals Submitted as of 7-15-2010 Project Costs* Total # of Proposals 1,264 Total Project Costs $1,093,036,719 Total Direct Costs $803,739,425 Total Indirects $290,408,131 Awards Received as of 2-11-2011 Project Costs* Year 1 Costs Total # of Awards 333 Total Project Costs $186

Bushman, Frederic

160

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the construction costs of natural gas, oil, and petroleumR. “Current pipeline costs. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 21,cost projections for over 20,000 miles of natural gas, oil, and

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A kinematic interpretation of the construction process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-site construction costs are very significant to project costs, as a result, the present trend is to fabricate larger components to simplify erection. This approach is however limited by the capacity of the transportation ...

Davis, Craig, M.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Commissioning : The Total Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, most new buildings have been equipped with increasingly sophisticated heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, energy conservation equipment, lighting systems, security systems, and environmental control devices that rely on electronic control. Very frequently these systems and design features have not performed as expected. This can result in energy-efficiency losses. occupant complaints about comfort, indoor air quality problems. high operating costs, and increased liability for building owners, operators, employers, and design professionals. Building commissioning was developed in response to these concerns. Commissioning involves the examining and testing of building systems to verify aspects of the building design, ensure that the building is constructed in accordance with the contract documents, and verify that the building and its systems function according to the design intent documents. The process helps to integrate and organize the design, construction, operations, and maintenance of a building's systems to produce a healthy, comfortable, and efficient facility.

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Alternative Energy in New State Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Texas requires state government departments to compare the cost of providing energy alternatives for new and reconstructed state government buildings and for certain construction or repair to...

164

A New Ventilation System Integrates Total Energy Recovery, Conventional Cooling and a Novel 'Passive' Dehumidification Wheel to Mitigate the Energy, Humidity Control and First Cost Concerns Often Raised when Designing for ASHRAE Standard 62-1999 Compliance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces a novel, ''passive" desiccant based outdoor air preconditioning system (PDH) that is shown to be significantly more energy-efficient than all known alternatives, and has the unique ability to dehumidify outdoor air streams to very low dewpoints unattainable with conventional cooling approaches. The system allows for precise control of the indoor space humidity while delivering high quantities of outdoor air, at both peak and part load conditions, and during both occupied and unoccupied modes. Low operating cost, reasonable first cost and a significant reduction in cooling plant capacity requirements provide a life cycle cost that is substantially less than that of more conventional system approaches.

Fischer, J. C.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

168

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

169

The design of a panelized roof system for residential construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cost of housing in the U.S. continues to rise faster than household income. Innovative building materials and construction technologies have the potential to reduce housing construction costs. One strategy to do this ...

Dentz, Jordan Lewis

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Projects Completed Year-to-Date Grand Total: $114,360,905 1,038,467Grand Total SF:Text25:09-Nov-10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Location: Branch Campus Architect Project Cost Project Name SFContractor Project Start/End Project,983,29974,624Total SF:Total Projects 5Totals for Branch Campus Project Location: HSC Architect Project Cost Project/30/2010 Mary Gauer Total Cost: $13,070,289118,332Total SF:Total Projects 12Totals for HSC Project Location

New Mexico, University of

171

Sandwich Construction Solar Structural Facets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silver/glass mirrors have excellent optical properties but need a method of support in order to be used in concentrating solar thermal systems. In collaboration with the Cummins dish/Stirling development program, they started investigating sandwich construction as a way to integrate silver/glass mirrors into solar optical elements. In sandwich construction, membranes such as sheet metal or plastic are bonded to the front and back of a core (like a sandwich). For solar optical elements, a glass mirror is bonded to one of the membranes. This type of construction has the advantages of a high strength-to-weight ratio, and reasonable material and manufacturing cost. The inherent stiffness of sandwich construction mirror panels also facilitates large panels. This can have cost advantages for both the amount of hardware required as well as reduced installation and alignment costs. In addition, by incorporating the panels into the support structure reductions in the amount of structural support required are potentially possible.

Diver, R. B.; Grossman, J.W.

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

172

Minimization of investment costs and the effect on economy and availability of coal-fired power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low manufacturing costs and short construction periods are two factors with a major influence on the economy of power plants. This paper identifies, on the basis of a power plant design concept actually developed, potential plant cost savings at the concept design and component design levels and the sometimes contradictory implications to be considered and attempts to assess the impact of these savings on plant economy and availability. By comparison with a conventionally constructed plant, the cost savings that can be achieved over the entire plant, including erection costs, total just on 15 percent. The construction period can be reduced by about 20%. The simplifications implemented in this design concept with a view to minimizing plant costs are expected to entail only a negligible reduction in plant availability, so that this type of power plant retains its overall economic lead.

Hebel, G.; Hauenschild, R. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 9, Operating Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost ...

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Low cost MCFC anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

Erickson, D.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 2,550,203 FY2009 39,646,446 FY2010 64,874,187 FY2011 66,253,207 FY2012...

176

Evaluation of I-15 Devore (08-0A4224) Long-Life Pavement Rehabilitation Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Indirect Costs Engineer's Estimate Category Amount2 lane-mi. Administrative Costs Engineer's Estimate CategoryMiles) Total (All Costs) Engineer's Estimate Amount Original

Fermo, Mary G; Santero, Nicholas J; Nokes, William; Harvey, John T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS 1 California Institute of Technology Issuing Authority: Office is that portion of the total cost of an externally funded project that is not funded by the sponsor. Depending as a demonstration of its commitment to the project. When voluntary cost sharing is included in the proposal budget

Tai, Yu-Chong

178

Cost and schedule reduction for next-generation Candu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AECL has developed a suite of technologies for Candu{sup R} reactors that enable the next step in the evolution of the Candu family of heavy-water-moderated fuel-channel reactors. These technologies have been combined in the design for the Advanced Candu Reactor TM1 (ACRTM), AECL's next generation Candu power plant. The ACR design builds extensively on the existing Candu experience base, but includes innovations, in design and in delivery technology, that provide very substantial reductions in capital cost and in project schedules. In this paper, main features of next generation design and delivery are summarized, to provide the background basis for the cost and schedule reductions that have been achieved. In particular the paper outlines the impact of the innovative design steps for ACR: - Selection of slightly enriched fuel bundle design; - Use of light water coolant in place of traditional Candu heavy water coolant; - Compact core design with unique reactor physics benefits; - Optimized coolant and turbine system conditions. In addition to the direct cost benefits arising from efficiency improvement, and from the reduction in heavy water, the next generation Candu configuration results in numerous additional indirect cost benefits, including: - Reduction in number and complexity of reactivity mechanisms; - Reduction in number of heavy water auxiliary systems; - Simplification in heat transport and its support systems; - Simplified human-machine interface. The paper also describes the ACR approach to design for constructability. The application of module assembly and open-top construction techniques, based on Candu and other worldwide experience, has been proven to generate savings in both schedule durations and overall project cost, by reducing premium on-site activities, and by improving efficiency of system and subsystem assembly. AECL's up-to-date experience in the use of 3-D CADDS and related engineering tools has also been proven to reduce both engineering and construction costs through more efficient work planning and use of materials, through reduced re-work and through more precise configuration management. Full-scale exploitation of AECL's electronic engineering and project management tools enables further reductions in cost. The Candu fuel-channel reactor type offers inherent manufacturing and construction advantages through the application of a simple, low-pressure low-temperature reactor vessel along with modular fuel channel technology. This leads to cost benefits and total project schedule benefits. As a result, the targets which AECL has set for replication units - overnight capital cost of $1000 US/kW and total project schedule (engineering/manufacturing/construction/commissioning) of 48 months, have been shown to be achievable for the reference NG Candu design. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Yu, S.; Pakan, M.; Soulard, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Construction proprietary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Construction a. The composite mirrors The mirror was made of a graphite #12;ber backing, coated An aerogel radiator can in principle pro- vide hadron separation throughout the full momentum range. However proton aerogel gas GeV mrad 0 50 100 150 200 250 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 track parameters Direct Ray Tracing

180

On Traveling Salesman Games with Asymmetric Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 1, 2012 ... We construct a stable cost allocation with budget balance guarantee equal ... and a previously unknown connection to linear production games.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Policy 1306 Cost Sharing on Sponsored Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy 1306 Cost Sharing on Sponsored Projects Responsible Office Office of Research Administration committed cost sharing, and in-kind/matching requirements associated with sponsored projects. Definitions Cost Sharing A portion of total sponsored project costs not funded by the sponsor. Mandatory Cost

182

Weatherford Inclined Wellbore Construction  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed construction of an inclined wellbore with seven (7) inch, twenty-three (23) pound casing at a total depth of 1296 feet. The inclined wellbore is near vertical to 180 feet with a build angle of approximately 4.5 degrees per hundred feet thereafter. The inclined wellbore was utilized for further proprietary testing after construction and validation. The wellbore is available to other companies requiring a cased hole environment with known deviation out to fifty degrees (50) from vertical. The wellbore may also be used by RMOTC for further deepening into the fractured shales of the Steele and Niobrara formation.

Schulte, R.

2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

183

Improved supplier selection and cost management for globalized automotive production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For many manufacturing and automotive companies, traditional sourcing decisions rely on total landed cost models to determine the cheapest supplier. Total landed cost models calculate the cost to purchase a part plus all ...

Franken, Joseph P., II (Joseph Philip)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Cost of Debt ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate firm-specific marginal cost of debt functions for a large panel of companies between 1980 and 2007. The marginal cost curves are identified by exogenous variation in the marginal tax benefits of debt. The location of a given company’s cost of debt function varies with characteristics such as asset collateral, size, book-to-market, asset tangibility, cash flows, and whether the firm pays dividends. By integrating the area between benefit and cost functions we estimate that the equilibrium net benefit of debt is 3.5 % of asset value, resulting from an estimated gross benefit of debt of 10.4 % of asset value and an estimated cost of debt of 6.9%. We find that the cost of being overlevered is asymmetrically higher than the cost of being underlevered and that expected default costs constitute approximately half of the total ex ante cost of debt. We thank Rick Green (the Acting Editor), and an anonymous referee, Heitor Almeida, Ravi Bansal,

Jules H. Van Binsbergen; John R. Graham; Jie Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Electricity Plant Cost Uncertainties (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Construction costs for new power plants have increased at an extraordinary rate over the past several years. One study, published in mid-2008, reported that construction costs had more than doubled since 2000, with most of the increase occurring since 2005. Construction costs have increased for plants of all types, including coal, nuclear, natural gas, and wind.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Cost analysis guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

New Jersey SmartStart Buildings - New Construction and Retrofits |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » New Jersey SmartStart Buildings - New Construction and Retrofits New Jersey SmartStart Buildings - New Construction and Retrofits < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate General: incentives may be limited to $500,000 per utility account per year. Custom Measures: limited to lesser of $0.16/kWh or $1.60/therm saved annually; 50% of total costs; or buydown to a 1-year payback period Program Info Funding Source New Jersey Societal Benefits Charge (public benefits fund)

188

Transmission Structure Design Features to Facilitate Construction and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry wants to construct reliable and cost-effective overhead lines. A reliable and cost-effective line requires not only that the line and structures meet design criteria for strength, clearances, and electrical considerations, but also that it can be constructed and maintained easily and safely. Design and construction practices should therefore go hand in hand. A minor change in design could have a large impact on construction and maintenance costs. The various departments within a ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

190

Riverside Public Utilities - Energy Efficiency Construction Incentive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate General: 150,000 LEED: 50% of total project costs, up to 180,000 Program Info State California Program Type...

191

Plant construction and community stress  

SciTech Connect

Reports on a study commissioned by EPRI's Energy Analysis and Environment Division to acquire a better understanding of the power plant construction process and the socioeconomic impacts it can bring about. Points out that because of a parallel study the NRC conducted involving nuclear plants, the EPRI study's emphasis was on coal-fired power plants, which represented 9 of the 12 case studies. Finds that the impacts on communities near the case study plants were considerably less than had been forecast. Emphasizes that improper socioeconomic assessment procedures and poor mitigation planning can contribute to costly construction delays and lower construction worker productivity.

Lihach, N.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Fusion reactor design studies: standard unit costs and cost scaling rules  

SciTech Connect

This report establishes standard unit costs and scaling rules for estimating costs of material, equipment, land, and labor components used in magnetic confinement fusion reactor plant construction and operation. Use of the standard unit costs and scaling rules will add uniformity to cost estimates, and thus allow valid comparison of the economic characteristics of various reactor concepts.

Schulte, S.C.; Bickford, W.E.; Willingham, C.E.; Ghose, S.K.; Walker, M.G.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

PUMP CONSTRUCTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump which utilizes the fluid being pumped through it as its lubricating fluid is described. This is achieved by means of an improved bearing construction in a pump of the enclosed or canned rotor type. At the outlet end of the pump, adjacent to an impeller mechanism, there is a bypass which conveys some of the pumped fluid to a chamber at the inlet end of the pump. After this chamber becomes full, the pumped fluid passes through fixed orifices in the top of the chamber and exerts a thrust on the inlet end of the pump rotor. Lubrication of the rotor shaft is accomplished by passing the pumped fluid through a bypass at the outlet end of the rotor shaft. This bypass conveys Pumped fluid to a cooling means and then to grooves on the surface of the rotor shait, thus lubricating the shaft.

Strickland, G.; Horn, F.L.; White, H.T.

1960-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

Nuclear plant construction and investment risk  

SciTech Connect

Escalated cost estimations, delays and cancellations in nuclear construction have caused a preoccupation with the risks of nuclear power plant construction that dominates utility stock investment, overshadowing increased earnings per share and recent growth in production. The issue will be resolved when increased power demand requires new construction, but the effect has so far been to erode the economic advantage of nuclear power and threaten the ability of utilities to get rate increases high enough to cover their costs. Projected delays and cost escalations and their effects must go into an economic appraisal of the investment risks.

Studness, C.M.

1984-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nuclear power plant construction activity 1987  

SciTech Connect

This annual report published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) presents data on nuclear power plant construction activity. The previous report, Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1986, included data for units that, as of December 31, 1986, were (1) in the construction pipeline, (2) canceled, or (3) commercial operation as of December 31, 1986. The data in this report, which were collected on Form EIA-254, ''Semiannual Report on Status of Reactor Construction,'' update the data in the previous report to be current as of December 31, 1987. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership; construction costs; and construction schedules and milestone dates.

1988-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cost effectiveness of the 1993 Model Energy Code in Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an analysis of the cost effectiveness of the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family homes in Colorado. The goal of this analysis was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to current construction practice in Colorado based on an objective methodology that determined the total life-cycle cost associated with complying with the 1993 MEC. This analysis was performed for the range of Colorado climates. The costs and benefits of complying with the 1993 NIEC were estimated from the consumer`s perspective. The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for homes built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to vary from 0.9 year in Steamboat Springs to 2.4 years in Denver. Compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1190 to $2274, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $119 to $227 (at 10% down). The net present value of all costs and benefits to the home buyer, accounting for the mortgage and taxes, varied from a savings of $1772 in Springfield to a savings of $6614 in Steamboat Springs. The ratio of benefits to costs ranged from 2.3 in Denver to 3.8 in Steamboat Springs.

Lucas, R.G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

2013-2014 Projected Aviation Program Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

06/21/13 2013-2014 Projected Aviation Program Costs UND Aerospace offers two aviation degree the cost of a degree program. BACHELOR of BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ** Flight Costs Airport Management Survey Certificate $ 11,574 **NOTE: Total flight costs are based on averages and are subject to change. Also, the ATC

Delene, David J.

198

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8 total installed cost #12;6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and downtown data Verified that historical natural gas pipeline cost data

199

Biomass Power Project Cost Analysis Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of biomass power projects presents a variety of challenges that result in high capital costs associated with developing, engineering, procuring, constructing, and operating biomass power projects. Although projects that rely on more homogeneous fuels such as natural gas must still account for site-specific issues when estimating development and construction costs, the complexities are not comparable.Recognizing the difficulties in estimating the capital costs for ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

200

Update on the Cost of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We update the cost of nuclear power as calculated in the MIT (2003) Future of Nuclear Power study. Our main focus is on the changing cost of construction of new plants. The MIT (2003) study provided useful data on the cost ...

Parsons, John E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Quality control during construction of power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper traces the background and examines the necessity for a program to control quality during the construction phase of a power plant. It also attempts to point out considerations for making these programs cost effective.

Hartstern, R.F.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% oncommissioning project costs and savings. Commissioning isproportional to total project cost. The nature of activities

Mills, Evan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Health and Visibility Cost of Air Pollution: A Comparison of Estimation Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whether the visibility cost estimates from CVM and HPA aredetermine the overall cost estimates. 6 And the considerableuncertainty in the total cost estimate, as manifested by the

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James; McCubbin, Donald

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Market failures, consumer preferences, and transaction costs in energy efficiency purchase decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transaction Costs, Energy Efficiency and InstitutionalTransaction Costs in Energy Efficiency Purchase Decisionsof total project costs than energy efficiency projects.

Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

206

Residential photovoltaic worth : an assessment of retrofit vs. new construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper characterizes the basic differences between photovoltaic retrofit and new construction applications. It quantifies the tradeoffs forced by rooftop area constraints, special array mounting costs, maintenance ...

Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The missing piece: improving seismic design and construction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... construction. For example the capital cost per KWH of output from a power plant has steady declined over the past decade. ...

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

C. ESTIMATED COSTS OF LRDP PROPOSALS C. ESTIMATED COSTS OF LRDP PROPOSALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, categorized by project category by site and with total estimated project costs. Table 38 compares and the Medical Center). /d/ Aldea housing project only; additional housing is planned, but the costs are highly renovation for the laboratory buildings). Recent projects comprised 19% of the total costs compared with 17

Mullins, Dyche

209

Handbook of energy use for building construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction industry accounts for over 11.14% of the total energy consumed in the US annually. This represents the equivalent energy value of 1 1/4 billion barrels of oil. Within the construction industry, new building construction accounts for 5.19% of national annual energy consumption. The remaining 5.95% is distributed among new nonbuilding construction (highways, ralroads, dams, bridges, etc.), building maintenance construction, and nonbuilding maintenance construction. The handbook focuses on new building construction; however, some information for the other parts of the construction industry is also included. The handbook provides building designers with information to determine the energy required for buildings construction and evaluates the energy required for alternative materials, assemblies, and methods. The handbook is also applicable to large-scale planning and policy determination in that it provides the means to estimate the energy required to carry out major building programs.

Stein, R.G.; Stein, C.; Buckley, M.; Green, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

U.S. Total Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Composite 67.94 94.74 59.29 76.69 101.87 100.93 1968-2012 Domestic 69.65 98.47 59.49 78.01 100.71 100.72 1968-2012 Imported 67.04 92.77...

211

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Cost Vehicle Cost Calculator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on AddThis.com... Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Also

212

Introduction to production cost models 1.0 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(t) is total maintenance costs in year t. · O(t) is the cost associated with outages. and the overbar in (1 · I(t) is total investment costs at year t · S(t) is total salvage value of retired plants at year t (and for all plants still in operation at year T). · F(t) is total fuel costs in year t. · M

McCalley, James D.

213

Computers could aid construction projects  

SciTech Connect

The procedures currently used by engineering companies in planning their work on a segmented basis are a very small step from the development of a computer model encompassing the total scope of a very large engineering construction effort. When the computer model concept has been accepted and implemented, the results are a harmonious relationship between divergent groups, replacing the frequent scrambling and reaction among engineering, procurement, and construction that often takes place in completing a capital project. It is a small step to be able to derive all the benefits of early planning based upon logically developed knowledge. Common scheduling techniques used to provide a scenario for a total coordinated effort could provide a computer model of an entire engineering-construction project. To date, it is this concept that has eluded the industry.

Leon, L.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

On Traveling Salesman Games with Asymmetric Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relaxation is actually a linear production game (Owen 1975). As a result, the dual multipliers of this LP relaxation can be used to construct a cost allocation in the ...

216

2012 2013 Projected Aviation Program Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 ­ 2013 Projected Aviation Program Costs UND Aerospace offers two aviation degree programs with a total of seven academic majors. Each has its own flight course requirements, which affect the cost of a degree program. BACHELOR of BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ** Flight Costs Airport Management Survey of Flight

Delene, David J.

217

Underground Transmission Construction: Vault and Manhole Design and Current Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underground transmission (UT) cable systems are alternatives to overhead transmission lines, especially if the costs in design and construction of the UT cable systems are further reduced. Among the major activities of an underground transmission cable project, vault (manhole) designs and related safety issues need to be addressed. Manhole design and construction account for one of the major costs in a cable project.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

ENGINEERING STUDY ON UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The advantages, disadvantages, and cost of constructing a auclear power reactor underground are outlinedData on underground construction of hydroelectric plants, other structures, and underground reactor projects in Norway and Sweden are reviewed. A hypothetical underground Experimental Boiling Water Reactor design and sketch are given with cost estimates(T.R.H.)

Beck, C.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

REQUEST FOR INDIRECT COST WAIVER I. Project Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REQUEST FOR INDIRECT COST WAIVER I. Project Director: Department: Project Title: Project Sponsor without fully recovering the institutional indirect costs which will be incurred in conducting the project COSTS 1. FULL: OF I. A. C. 2. PARTIAL: OF H. B. K. TOTAL PROJECT COSTS L. INDIRECT COSTS TO BE WAIVED, J

Krovi, Venkat

220

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Sample Invoice Cost Share UT-B Contracts Div August 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SHIPPED VIA CUSTOMER NUMBER TERMS NET DAYS COST ELEMENT DESCRIPTION CURRENT COSTS CUMULATIVE COSTS DIRECT for the Department of Energy COMMENTS OR SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS: SUBCONTRACT NUMBER BILLING PERIOD Begin/End Date AMOUNT PREVIOUSLY PAID TOTAL COST INCURRED COMPANY COST SHARE * SELLERS COST SHARE * TOTAL INVOICED *If

222

MODULAR CONSTRUCTION SYSTEM EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to respond to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Direction Letter (TDL) 02-003 (Waisley 2001), which directs Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) to complete a design study to recommend repository design options to support receipt and/or emplacement of any or all of the following: commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), high-level radioactive waste (HLW), DOE-managed spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) (including naval spent nuclear fuel [SNF]), and immobilized plutonium (if available), as soon as practicable, but no later than 2010. From the possible design options, a recommended approach will be determined for further evaluation to support the preliminary design of the repository. This study integrates the results of the repository Design Evolution Study (Rowe 2002) with supporting studies concerning national transportation options (BSC 2002b) and Nevada transportation options (Gehner 2002). The repository Design Evolution Study documents the processes used to reevaluate the design, construction, operation, and cost of the repository in response to TDL 02-003 (Waisley 2001), and to determine possible repository conceptual design options. The transportation studies evaluate the national and Nevada transportation options that support the repository conceptual design options. An evaluation methodology was established, based on Program-level requirements developed for the study in reference BSC 2001a, to allow the repository and system design options to be evaluated on a consistent basis. The transportation options and the design components were integrated into system design implementation options, which were evaluated using receipt and emplacement scenarios. The scenarios tested the ability of the design concept to adapt to changes in funding, waste receipt rate, and Nevada rail transportation availability. The results of the evaluation (in terms of system throughput, cost, and schedule) were then compared to the Program-level requirements, and recommendations for design alternatives, requirements changes, or further evaluation were developed.

S. Gillespie

2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

223

Managing Constructibility Reviews to Reduce Highway Project Durations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- creases costs. Research confirms that schedule compression has led to increases in project cost CII 1989 in project cost provided certain tech- niques are applied during project development and especially dur- ing to have the highest potential to reduce project duration without increasing total project cost. Project

Ford, David N.

224

Geothermal power plant R and D: an analysis of cost-performance tradeoffs and the Heber Binary-Cycle Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

A study of advancements in power plant designs for use at geothermal resources in the low to moderate (300 to 400F) temperature range is reported. In 3 case studies, the benefits of R and D to achieve these advancements are evaluated in terms of expected increases in installed geothermal generating capacity over the next 2 decades. A parametric sensitivity study is discussed which analyzes differential power development for combinations of power plant efficiency and capitol cost. Affordable tradeoffs between plant performance and capital costs are illustrated. The independent review and analysis of the expected costs of construction, operation and maintenance of the Heber Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Demonstration Plant are described. Included in this assessment is an analysis of each of the major cost components of the project, including (1) construction cost, (2) well field development costs, (3) fluid purchase costs, and (4) well field and power plant operation and maintenance costs. The total cost of power generated from the Heber Plant (in terms of mills per kWh) is then compared to the cost of power from alternative fossil-fueled base load units. Also evaluated are the provisions of both: (a) the Cooperative Agreement between the federal government and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E); and (b) the Geothermal Heat Sales Contract with Union Oil Company.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cogeneration Plant is Designed for Total Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes application considerations, design criteria, design features, operating characteristics and performance of a 200 MW combined cycle cogeneration plant located at Occidental Chemical Corporation's Battleground chlorine-caustic plant at La Porte, Texas. This successful application of a total energy management concept utilizing combined cycle cogeneration in an energy intensive electrochemical manufacturing process has resulted in an efficient reliable energy supply that has significantly reduced energy cost and therefore manufacturing cost.

Howell, H. D.; Vera, R. L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

227

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

228

New method for classifying construction information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Classification plays a vital role in construction specifications, structuring of construction documents, measuring bills of quantities, and calculation of construction costs. A multitude of classification systems exists in the global construction market with very little commonality among them. With continued globalization of the construction industry and the rapid development toward a computer integrated construction process based on computer-aided product data modeling, the need for a uniform general classification system is felt more than ever by the construction professionals. The purpose of this study is to analyze the major classification systems of construction works, such as MasterFormat or UniFormat used in the United States, and SfB, CI/SfB, or UniClass used in the European countries and elsewhere in the world, and to describe the adaptability of a new system for Relational Database Management System. Based on the results of study, an interactive database of new construction information classification system is constructed. This study will be useful as a foundation for an identification of construction works uniformly on a global basis.

Lee, Sunku

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Low-cost inertial measurement unit.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories performs many expensive tests using inertial measurement units (IMUs)--systems that use accelerometers, gyroscopes, and other sensors to measure flight dynamics in three dimensions. For the purpose of this report, the metrics used to evaluate an IMU are cost, size, performance, resolution, upgradeability and testing. The cost of a precision IMU is very high and can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Thus the goals and results of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the data flow in an IMU and determine a generic IMU design. (2) Discuss a high cost IMU implementation and its theoretically achievable results. (3) Discuss design modifications that would save money for suited applications. (4) Design and implement a low cost IMU and discuss its theoretically achievable results. (5) Test the low cost IMU and compare theoretical results with empirical results. (6) Construct a more streamlined printed circuit board design reducing noise, increasing capabilities, and constructing a self-contained unit. Using these results, we can compare a high cost IMU versus a low cost IMU using the metrics from above. Further, we can examine and suggest situations where a low cost IMU could be used instead of a high cost IMU for saving cost, size, or both.

Deyle, Travis Jay

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Emission Control Cost-Effectiveness of Alternative-Fuel Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kwh/mile) d Total Battery Capacity (Kwh) Cost per Battery (this study. in Total battery capacity was calculated as:calculated as total battery capacity multiplied by per-unit-

Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel; Olmstead, Janis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost...

232

Market assessment of fuel cell total energy systems summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An investigation of the potential market penetration of fuel cell total energy systems (FCTES) into the nonindustrial, single building market is summarized. Nine building types, two types of construction, and the ten Department of Energy (DOE) regions were used to model the market for the time period 1985--2000. Input data developed for the penetration model included size distributions of each building type and performance and cost characteristics of FCTES and competing conventional systems. Two fuel cell systems, fuel cell - heat pump and fuel cell - central boiler and chiller, were assumed to compete with two conventional systems, electric heat pump and central chiller-boiler models. Two fuel cell supply situations were considered: (a) one in which only 40 kW(e) modules were available, and (b) one in which a catalog of 25, 40, 100, and 250 kW(e) modules were available. Data characterizing the economic climate, the intended market, and system cost and performance were used to determine the present value of life-cycle costs for each system in each market segment. Two market models were used to estimate FCTES sales. In the first, the perfect market model, FCTES sales were assumed to occur in all segments in which that system had the lowest present-valued costs. In the second, a market diffusion model was used to obtain a more probable (and lower) sales estimate than that of the perfect market model. Results are presented as FCTES sales for each market segment by FCTES module size and the effect on primary energy use by fuel type.

Mixon, W.R.; Christian, J.E.; Jackson, W.L.; Pine, G.D.; Hagler, H.; Shanker, R.; Koppelman, L.; Greenstein, D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Cost-Effective Responses to Terrorist Risks in Constructed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a framework to define procedures to make ... Reference Manual to Mitigate Potential Terrorist ... Manager's Emergency Preparedness Handbook.44 ...

2004-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

234

Construction Simplicity and Cost as Selection Criteria Between Two ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

pattern, would perform better under these circumstances. T. Manios (&) 4 M. S. ... different tasks involved in the project. One of the .... according to ANOVA analysis followed by Tukey test (at p \\ 0.05) for .... This specific job was subcontracted by.

235

Low cost materials of construction for biological processes: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The workshop was held, May 1993 in conjunction with the 15th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals. The purpose of this workshop was to present information on the biomass to ethanol process in the context of materials selection and through presentation and discussion, identify promising avenues for future research. Six technical presentations were grouped into two sessions: process assessment and technology assessment. In the process assessment session, the group felt that the pretreatment area would require the most extensive materials research due the complex chemical, physical and thermal environment. Discussion centered around the possibility of metals being leached into the process stream and their effect on the fermentation mechanics. Linings were a strong option for pretreatment assuming the economics were favorable. Fermentation was considered an important area for research also, due to the unique complex of compounds and dual phases present. Erosion in feedstock handling equipment was identified as a minor concern. In the technology assessment session, methodologies in corrosion analysis were presented in addition to an overview of current coatings/linings technology. Widely practiced testing strategies, including ASTM methods, as well as novel procedures for micro-analysis of corrosion were discussed. Various coatings and linings, including polymers and ceramics, were introduced. The prevailing recommendations for testing included keeping the testing simple until the problem warranted a more detailed approach and developing standardized testing procedures to ensure the data was reproducible and applicable. The need to evaluate currently available materials such as coatings/linings, carbon/stainless steels, or fiberglass reinforced plastic was emphasized. It was agreed that economic evaluation of each material candidate must be an integral part of any research plan.

Not Available

1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

236

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of  ...

237

Optimal Incentive/Disincentive Determination Between Cost and Benefit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to motivate contractors to complete construction projects early on high-impact highway pavement construction projects, state transportation agencies (STAs) including TxDOT have often used incentive/disincentive (I/D) contracts. However, determining I/D rates is extremely difficult due largely to the lack of systematic methods for helping STAs determine effective I/D rates. The primary goal of this project is to develop a novel framework for determining the most realistic and economical I/D dollar amounts for high-impact highway improvement projects. To achieve its goal, this project proposes an integration analysis including project schedule and the lower and upper bounds of the I/D contract. The lower bound is the contractor’s additional cost of acceleration, and the upper is the total savings to road users and to the agency. The study data were gathered using Construction Analysis for Pavement Rehabilitation Strategies (CA4PRS) software. These data were then grouped by four different types of pavements, namely Joint Plain Concrete Pavement (JPCP), Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement (CRCP), Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA), and Milling and Asphalt Concrete Overlay (MACO). With these data, a series of regression analyses were carried out to develop predictive models for the validation of time-cost tradeoff to determine I/D lower bound. Road user cost and agency cost savings were quantified using CA4PRS to develop lookup tables to determine I/D upper bound. Adjustment of contractors’ additional cost of acceleration with Level of Service (LOS) and total savings adjustment using Net Present Value (NPV) were incorporated in the research study to calculate point based estimates of I/D for lower and upper bound, respectively. Lastly, case studies on real world projects were conducted to evaluate robustness of the model. The research results reveal that the predictive models give appropriate results for the case studies in determining the I/D dollar amount for the lower and upper bound. This study will provide the research community with the first view and systematic estimation method that STAs can use to determine the most economical and realistic I/D dollar amount for a given project–an optimal value that allows the agency to stay within budget while effectively motivating contractors to complete projects ahead of schedule. It will also significantly reduce the agency’s expenses in the time and effort required for determining I/D dollar amounts.

Sharma, Piyush

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) well construction technology evaluation report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electricity production from geothermal resources is currently based on the exploitation of hydrothermal reservoirs. Hydrothermal reservoirs possess three ingredients critical to present day commercial extraction of subsurface heat: high temperature, in-situ fluid and high permeability. Relative to the total subsurface heat resource available, hydrothermal resources are geographically and quantitatively limited. A 2006 DOE sponsored study led by MIT entitled 'The Future of Geothermal Energy' estimates the thermal resource underlying the United States at depths between 3 km and 10 km to be on the order of 14 million EJ. For comparison purposes, total U.S. energy consumption in 2005 was 100 EJ. The overwhelming majority of this resource is present in geological formations which lack either in-situ fluid, permeability or both. Economical extraction of the heat in non-hydrothermal situations is termed Enhanced or Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The technologies and processes required for EGS are currently in a developmental stage. Accessing the vast thermal resource between 3 km and 10 km in particular requires a significant extension of current hydrothermal practice, where wells rarely reach 3 km in depth. This report provides an assessment of well construction technology for EGS with two primary objectives: (1) Determining the ability of existing technologies to develop EGS wells. (2) Identifying critical well construction research lines and development technologies that are likely to enhance prospects for EGS viability and improve overall economics. Towards these ends, a methodology is followed in which a case study is developed to systematically and quantitatively evaluate EGS well construction technology needs. A baseline EGS well specification is first formulated. The steps, tasks and tools involved in the construction of this prospective baseline EGS well are then explicitly defined by a geothermal drilling contractor in terms of sequence, time and cost. A task and cost based analysis of the exercise is subsequently conducted to develop a deeper understanding of the key technical and economic drivers of the well construction process. Finally, future research & development recommendations are provided and ranked based on their economic and technical significance.

Capuano, Louis, Jr. (Thermasource Inc.); Huh, Michael; Swanson, Robert (Thermasource Inc.); Raymond, David Wayne; Finger, John Travis; Mansure, Arthur James; Polsky, Yarom; Knudsen, Steven Dell

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

240

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

242

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

243

Status Production Energy Efficiency % 72 70 Storage, Compression, Dispensing Efficiency Total Hydrogen Costs Hydrogen Production Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By 2012, develop and demonstrate distributed reforming technology for producing hydrogen from bio-oil at $3.80/kilogram (kg) purified hydrogen. By 2011, develop a prototype that incorporates the key operations: bio-oil injection, catalytic autothermal reforming, water-gas shift, and hydrogen isolation. Develop the necessary understanding of process chemistry, bio-oil compositional effects, catalyst chemistry, and deactivation and regeneration strategy to form a basis for process definition for automated distributed reforming to meet the DOE targets. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2010, demonstrate the process of auto-thermal reforming of bio-oil including a longterm catalyst performance, yields of hydrogen, and mass balances. Using a bench-scale reactor system, demonstrate catalytic conversion consistent with $3.80/kg hydrogen.

Richard French; Michael Penev; Rick Farmer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

2011 Cost Symposium Agenda for web (2)-OPAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Engineering and Construction Office of Engineering and Construction Management (OECM) 1:05 PM 1:45 PM 40 Opening Remarks - Project management Update Paul Bosco, Director, Office of Engineering and Construction Management (OECM) 1:45 PM 2:45 PM 60 Construction Market Overview TBD (panelists from the Procurement Executives Group (PEG)) 2:45 PM 3:00 PM 15 3:00 PM 3:40 PM 40 GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide (GAO-09- 3SP) and the Schedule Estimating Guide that is under development Karen Richey, Senior Cost Analyst, Government Accountability Office (GAO) 3:40 PM 4:20 PM 40 Risk Management & Cost Estimating Guide Gruber Chris, Independent Cost Consultant 4:20 PM 5:00 PM 40 Cost Estimating for Corps of Engineers' New Orleans Levee replacement TBD Thursday, May 26 8:15 AM 8:20 AM 5 Welcome Back John Makepeace,Office of Engineering and Construction

246

Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Title, Location Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: 2010 LCLS Undulator 2 is envisioned to be a 0.2 - 2keV FEL x-ray source, capable of delivering x-rays to End Station A (ESA), located in the existing Research Yard at SLAC. It will also be configurable as a non- FEL hard x-ray source capable of delivering a chirped x-ray pulse for single-shot broad-spectrum measurements. The project would entail reconstruction of the electron beam transport to End Station A, construction and installation of a new undulator in the tunnel upstream of ESA and beam dump, and construction and installation of x-ray transport, optics, and diagnostics in ESA. It also includes the construction of an annex to End Station A , providing hutches for experiment stations.

247

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 2010 Construction Method of Single-Family Homes, by Region (Thousand Units and Percent of Total Units) Region Total Northeast 49 10% 4 33% 2 18% 54 Midwest 76 16% 3 25% 2 18% 82...

248

Photovoltaic balance-of-system designs and costs at PVUSA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is one in a series of 1994-1995 PVUSA reports that document PVUSA lessons learned at demonstration sites in California and Texas. During the last 7 years (1988 to 1994), 16 PV systems ranging from 20 kW to 500 kW have been installed. Six 20-kW emerging module technology (EMT) arrays and three turnkey (i.e., vendor designed and integrated) utility-scale systems were procured and installed at PVUSA`s main test site in Davis, California. PVUSA host utilities have installed a total of seven EMT arrays and utility-scale systems in their service areas. Additional systems at Davis and host utility sites are planned. One of PVUSA`s key objectives is to evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of PV balance-of-system (BOS). In the procurement stage PVUSA encouraged innovative design to improve upon present practice by reducing maintenance, improving reliability, or lowering manufacturing or construction costs. The project team worked closely with suppliers during the design stage not only to ensure designs met functional and safety specifications, but to provide suggestions for improvement. This report, intended for the photovoltaic (PV) industry and for utility project managers and engineers considering PV plant construction and ownership, documents PVUSA utility-scale system design and cost lessons learned. Complementary PVUSA topical reports document: construction and safety experience; five-year assessment of EMTs; validation of the Kerman 500-kW grid-support PV plant benefits; PVUSA instrumentation and data analysis techniques; procurement, acceptance, and rating practices for PV power plants; experience with power conditioning units and power quality.

Reyes, A.B.; Jennings, C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Sustainable Steel Construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 3, 2008... House Gases, and Climate Change, Educational Resources. Spacer ... on the construction process—namely speed, prefabrication, safety, ...

250

Construction and Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in building sector energy consumption by improving ... housing construction: improving energy efficiency and ... Reinforced Soil Bridge Pier Load Test ...

2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

251

Obama Administration Announces Loan Guarantees to Construct New Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Public Affairs Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant WASHINGTON, DC � U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced selections for the award of approximately $40 million in total to two teams led by Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse Electric Co. and San Diego-based General Atomics for conceptual design and planning work for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The results of this work will help the Administration determine whether to proceed with detailed efforts toward construction and demonstration of the NGNP. If successful, the NGNP Demonstration Project will demonstrate high-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology that will be capable of producing electricity as well as process heat for industrial applications and will be configured for low technical and safety risk with highly reliable operations. Final cost-shared awards are subject to the negotiation of acceptable terms and conditions.

252

Toshiba's developments on construction techniques of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Reliable and economic energy supplies are fundamental requirements of energy policies in Japan. To accomplish these needs, nuclear power plants are being increased in Japan. In recent years, construction cost increases and schedule extensions have affected the capital cost of nuclear energy, compared with fossil power plants, due to lower costs of oil and coal. On the other hand, several severe regulations have been applied to nuclear power plant designs. High-quality and cooperative engineering and harmonized design of equipment and parts are strongly required. Therefore, reduced construction costs and scheduling, as well as higher quality and reliability, are the most important items for nuclear industry. Toshiba has developed new construction techniques, as well as design and engineering tools for control and management, that demonstrate the positive results achieved in the shorter construction period of 1100-MW(electric) nuclear power plants. The normal construction period so far is 64 months, whereas the current construction period is 52 months. (New construction techniques are partially applied). In future years, the construction period will be lowered to 48 months. (New construction techniques are fully applied). A construction period is defined as time from the start of rock inspection to the start of commercial operation.

Hayashi, Y.; Itoh, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Utility Scale Solar PV Cost Steven SimmonsSteven Simmons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, permitting) Early construction (procurement, site prep) Construction Month % of TTL Cost 12 month ­ 1% 12 month ­ 14 % 12 month ­ 85 % Month % of TTL Cost 12 month ­ 1% 12 month ­ 14 % 12 month ­ 85 % Financing.69 113.43 96.66 TTL 213.94 189.08 156.97 137.12 0 debt term 25 years 200 250 $/MWh 2012$ Levelized Cost

254

Perception of a building construction schedule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating a schedule means making a judgment about the schedule after thinking carefully about its duration, cost, and the probable quality of its deliverable product. Despite recent advances in 4D visualization, (i.e., 3D building geometry + time), ... Keywords: 4D visualization, building construction planning, decision support systems, perception model

Kais Samkari, Ralf Gnerlich, Volkhard Franz

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Insulation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Bonus maximum: $100,000 All incentives: $2.50/sq. ft. (base plus bonus), $300,000, 75% of project costs, and 100% of incremental costs Program Info Funding Source Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) surcharge for Ameren,

256

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

259

Florida Boat ramp EnhancEmEnt and construction projEct General Project DescriPtion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhancement and Construction Project is $10,153,642. estiMateD cost The estimated cost for this project costs for some of the projects were updated from those provided in the DERP/EA. Actual costs may differFlorida Boat ramp EnhancEmEnt and construction projEct General Project DescriPtion This early

260

Allocation of Space and the Costs of Multimodal Transport in Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B) ), the total social cost of transportation in the city issocial cost of motor vehicle use in the United States. Journal of Transportation and

Gonzales, Eric Justin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost of Wind Power Also important to how renewable energyenergy considered in these plans. Not surprisingly, the total modeled cost of wind

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Project Construction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Construction Project Construction Project Construction October 16, 2013 - 5:14pm Addthis Building Design Project Construction Commisioning Integrating renewable energy into Federal new construction or major renovations requires effective structuring of the construction team and project schedule. This overview discusses key construction team considerations for renewable energy as well as timing and expectations for the construction phase. The project construction phase begins after a project is completely designed and the construction documents (100%) have been issued. Construction team skills and experience with renewable energy technologies are crucial during construction, as is how the integration of renewable energy affects the project construction schedule. Construction Team

263

Drilling costs drop 7% in 1985  

SciTech Connect

Drilling costs dropped about 7% last year. This decline cancels a slight increase in 1984. Total costs to drill now run about 59% of the 1981 highs. Comparable figures for the previous 2 years are 63 and 61%. Deeper wells showed the biggest drops. Shallow well costs fell about 6%. Energy Information Administration (EIA) indexes drilling costs on a 1976 base year. Costs for shallow wells (5,000 ft or less) show an index about 138. Deeper wells have an index around 149. Cost declines were the greatest in West and North Texas and the Rockies, of 11%. The Northeast and Western areas showed greater than average declines, 9% or so. The High Plains, New Mexico, and Midcontinent areas recorded near the average 7% decline. Costs in South Louisiana, the Southeast, and Ark-La-Tex 2%. West Central Texas costs were off only 1%. The Southeast was essentially unchanged. Indexes by area show generally that drilling costs have declined since 1983. The summary here comes from EIA's ''Indexes and Estimates of Domestic Well Drilling Costs 1984 and 1985''. That report covers oil, gas, and dry hole costs, cost components, and overall costs.

Anderson, T.; Funk, V.

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Emission Control Cost-Effectiveness of Alternative-Fuel Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

d Total Battery Capacity (Kwh) Cost per Battery ($)e Totalcosts to consumersto purchase a EV fuel economy in miles per kwhKwh equivalent to per-mile gasoline road tax was included. Table 11 Performance and Cost

Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel; Olmstead, Janis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cost analysis and policy implications in psychiatric care.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The economic burden of mental health constitutes a substantial part of the total costs of illnesses. Most estimates of cost-of-illness focus on somatic illnesses and… (more)

Tiainen, Anne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

267

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

268

New Mexico State University campus geothermal demonstration project: an engineering construction design and economic evaluation. Final technical report, February 25, 1980-April 24, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed engineering construction cost estimate and economic evaluation of low temperature geothermal energy application for the New Mexico State University Campus are provided. Included are results from controlled experiments to acquire design data, design calculations and parameters, detailed cost estimates, and a comprehensive cost and benefit analysis. Detailed designs are given for a system using 140 to 145{sup 0}F geothermal water to displace 79 billion Btu per year of natural gas now being burned to generate steam. This savings represents a displacement of 44 to 46 percent of NMSU central plant natural gas consumption, or 32 to 35 percent of total NMSU natural gas consumption. The report forms the basis for the system construction phase with work scheduled to commence in July 1981, and target on-stream data of February 1982.

Cunniff, R.A.; Ferguson, E.; Archey, J.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

270

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life or life-cycle cost of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select an ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life-Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life, or life-cycle cost, of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability-associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select a...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be less. Item Battery Mode Cost Hours required Backgroundwiring Total battery mode capital costs Adjustments fora detailed list of costs in the battery mode of operation.

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Constructability -- from Qinshan to the ACR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has recognized the importance of constructability for many years, and it is applying its principals to CANDU projects with increasing success. The CANDU 6 Nuclear Power Plant has been constructed eleven times in the last 25 years. However, the last two units completed on the Qinshan project in China have employed some very innovative construction methods that have not been used on the previous units. In order to make nuclear power generation more competitive, shorter construction schedules and reduced project cost and risks are essential objectives. The application of constructability principles is a major contributor to achieving these objectives. The success of Qinshan has increased the confidence in the new construction methods, which are being implemented on the ACR (Advanced CANDU Reactor) successfully. An ACR construction strategy that utilizes advanced construction techniques has been developed by AECL. The strategy includes paralleling of activities by using extensive modularization and the vertical installation of equipment and modules into the reactor building using a VHL (Very Heavy Lift) crane. This strategy allows short schedules to be met with a minimum risk to the project.

Elgohary, Medhat; Fairclough, Neville; Ricciuti, Rick

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

276

Improving the constructibility of the Clinch River breeder plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extended planning time which became available for Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) architect/engineers may eliminate some of the high materials and labor costs, shortages, and long lead times suffered by recent nuclear projects by allowing construction input into the planning. Since constructibility reviews are less disruptive during the conceptual design stage, a list of specific constructibility criteria has been regularly updated during the past 10 years and has solved several design problems in new technology. Several recommendations intended to save costs or make construction easier illustrate how the process developed. A scale model of the CRBR has helped to eliminate many potential construction problems in the design stage and to determine the best layout of pipe and electrical connections. Engineers can already identify over $25 million in cost avoidance on the project. (DCK)

Scott, W.W.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Underground Transmission Cable System Installation and Construction Practices Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Installation and construction remain the most expensive implementation components of underground transmission cable systems. Recent advancements in underground transmission have led to more demand for best practices and innovative ways to reduce installation and construction costs in a cable project. EPRI has funded many projects over the years to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of underground transmission cable installation. Other organizations such as Association of Edison Illuminating Compa...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

278

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

279

Include in Column B cost of all composition produced by plant. Include in Column C cost of all operations not involving printing (Col. A)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occupied (whether Government-owned or rented), utilities, etc. (14.5 cents per month per square foot. Amount spent for rental of equipment Total cost (Use col.A total from this line to compute cost per 1 units produced in plant this fiscal quarter Total units produced in plant this fiscal year Cost per 1

US Army Corps of Engineers

280

Construction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Construction Construction In neighborhoods all across the country, the Energy Department's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is helping families and business owners make energy efficiency upgrades that are saving them money and improving the comfort of our buildings. Learn more about the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. In neighborhoods all across the country, the Energy Department's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is helping families and business owners make energy efficiency upgrades that are saving them money and improving the comfort of our buildings. Learn more about the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Learn about the energy-efficient construction projects that are saving businesses and communities money while creating jobs.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Construction of Channels (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Permission is required from the Natural Resources Commission is required for the construction or alteration of artificial channels or improved channels of natural watercourses that connect to any...

282

Commercial New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Vermont offers support to encourage energy efficient design for new construction. Efficiency Vermont will provide support for new commercial buildings, including technical assistance at...

283

Pipeline Construction Guidelines (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Utility Regulatory Commission regulates the construction of any segment of an interstate pipeline on privately owned land in Indiana. The division has provisions for...

284

Labor Standards for Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Project Management with Contract Management for Non-Management and Operating (M&O) Cost Reimbursement Contracts for Capital Asset Projects, Environmental Remediation,...

285

Total Building Air Management: When Dehumidification Counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry trends toward stringent indoor air quality codes, spearheaded by ASHRAE 62-89: Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, present four challenges to the building industry in hot and humid climates: 1. Infusion of large quantities of make-up air to code based on zone requirements 2. Maintenance of tight wet bulb and dry bulb temperature tolerances within zones based on use 3. Energy management and cost containment 4. Control of mold and mildew and the damage they cause Historically, total air management of sensible and latent heat, filtration and zone pressure was brought about through the implementation of non-integrated, composite systems. Composite systems typically are built up of multi-vendor equipment each of which perform specific, independent functions in the total control of the indoor air environment. Composite systems have a high up-front cost, are difficult to maintain and are costly to operate. Today, emerging technologies allow the implementation of fully integrated system for total building air management. These systems provide a single-vendor solution that is cost effective to purchase, maintain and operate. Operating saving of 23% and ROIs of 2.3 years have been shown. Equipment specification is no longer based primarily on total building load. Maximum benefits of these dynamic systems are realized when systems are designed with a total operating strategy in mind. This strategy takes into consideration every factor of building air management including: 1. Control of sensible heat 2. Balance management of heat rejection 3. Latent heat management 4. Control of process hot water 5. Indoor air quality management 6. Containment of energy consumption 7. Load shedding

Chilton, R. L.; White, C. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Costs of Urban Stormwater Control Practices Arvind Narayanan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The life-cycle project costs include the initial construction costs, in addition to long- term maintenance)......................................................................................................................76 Table 64. Estimated Capital Cost of a 1.5-foot Deep, 10-feet Wide, 1,000-feet Long Grass Swale (SEWRPC)......................................................................................................................78 Table 65. Estimated Capital Cost of a 3.0-feet Deep, 21-feet Wide, 1,000-feet Long Grass Swale (SEWRPC

Pitt, Robert E.

287

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

288

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

289

Information erasure without an energy cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landauer argued that the process of erasing the information stored in a memory device incurs an energy cost in the form of a minimum amount of mechanical work. We find, however, that this energy cost can be reduced to zero by paying a cost in angular momentum or any other conserved quantity. Erasing the memory of Maxwell's demon in this way implies that work can be extracted from a single thermal reservoir at a cost of angular momentum and an increase in total entropy. The implications of this for the second law of thermodynamics are assessed.

Joan A. Vaccaro; Stephen M. Barnett

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

290

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

291

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

292

VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

C.R. Gorrell

1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan...

294

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of each project together with progress photographs and the project manager's estimate of the cost to complete the project. Because the reports contain projected costs and also account for budget risks #12;Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2012 Project Number Project Index

Holsinger, Kent

296

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? A measure of the total cost to produce crude oil and natural gas is the upstream costs.

297

Transaction-Cost Economic Analysis of Institutional Change toward Design-Build Contracts for Public Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for example, compare DOT cost estimates to the price paid toscope are supported by cost estimates from WSDOT, which wereComplete at Bid DOT Cost Estimate at Bid Bid Price Total

Whittington, Jan; Dowall, David E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

FY 1996 cost savings report  

SciTech Connect

Cost savings are an integral part of Hanford site operations. Congressional actions towards establishing a balanced budget have resulted in reductions to funding for all federal agencies, including the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission. In September 1994 the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) approved the FY 1995 multi-year baseline that included a cost estimate of $1.9 billion for FY 1996. However, Congress only appropriated $1.3 billion for that year. The shortfall of $600 million resulted in a significant challenge to accomplish the required workscope. Therefore, RL initiated an aggressive cost savings program to eliminate the shortfall by deleting workscope that was unnecessary and performing the remaining workscope more efficiently. RL initiated baseline planning actions (including deletions, deferrals, transfers, and additions) during the FY 1996 multi-year baseline development process to match workscope and anticipated funding and identified $205 million of workscope deletions. CFR (Contract Finance and Review Division) then reviewed over 200 cost baseline change requests during FY 1996 and documented an additional $95 million of FY 1996 cost savings. This included $73 million of workscope deletions and $22 million of efficiencies. Total savings as a result of FY 1996 initiatives, including baseline planning actions and current year initiatives, were $300 million.

Andrews-Smith, K.L.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Underground Transmission Cable System Construction and Installation Practices Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reliable underground transmission line depends on reliable cable system manufacturing, design, construction, installation, and operation and maintenance. Construction and installation remain the most expensive component to implement. Recent advances in underground transmission have led to more demand for best practices and innovative ways to reduce construction and installation costs in a cable project. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has funded many projects over the years to improve the ...

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

300

Chapter 8: Constructing the Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: : Constructing the Building Developing a Construction Plan Writing Effective Construction Documents Safeguarding Design Goals During Construction Protecting the Site Low-Impact Construction Processes Protecting Indoor Air Quality Managing Construction Waste LANL | Chapter 8 Constructing the Building Developing a Construction Plan A high-performance design is a great achievement, but it doesn't mean much if the building isn't then built as intended. Getting from design to a completed project happens in two stages: 1) development of construction documents and 2) actual construction. To successfully implement a sustainable design, the construction docu- ments must accurately convey the specifics that deter- mine building performance, and they have to set up

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Waste management facilities cost information: System cost model product description. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) in Idaho Falls, Idaho and subcontractors developed the System Cost Model (SCM) application. The SCM estimates life-cycle costs of the entire US Department of Energy (DOE) complex for designing; constructing; operating; and decommissioning treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, transuranic, and mixed transuranic waste. The SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing facilities at DOE installations. In addition, SCM can model new facilities based on capacity needs over the program life cycle. The SCM also provides transportation costs for DOE wastes. Transportation costs are provided for truck and rail and include transport of contact-handled, remote-handled, and alpha (transuranic) wastes. The user can provide input data (default data is included in the SCM) including the volume and nature of waste to be managed, the time period over which the waste is to be managed, and the configuration of the waste management complex (i.e., where each installation`s generated waste will be treated, stored, and disposed). Then the SCM uses parametric cost equations to estimate the costs of pre-operations (designing), construction costs, operation management, and decommissioning these waste management facilities.

Lundeen, A.S.; Hsu, K.M.; Shropshire, D.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Economic analysis of geothermal energy costs  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the computer program, GEOCOST, and its application to some analyses of the economics of geothermal energy. GEOCOST combines both technical and economic factors into one systematic cost accounting framework. The program, which simulates production of electricity from most types of geothermal resources, is composed of two parts: a reservoir model which simulates the costs associated with the exploration, development, and operation of a geothermal reservoir; and a power-plant model which simulates the costs associated with the design, construction, and operation of the power plant. The costs from the reservoir model become the energy supply costs to the power plant. The combined reservoir and power plant models represent the complete energy production system. (LBS)

Bloomster, C.H.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Vehicle Cost Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Vehicle Cost Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/calc/ Web Application Link: www.afdc.energy.gov/calc/ OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: Vehicle Cost Calculator[1] Logo: Vehicle Cost Calculator Calculate the total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Overview This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate

304

TANK OPERATIONS CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY UTILIZING THE AGENCY METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has faced significant project management challenges in managing Davis-Bacon construction work that meets contractually required small business goals. The unique challenge is to provide contracting opportunities to multiple small business constructioin subcontractors while performing high hazard work in a safe and productive manner. Previous to the WRPS contract, construction work at the Hanford Tank Farms was contracted to large companies, while current Department of Energy (DOE) Contracts typically emphasize small business awards. As an integral part of Nuclear Project Management at Hanford Tank Farms, construction involves removal of old equipment and structures and installation of new infrastructure to support waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant. Utilizing the optimum construction approach ensures that the contractors responsible for this work are successful in meeting safety, quality, cost and schedule objectives while working in a very hazardous environment. This paper descirbes the successful transition from a traditional project delivery method that utilized a large business general contractor and subcontractors to a new project construction management model that is more oriented to small businesses. Construction has selected the Agency Construction Management Method (John E Schaufelberger, Len Holm, "Management of Construction Projects, A Constructor's Perspective", University of Washington, Prentice Hall 2002). This method was implemented in the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2009 (FY2009), where Construction Management is performed by substantially home office resources from the URS Northwest Office in Richland, Washington. The Agency Method has allowed WRPS to provide proven Construction Managers and Field Leads to mentor and direct small business contractors, thus providing expertise and assurance of a successful project. Construction execution contracts are subcontracted directly by WRPS to small or disadvantaged contractors that are mentored and supported by URS personnel. Each small contractor is mentored and supported utilizing the principles of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) Partnering process. Some of the key mentoring and partnering areas that are explored in this paper are, internal and external safety professional support, subcontractor safety teams and the interface with project and site safety teams, quality assurance program support to facilitate compliance with NQA-1, construction, team roles and responsibilities, work definition for successful fixed price contracts, scheduling and interface with project schedules and cost projection/accruals. The practical application of the CII Partnering principles, with the Construction Management expertise of URS, has led to a highly successful construction model that also meets small business contracting goals.

LESKO KF; BERRIOCHOA MV

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

TANK OPERATIONS CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY UTILIZING THE AGENCY METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has faced significant project management challenges in managing Davis-Bacon construction work that meets contractually required small business goals. The unique challenge is to provide contracting opportunities to multiple small business constructioin subcontractors while performing high hazard work in a safe and productive manner. Previous to the WRPS contract, construction work at the Hanford Tank Farms was contracted to large companies, while current Department of Energy (DOE) Contracts typically emphasize small business awards. As an integral part of Nuclear Project Management at Hanford Tank Farms, construction involves removal of old equipment and structures and installation of new infrastructure to support waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant. Utilizing the optimum construction approach ensures that the contractors responsible for this work are successful in meeting safety, quality, cost and schedule objectives while working in a very hazardous environment. This paper descirbes the successful transition from a traditional project delivery method that utilized a large business general contractor and subcontractors to a new project construction management model that is more oriented to small businesses. Construction has selected the Agency Construction Management Method (John E Schaufelberger, Len Holm, "Management of Construction Projects, A Constructor's Perspective", University of Washington, Prentice Hall 2002). This method was implemented in the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2009 (FY2009), where Construction Management is performed by substantially home office resources from the URS Northwest Office in Richland, Washington. The Agency Method has allowed WRPS to provide proven Construction Managers and Field Leads to mentor and direct small business contractors, thus providing expertise and assurance of a successful project. Construction execution contracts are subcontracted directly by WRPS to small or disadvantaged contractors that are mentored and supported by URS personnel. Each small contractor is mentored and supported utilizing the principles of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) Partnering process. Some of the key mentoring and partnering areas that are explored in this paper are, internal and external safety professional support, subcontractor safety teams and the interface with project and site safety teams, quality assurance program support to facilitate compliance with NQA-1, construction, team roles and responsibilities, work definition for successful fixed price contracts, scheduling and interface with project schedules and cost projection/accruals. The practical application of the CII Partnering principles, with the Construction Management expertise of URS, has led to a highly successful construction model that also meets small business contracting goals.

LESKO KF; BERRIOCHOA MV

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

306

Economic and Financial Costs of Saving Water and Energy: Preliminary Analysis for Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Replacement of Pipeline Units I-7A, I-18, and I-22  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2. The proposed project primarily consists of replacing aged mortar-joint pipe in pipeline units I-7A, I-18, and I-22 with new rubber-gasketed, reinforced concrete pipe. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for the cost of saving water are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 485 ac-ft of water per year and 179,486,553 BTUs {52,604 kwh} of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost-of-saving water is estimated to be $385.46 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost-of-saving energy is estimated to be $0.0010735 per BTU {$3.663 per kwh}. In addition, expected real (vs. nominal) values are provided for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in U.S. Public Law 106-576. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water saved measure is $510.92. The aggregate initial construction cost per unit of energy saved measure is $0.0013798 per BTU {$4.708 per kwh}. The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -2.53.

Sturdivant, Allen W.; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

308

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

310

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.3 Value of Construction and Research  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Number of Construction Employees and Total Employees for Select Building Equipment Industries (Thousand Employees) Electrical Contractors and Other Wiring Installation Contractors (NAICS 238210) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations -Construction/Extraction % of Total Plumbing, Heating, and Air-Conditioning Contractors (NAICS 238220) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations -Construction/Extraction % of Total Other Building Equipment Contractors (NAICS 238290) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations -Construction/Extraction % of Total Source(s): Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates: 2002 OES Estimates for 2002 Data, November 2004 OES Estimates for 2004 Data, May 2006 Estimates for 2006 Data, May 2008 Estimates for 2008 Data, May 2010 Estimates for 2010 Data. Available at

311

Passive solar construction handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Construction Readiness RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The authorization to proceed with construction of a new facility is given at the CD-3 phase of the project management cycle, after completion of the final design. Between CD-3 and CD-4 stages of...

313

Spider Web Construction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spider Web Construction Name: Stephanie Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Near our home on Lake Ontario, we often find spider websm that have a horizontal line at the...

314

Photon Sciences | Construction Cameras  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Construction Cameras You may click either the links or the camera icons shown below to access each webcam. Note: It may take 5-20 seconds to load the webcam console. Live...

315

Automatic thesaurus construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce a novel method of automating thesauri using syntactically constrained distributional similarity. With respect to syntactically conditioned cooccurrences, most popular approaches to automatic thesaurus construction simply ignore ... Keywords: distribution, similarity, syntactic dependency

Dongqiang Yang; David M. Powers

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

ARCHITECT AND ENGINEERING COSTS AT LOS ALAMOS AND SANDIA NATIONAL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

operations offices to manage to a standard architect and engineering (A-E) cost as a percentage of construction. Based on this initiative, the objective of our audit was to...

317

Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Newly developed solar water heating technology can help Federal agencies cost effectively meet the EISA requirements for solar water heating in new construction and major renovations. This document provides design considerations, application, economics, and maintenance information and resources.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Preplanning gives savings in new hotel construction  

SciTech Connect

A new trend toward preplanning energy conservation in new hotel design is lowering energy costs for new construction 25 to 50%. The architectural/engineering preplanning options that can accomplish an energy goal and be integrated into the architectural/engineering process include how the building is oriented, how much and what kind of glass it contains, what energy-management systems will be installed, and whether to include cogeneration with waste-heat recovery systems. (DCK)

Watson, F.

1983-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

320

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Documents: Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Cost Analysis PDF Icon Summary of the Cost Analysis Report for the Long-term Management of Depleted UF6...

322

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

323

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

324

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 1 of 4 7 is that portion of the total cost of a research or other externally funded project that is not funded as a demonstration of its commitment to the project. When voluntary cost sharing is included in the proposal budget

Goddard III, William A.

325

Lawrence Livermore National Security Cost Model Functional Management Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of the Functional Management Assessment of the cost model included a review of the plan and progress of the Cost Model Review Team. The review focused on processes in place to ensure simplicity, compliance with cost accounting standards and indirect cost allocation methodology, and the change management plan. This was intended to be a high-level initial review in order to provide recommendations for a subsequent more comprehensive review. The single document reviewed by the team during the assessment was the Indirect Cost Recovery Model Review, which describes how the indirect rate restructure and new organizational structure have resulted in streamlined charging practices to better understand and strategically manage costs. ISSUE 1: The cost model focuses heavily on rate structure but not on cost management. Significant progress has been made to simplify the rate structure. The number of indirect rates has been reduced from 67 different indirect rates used under the prior contract to 32 rates in the first year of the LLNS contract, with a goal of further reduction to 16 for FY09. The reductions are being recommended by a broad-based Working Group driven by Lab leadership desiring a simplified rate structure that would make it easier to analyze the true cost of overhead, be viewed as equitable, and ensure appropriate use of Service, i.e., operations, Centers. This has been a real challenge due to the significant change in approach from one that previously involved a very complex rate structure. Under this prior approach, the goal was to manage the rates, and rates were established at very detailed levels that would 'shine the light' on pools of overhead costs. As long as rates stayed constant or declined, not as much attention tended to be given to them, particularly with so many pools to review (184 indirect rate pools in FY05). However, as difficult and important as simplifying the rate structure has been, the fundamental reason for the simplification is to make it easier to analyze the true cost of overhead so the costs can be effectively managed. For the current year, the overall the goal of keeping the total cost of an FTE to FY07 levels. This approach reflects the past practice of managing to rates rather than focusing on costs, although streamlined with the more simplified rate structure. Given all the challenges being faced with the contract transition, this was a reasonable interim tactic for dealing with the known cost increases such as fees and taxes. Nonetheless, in order to take full advantage of the opportunities that exist for making sound decisions for further reducing the rates themselves, the Laboratory needs to implement an ongoing and disciplined approach to understanding and managing overhead cost. ISSUE 2: The NIF has a significantly different rate structure than other Laboratory work. Because of its significant size and unique organizational structure as a major construction project, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has indirect charges that vary from the norm. These variations were reviewed and approved by and disclosed to the NNSA in the Laboratory's past annual Disclosure Statements. In mid-FY 09, NIF will begin transition from a construction line item to an operational center. The reallocation of costs when this occurs could significantly impact the Laboratory's rates and rate structure planning for that transition from a cost- and rate- impact standpoint should begin soon. ISSUE 3: The new rate model must be finalized shortly in order to implement the model beginning in FY 09. As noted in Issue No.1, a Working Group has developed a simplified rate structure for the Lab to use for FY09. The Working Group has evaluated the cost impacts of the simplified rate structure at the major program level and identified a disparate impact in the Safeguards and Security area where a substantial increase in overhead cost allocation may need to be mitigated. The simplified rate structure will need to be approved by the Laboratory Director and issued within the Laboratory to formulate detailed bu

Tevis, J; Hirahara, J; Thomas, B; Mendez, M

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

327

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions.      ...

328

Cost Estimation Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

329

SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transformational Approach to Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Digg

330

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Construction Price Indexes | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Price Indexes Price Indexes BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Construction Price Indexes Dataset Summary Description The Construction Price Indexes provide price indexes for single-family houses sold and for single-family houses under construction. The houses sold index incorporates the value of the land and is available quarterly at the national level and annually by region. The indexes for houses under construction are available monthly at the national level. The indexes are based on data funded by HUD and collected in the Survey of Construction (SOC). Tags {Laspeyres,Constant,Quality,Paasche,Output,Deflator,Fisher,Ideal,Index,absorption,apartment,authorized,authorization,build,building,built,characteristic,completed,completion,construction,contract,contractor,cost,development,dwelling,economic,existing,expenditures,family,financing,finished,floor,home,house,houses,housing,hud,indicator,index,issue,issuing,living,manufactured,market,metropolitan,microdata,month,multifamily,multiple,new,nonresidential,occupancy,occupants,occupied,office,one-unit,owner,permanent,permit,permits,price,private,privately-owned,public,quarters,rebuilt,region,regional,rent,rental,residential,rural,sale,sectional,single,single-family,site-built,size,sold,speculative,spending,stage,started,starts,structure,timeshare,under,unit,units,urban,u.s.,vacancy,valuation,zoning}

333

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A Review of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor Vehicle Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accidents, air pollution, noise, land use, and “dissociationpollution Total societal costs Unquantified costs Wetlands lost Agricultural landland use Vehicle ownership and operation Vibration damage to buildings Water pollution

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Achieving Sustainable Construction in Affordable Housing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy-efficient design and construction checklist and information sheets on energy-efficient design and construction are two products being developed. These products will help affordable housing providers take the first steps toward a whole-house approach to the design and implementation of energy-efficient construction practices. The checklist presents simple and clear guidance on energy improvements that can be readily addressed now by most affordable housing providers. The information sheets complement the checklist by providing installation instructions and material specifications that are accompanied by detailed graphics. The information sheets also identify benefits of recommended energy-efficiency measures and procedures including cost savings and impacts on health and comfort. This paper presents details on the checklist and information sheets and discusses their use in two affordable housing projects.

Barcik, M.K.; Creech, D.B.; Ternes, M.P.

1998-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

Celeste, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis After determining the best greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction strategies using renewable energy, a Federal agency should estimate the cost of implementing them in a building or buildings. There are several cost factors that need to be considered when developing a renewable energy project. Capital costs, fixed and variable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs and in the case of biomass and waste-to-energy projects, fuel costs all contribute to the total cost of operating a renewable energy system. The levelized system cost takes into account these

338

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

339

Achieving the 30% Goal: Energy and Cost Savings Analysis of ASHRAE Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the 30% Goal: Energy and Cost Savings Analysis of ASHRAE Standard the 30% Goal: Energy and Cost Savings Analysis of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 This report documents the progress indicator (PI) process and analysis that Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed to evaluate the potential energy savings from the application of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 to building design and construction compared to the application of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The report describes PNNL's EnergyPlus simulation framework, and the building prototype simulation models. The combined upgrades from ASHRAE Standard 90.1 -2004 to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 are described, and consist of a total of 153 approved addenda (44 addenda to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 and 109 addenda to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010). PNNL reviewed and considered all 153 addenda for quantitative analysis in

340

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 2007-2010. Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of$/W) Total Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of$/W) Total Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of

Darghouth, Naim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and posted 2/10/2011 and posted 2/10/2011 *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain $50,000 FONSI: uncertain Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $70,000 Attachment: Memo, Moody to Marcinowski, III, SUBJECT: NEPA 2011 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: Annual NEPA Planning Summary Environmental Assessments (EAs) Expected to be Initiated in the Next 12 Months Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Jan-11 Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones) South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Industrial Stormwater General Permit (IGP) # SCR000000 November 12, with an effective date of January

342

Conceptual design study on incorporating a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into an operating total energy system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design study on incorporating a pyrolysis unit into an existing total energy plant are presented. The objectives of this study were to examine the institutional, technical and economic factors affecting the incorporation of a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant. The Indian Creek total energy plant is described. Results of the conceptual design are presented. A survey of the availability of waste materials and a review of health and safety ordinances are included. The technical aspects of the pyrolysis system are discussed, including the results of the review of facilities requirements for the pyrolysis unit, the analysis of necessary system modification, and an estimate of the useful energy contribution by the pyrolysis unit. Results of the life-cycle cost analysis of the pyrolysis unit are presented. The major conclusions are that: there appears to be no institutional or technical barriers to constructing a waste pyrolysis unit at the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant; pyrolysis gas can be consumed in the engines and the boilers by utilizing venturi mixing devices; the engines can consume only 5% of the output of the 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit; Therefore, consumption of pyrolysis gas will be controlled by boiler energy demand patterns; a waste pyrolysis unit is not cost effective at the current natural gas price of $0.90/10/sup 6/ Btu; and pyrolysis is economically attractive at natural gas prices above $3.00/10/sup 6/ Btu.

None

1976-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Construction Standards for Public  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Construction Standards for Public Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Construction Standards for Public Buildings Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Construction Standards for Public Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Georgia Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Georgia Environmental Finance Authority Senate Bill 130 of 2008 established energy efficiency goals for new state building projects. All major facility projects over 10,000 square feet should strive to exceed the efficiency standards of ASHRAE 90.1.2004 by 30% where it is determined that such 30% efficiency is cost effective based on

344

Photovoltaic-system costing-methodology development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented are the results of a study to expand the use of standardized costing methodologies in the National Photovoltaics Program. The costing standards, which include SAMIS for manufacturing costs and M and D for marketing and distribution costs, have been applied to concentrator collectors and power-conditioning units. The M and D model was also computerized. Finally, a uniform construction cost-accounting structure was developed for use in photovoltaic test and application projects. The appendices contain example cases which demonstrate the use of the models.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Curry Main Pipeline Project, Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg)

Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Labor Standards for Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 43.3 (March 2013) Chapter 43.3 (March 2013) 1 Maintaining Alignment of Project Management with Contract Management for Non-Management and Operating (M&O) Cost Reimbursement Contracts for Capital Asset Projects, Environmental Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Facility Operations, and Other Major Projects Purpose and Applicability This chapter provides guidance on how Contracting Officers (COs) should manage contract changes, and how COs and Federal Project Directors (FPDs) should maintain alignment between project and contract management under non-M&O cost reimbursement contracts for capital asset projects, environmental remediation, decontamination and decommissioning, facility operations, and other projects. This chapter has three sections. Section I provides pre-award

347

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

348

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

349

Baseline Costs and Performance of Fabric Drying Curing Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increasing of imports of textile products, especially apparel products, the domestic manufacturers must minimize their production costs in order to stay competitive. A knowledge of the different aspects of the costs associated with the total manufacturing cost will provide a means for better management of the production process. This study examined the efficiency and the costs for a number of thermal processing steps used in the manufacturing of textile products

2000-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

352

EUV lithography cost of ownership analysis  

SciTech Connect

The cost of fabricating state-of-the-art integrated circuits (ICs) has been increasing and it will likely be economic rather than technical factors that ultimately limit the progress of ICs toward smaller devices. It is estimated that lithography currently accounts for approximately one-third the total cost of fabricating modem ICs({sup 1}). It is expected that this factor will be fairly stable for the forseeable future, and as a result, any lithographic process must be cost-effective before it can be considered for production. Additionally, the capital equipment cost for a new fabrication facility is growing at an exponential rate (2); it will soon require a multibillion dollar investment in capital equipment alone to build a manufacturing facility. In this regard, it is vital that any advanced lithography candidate justify itself on the basis of cost effectiveness. EUV lithography is no exception and close attention to issues of wafer fabrication costs have been a hallmark of its early history. To date, two prior cost analyses have been conducted for EUV lithography (formerly called {open_quotes}Soft X-ray Projection Lithography{close_quotes}). The analysis by Ceglio, et. al., provided a preliminary system design, set performance specifications and identified critical technical issues for cost control. A follow-on analysis by Early, et.al., studied the impact of issues such as step time, stepper overhead, tool utilization, escalating photoresist costs and limited reticle usage on wafer exposure costs. This current study provides updated system designs and specifications and their impact on wafer exposure costs. In addition, it takes a first cut at a preliminary schematic of an EUVL fabrication facility along with an estimate of the capital equipment costs for such a facility.

Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

353

Martifer Construction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Martifer Group that deals in construction services. The division operates in wind farm tower construction, also provides engineering services for solar projects. References...

354

Construction Schedule | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Construction Schedule Current Projects APCF 27-ID and 35-ID LOM438 Pentagon F LOM437 Protocol for halting construction because of vibrations 0614...

355

Constructing Approximations to the Efficient Set of Convex Quadratic ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it is important to gain as much information as possible about the solution set of a given problem ...... the total energy production cost is minimized,. • the wear ..... Markets. Basil Blackwell Ltd, Oxford, 1987. [34] H[arry] M. Markowitz. Portfolio ...

356

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

357

CAES Updated Cost Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems (CAES) for bulk energy storage applications have been receiving renewed interest. Increased penetration of large quantities of intermittent wind generation are requiring utilities to re-examine the cost and value of CAES systems. New second generation CAES cycles have been identified which offer the potential for lower capital and operating costs. This project was undertaken to update and summarize the capital and operating costs and performance features of second ge...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Cost Affordable Titanium IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Enhancing the Cost Effectiveness of High Performance Titanium Alloy Component Production by Powder Metallurgy · Evolution of Texture in ...

360

Cost Effective Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

three relevant technologies, namely casting, alloy development and orientation measurement, developed by Rolls-Royce to enable the cost effective production.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sharing Supermodular Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs collectively incurred by a group of cooperating agents. ..... Mixed integer programming formulations for production planning and scheduling prob- lems.

362

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial… (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

COST REVIEW and ESTIMATING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Guide. OMB Circular A-94, Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Federal Programs, dated October 29, 1992 Page | 41 APPENDIX A ICRICE...

364

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

365

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

366

Costs to build Fermilab in 1984 dollars  

SciTech Connect

It is of current interest to examine the costs incurred to date to build Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and to determine what those costs are when stated in FY 1984 constant dollars. The appended tables are in support of this exercise and are based on all costs for Equipment items (reduced by obsolescence) and all Plant Projects which have been appropriated through FY 1984. Also included are non-plant costs which are required to complete the Energy Saver, Tevatron I and II projects (i.e., Equipment and R and D in support of Construction). This study makes the assumption that all funding through FY 1984 will have been costed by the end of FY 1986. Those costs incurred in FY 1985 and FY 1986 have been deflated to FY 1984 dollars. See Appendix A for the DOE inflation factors used in the conversion to FY 1984 dollars. The costs are identified in three categories. The Accelerator Facilities include all accelerator components, the buildings which enclose them and utilities which support them. The Experimental Facilities include all beam lines, enclosures, utilities and experimental equipment which are usable in current experimental programs. The Support Facilities include lab and office space, shops, assembly facilities, roads, grounds and the utilities which do not specifically support the Accelerator or Experimental Facilities, etc.

Jordan, N.G.; Livdahl, P.V.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Nuclear-fuel-cycle costs. Consolidated Fuel-Reprocessing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel-cycle costs are given for the pressurized-water reactor once-through and fuel-recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast-breeder-reactor system. These calculations show that fuel-cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel-cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder-reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Cost Effective Recovery of Low-TDS Frac Flowback Water for Re-use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project goal was to develop a cost-effective water recovery process to reduce the costs and envi-ronmental impact of shale gas production. This effort sought to develop both a flowback water pre-treatment process and a membrane-based partial demineralization process for the treatment of the low-Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) portion of the flowback water produced during hydrofracturing operations. The TDS cutoff for consideration in this project is shale plays, identified the likely applicability of membrane treatment processes in those shales, and expanded the proposed product portfolio to include four options suitable for various reuse or discharge applications. Pretreatment technologies were evaluated at the lab scale and down-selected based upon their efficacy in removing key contaminants. The chosen technologies were further validated by performing membrane fouling studies with treated flowback water to demonstrate the technical feasibility of flowback treatment with RO membranes. Process flow schemes were constructed for each of the four product options based on experimental performance data from actual flowback water treatment studies. For the products requiring membrane treatment, membrane system model-ing software was used to create designs for enhanced water recovery beyond the typical seawater desalination benchmark. System costs based upon vendor and internal cost information for all process flow schemes were generated and are below target and in line with customer expectations. Finally, to account for temporal and geographic variability in flowback characteristics as well as local disposal costs and regulations, a parametric value assessment tool was created to assess the economic attractiveness of a given flowback recovery process relative to conventional disposal for any combination of anticipated flowback TDS and local disposal cost. It is concluded that membrane systems in combination with appropriate pretreatment technologies can provide cost-effective recovery of low-TDS flow-back water for either beneficial reuse or safe surface discharge.

Claire Henderson; Harish Acharya; Hope Matis; Hareesh Kommepalli; Brian Moore; Hua Wang

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

CE 4990 -Construction Scheduling Week 1: Steel Frame Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steel or about 10 pounds per square foot. Fabrication and erection cost $9 per square foot. A total . The building has four stories, 80,000 square feet of built area, weighs approximately 400 tons of structural and keeping costs low. 1This case study has been adapted from: Daccarett, V., and T. Mrozowski. 2005. Aisc

Mukherjee, Amlan

370

Underground Transmission Cable System Construction and Installation Practices Manual — 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reliable underground transmission line depends on acceptable cable system manufacturing, design, construction, installation, operation, and maintenance. Within implementation, construction and installation remain the most expensive processes. Recent advances in underground transmission have led to more demand for best practices and innovative ways to reduce construction and installation costs in a cable project. Background ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

371

Construction Readiness RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Readiness Review Module Construction Readiness Review Module March 2010 CD- [This Rev Readiness -0 view Module w s Review (CRR OFFICE O CD-1 was used to dev R). This Review OF ENVIRO Standard R Construc Rev Critical D CD-2 M velop the Revie w Module cont ONMENTA Review Pla ction Rea view Modul Decision (CD C March 2010 ew Plan for Sal tains the lesson Review.] AL MANAG an (SRP) adiness le D) Applicabili D-3 lt Waste Proce ns learned from GEMENT ity CD-4 ssing Facility ( m the SWPF Co Post Ope (SWPF) Const onstruction Re eration truction eadiness Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

372

Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction Developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the "Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy into Federal Construction" helps Federal agencies understand renewable energy options, select appropriate types of renewable energy technologies, and integrate these technologies into all phases of new construction or major renovation projects. To reduce costs and increase options, renewable energy should be considered from the very beginning of a construction project as well as at every stage of the project process from planning to operation. Depicted in the chart below, this Guide is structured to address renewable

373

Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

SciTech Connect

Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

Greene, D.L.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

Cost of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

Greene, D.L.; Tishchishyna, N.I.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates in

Mills, Evan

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

376

Breakeven costs of storage in optimized solar energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are described of an analysis of the breakeven cost, or value, of energy storage to solar energy systems. It is shown that the value of storage depends strongly both on solar fraction of the solar energy system in which the storage is employed, and on the cost of the collectors used in the system. Various strategies for dealing with this ambiguity are presented, and it is shown that for a broad class of technically and economically practical solar energy systems, storage costs need only be low enough to make a system employing very small amounts of storage practical. Reductions in cost of collectors will thereafter produce greater reductions in the total system costs or provide greater fuel displacement at constant total system cost than will reductions in the cost of storage, within limits discussed. The analysis makes use of a simple, accurate representation of solar energy system performance which may prove useful in other contexts.

Leigh, R. W.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

NONE

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

379

Combinatorial aspects of total positivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I study combinatorial aspects of an emerging field known as total positivity. The classical theory of total positivity concerns matrices in which all minors are nonnegative. While this theory was pioneered ...

Williams, Lauren Kiyomi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Cost-Affordable Titanium III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Production and Thermomechanical Consolidation of Titanium Alloy Powders · Cost Affordable Developments in Titanium Technology and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Software Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software cost estimation is the process of predicting the effort required to develop a software system. Many estimation models have been proposed over the last 30 years. This paper provides a general overview of software cost estimation methods including the recent advances in the field. As a number of these models rely on a software size estimate as input, we first provide an overview of common size metrics. We then highlight the cost estimation models that have been proposed and used successfully. Models may be classified into 2 major categories: algorithmic and non-algorithmic. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses. A key factor in selecting a cost estimation model is the accuracy of its estimates. Unfortunately, despite the large body of experience with estimation models, the accuracy of these models is not satisfactory. The paper includes comment on the performance of the estimation models and description of several newer approaches to cost estimation.

Hareton Leung Zhang; Zhang Fan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Portable top drive cuts horizontal drilling costs  

SciTech Connect

Economic analysis of a seven-well, long-reach horizontal drilling program into an unconsolidated, heavy-oil-bearing reservoir in Winter field near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border in Canada reveals that -- in the right application -- renting a portable top drive drilling system can reduce total drilling costs. Use of the portable top drive combined with other cost-saving measures enabled Saskoil, one of Canada`s larger independents, to drill more cheaply, on a cost-per-meter basis, in 1993 than in 1992. This was despite significant rental rates for drilling rigs and directional drilling services caused by increased demand in Western Canada. Total cost savings of 10% on wells that would otherwise cost in the (C) $500,000 range are believed realistic. Based on this year`s performance, Saskoil recommends top drive for the company`s future horizontal wells in this area. This article describes the operator`s horizontal well program, advantages of top drive in that program and how it was installed and applied. Estimated time savings for six wells, plus other ways top drive can cut costs and improve operations are discussed.

Jackson, B. [Saskoil, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Yager, D. [Tesco Drilling Tech., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Total correlations and mutual information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In quantum information theory it is generally accepted that quantum mutual information is an information-theoretic measure of total correlations of a bipartite quantum state. We argue that there exist quantum states for which quantum mutual information cannot be considered as a measure of total correlations. Moreover, for these states we propose a different way of quantifying total correlations.

Zbigniew Walczak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Increase Your Boiler Pressure to Decrease Your Electric Bill: The True Cost of CHP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of small scale steam turbine generator projects are installed as an afterthought to overall plant design. As a plant manager or process engineer, the primary concern is providing the process with the thermal load it needs at the lowest $ per Btu. The viability of installing a steam turbine generator set comes after the plant is in operation and pressure reducing valves (PRV's) have been installed, providing the opportunity has been proven to be sufficient for onsite power generation. This methodology produces reliable systems that operate with whatever steam conditions were present. What if users could take a step back to the initial design of the steam boiler? Plant engineers can proactively analyze the impact of folding a steam turbine generator set into the overall plant design at the pre-construction phase, significantly decreasing total energy costs and reducing the net $ per Btu. This paper analyzes the costs and benefits of integrating a steam turbine generator set into the initial boiler plant design, with marginal fuel increase and equipment cost yet providing the added benefit of clean, low cost and reliable onsite power production.

Downing, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Lookin g for data personnel costs, indirect costs, equipment costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Negotiating Group Question/Answer Sessions November 19, 2009 Q: What happens now? A: The negotiation process starts tomorrow [November 20, 2009], when DOE will be sending the Awardees an e-mail with information about which website to go to for clarification and direction, information from the Office of Civil Rights, and answers to some of the questions that came up in the meeting. DOE will be gathering information about the questions concerning cyber requirements, metrics, and reporting requirements and will be getting back to the awardees about those issues the week after Thanksgiving. We have done a review of the budgets, and emails will be sent giving opportunities to address any issues. We will also re-review technical and cost proposals.

388

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - A new resin EM, the Richland Operations Office, and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using in contaminated groundwater treatment is expected to increase efficiency and reduce costs in the operation of pump-and-treat facilities along the Columbia River at the Hanford site. The higher performance resin, SIR-700, is expected to reduce DOE's estimated operation and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility by approximately $20 million. In comparison to this expected cost savings, the construction cost for the treatment

389

TANK OPERATIONS CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY UTILIZING THE AGENCY METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT TO SAFELY AND EFFECTIVELY COMPLETE NUCLEAR CONSTRUCTION WORK  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has faced significant project management challenges in managing Davis-Bacon construction work that meets contractually required small business goals. The unique challenge is to provide contracting opportunities to multiple small business construction subcontractors while performing high hazard work in a safe and productive manner. Previous to the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC contract, Construction work at the Hanford Tank Farms was contracted to large companies, while current Department of Energy (DOE) Contracts typically emphasize small business awards. As an integral part of Nuclear Project Management at Hanford Tank Farms, construction involves removal of old equipment and structures and installation of new infrastructure to support waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant. Utilizing the optimum construction approach ensures that the contractors responsible for this work are successful in meeting safety, quality, cost and schedule objectives while working in a very hazardous environment. This paper describes the successful transition from a traditional project delivery method that utilized a large business general contractor and subcontractors to a new project construction management model that is more oriented to small businesses. Construction has selected the Agency Construction Management Method. This method was implemented in the first quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2009, where Construction Management is performed by substantially home office resources from the URS Northwest Office in Richland, Washington. The Agency Method has allowed WRPS to provide proven Construction Managers and Field Leads to mentor and direct small business contractors, thus providing expertise and assurance of a successful project. Construction execution contracts are subcontracted directly by WRPS to small or disadvantaged contractors that are mentored and supported by DRS personnel. Each small contractor is mentored and supported utilizing the principles of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) Partnering process. Some of the key mentoring and partnering areas that are explored in this paper are, internal and external safety professional support, subcontractor safety teams and the interface with project and site safety teams, quality assurance program support to facilitate compliance with NQA-1, construction, team roles and responsibilities, work definition for successful fixed price contracts, scheduling and interface with project schedules and cost projection/accruals. The practical application of the CII Partnering principles, with the Construction Management expertise of URS, has led to a highly successful construction model that also meets small business contracting goals.

LESO KF; HAMILTON HM; FARNER M; HEATH T

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Virtual Construction: Linking the 3D Model of the AP600 Nuclear Plant Design To its Construction Schedule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of an eight-month virtual construction study performed by Westinghouse for EPRI. Westinghouse performed this study as part of EPRI's interest in advancing the use of computer-aided processes to reduce the cost of nuclear power plants. EPRI believed that if one could relate appropriate portions of an advanced light water reactor plant design model to activities in its construction sequence and this relationship could be portrayed visually, then optimization of the constru...

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

391

Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Montana Construction Code BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the DC Energy Conservation Code The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Montana homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current Montana Construction Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Montana homeowners will save $4,105 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

392

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

393

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

394

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

395

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

396

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

397

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

398

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

399

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

400

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

402

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

403

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

404

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

405

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

406

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

407

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

408

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

409

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

410

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

411

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

412

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

413

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

414

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

415

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

416

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

417

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

418

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

419

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

420

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

422

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

423

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

424

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,000 to 79,999 80,000 or More Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

425

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators U.S. Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Energy Information...

426

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.7...

427

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC4.7...

428

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC8.7...

429

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East North Central West North Central Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

430

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

431

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

432

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

433

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump... 53.5...

434

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

435

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

436

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

m... 3.2 0.2 Q 0.1 Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 14.9 11.1 3.9 Cordless...

437

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

m... 3.2 0.9 0.7 Q Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 19.3 13.2 6.1 Cordless...

438

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q 0.5 Q Q Monitor is Turned Off... 0.5 N Q Q Q Q N Q Use of Internet Have Access to Internet Yes... 66.9...

439

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Four Most Populated States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four...

440

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total construction cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

442

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer......

443

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 25.8 2.8 5.8 5.5 3.8 7.9 1.4 5.1 Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan Used All Summer... 18.7 4.2 4.9 4.1 2.1 3.4 2.4 6.3...

444

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Characteristics Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC5.4 Space Heating...

445

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.1 0.5 Q 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

446

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.3 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.7 0.5 Q Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

447

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.8 0.3 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

448

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.1 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.4 Q 0.2 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

449

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.4 0.4 0.4 0.7 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

450

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

451

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 34.3 1.2 0.9 2.2 2.9 5.4 7.0 8.2 6.6 Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated... 29.5 1.5 0.9 2.3 2.7 4.1...

452

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

453

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

454

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

455

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

456

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

457

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

458

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

459

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

460

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

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461

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

462

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

463

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

464

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

465

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

466

Coal-fired power-plant-capital-cost estimates. Final report. [Mid-1978 price level; 13 different sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual designs and order-of-magnitude capital cost estimates have been prepared for typical 1000-MW coal-fired power plants. These subcritical plants will provide high efficiency in base load operation without excessive efficiency loss in cycling operation. In addition, an alternative supercritical design and a cost estimate were developed for each of the plants for maximum efficiency at 80 to 100% of design capacity. The power plants will be located in 13 representative regions of the United States and will be fueled by coal typically available in each region. In two locations, alternate coals are available and plants have been designed and estimated for both coals resulting in a total of 15 power plants. The capital cost estimates are at mid-1978 price level with no escalation and are based on the contractor's current construction projects. Conservative estimating parameters have been used to ensure their suitability as planning tools for utility companies. A flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system has been included for each plant to reflect the requirements of the promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions. The estimated costs of the FGD facilities range from 74 to 169 $/kW depending on the coal characteristics and the location of the plant. The estimated total capital requirements for twin 500-MW units vary from 8088 $/kW for a southeastern plant burning bituminous Kentucky coal to 990 $/kW for a remote western plant burning subbituminous Wyoming coal.

Holstein, R.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Labor Standards for Construction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Labor Standards for Construction Labor Standards for Construction Labor Standards for Construction More Documents & Publications Chapter 22 - Labor Standards for Construction Labor...

468

Idaho National Laboratory Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho National Laboratory Former Construction Workers, Construction Idaho National Laboratory Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Idaho National Laboratory Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: 1-800-866-9663 Local Outreach Office: Dan Obray 456 N. Arthur Avenue Pocatello, ID 83204 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica

469

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Worker  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: WIPP Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPh, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

470

Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Rocky Flats Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Local Outreach Office: Dwayne Adkins 7510 W. Mississippi Ave., Suite 230 Lakewood, CO 80226 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica

471

Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Projects Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Pinellas Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: 1-800-866-9663 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

472

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

473

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

474

Question: What is the cost threshold for providing cost detail for subrecipient  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Question: What is the cost threshold for providing cost detail for subrecipients or consultant Question: What is the cost threshold for providing cost detail for subrecipients or consultant information? Is there a cost threshold set for third parties? Answer: Each subawardee/subrecipient/subcontractor whose work is expected to exceed $650,000 or 50% of the total work effort (whichever is less) should complete a Budget Justification package to include the SF 424A budget form, Budget Justification Guideline Excel document, and a narrative supporting the Budget Justification Guidelines. This information may be saved as a separate file or included with the Prime Applicant's Budget.pdf file. Summary level information for subawardees is not sufficient. Detailed explanations and supporting

475

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

476

China Total Cloud Amount Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Total Cloud Amount Over China DOI: 10.3334CDIACcli.008 data Data image Graphics Investigator Dale P. Kaiser Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental...

477

Construction Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Execution - (2009 - 2011) North Execution - (2009 - 2011) Construction Project Number 2009 2010 2011 Project Description ANMLPL 0001C 76,675.32 - - Animas-Laplata circuit breaker and power rights CRGRFL 0001C - - 7,177.09 Craig Rifle Bay and transfer bay upgrade to 2000 amps; / Convert CRG RFL to 345 kV out of Bears Ear Sub FGE 0019C - - 39,207.86 Replace 69/25kV transformer KX2A at Flaming Gorge FGE 0020C - - 52,097.12 Flaming Gorge: Replace failed KW2A transformer HDN 0069C 16,638.52 208,893.46 3,704,578.33 Replace failed transformer with KZ1A 250 MVA 230/138kv

478