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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

2

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

3

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

4

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

5

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

6

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

7

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

8

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

9

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

10

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

11

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

12

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

13

Novel heat pipe combination  

SciTech Connect

The basic heat pipe principle is employed in a heat pipe combination wherein two heat pipes are combined in opposing relationship to form an integral unit; such that the temperature, heat flow, thermal characteristics, and temperature-related parameters of a monitored environment or object exposed to one end of the heat pipe combination can be measured and controlled by controlling the heat flow of the opposite end of the heat pipe combination.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

14

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

15

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

16

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

17

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ............................. 2,037 1,378 338 159 163 42.0 28.4 7.0 3.3 3.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 156 35 41 18 78.6 49.1 11.0 12.9 5.6 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 218 147 32 31 7 54.8 37.1 8.1 7.9 1.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 343 265 34 25 18 43.8 33.9 4.4 3.2 2.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 270 196 41 13 Q 40.9 29.7 6.3 2.0 2.9 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 269 186 45 13 24 35.8 24.8 6.0 1.8 3.2 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 267 182 56 10 19 35.4 24.1 7.4 1.3 2.6 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 204 134 43 11 17 34.7 22.7 7.3 1.8 2.9 Over 500,000 .............................

18

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................... 1,870 1,276 322 138 133 43.0 29.4 7.4 3.2 3.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 243 151 34 40 18 78.7 48.9 11.1 13.0 5.7 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 202 139 31 29 Q 54.8 37.6 8.5 7.9 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 300 240 31 21 7 42.5 34.1 4.4 3.0 1.1 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 250 182 40 11 Q 41.5 30.2 6.6 1.9 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 236 169 41 8 19 35.4 25.2 6.2 1.2 2.8 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 241 165 54 7 16 36.3 24.8 8.1 1.0 2.4 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 199 130 42 11 16 35.0 22.8 7.5 1.9 2.8 Over 500,000 ............................. 198

19

Combined cycle total energy system  

SciTech Connect

A system is described for the co-generation of steam and electricity comprising: a source of gaseous fuel, a source of air, means for mixing the fuel and air to form a relatively lean fuel/air mixture, a gas turbine, a first fuel/air mixture compressor directly driven by the turbine, a second fuel/air mixture compressor driven by the turbine for further compressing the fuel/air mixture, a catalytic burner between the second compressor and gas turbine, a motor/generator, a steam turbine, means coupling the gas turbine, motor/generator, first and second compressors and steam turbine to one another, a source of water, a steam boiler connected to the source of water and to the exhaust system of the gas turbine, a steam economizer connected to the boiler, a steam superheater in heat exchange relationship with the exhaust system of the gas turbine disposed between the economizer and the steam turbine, and controllable means for bypassing superheated steam from the superheater around the steam turbine to maximize steam or electric power output of the system selectively.

Joy, J.R.

1986-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power Information about the Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Information about the Department of Energys Industrial Technologies Program and its Combined Heat and Power program.

22

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating solar air collector PV-panel fannon-return valve DHW tank mantle cold waterhot water roof Solar Energy Centre Denmark Danish Technological Institute SEC-R-29 #12;Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating Søren ?stergaard Jensen

23

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load SouthernCombined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

24

Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combined Heat and Power Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search All power plants release a certain amount of heat during electricity generation. This heat can be used to serve thermal loads, such as building heating and hot water requirements. The simultaneous production of electrical (or mechanical) and useful thermal power from a single source is referred to as a combined heat and power (CHP) process, or cogeneration. Contents 1 Combined Heat and Power Basics 2 Fuel Types 2.1 Rural Resources 2.2 Urban Resources 3 CHP Technologies 3.1 Steam Turbine 3.2 Gas Turbine 3.3 Microturbine 3.4 Reciprocating Engine 4 Example CHP Systems[7] 4.1 University of Missouri (MU) 4.2 Princeton University 4.3 University of Iowa 4.4 Cornell University 5 Glossary 6 References Combined Heat and Power Basics

25

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentationgiven at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingcovers combined heat and power (CHP) technologies and their applications.

26

Combined Heat and Power: A Technology Whose Time Has Come  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grid, the few buildings equipped with Combined Heat andthe grid system. 29 Source: EPA Combined Heat and Powergrid system. 21 Alternatively, a CHP system collects the wasted heat

Ferraina, Steven

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

28

Table WH1. Total Households Using Water Heating Equipment, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH1. Total Households Using Water Heating Equipment, 2005 Million U.S. Households Fuels Used (million U.S. households) Number of Water Heaters Used

29

Energy Efficiency Improvements Through the Use of Combined Heat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) in Buildings Combined technology helps Federal energy managers meet mission critical energy needs Buildings Cooling, Heating and Power...

30

Federal Energy Management Program: Combined Heat and Power Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Heat and Power Basics to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Combined Heat and Power Basics on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management...

31

Renewable Combined Heat and Power Dairy Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horsepower Guascor model SFGLD-560 biogas-fired lean burn internal combustion (IC) engine and generator set and modify the existing biogas toelectricity combined heat and power (CHP) system operated at Fiscalini bacteria to remove hydrogen sulfide presented in the biogas. Source: Fiscalini Farms Term: March 2011

32

Combined heat and power technology fills an important energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Combined heat and power (CHP), also called cogeneration, is an efficient approach to generating electric power and useful thermal energy for heating ...

33

Equilibrium Modeling of Combined Heat and Power deployment in Philadelphia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Combined heat and power (CHP) generates electricity and heat from the same fuel source and can provide these services at higher equivalent conversion efficiency relative (more)

Govindarajan, Anand

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Inexpensive solar-wood water heating combinations  

SciTech Connect

A promising batch heater recently built and now being tested consists of lengths of eight-inch galvanized culvert pipe painted with semiselective black coating, hooked in series and tied in as part of a passive closed loop, unpressurized solar-wood water heating combination. One 10-foot length of eight-inch culvert contains 14.6 gallons of water. Eight-inch culvert provides a near optimum surface area per unit volume ratio, resulting in quicker, more efficient solar water heating. Moreover, the proposed arrangement minimizes the mixing of hot with cold water as warm water is used, often a problem with many types of batch heaters. Details for constructing this type of batch heater are provided. The system is an unpressurized, closed loop set-up, which means that the same liquid circulates continually from solar heater to wood heater to storage tank heat exchanger. The collector design is a variation on the inverted batch heater which takes its inspiration from a number of solar designers of similar units and introduces several additional measures to take advantage of the wood heating connection and to improve the design based on operating experience.

Poitras, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE) (DOE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power (CHP) Richard Sweetser Senior Advisor DOE's Mid-Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center 32% Helping plants save energy today using efficient energy management practices and efficient new technologies Activities to spur widespread commercial use of CHP and other distributed generation solutions 10% Manufacturing Energy Systems 33% Industries of the Future R&D addressing top priorities in America's most energy-intensive industries and cross-cutting activities applicable to multiple industrial subsectors 25% Industrial Distributed Energy Industrial Technical Assistance DOE ITP FY'11 Budget: $100M Knowledge development and

36

Table A55. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Cogeneration Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"Steam Turbines",,,,"Steam Turbines" ,," ","Supplied by Either","Conventional",,,"Supplied by","One or More",," " " "," ",,"Conventional","Combustion ","Combined-Cycle","Internal Combustion","Heat Recovered from","Cogeneration",,"RSE" "SIC"," ",,"or Fluidized","Turbines with","Combustion","Engines with","High-Temperature","Technologies","None","Row"

37

Combined heat recovery and make-up water heating system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cogeneration plant is described comprising in combination: a first stage source of hot gas; a duct having an inlet for receiving the hot gas and an outlet stack open to the atmosphere; a second stage recovery heat steam generator including an evaporator situated in the duct, and economizer in the duct downstream of the evaporator, and steam drum fluidly connected to the evaporator and the economizer; feedwater supply means including a deaerator heater and feedwater pump for supplying deaerated feedwater to the steam drum through the economizer; makeup water supply means including a makeup pump for delivering makeup water to the deaerator heater; means fluidly connected to the steam drum for supplying auxiliary steam to the deaerator heater; and heat exchanger means located between the deaerator and the economizer, for transferring heat from the feedwater to the makeup water, thereby increasing the temperature of the makeup water delivered to the deaerator and decreasing the temperature of the feedwater delivered to the economizer, without fluid exchange.

Kim, S.Y.

1988-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

Combined Heat and Power Systems (CHP): Capabilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

D&MT Capabilities fact sheet that describes the NREL capabilities related to combined heat and power (CHP).

Not Available

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

FINAL STAFF PAPER A New Generation of Combined Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

onsite or exporting it to the grid. The feasibility of meeting the state's combined heat and power goals FINAL STAFF PAPER A New Generation of Combined Heat and Power: Policy Planning. Neff , Bryan. A New Generation of Combined Heat and Power: Policy Planning for 2030. 2012. California

40

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal systems lose their heat by a site-specific combination of conduction (heat flow) and advection (surface discharge). The conductive loss at or near the surface (shallow heat flow) is a primary signature and indication of the strength of a geothermal system. Using a database of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Section 5.8.8 Combined Heat and Power: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Combined Heat and Power Technical Information Thermal-energy losses from power plants in the U.S. currently total approximately 23 quads (one quad is 10 15 Btu)-more than...

42

Combined Heat and Power ecopower micro CHP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (Grandkids) ? Full in-floor radiant heating system in the house ? Geothermal system as backup. ? In 20 months of ecopower ...

2012-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

43

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Focus Area: Solar Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.epa.gov/chp/documents/utility_incentives.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/utility-incentives-combined-heat-and- Language: English Policies: Financial Incentives This report reviews a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study that researched 41 U.S. utilities and found that nearly half provided some kind of support for combined heat and power (CHP). Here they profile 16 utility programs that support CHP in ways excluding direct financial incentives. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utility_Incentives_for_Combined_Heat_and_Power&oldid=514610

44

Combined heat and power technology fills an important energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home; Browse by Tag; Most ... Combined heat and power technology fills an important ... CHP capacity additions followed the pattern of the electric power industry ...

45

PureComfort 240 Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an interim case study of a PureComfort 240 combined cooling, heating and power project at the University of Toronto, Mississauga.

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

AHEX-A New, Combined Waste Heat Recovery and Emission ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, AHEX-A New, Combined Waste Heat Recovery and Emission Control System for Anode Bake Furnaces. Author(s), Anders Kenneth Sorhuus,...

47

Combined Heat and Power Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power Basics Combined Heat and Power Basics Combined Heat and Power Basics November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Combined heat and power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, is: A process flow diagram showing efficiency benefits of CHP CHP Process Flow Diagram The concurrent production of electricity or mechanical power and useful thermal energy (heating and/or cooling) from a single source of energy. A type of distributed generation, which, unlike central station generation, is located at or near the point of consumption. A suite of technologies that can use a variety of fuels to generate electricity or power at the point of use, allowing the heat that would normally be lost in the power generation process to be recovered to provide needed heating and/or cooling. CHP technology can be deployed quickly, cost-effectively, and with few

48

Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. [Geothermally heated]. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An engineering and economic study was made to determine a practical balance of selected agribusiness subsystems resulting in realistic estimated produce yields for a geothermally heated system known as the Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. The subsystem cycles for an average application at an unspecified hydrothermal resources site in the western United States utilize waste and by-products from their companion cycles insofar as practicable. Based on conservative estimates of current controlled environment yields, produce wholesale market prices, production costs, and capital investment required, it appears that the family-operation-sized TERSA module presents the potential for marginal recovery of all capital investment costs. In addition to family- or small-cooperative-farming groups, TERSA has potential users in food-oriented corporations and large-cooperative-agribusiness operations. The following topics are considered in detail: greenhouse tomatoes and cucumbers; fish farming; mushroom culture; biogas generation; integration methodology; hydrothermal fluids and heat exchanger selection; and the system. 133 references. (MHR)

Fogleman, S.F.; Fisher, L.A.; Black, A.R.; Singh, D.P.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices Sumit Mitra , Lige Sun , Ignacio E. Grossmann December 24, 2012 Abstract Combined heat and power companies. However, under-utilization can be a chance for tighter interaction with the power grid, which

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

50

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of the installed cost of the project Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $400/kW - $500/kW up to 50% of the installed cost of the project Provider Southwest Gas Corporation Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers incentives to qualifying commercial and industrial facilities who install efficient Combined Heat and Power systems (CHP). CHP systems produce localized, on-site power and heat which can be used in a variety of ways. Incentives vary based upon the efficiency

51

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat and power; distributed generation; premium powerand operation of distributed generation, combined heat andcost combination of distributed generation technologies that

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Table SH1. Total Households Using a Space Heating Fuel, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households Using a Space Heating Fuel, 2005 Million U.S. Households Using a Non-Major Fuel 5 ... Space Heating (millions) Energy Information Administration

53

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System October 3, 2011 - 4:43pm Addthis U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today applauded the commissioning of a combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell system at Portland Community College in Oregon. The CHP fuel cell system will help Portland Community College save on its energy bills and help achieve its energy efficiency and sustainability goals. Students at the College will also learn about the fuel cell technology used in the project as part of a comprehensive alternative energy curriculum offered by the school. "The benefits of a combined heat and power fuel cell system, coupled with

54

ARM - PI Product - Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals & Heating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsCombined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals & ProductsCombined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals & Heating Rates Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals & Heating Rates 2011.10.11 - 2012.02.07 Site(s) GAN General Description Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval. The PNNL Combined Remote Sensor retrieval algorithm (CombRet) is designed to retrieve cloud and precipitation properties for all sky conditions. The retrieval is based on a combination of several previously published retrievals, with new additions related to the retrieval of cloud microphysical properties when only one instrument is able to detect cloud (i.e. radar only or lidar only).

55

Definition: Combined heat and power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heat and power heat and power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Combined heat and power The production of electricity and heat from a single process. Almost synonymous with the term cogeneration, but slightly more broad. Under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), the definition of cogeneration is the production of electric energy and "another form of useful thermal energy through the sequential use of energy." Since some facilities produce both heat and power but not in a sequential fashion, the term CHP is used.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition View on Reegle Reegle Definition Cogeneration power plants produce electricity but do not waste the heat this process creates. The heat is used for district heating or other purposes, and thus the overall efficiency is improved. For example could

56

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Combined Heat and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Heat and Power Combined Heat and Power Combined heat and power (CHP) systems on research campuses can reduce climate impact by 15% to 30% and yield a positive financial return, because they recover heat that is typically wasted in the generation of electric power and deliver that energy in a useful form. The following links go to sections that describe how CHP may fit into your climate action plans. Considerations Sample Project Related Links CHP systems can take advantage of large central heating plants and steam distribution systems that are available on many campuses. CHP systems may be new at a particular facility, but the process and equipment involve well-established industrial technologies. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CHP Partnership offers technical information and resources that

57

Table WH5. Total Expenditures for Water Heating by Major Fuels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Table WH5. Total Expenditures for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Billion Dollars Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil LPG U.S. Households

58

Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Southwest www.southwestCHPTAP.org Christine Brinker Southwest Energy Efficiency Project 720-939-8333 cbrinker@swenergy.org Arizona Ina Road Water Pollution Control Facility, Tucson University of Arizona, Tucson View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Arizona. Colorado Metro Wastewater Reclamation District, Denver MillerCoors, Golden New Belgium Brewery, Fort Collins Trailblazer Pipeline, Fort Collins View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Colorado.

59

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

60

Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Southeast www.southeastCHPTAP.org Isaac Panzarella North Carolina State University 919-515-0354 ipanzarella@ncsu.edu Alabama View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Alabama. Arkansas Fourche Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility, Little Rock View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Arkansas. Florida Howard F. Curren Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant, Tampa Shands Hospital, Gainesville View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Florida.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Midwest www.midwestCHPTAP.org John Cuttica University of Illinois at Chicago 312-996-4382 cuttica@uic.edu Cliff Haefke University of Illinois at Chicago 312-355-3476 chaefk1@uic.edu Illinois Adkins Energy, Lena Advocate South Suburban Hospital, Hazel Crest Antioch Community High School, Antioch Elgin Community College, Elgin Evanston Township High School, Evanston Hunter Haven Farms, Inc., Pearl City Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago Lake Forest Hospital, Lake Forest

62

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

63

Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Northwest www.northwestCHPTAP.org David Sjoding Washington State University 360-956-2004 sjodingd@energy.wsu.edu Alaska Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Anvik Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Grayling Exit Glacier - Kenai Fjords National Park, Seward Golovin City, Golovin Inside Passage Electric Cooperative, Angoon Kokhanok City, Kokhanok St. Paul Island, St. Paul Island Village Council, Kongiganak City Village Council, Kwigillingok City Village Council, Stevens Village

64

Combined Heat & Power Technology Overview and Federal Sector Deployment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the Combined Heat & Power Technology Overview and Federal Sector Deployment from Oakridge National Laboratory. The presentation is from the FUPWG Spring Meeting, held on May 22, 2013 in San Francisco, California.

65

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power Speaker(s): Zack Norwood Date: February 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This seminar will examine the potential for the mild...

66

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - XLS Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top...

67

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - ODS format Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...

68

Radiative component and combined heat transfer in the thermal calculation of finned tube banks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more exact calculation of combined heat transfer in the case of finned tube banks (e.g., in the convective section of a furnace), the radiative heat transfer cannot be neglected. A new method for relatively simple calculation of total heat flux (convection + radiation + conduction in fins) is fully compatible with that for bare tube banks/bundles developed earlier. It is based on the method of radiative coefficients. However, the resulting value of heat flux must be corrected due to fin thickness and especially due to the fin radiative influence. For this purpose the so-called multiplicator of heat flux was introduced. The applicability of this methods has been demonstrated on a tubular fired heater convective section. A developed computer program based on the method has also been used for an analysis of the influence of selected parameters to show the share of radiation on the total heat flux.

Stehlik, P. [Technical Univ. of Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Process Engineering] [Technical Univ. of Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Process Engineering

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests  

SciTech Connect

Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Technical and Economic Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Technologies for Commercial Customer Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general, the overall efficiency of energy utilization by conventional power systems averages around 33 percent. Combined heat and power (CHP) technologies installed at commercial and industrial sites, however, can increase the overall efficiency beyond 85 percent by recovering waste heat and putting it to beneficial use. Thus, CHP reduces the energy consumption and improves environmental quality. Currently, CHP accounts for approximately only 7 percent of total generation capacity and 40 percent of th...

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas-Only Heating Load Annual Total Energy Demand (Natural Gas-Only Heating Load Annual Total Energy Demand (Natural Gas-Only Heating Load Annual Total Energy Demand (

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power Projects Combined Heat and Power Projects Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of CHP project profiles. Search the project profiles database. Project profiles can be searched by state, CHP TAP, market sector, North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code, system size, technology/prime mover, fuel, thermal energy use, and year installed. View a list of project profiles by market sector. To view project profiles by state, click on a state on the map or choose a state from the drop-down list below. "An image of the United States representing a select number of CHP project profiles on a state-by-state basis View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known

73

Combined Heat & Power Technology Overview and Federal Sector Deployment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview and Overview and Federal Sector Deployment Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2013 - May 22-23 San Francisco, CA Hosted by: Pacific Gas and Electric Company Bob Slattery Oak Ridge National Laboratory CHP is an integrated energy system that:  is located at or near a facility  generates electrical and/or mechanical power  recovers waste heat for ◦ heating ◦ cooling ◦ dehumidification  can utilize a variety of technologies and fuels  is also referred to as cogeneration The on-site simultaneous generation of two forms of energy (heat and electricity) from a single fuel/energy source Defining Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Steam Electricity Fuel Prime Mover & Generator Heat Recovery Steam Boiler Conventional CHP

74

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power Systemfor Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Powerin parabolic trough solar power technology. Journal of Solar

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Table A56. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"RSE" "SIC",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1 20,"FOOD and KINDRED PRODUCTS" ,"Industry-Specific Technologies" ,"One or More Industry-Specific Technologies Present",2353,9 ," Infrared Heating",607,13 ," Microwave Drying",127,21 ," Closed-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Recover Heat",786,19

76

GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATION OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description 1 CHP System Name 2 CEC Plant ID 3 EIA Plant ID 4 Qualifying Facility ID (if applicable) 5 Thermal, and emissions related to combined heat and power (CHP) system power plant operations. This information is used the power plant is first reported on Form CEC-2843. The respondent should use the Commission assigned code

77

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" "...

78

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1991:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in...

79

Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1994:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in...

80

Table WH2. Total Households by Water Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households by Water Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Table WH2.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units Electricity (billion kWh) Natural Gas (billion cf) Fuel Oil

82

Table SH2. Total Households by Space Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households by Space Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: ... Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG Other

83

Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas (billion cf) Major Fuels Used 4 (physical units) Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units

84

Table A12. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical...

85

Thermodynamic Analysis of Combined Cycle District Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the University of Massachusetts' Combined Heat and Power (CHP) District Heating System. Energy and exergy analyses are performed based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics for power generation systems that include a 10 MW Solar combustion gas turbine, a 4-MW steam turbine, a 100,000 pph heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), three 125,000 pph package boilers, and auxiliary equipment. In the analysis, actual system data is used to assess the district heating system performance, energy and exergy efficiencies, exergetic improvement potential and exergy losses. Energy and exergy calculations are conducted for the whole year on an hourly basis. System efficiencies are calculated for a wide range of component operating loads. The results show how thermodynamic analysis can be used to identify the magnitudes and location of energy losses in order to improve the existing system, processes or components.

Suresh, S.; Gopalakrishnan, H.; Kosanovic, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Deaerator heat exchanger for combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a combined cycle power plant. It comprises a steam turbine including an inlet portion for receiving motive steam and an exhaust portion for exhausting the motive steam that is spent by the steam turbine; a condenser connected to the exhaust portion of the steam turbine for receiving the spent motive steam and for condensing the spent motive steam to a supply of condensate; a gas turbine including an exhaust portion for exhausting waste heat that is produced by the gas turbine in the form of exhaust gases; a heat recovery steam generator connected between the exhaust portion of the gas turbine and the steam turbine, for receiving the waste heat exhausted by the gas turbine, for generating the motive steam from a supply of feedwater heated by the waste heat, and for supplying the motive steam to the steam turbine; a deaerator connected to the condenser for receiving the supply of condensate and for deaerating the condensate to provide the supply of feedwater to the heat recovery steam generator; and a heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Richardson, B.L.

1990-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

Combined Heat and Power Pilot Grant Program (Connecticut ) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grant Program (Connecticut ) Grant Program (Connecticut ) Combined Heat and Power Pilot Grant Program (Connecticut ) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $450 per kilowatt Program Info Funding Source Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority State Connecticut Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies based on the specific technology, efficiency, and economics of the installation Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Note: The initial application deadline was September 28, 2012. This solicitation is now closed. Check the program web site for information regarding the next solicitation. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA) is administering

88

Combined Heat and Power Pilot Loan Program (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Program (Connecticut) Loan Program (Connecticut) Combined Heat and Power Pilot Loan Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $450 per kilowatt Program Info Funding Source Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Start Date 06/18/2012 State Connecticut Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount Varies based on the specific technology, efficiency, and economics of the installation Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Note: The application deadline was September 28, 2012. This solicitation is now closed. Check the program web site for information regarding the next solicitation. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA) is administering

89

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Development » Smart Grid » Distributed Technology Development » Smart Grid » Distributed Energy » Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems The CHP systems program aimed to facilitate acceptance of distributed energy in end-use sectors by forming partnerships with industry consortia in the commercial building, merchant stores, light industrial, supermarkets, restaurants, hospitality, health care and high-tech industries. In high-tech industries such as telecommunications, commercial data processing and internet services, the use of electronic data and signal processing have become a cornerstone in the U.S. economy. These industries represent high potential for CHP and distributed energy due to their ultra-high reliability and power quality requirements and related large

90

Combined Heat and Power with Your Local Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership Working Group Combined Heat and Power C.A. Skip Cofield October 16, 2012 Agenda * Southern Company * Combined Heat and Power (CHP) * Southern Company CHP * Utility Partnerships 2 Southern Company Overview Operating Companies: * Alabama Power * Georgia Power * Gulf Power * Mississippi Power Subsidiaries: * Southern LINC * Southern Nuclear * Southern Power * Southern Telecom 3 Retail Generating Units Wholesale Generating Units * 4.4 million customers * 43,500+ MW * 26,000+ employees * 120,000 square miles of retail service territory * 27,000 mi. of transmission lines * 3,700 substations * $17.7B in operating revenue * $2.2B in net income * $39.2B in market cap * $59.3B in assets * $13.5B annual op. expense 4 Southern Company Overview

91

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

267E 267E Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Michael Stadler, Markus Groissböck, Gonçalo Cardoso, Andreas Müller, and Judy Lai Environmental Energy Technologies Division http://microgrid.lbl.gov This project was funded by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program under WFO Contract No. 500-10-052 and by the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. We are appreciative of the Commission's timely support for this project. We particularly thank Golam Kibrya and Chris Scruton for their guidance and assistance through all phases of the project. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California

92

Table A54. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of General Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,," "," ",," "," ",," "," "," "," " ,,,,"Computer Control" ,," "," ","of Processes"," "," ",," "," ",," " ,," ","Computer Control","or Major",,,"One or More"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"of Building","Energy-Using","Waste Heat"," Adjustable-Speed","General Technologies","None","Row"

93

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Characteristics Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC5.4 Space Heating...

94

Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent Conditioned Floorspace","Total","Present","Not Present","Factors" " "," " "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1.3,0.9 "ALL SQUARE FEET CATEGORIES" "Approximate Conditioned Floorspace"

95

Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"

96

Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Combined Heat and Power 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of obtaining heat from a boiler and power from the electric grid. Additionally, since CHP system energyTracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Combined Heat and Power 1 Combined Heat and Power Combined heat and power (CHP) systems, also referred to as cogeneration, generate on-site electricity

97

Prediction of the Proton-to-Total Turbulent Heating in the Solar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper employs a recent turbulent heating prescription to predict the ratio of proton-to-total heating due to the kinetic dissipation of Alfvenic turbulence as a function of heliocentric distance. Comparing to a recent empirical estimate for this turbulent heating ratio in the high-speed solar wind, the prediction shows good agreement with the empirical estimate for R >~ 0.8 AU, but predicts less ion heating than the empirical estimate at smaller heliocentric radii. At these smaller radii, the turbulent heating prescription, calculated in the gyrokinetic limit, fails because the turbulent cascade is predicted to reach the proton cyclotron frequency before Landau damping terminates the cascade. These findings suggest that the turbulent cascade can reach the proton cyclotron frequency at R ~ 0.8 AU, this turbulent heating prescription contains all of the necessary physical mechanisms needed to reproduce the empirically estimated proton-to-total heating ratio.

Howes, G G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ios in which distributed generation and heat recovery486-7976 Keywords: distributed generation; combined heat andCERTS) Microgrid. Distributed generation would alleviate the

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

XLS Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - XLS Updated through 12:00 AM on July 16, 2010. 52Item84Recovery...

100

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ODS format Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - ODS format Updated through 12:00 AM on July 16, 2010....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Using and Measuring the Combined Heat and Power Advantage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, refers to the integration of thermal energy with power generation. CHP is a powerful energy conservation measure that has been identified as an important greenhouse gas reduction measure with net economic benefits. It complements other energy conservation measures. CHP can be used any place that heat is needed so it is used with a variety of applications, fuels, and equipment. There are ancillary benefits of CHP to the host site and the public including air quality, reliability, reduced water consumption, and economic development. There is no universal practice for reporting the efficiency of CHP systems which can result in both overstatement and understatement of the benefits of CHP compared to other power generation systems. Fuel Charged to Power (FCP) is the fuel, net of credit for thermal output, required to produce a kilowatt-hour of electricity. This provides a metric that is used for comparison to the heat rate of other types of generation and insight into the development of CHP projects that maximize economic and environmental benefits. Biomass generation is generally less efficient than fossil fuel generation due to size and combustion characteristics, which means that there is more benefit from CHP because there is more waste heat available for recovery. An example is presented demonstrating that CHP significantly improves the economics and environmental benefits for biomass to power.

John, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Thermal Energy Corporation Combined Heat and Power Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the planned heating and cooling load growth at the Texas Medical Center (TMC), Thermal Energy Corporation (TECO) implemented Phase 1 of a Master Plan to install an additional 32,000 tons of chilled water capacity, a 75,000 ton-hour (8.8 million gallon) Thermal Energy Storage (TES) tank, and a 48 MW Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. The Department of Energy selected TMC for a $10 million grant award as part of the Financial Assistance Funding Opportunity Announcement, U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology, Recovery Act: Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficiency Industrial Equipment Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000044 to support the installation of a new 48 MW CHP system at the TMC located just outside downtown Houston. As the largest medical center in the world, TMC is home to many of the nation??s best hospitals, physicians, researchers, educational institutions, and health care providers. TMC provides care to approximately six million patients each year, and medical instruction to over 71,000 students. A medical center the size of TMC has enormous electricity and thermal energy demands to help it carry out its mission. Reliable, high-quality steam and chilled water are of utmost importance to the operations of its many facilities. For example, advanced medical equipment, laboratories, laundry facilities, space heating and cooling all rely on the generation of heat and power. As result of this project TECO provides this mission critical heating and cooling to TMC utilizing a system that is both energy-efficient and reliable since it provides the capability to run on power independent of the already strained regional electric grid. This allows the medical center to focus on its primary mission ?? providing top quality medical care and instruction ?? without worrying about excessive energy costs or the loss of heating and cooling due to the risk of power outages. TECO??s operation is the largest Chilled Water District Energy System in the United States. The company used DOE??s funding to help install a new high efficiency CHP system consisting of a Combustion Turbine and a Heat Recovery Steam Generator. This CHP installation was just part of a larger project undertaken by TECO to ensure that it can continue to meet TMC??s growing needs. The complete efficiency overhaul that TECO undertook supported more than 1,000 direct and indirect jobs in manufacturing, engineering, and construction, with approximately 400 of those being jobs directly associated with construction of the combined heat and power plant. This showcase industrial scale CHP project, serving a critical component of the nation??s healthcare infrastructure, directly and immediately supported the energy efficiency and job creation goals established by ARRA and DOE. It also provided an unsurpassed model of a district energy CHP application that can be replicated within other energy intensive applications in the industrial, institutional and commercial sectors.

E. Bruce Turner; Tim Brown; Ed Mardiat

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

104

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Title Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6267E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Stadler, Michael, Markus Groissböck, Gonçalo Cardoso, Andreas Müller, and Judy Lai Abstract Governor Brown's research priorities include an additional 6.5 GW of combined heat and power (CHP) by 2030. As of 2009, roughly 0.25 GW of small natural gas and biogas fired CHP is documented by the Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) database. The SGIP is set to expire, and the anticipated grid de-carbonization based on the development of 20 GW of renewable energy will influence the CHP adoption. Thus, an integrated optimization approach for this analysis was chosen that allows optimizing the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) such as photovoltaics (PV), CHP, storage technologies, etc. in the California commercial sector from the building owners' perspective. To solve this DER adoption problem the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and used extensively to address the problem of optimally investing and scheduling DER under multiple settings, has been used. The application of CHP at large industrial sites is well known, and much of its potential is already being realized. Conversely, commercial sector CHP, especially those above 50 to 100 kW peak electricity load, is widely overlooked. In order to analyze the role of DER in CO2 reduction, 147 representative sites in different climate zones were selected from the California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS). About 8000 individual optimization runs, with different assumptions for the electric tariffs, natural gas costs, marginal grid CO2 emissions, and nitrogen oxide treatment costs, SGIP, fuel cell lifetime, fuel cell efficiency, PV installation costs, and payback periods for investments have been performed. The most optimistic CHP potential contribution in this sector in 2020 will be 2.7 GW. However, this result requires a SGIP in 2020, 46% average electric efficiency for fuel cells, a payback period for investments of 10 years, and a CO2 focused approach of the building owners. In 2030 it will be only 2.5 GW due to the anticipated grid de-carbonization. The 2030 result requires a 60% electric efficiency and 20 year life time for fuel cells, a payback period of 10 years, and a CO2 minimization strategy of building owners. Finally, the possible CHP potential in 2030 shows a significant variance between 0.2 GW and 2.5 GW, demonstrating the complex interactions between technologies, policies, and customer objectives.

105

WORKING PARK-FUEL CELL COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the aims and objectives of the project which was to design, install and operate a fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) system in Woking Park, the first fuel cell CHP system in the United Kingdom. The report also covers the benefits that were expected to accrue from the work in an understanding of the full technology procurement process (including planning, design, installation, operation and maintenance), the economic and environmental performance in comparison with both conventional UK fuel supply and conventional CHP and the commercial viability of fuel cell CHP energy supply in the new deregulated energy markets.

Allan Jones

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and operation of distributed generation, combined heat andcost combination of distributed generation technologies thatdesires to install distributed generation to minimize the

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown...

108

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES Section...

109

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

110

A comparison of ground source heat pumps and micro-combined heat and power as residential greenhouse gas reduction strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both ground source heat pumps operating on electricity and micro-combined heat and power systems operating on fossil fuels offer potential for the reduction of green house gas emissions in comparison to the conventional ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Table A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy-Management Program, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,"RSE" "SIC",,,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.2,1.1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",12605,1209,3303,6386,1706,2.9

112

Table A15. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.3,1,1,0.9,1.2,1.2

113

Table A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy Management Program, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.3,1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",10743,1150,2819,5309,1464,2.6,,,"/WIR{D}~"

114

PREDICTION OF THE PROTON-TO-TOTAL TURBULENT HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND  

SciTech Connect

This paper employs a recent turbulent heating prescription to predict the ratio of proton-to-total heating due to the kinetic dissipation of Alfvenic turbulence as a function of heliocentric distance. Comparing to a recent empirical estimate for this turbulent heating ratio in the high-speed solar wind, the prediction shows good agreement with the empirical estimate for R {approx}> 0.8 AU, but predicts less ion heating than the empirical estimate at smaller heliocentric radii. At these smaller radii, the turbulent heating prescription, calculated in the gyrokinetic limit, fails because the turbulent cascade is predicted to reach the proton cyclotron frequency before Landau damping terminates the cascade. These findings suggest that the turbulent cascade can reach the proton cyclotron frequency at R {approx}< 0.8 AU, leading to a higher level of proton heating than predicted by the turbulent heating prescription in the gyrokinetic limit. At larger heliocentric radii, R {approx}> 0.8 AU, this turbulent heating prescription contains all of the necessary physical mechanisms needed to reproduce the empirically estimated proton-to-total heating ratio.

Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

116

Understanding Emissions from Combined Heat and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) is more energy efficient than separate generation of electricity and thermal energy. In CHP, heat that is normally wasted in conventional power generation is recovered as useful energy for satisfying an existing thermal demand thus avoiding the losses that would otherwise be incurred from separate generation of power. Modeling analyses has demonstrated significant air emissions, transmission and price benefits of clean CHP technologies. Despite these benefits, CHP remains an underutilized technology hindered by a number of disincentives, including treatment under current air quality permitting practice, which does not recognize the efficiency benefits of CHP. Output-based standards begin to address these permitting shortcomings. This paper will discuss how to view emissions from CHP systems from an output-basis and compares emission from different technologies. Treatment of distributed generation is compared with central generation, and emissions from an integrated system that produces more than one usable output are discussed. Regulatory and policy strategies that encourage clear and efficient CHP are also discussed.

Shipley, A. M.; Greene, N.; Carter, S.; Elliott, R. N.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump... 53.5...

118

Federal Energy Management Program: Combined Heat and Power Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity; and the waste heat is used in some type of thermal process. Process flow for a typical CHP system leverages heat created during electricity generation to...

119

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

120

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

122

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

123

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

124

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

125

Table A32. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,," ","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ," "," "," ",,,,,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "

126

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

127

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

128

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

129

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

130

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

131

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

132

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

133

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

134

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

135

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

136

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

137

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

138

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

139

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

140

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power Basics  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or power at the point of use, allowing the heat that would normally be lost in the power generation process to be recovered to provide needed heating andor cooling. CHP...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Table 5a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using District Heat (thousand) Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu) District Heat Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 94 429 84 93 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 18 Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 11 Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 28 65 144 155 25,001 to 50,000 16 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 9 50 79 81 100,001 to 200,000 6 59 76 79 200,001 to 500,000 5 109 71 77 Over 500,000 1 65 62 80 Principal Building Activity Education 22 50 71 78 Food Sales and Service Q Q Q Q Health Care 3 57 100 142 Lodging 9 66 112 116 Mercantile and Service 9 Q Q Q Office 24 110 63 70 Public Assembly 10 23 64 66 Public Order and Safety Q Q Q Q Religious Worship Q Q Q Q Warehouse and Storage

142

Table 5b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using District Heat (thousand) Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu) District Heat Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 11 16 16 16 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 27 78 76 76 5,001 to 10,000 38 60 51 51 10,001 to 25,000 18 43 36 35 25,001 to 50,000 24 68 51 51 50,001 to 100,000 18 40 30 30 100,001 to 200,000 27 33 35 36 200,001 to 500,000 22 31 26 27 Over 500,000 42 26 14 10 Principal Building Activity Education 17 29 22 23 Food Sales and Service 67 93 207 150 Health Care 35 26 25 14 Lodging 30 40 30 29 Mercantile and Service 40 74 59 58 Office 23 28 26 27 Public Assembly 25 33 25 26 Public Order and Safety

143

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

144

Modeling Infrared and Combination Infrared-Microwave Heating of Foods in an Oven .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A quantitative, model-based understanding of heat exchange in infrared and combined infrared-microwave heating of food inside an oven is developed. The research is divided into (more)

Frangipani Almeida, Marialuci

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Didn't Know About..." Be sure to check back for more entries soon. 10. Often called cogeneration or CHP, a combined heat and power system provides both electric power and heat from...

146

EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, 2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska SUMMARY DOE (lead agency), Denali Commission (cooperating agency) and USDA Rural Utilities Services (cooperating agency) are proposing to provide funding to support the final design and construction of a biomass combined heat and power plant and associated district heating system to the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments and the Gwitchyaa Zhee Corporation. The proposed biomass district heating system would be located in Fort Yukon Alaska. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 6, 2013 EA-1922: Finding of No Significant Impact Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska

147

EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, 2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska SUMMARY DOE (lead agency), Denali Commission (cooperating agency) and USDA Rural Utilities Services (cooperating agency) are proposing to provide funding to support the final design and construction of a biomass combined heat and power plant and associated district heating system to the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments and the Gwitchyaa Zhee Corporation. The proposed biomass district heating system would be located in Fort Yukon Alaska. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 6, 2013 EA-1922: Finding of No Significant Impact Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska

148

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

149

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

150

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

151

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

152

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

153

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

154

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

155

Table A52. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" 2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" " Categories and Presence of General Technologies and Cogeneration Technologies, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Employment Size(a)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" ,,,,,,,"1000 and","Row" "General/Cogeneration Technologies","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","Over","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2,2.1,1,0.7,0.7,0.9 "One or More General Technologies Present",14601,387,781,2054,2728,3189,5462,3.1 " Computer Control of Building Environment (b)",5079,64,116,510,802,1227,2361,5

156

Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

Frank J. Hartz

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

158

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

159

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

160

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar power (CSP) troughs in the central valley of California (Pricesolar combined heat and power with desalination Figure 2.7: Comparison of desalination plants; price

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PureComfort 240 Combined Cooling,Heating,and Power Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second interim case study of a PureComfort 240 combined cooling, heating and power project at the University of Toronto, Mississauga.

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

162

THE STIRLING ENGINE: THERMODYNAMICS AND APPLICATIONS IN COMBINED COOLING, HEATING, AND POWER SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The goal of this study is to assess the potential of the Stirling engine in alternative energy applications including combined cooling, heating, and power (more)

Harrod, James C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Integration of Combined Heat and Power Generators into Small Buildings - A Transient Analysis Approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Small combined heat and power generators have the potential to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of residential buildings. Recently, much attention has been (more)

DeBruyn, Adrian Bryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case, such as total electricity bill, electricity generationHeat and Power Applications electricity bill for electricityK$ Investment Costs Annual Electricity Bill for Purchases

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Combined permeable pavement and ground source heat pump systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The PhD thesis focuses on the performance assessment of permeable pavement systems incorporating ground source heat pumps (GSHP). The relatively high variability of temperature in (more)

Grabowiecki, Piotr

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

167

A Ranking of State Combined Heat and Power Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) has been identified as a significant opportunity for greater energy efficiency and decreased environmental impacts of energy consumption. Despite this, the regulatory and policy landscape for CHP is often quite discouraging to the deployment of these systems, despite their many benefits to customers and society at large. That the landscape changes considerably from state to state only confuses the matter. Of all the various types of distributed generation, CHP systems encompass technologies particularly hard hit by policies and regulations that do not actively support their deployment. Given the large size of some CHP systems, interconnection standards that clearly delineate interconnection processes for multi-megawatt systems are necessary. In addition, since many CHP technologies emit incremental criteria pollutants as part of their operation, the manner in which emissions are regulated by a state can significantly impact the financial realities of running a CHP system. In the absence of strong federal guidance, interconnection standards, tax incentives, tariff designs, environmental regulations and other policy measures that dramatically impact the attractiveness of CHP projects can only be significantly addressed by state lawmakers and regulators. State activity is essential to creating a policy framework that encourages CHP. Within the past several years, a number of states have made significant strides in implementing more CHP-friendly policies. Some states have worked to develop these policies at an accelerated rate while others have done little. In many cases the difference between states that are proactively encouraging CHP and states that are ignoring it all together is stark. This paper will identify which states are leading the way, which states are following, and what the policies of all states look like at this current point in time. It will define what CHP-friendly policies are, what makes a good policy better, and discuss the manners in which a variety of states have chosen to approach CHP. CHP system developers will come away with a clearer picture of each states unique CHP barriers, potential CHP customers will understand how their current CHP climate compares to that of other locations, and state lawmakers and CHP advocates will be able to learn about best practices in policy creation that already exist in the field.

Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Opportunities for Combined Heat and Power in Data Centers  

SciTech Connect

Data centers represent a rapidly growing and very energy intensive activity in commercial, educational, and government facilities. In the last five years the growth of this sector was the electric power equivalent to seven new coal-fired power plants. Data centers consume 1.5% of the total power in the U.S. Growth over the next five to ten years is expected to require a similar increase in power generation. This energy consumption is concentrated in buildings that are 10-40 times more energy intensive than a typical office building. The sheer size of the market, the concentrated energy consumption per facility, and the tendency of facilities to cluster in 'high-tech' centers all contribute to a potential power infrastructure crisis for the industry. Meeting the energy needs of data centers is a moving target. Computing power is advancing rapidly, which reduces the energy requirements for data centers. A lot of work is going into improving the computing power of servers and other processing equipment. However, this increase in computing power is increasing the power densities of this equipment. While fewer pieces of equipment may be needed to meet a given data processing load, the energy density of a facility designed to house this higher efficiency equipment will be as high as or higher than it is today. In other words, while the data center of the future may have the IT power of ten data centers of today, it is also going to have higher power requirements and higher power densities. This report analyzes the opportunities for CHP technologies to assist primary power in making the data center more cost-effective and energy efficient. Broader application of CHP will lower the demand for electricity from central stations and reduce the pressure on electric transmission and distribution infrastructure. This report is organized into the following sections: (1) Data Center Market Segmentation--the description of the overall size of the market, the size and types of facilities involved, and the geographic distribution. (2) Data Center Energy Use Trends--a discussion of energy use and expected energy growth and the typical energy consumption and uses in data centers. (3) CHP Applicability--Potential configurations, CHP case studies, applicable equipment, heat recovery opportunities (cooling), cost and performance benchmarks, and power reliability benefits (4) CHP Drivers and Hurdles--evaluation of user benefits, social benefits, market structural issues and attitudes toward CHP, and regulatory hurdles. (5) CHP Paths to Market--Discussion of technical needs, education, strategic partnerships needed to promote CHP in the IT community.

Darrow, Ken [ICF International; Hedman, Bruce [ICF International

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

170

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

171

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

172

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

173

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

174

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

175

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

176

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

177

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

179

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

180

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System Callaway Spring 2011 #12;Abstract A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar of analysis of Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power (DCS-CHP) systems is a design

California at Berkeley, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Combined heat and power economic dispatch by mesh adaptive direct search algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optimal utilization of multiple combined heat and power (CHP) systems is a complex problem. Therefore, efficient methods are required to solve it. In this paper, a recent optimization technique, namely mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) is implemented ... Keywords: Combined heat and power, Economic dispatch, Mesh adaptive direct search algorithm, Optimization

Seyyed Soheil Sadat Hosseini; Ali Jafarnejad; Amir Hossein Behrooz; Amir Hossein Gandomi

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A modified unit decommitment algorithm in combined heat and power production planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the unit commitment in multi-period combined heat and power (CHP) production planning, considering the possibility to trade power on the spot market. We present a modified unit decommitment algorithm (MUD) that starts with a good ... Keywords: combined heat and power production, deregulated power market, energy optimization, modelling, modified unit decommitment, unit commitment

Aiying Rong; Risto Lahdelma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

Rudd, A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post 741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide an American Recovery Act and Reinvestment Act of 2009 financial assistance grant to Seattle Steam Company to facilitate the installation of a combined heat and power plant in downtown Seattle, Washington. NOTE: This project has been cancelled. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download June 16, 2010 EA-1741: Draft Environmental Assessment Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington (June 2010)

185

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency October 21, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 Underscoring President Obama's Climate Action Plan to cut harmful emissions and double energy efficiency, the Energy Department is taking action to develop the next generation of combined heat and power (CHP) technology and help local communities and businesses make cost-effective investments that save money and energy. As part of this effort, the Department launched today seven new regional Combined Heat and Power Technical Assistance Partnerships across the country to help strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce

186

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power October 21, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis Learn how combined heat and power could strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce harmful emissions. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Learn how combined heat and power could strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce harmful emissions. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs More Top Things: Top 9 Things You Didn't Know About America's Power Grid Top 9 Things You Didn't Know about Carbon Fiber

187

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency October 21, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 Underscoring President Obama's Climate Action Plan to cut harmful emissions and double energy efficiency, the Energy Department is taking action to develop the next generation of combined heat and power (CHP) technology and help local communities and businesses make cost-effective investments that save money and energy. As part of this effort, the Department launched today seven new regional Combined Heat and Power Technical Assistance Partnerships across the country to help strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce

188

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power October 21, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis Learn how combined heat and power could strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce harmful emissions. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Learn how combined heat and power could strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce harmful emissions. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs More Top Things: Top 9 Things You Didn't Know About America's Power Grid Top 9 Things You Didn't Know about Carbon Fiber

189

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system efficiency. Capstone Turbine Corporation is designing a combined 65 kilowatt CHP system and biomass gasifier that can use stalks, grass and other material to generate...

190

Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix for providing simultaneous heat transfer and mass transfer at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, whereby the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process is significantly improved. The small channel heat exchange matrix is comprised of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 mm. The channels are connected to an inlet header for supplying a two-phase coolant to the channels and an outlet header for receiving the coolant horn the channels. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within a separation column, whereby liquid descends along the exterior surfaces of the cooling channels and vapor ascends between adjacent channels within the matrix. Preferably, a perforated and concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel, such that liquid further descends along the concave surfaces of the sheets and the vapor further ascends through the perforations in the sheets. The size and configuration of the small channel heat exchange matrix allows the heat and mass transfer device to be positioned within the separation column, thereby allowing precise control of the local operating conditions within the column and increasing the energy efficiency of the process.

Tran, Thanh Nhon

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

Tran, Thanh Nhon (Flossmoor, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

Tran, T.N.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

193

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR. (authors)

Conklin, James C.; Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR.

Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effect of longer combination vehicles on the total logistic costs of truckload shippers  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the research described in this paper was to examine the effects of using longer and heavier tractor-trailer combinations from the standpoint of the individual firm or shipper rather than from the viewpoint of the motor carrier. The objective was to determine the effect of longer combination vehicles (LCVS) not only on shippers freight costs but on their inventory and other logistical costs as well. A sample of companies in selected industries provided data on their principal products, traffic flows, and logistics costs in a mail survey. These data were entered into a computer program called the Freight Transportation Analyzer (FTA) which calculated the component logistics costs associated with shipping by single trailers and by two alternative types of double trailer LCVS. A major finding of the study was that, given sufficient flows of a company`s product in a traffic lane, LCVs would in most cases greatly reduce the total logistics cost of firms that currently ship in single trailer truckload quantities. Annual lane volume, lane distance, and annual lane ton-mileage appeared to be good indicators of whether or not shipping by LCVs would benefit a company, whereas product value had surprisingly little influence on the cost-effectiveness of LCVS. An even better indicator was the ratio of current annual freight costs to current annual inventory carrying costs for a firm`s single trailer truckload shipments. Given the current trend toward maintaining small inventories and shipping in small quantities, it is not clear to what extent shippers will abandon single trailer transport to take advantage of the potential reduction in total logistics cost afforded by LCVS.

Middendorf, D.P.; Bronzini, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jacoby, J. [Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Coyle, J.J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1994-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

196

Comparing maintenance costs of geothermal heat pump systems with other HVAC systems: Preventive maintenance actions and total maintenance costs  

SciTech Connect

Total annual heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) maintenance costs were determined for 20 schools in the Lincoln, Nebraska, Public School District. Each school examined provides cooling to over 70% of its total floor area and relies on one of the following heating and cooling systems to provide the majority of space conditioning: vertical-bore, geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), air-cooled chiller with gas-fired hot water boiler (ACC/GHWB), or water-cooled chiller with gas-fired steam boiler (WCC/GSB). A precursor to this study examined annual costs associated with repair, service, and corrective maintenance activities tracked in a work order database. This follow-up study examines costs associated with preventive maintenance (PM) activities conducted by the district. Annual PM costs were 5.87 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (63.14 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 7.14 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (76.86 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 9.82 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (105.39 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/ GSB, and 12.65 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (136.30 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. The results of the two analyses are combined to produce an estimate of total annual maintenance costs, by system type, for the 20 schools. Total annual maintenance costs were 8.75 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (94.20 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 9.27 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (99.76 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 13.54 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (145.49 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GSB, and 18.71 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (201.61 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. It should be noted that these costs represent only the trends seen in the maintenance database of the Lincoln School District. Because of differences in the number of schools using each system type, varying equipment age, and the small total number of schools included in the study, the maintenance costs presented here may not be representative of the maintenance costs seen for similar equipment in other locations.

Martin, M.A.; Madgett, M.G.; Hughes, P.J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Total U.S. Main Space Heating Fuel Used U.S. Using Any Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Heating Degree Days by Main Space Heating Fuel Used, ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: ... Any Fuel Natural Gas Fuel Oil Age of Main Heating ...

198

Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Mid-Atlantic www.midatlanticCHPTAP.org Jim Freihaut Pennsylvania State University 814-863-0083 jdf11@psu.edu Delaware View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Delaware. District of Columbia View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in the District of Columbia. Maryland Baltimore Refuse Energy Co., Baltimore View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Maryland. New Jersey View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in New Jersey.

199

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES Section 1308 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ("EISA 2007") directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the States, to undertake a study of the laws affecting the siting of privately-owned distribution wires on or across public rights of way and to consider the impact of those laws on the development of combined heat and power ("CHP") facilities, as well as to determine whether a change in those laws would impact utility operations, costs or reliability, or impact utility customers. The study is also to consider whether changing the laws would

200

Distributed Generation as Combined Heat and Power (DG-CHP) (New...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Distributed Generation as Combined Heat and Power (DG-CHP) (New York) This is the approved revision of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion ...

202

Mild Hybrid System in Combination with Waste Heat Recovery for Commercial Vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Performance of two different waste heat recovery systems (one based on Rankine cycle and the other one using thermoelectricity) combined with non-hybrid, mild-hybrid and (more)

Namakian, Mohsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu)

204

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resources: The CERTS MicroGrid Concept. Berkeley Lab1. Energy Characteristics of Microgrids Individual MembersEffects of a Carbon Tax on Microgrid Combined Heat and Power

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES Section 1308 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ("EISA 2007") directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the States, to undertake a study of the laws affecting the siting of privately-owned distribution wires on or across public rights of way and to consider the impact of those laws on the development of combined heat and power ("CHP") facilities, as well as to determine whether a change in those laws would impact utility operations, costs or reliability, or impact utility customers. The study is also to consider whether changing the laws would

206

Customer Sited Combined Heat and Power on Maui: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the experience of Maui Electric Company (MECO) in developing and operating a 150 kW combined heat and power (CHP) project at a resort on Maui. Tests conducted during the project evaluated the heat rate and performance of the packaged CHP system, which had been originally designed for natural gas fueling but was fueled by commercial propane in this application.

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. et al. , (2007), Microgrids, An Overview of OngoingSolar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat andSolar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies in a Grid Application heat, usually in thethe Grid. In this Grid the heat loads are not that great,Combined Heat and Power Technologies in a Grid Application

Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

"Table B29. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,15996,32970,3818,4907 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,1779,2672,484,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,1686,3068,428,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,3366,5807,536,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,2264,4974,300,325

210

Nuclear steam turbines for power production in combination with district heating and desalination  

SciTech Connect

The optimization of the turbine plant of a nuclear power station in combination with heat production is dependent upon many factors, the most important being the heat requirements, full-load equivalent operating time, and the heat transport distance, i.e., the trunk mains' costs. With hot-water-based heat transport, this usually results in a large temperature difference between supply and return water and heating in two or three stages. The turbine can consist of a back-pressure turbine, a back-pressure turbine with condensing tail, or a condensing turbine with heat extractions. The most attractive solution from technical as well as economic points of view is the condensing turbine with extraction for district heating or desalination as appropriate. The turbines can be of conventional design, with only minor modifications needed to adapt them to the operating conditions concerned.

Frilund, B.; Knudsen, K.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combustion Turbine Combined-Cycle Heat Recovery Steam Generator Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to assist personnel involved with the maintenance of the heat recovery steam generator at a combustion gas turbine combined cycle facility, including good maintenance practices, preventive maintenance techniques and troubleshooting guidance.BackgroundCombustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that can be unique to this particular type of power plant. As such, owners and ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIE STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIE Section 1308 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ("EISA 2007") directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the States, to undertake a study of the laws affecting the siting of privately-owned distribution wires on or across public rights of way and to consider the impact of those laws on the development of combined heat and power ("CHP") facilities, as well as to determine whether a change in those laws would impact utility operations, costs or reliability, or impact utility customers. The study is also to consider whether a change in those laws

213

Combined Heat & Power (CHP) -A Clean Energy Solution for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the late 1970's to the early 1990's cogeneration or CHP saw enormous growth, especially in the process industries. By 1994, CHP provided 42 GW of electricity generation capacity -about 6 percent of the U.S. total. Three manufacturing industries (Pulp and paper -59 Twh; Chemicals -47 Twh; Petroleum refuting -IS Twh) accounted for 85% of all cogenerated electricity in 1994. But since the mid-1990s, installation of new CHP has slowed dramatically. This slow down is due to uncertainties and policies associated with electric utility restructuring and impending environmental regulations. By 1997, a group comprising CHP manufacturers and nonprofit groups had formed to identify these CHP barriers and to work to remove them. At the same time several studies on the role of energy efficiency in greenhouse gas emissions reductions identified CHP as one of the most promising options. These studies showed a key window of opportunity-many new or updated highly-efficient and lower-cost CHP systems will become available just when the industrial "boiler baby boom" retires. These technology opportunities take advantage of advances in materials, power electronics, and computer-aided design techniques have increased equipment efficiency and reliability dramatically, while reducing costs and emissions of pollutants. This next generation of turbines, fuel cells, and reciprocating engines is the result of intensive, collaborative research, development, and demonstration by government and industry. These have allowed for new configurations that reduce size yet increase output. Turbines are now cost-effective for systems down to 50 KW, the size of a small office or restaurant. Even smaller equipment is on the horizon. However, without rapid action, this opportune nexus of market, regulatory, and technology opportunities could dissipate. In fiscal year 1999, we launched the U. S. Department of Energy CHP Challenge program. By 2002 when the Challenge is complete, it should have substantially increased the use of CHP systems in industry and buildings. We estimate that efforts such as CHP Challenge could result in more than 50 MW of additional CHP electricity generation being installed at greater than 60 percent fuel-use efficiency (nearly double the average grid efficiency) by 2010. This paper will report on the first results of CHP Challenge and discuss future activities-especially in the industrial sector.

Parks, H.; Hoffman, P.; Kurtovich, M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Experimental Study on Operating Characteristic of the System of Ground Source Heat Pump Combined with Floor Radiant Heating of Capillary Tube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At first, the article presented particularly the working theory of the system of ground source heat pump combined with floor radiant heating of capillary tube, the characteristic of soil layers and the arrangement form of capillary tube mat and the floor ... Keywords: Ground source heat pump, Capillary tube, Radiant heating, Characteristic, Experiment

Yunzhun Fu; Cai Yingling; Jing Li; Yeyu Wang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inland areas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

216

Expert Meeting Report: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The topic of this meeting was 'Recommendations For Applying Water Heaters In Combination Space And Domestic Water Heating Systems.' Presentations and discussions centered on the design, performance, and maintenance of these combination systems, with the goal of developing foundational information toward the development of a Building America Measure Guideline on this topic. The meeting was held at the Westford Regency Hotel, in Westford, Massachusetts on 7/31/2011.

Rudd, A.; Ueno, K.; Bergey, D.; Osser, R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Comprehensive Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Combined Cycle/Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSGs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) plant component availability and reliability. These guidelines for combined cycle/HRSG plants provide information on the application of all-volatile treatment (AVT), oxygenated treatment (OT), phosphate treatment (PT), caustic treatment (CT), and amine treatment. The guidelines will help operators reduce corrosion and deposition and thereby achieve significant operation and maintenance cost ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

Modeling and optimization of a combined cycle Stirling-ORC system and design of an integrated microchannel Stirling heat rejector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of a combined Stirling-ORC power cycle is evaluated, and an integrated microchannel heat exchanger is designed as an annular cold-side heat rejector for (more)

[No author

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Enhancement of historical printed document images by combining Total Variation regularization and Non-local Means filtering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel method for document enhancement which combines two recent powerful noise-reduction steps. The first step is based on the Total Variation framework. It flattens background grey-levels and produces an intermediate image where ... Keywords: Character recognition, Document image enhancement, Historical documents, Image processing, Non-local Means, Variational approach

Laurence Likforman-Sulem; Jrme Darbon; Elisa H. Barney Smith

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

State Opportunities for Action: Review of States' Combined Heat and Power Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) has been the focus of federal attention since the mid-1990s. However, many of the market barriers to CHP are at the state level. As a sign of the maturing CHP market, a number of states are now undertaking activities to addre

Brown, E.; Elliott, N.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation Environment for Whole-building Performance Analysis Title CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation Environment for Whole-building Performance Analysis Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Zhang, J. S., Wei Feng, John Grunewald, Andreas Nicolai, and Carey Zhang Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 18 Issue 1-2 Abstract A computer simulation tool, named "CHAMPS-Multizone" is introduced in this paper for analyzing bothenergy and IAQ performance of buildings. The simulation model accounts for the dynamic effects ofoutdoor climate conditions (solar radiation, wind speed and direction, and contaminant concentrations),building materials and envelope system design, multizone air and contaminant flows in buildings,internal heat and pollutant sources, and operation of the building HVAC systems on the buildingperformance. It enables combined analysis of building energy efficiency and indoor air quality. Themodel also has the ability to input building geometry data and HVAC system operation relatedinformation from software such as SketchUp and DesignBuilder via IDF file format. A "bridge" to accessstatic and dynamic building data stored in a "virtual building" database is also developed, allowingconvenient input of initial and boundary conditions for the simulation, and for comparisons between thepredicted and measured results. This paper summarizes the mathematical models, adoptedassumptions, methods of implementation, and verification and validation results. The needs andchallenges for further development are also discussed

222

Heat Recovery Steam Generators for Combined Cycle Applications: HRSG Procurement, Design, Construction, and Operation Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design alternatives and procurement approaches for heat recovery steam generators, supplemental firing duct burners, and ancillary steam systems are addressed in this report. Power engineers and project developers will find an up-to-date, comprehensive resource for planning, specification and preliminary design in support of combined cycle plant development.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

223

Optimal Selection of On-Site Generation with Combined Heat and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 and by the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research, process, or service by its trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily: distributed generation; combined heat and power; decentralised optimisation; microgrid; power quality ABSTRACT

224

Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Combined Cycle/Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSGs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cycle chemistry in combined cycle plants influences about 70 of the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failure mechanisms. These guidelines have been assembled to assist operators and chemists in developing an effective overall cycle chemistry program which will prevent HRSG tube failures (HTF).

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

225

Assessment of Residential Combined Heat and Power Systems: Application Benefits and Vendors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an analysis of the benefits of installing a residential combined heat and power (RCHP) plant in several U.S. geographies and under a number of dispatch scenarios. The report also provides an assessment of 14 companies developing or selling RCHP systems in North American, Europe, and Japan.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

226

Mapping the energy saving potential of passive heating combined with conservation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A procedure is presented for estimating the energy savings potential of combining conservation and passive solar strategies to reduce building heating. General scaling laws are used for costs and the resulting continuous equations are evaluated to find the least life-cycle cost strategy. Results are mapped for the US.

Balcomb, J.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Table SH5. Total Expenditures for Space Heating by Major Fuels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Space Heating Fuel 4 (millions) Fuel Oil U.S. Households ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Natural Gas

228

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A microgrid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The microgrid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (< 500 kW), such as reciprocating engines, microturbines, and fuel cells, with or without combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, such as water and space heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the microgrid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean central station generation in California.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Combining Total Monte Carlo and Benchmarks for nuclear data uncertainty propagation on an LFRs safety parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyses are carried out to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties on keff for the European Lead Cooled Training Reactor (ELECTRA) using the Total Monte Carlo method. A large number of Pu-239 random ENDF-formated libraries generated using the TALYS based system were processed into ACE format with NJOY99.336 code and used as input into the Serpent Monte Carlo neutron transport code to obtain distribution in keff. The keff distribution obtained was compared with the latest major nuclear data libraries - JEFF-3.1.2, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0. A method is proposed for the selection of benchmarks for specific applications using the Total Monte Carlo approach. Finally, an accept/reject criterion was investigated based on chi square values obtained using the Pu-239 Jezebel criticality benchmark. It was observed that nuclear data uncertainties in keff were reduced considerably from 748 to 443 pcm by applying a more rigid acceptance criteria for accepting random files.

Alhassan, Erwin; Duan, Junfeng; Gustavsson, Cecilia; Koning, Arjan; Pomp, Stephan; Rochman, Dimitri; sterlund, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Combining Total Monte Carlo and Benchmarks for nuclear data uncertainty propagation on an LFRs safety parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyses are carried out to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties on keff for the European Lead Cooled Training Reactor (ELECTRA) using the Total Monte Carlo method. A large number of Pu-239 random ENDF-formated libraries generated using the TALYS based system were processed into ACE format with NJOY99.336 code and used as input into the Serpent Monte Carlo neutron transport code to obtain distribution in keff. The keff distribution obtained was compared with the latest major nuclear data libraries - JEFF-3.1.2, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0. A method is proposed for the selection of benchmarks for specific applications using the Total Monte Carlo approach. Finally, an accept/reject criterion was investigated based on chi square values obtained using the Pu-239 Jezebel criticality benchmark. It was observed that nuclear data uncertainties in keff were reduced considerably from 748 to 443 pcm by applying a more rigid acceptance criteria for accepting random files.

Erwin Alhassan; Henrik Sjstrand; Junfeng Duan; Cecilia Gustavsson; Arjan Koning; Stephan Pomp; Dimitri Rochman; Michael sterlund

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

232

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS HEATING SYSTEM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS HEATING SYSTEM FORT YUKON, ALASKA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE In Cooperation with USDA RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE DENALI COMMISSION APRIL 2013 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ADEC Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation AFRPA Alaska Forest Resources Practices Act BFE Base Flood Elevation BMP best management practice BTU British Thermal Unit CATG Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP Combined Heat and Power CO carbon monoxide CO 2 carbon dioxide CWA Clean Water Act dBA A-weighted decibel DBH diameter at breast height DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA Environmental Assessment

233

Combined Heat and Power System Implementation A Management Decision Guide: Industrial Center of Excellence Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide discusses how a well-balanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) project is the most efficient power generation resource available and suggests the open exploration of collaboration and sharing of benefits between utilities and their key customers who have coincident electric and thermal loads for solid CHP project development. The overriding objective of the guide is to present a balanced and effective approach for potential CHP project developers, owners, and participants to make well-informed ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

Combined Heat and Power in Biofuels Production and Use of Biofuels for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rise of the biofuels industry presents electric utilities with two types of opportunities: combined heat and power (CHP) applications in biofuel production facilities using topping and bottoming power generation cycles and the use of the biofuels as a fuel in electric power generation. This report reviews production processes for ethanol and biodiesel, including the prospects for CHP applications, and describes power generation opportunities for the use of biofuels in power production, especially in ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

235

Solar Colletors Combined with Ground-Source Heat Pumps in Dwellings - Analyses of System Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of ground-source heat pumps for heating buildings and domestic hot water in dwellings is increasing rapidly in Sweden. The heat pump extracts heat (more)

Kjellsson, Elisabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:","NF",0.4,1.6,1.5,0.7,1,1.6,"NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",15027,2370,414,139,5506,105,1184,5309,3 "Boiler Fuel","--","W",296,40,2098,18,859,"--",3.6

237

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:"," NF",0.5,1.3,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2," NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",16515,2656,441,152,6141,99,1198,5828,2.7 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel"," --",28,313,42,2396,15,875," --",4

238

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors" ,,,,,,,,,,, ,"Total United States"

239

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat andpower applications  

SciTech Connect

While demand for electricity continues to grow, expansion of the traditional electricity supply system, or macrogrid, is constrained and is unlikely to keep pace with the growing thirst western economies have for electricity. Furthermore, no compelling case has been made that perpetual improvement in the overall power quality and reliability (PQR)delivered is technically possible or economically desirable. An alternative path to providing high PQR for sensitive loads would generate close to them in microgrids, such as the Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid. Distributed generation would alleviate the pressure for endless improvement in macrogrid PQR and might allow the establishment of a sounder economically based level of universal grid service. Energy conversion from available fuels to electricity close to loads can also provide combined heat and power (CHP) opportunities that can significantly improve the economics of small-scale on-site power generation, especially in hot climates when the waste heat serves absorption cycle cooling equipment that displaces expensive on-peak electricity. An optimization model, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed at Berkeley Lab identifies the energy bill minimizing combination of on-site generation and heat recovery equipment for sites, given their electricity and heat requirements, the tariffs they face, and a menu of available equipment. DER-CAM is used to conduct a systemic energy analysis of a southern California naval base building and demonstrates atypical current economic on-site power opportunity. Results achieve cost reductions of about 15 percent with DER, depending on the tariff.Furthermore, almost all of the energy is provided on-site, indicating that modest cost savings can be achieved when the microgrid is free to select distributed generation and heat recovery equipment in order to minimize its over all costs.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; HamachiLaCommare, Kristina

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion Turbines Steam Turbine Generators Heat Recoveryi.e. combustion turbine, steam turbine (if applicable), heat

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) or cogeneration is the sequential production of two forms of useful energy from a single fuel source. In most CHP applications, chemical energy in fuel is converted to both mechanical and thermal energy. The mechanical energy is generally used to generate electricity, while the thermal energy or heat is used to produce steam, hot water, or hot air. Depending on the application, CHP is referred to by various names including Building Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP); Cooling, Heating, and Power for Buildings (CHPB); Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power (CCHP); Integrated Energy Systems (IES), or Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The principal technical advantage of a CHP system is its ability to extract more useful energy from fuel compared to traditional energy systems such as conventional power plants that only generate electricity and industrial boiler systems that only produce steam or hot water for process applications. By using fuel energy for both power and heat production, CHP systems can be very energy efficient and have the potential to produce electricity below the price charged by the local power provider. Another important incentive for applying cogeneration technology is to reduce or eliminate dependency on the electrical grid. For some industrial processes, the consequences of losing power for even a short period of time are unacceptable. The primary objective of the guide is to present information needed to evaluate the viability of cogeneration for new or existing industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boiler installations and to make informed CHP equipment selection decisions. Information presented is meant to help boiler owners and operators understand the potential benefits derived from implementing a CHP project and recognize opportunities for successful application of cogeneration technology. Topics covered in the guide follow: (1) an overview of cogeneration technology with discussions about benefits of applying cogeneration technology and barriers to implementing cogeneration technology; (2) applicable federal regulations and permitting issues; (3) descriptions of prime movers commonly used in CHP applications, including discussions about design characteristics, heat-recovery options and equipment, fuels and emissions, efficiency, maintenance, availability, and capital cost; (4) electrical generators and electrical interconnection equipment; (5) cooling and dehumidification equipment; (6) thermodynamic cycle options and configurations; (7) steps for evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of applying cogeneration technology; and (8) information sources.

Oland, CB

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process. In the first heat exchanger (evaporator)_ heat fromand fed into a second heat exchanger As the It is thenfrom a well to the heat exchanger of the heat pump's outer

Pelka, Walter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

244

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 Short","Other","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors",

246

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

247

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1",,,,,,,"Coal" 1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Other","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

248

A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources is under investigation in this paper. The proposed cycle combines the organic Rankine cycle and the ejector refrigeration cycle. The ejector is driven by the exhausts from the turbine to produce power and refrigeration simultaneously. A simulation was carried out to analyze the cycle performance using R245fa as the working fluid. A thermal efficiency of 34.1%, an effective efficiency of 18.7% and an exergy efficiency of 56.8% can be obtained at a generating temperature of 395 K, a condensing temperature of 298 K and an evaporating temperature of 280 K. Simulation results show that the proposed cycle has a big potential to produce refrigeration and most exergy losses take place in the ejector. (author)

Zheng, B.; Weng, Y.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the Californiaand/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems with and without heatmicro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP)

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Heat recovery steam generator outlet temperature control system for a combined cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a command cycle electrical power plant including: a steam turbine and at least one set comprising a gas turbine, an afterburner and a heat recovery steam generator having an attemperator for supplying from an outlet thereof to the steam turbine superheated steam under steam turbine operating conditions requiring predetermined superheated steam temperature, flow and pressure; with the gas turbine and steam turbine each generating megawatts in accordance with a plant load demand; master control means being provided for controlling the steam turbine and the heat recovery steam generator so as to establish the steam operating conditions; the combination of: first control means responsive to the gas inlet temperature of the heat recovery steam generator and to the plant load demand for controlling the firing of the afterburner; second control means responsive to the superheated steam predetermined temperature and to superheated steam temperature from the outlet for controlling the attemperator between a closed and an open position; the first and second control means being operated concurrently to maintain the superheated steam outlet temperature while controlling the load of the gas turbine independently of the steam turbine operating conditions.

Martens, A.; Myers, G.A.; McCarty, W.L.; Wescott, K.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A microgrid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The microgrid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (microgrid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean central station generation in California.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalwith absorption chillers that use waste heat for cooling (

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Effects of a carbon tax on combined heat and power adoption by a microgrid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid ((mu)Grid) consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A (mu)Grid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The (mu)Grid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (< 500 kW), such as reciprocating engines, microturbines, and fuel cells, with or without CHP equipment, such as water- and space-heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the (mu)Grid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean generation in California.

Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Siddidqui, Afzal S.; Stadler, Michael

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Expert Meeting Report: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recommendations for Applying Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems A. Rudd, K. Ueno, D. Bergey, R. Osser Building Science Corporation June 2012 i This report received minimal editorial review at NREL. NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affiliated partners makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

255

Combined Heat and Power (CHP): Is It Right For Your Facility?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership with the US DOE Partnership with the US DOE Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Is It Right For Your Facility U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program Webcast Series May 14 th , 2009 John J. Cuttica Cliff Haefke 312/996-4382 312/355-3476 cuttica@uic.edu chaefk1@uic.edu In Partnership with the US DOE Mid Atlantic www.chpcenterma.org Midwest www.chpcentermw.org Pacific www.chpcenterpr.org Northwest Region www.chpcenternw.org Northeast www.northeastchp.org Intermountain www.IntermountainCHP.org Gulf Coast www.GulfCoastCHP.org Southeastern www.chpcenterse.org In Partnership with the US DOE CHP Decision Making Process Presented by Ted Bronson & Joe Orlando Webcast Series January 8, 2009 CHP Regional Application Centers Walkthrough STOP Average Costs Typical Performance Yes No Energy Rates Profiles

256

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate and compare several generic depreciation methods to assess the effectiveness of possible policy measures with respect to the depreciation schedules for investments in combined heat and power plants in the United States. We assess the different depreciation methods for CHP projects of various sizes (ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW). We evaluate the impact of different depreciation schedules on the tax shield, and the resulting tax savings to potential investors. We show that a shorter depreciation cycle could have a substantial impact on the cost of producing power, making cogeneration more attractive. The savings amount to approximately 6-7 percent of capital and fixed operation and maintenance costs, when changing from the current system to a 7 year depreciation scheme with switchover from declining balance to straight line depreciation. Suggestions for further research to improve the analysis are given.

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

State Opportunities for Action: Review of States' Combined Heat and Power Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) has been the focus of federal attention since the mid-1990s. However, many of the market barriers to CHP are at the state level. As a sign of the maturing of the CHP market, a number of states are now undertaking activities to address barriers to CHP, and some states have begun to provide incentives to encourage the development of systems in their states. This report outlines current state-level activities regarding CHP in the areas of interconnection, emissions standards, and financial incentives offered for CHP. Moreover, because this report intends to educate the public about the difficulties of installing CHP, specifically not covered in this report are utility-owned CHP facilities and large investor-owned utilities (IOUs).

Brown, E.; Scott, K.; Elliott, R. N.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Real-Time Combined Heat and Power Operational Strategy Using a Hierarchical Optimization Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing attempts to optimize the operation of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems for building applications have two major limitations: the electrical and thermal loads are obtained from historical weather profiles; and the CHP system models ignore transient responses by using constant equipment efficiencies. This paper considers the transient response of a building combined with a hierarchical CHP optimal control algorithm to obtain a real-time integrated system that uses the most recent weather and electric load information. This is accomplished by running concurrent simulations of two transient building models. The first transient building model uses current as well as forecast input information to obtain short term predictions of the thermal and electric building loads. The predictions are then used by an optimization algorithm, i.e., a hierarchical controller, that decides the amount of fuel and of electrical energy to be allocated at the current time step. In a simulation, the actual physical building is not available and, hence, to simulate a real-time environment, a second, building model with similar but not identical input loads are used to represent the actual building. A state-variable feedback loop is completed at the beginning of each time step by copying, i.e., measuring, the state variable from the actual building and restarting the predictive model using these ?measured? values as initial conditions. The simulation environment presented in this paper features nonlinear effects such as the dependence of the heat exchanger effectiveness on their operating conditions. The results indicate that the CHP engine operation dictated by the proposed hierarchical controller with uncertain weather conditions have the potential to yield significant savings when compared to conventional systems using current values of electricity and fuel prices.

Yun, Kyung Tae; Cho, Heejin; Luck, Rogelio; Mago, Pedro J.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

SciTech Connect

In this report, an economic model of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) is developed. It covers progress on the DER project for the California Energy Commission (CEC) at Berkeley Lab during the period July 2001 through Dec 2002 in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. CERTS has developed a specific paradigm of distributed energy deployment, the CERTS Microgrid (as described in Lasseter et al. 2002). The primary goal of CERTS distributed generation research is to solve the technical problems required to make the CERTS Microgrid a viable technology, and Berkeley Lab's contribution is to direct the technical research proceeding at CERTS partner sites towards the most productive engineering problems. The work reported herein is somewhat more widely applicable, so it will be described within the context of a generic microgrid (mGrid). Current work focuses on the implementation of combined heat and power (CHP) capability. A mGrid as generically defined for this work is a semiautonomous grouping of generating sources and end-use electrical loads and heat sinks that share heat and power. Equipment is clustered and operated for the benefit of its owners. Although it can function independently of the traditional power system, or macrogrid, the mGrid is usually interconnected and exchanges energy and possibly ancillary services with the macrogrid. In contrast to the traditional centralized paradigm, the design, implementation, operation, and expansion of the mGrid is meant to optimize the overall energy system requirements of participating customers rather than the objectives and requirements of the macrogrid.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

HEATMAPCHP - The International Standard for Modeling Combined Heat and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEATMAPCHP is a software tool that can provide a comprehensive simulation of proposed and existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant and system applications, The software model provides a fully integrated analysis of central power production plants that are linked to district energy applications using hot water or steam for heating and/or chilled water-cooling and/or refrigeration connected to a network of buildings or other residential commercial, institutional, or industrial facilities. The program will provide designers, planners. engineers, investors, utilities, and operators with extensive technical, economical, and air emission information about a specific CHP application. The software can also be a valuable tool for community, military, regional, or national planners in defining all aspects of developing, evaluating, and justifying a new CHP project or upgrading an existing thermal system for CHP. Program output may be used to evaluate existing system performance or model the effects of various potential alternative system strategies including upgrades, expansions or conversion of thermal fluids (e.g., steam to hot water). A major feature of the program is its capability to comprehensively analyze a central CHP plant interface application involving thermal storage for both heating and cooling systems in conjunction with various technical distribution parameters covering both the supply and return elements of an extensive piping distribution system. Important features of the software include: the capability to utilize a myriad of fuel and equipment options; determination of air emission impacts that can result from CHP or central energy plant implementation; and the evaluation of extensive economic scenarios including the influence of environmental taxes on a variety of fuel alternatives.

Bloomquist, R. G.; O'Brien, R. G.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. [43] WHOembody a stand-alone solar heating system. It is assumedrecent growth in solar-thermal heating (Weiss et al. [42]),

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

since during the heating season the solar radiation is atHeating and cooling demand compared with air temperature and solarHeating and cooling demand compared with air temperature and solar

Pelka, Walter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

together with the low heat capacity of air implies large airBulk density and bulk heat capacity P and c ' are calculatedaT) ax. J = o The bulk heat capacity and density, as well as

Pelka, Walter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar heat; refrigeration loads that can be met either by standard equipment or absorption equivalents; hot-water and space-heating

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Effects of a carbon tax on combined heat and power adoption by a microgrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a heat exchanger or an absorption chiller) ? u The amount ofof heat exchangers, absorption chillers, and the relatedheat exchangers and/or absorption chillers, thermodynamic

Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Siddidqui, Afzal S.; Stadler, Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storageCHP, often with absorption chillers that use waste heat forand heat-driven absorption chillers. Figure 1 shows a

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG preferable to grid power only when the waste heat can bethe grid electricity it displaces when the waste heat from

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery Steam Generators Water Treatment System Electricalapplicable), heat recovery steam generators, water treatmentMW Combustion Turbines Steam Turbine Generators Heat

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of the waste heat, a condenser is much preferable, inheat rejection in a condenser. Making a few approximationspressure heat rejection in a condenser across a temperature

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the current economic and environmental performance of combined heat and power (CHP) systems in power interruption intolerant commercial facilities. Through a series of three case studies, key trade-offs are analyzed with regard to the provision of black-out ridethrough capability with the CHP systems and the resutling ability to avoid the need for at least some diesel backup generator capacity located at the case study sites. Each of the selected sites currently have a CHP or combined heating, cooling, and power (CCHP) system in addition to diesel backup generators. In all cases the CHP/CCHP system have a small fraction of the electrical capacity of the diesel generators. Although none of the selected sites currently have the ability to run the CHP systems as emergency backup power, all could be retrofitted to provide this blackout ride-through capability, and new CHP systems can be installed with this capability. The following three sites/systems were used for this analysis: (1) Sierra Nevada Brewery - Using 1MW of installed Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells operating on a combination of digestor gas (from the beer brewing process) and natural gas, this facility can produce electricty and heat for the brewery and attached bottling plant. The major thermal load on-site is to keep the brewing tanks at appropriate temperatures. (2) NetApp Data Center - Using 1.125 MW of Hess Microgen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators, with exhaust gas and jacket water heat recovery attached to over 300 tons of of adsorption chillers, this combined cooling and power system provides electricity and cooling to a data center with a 1,200 kW peak electrical load. (3) Kaiser Permanente Hayward Hospital - With 180kW of Tecogen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators this CHP system generates steam for space heating, and hot water for a city hospital. For all sites, similar assumptions are made about the economic and technological constraints of the power generation system. Using the Distributed Energy Resource Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we model three representative scenarios and find the optimal operation scheduling, yearly energy cost, and energy technology investments for each scenario below: Scenario 1 - Diesel generators and CHP/CCHP equipment as installed in the current facility. Scenario 1 represents a baseline forced investment in currently installed energy equipment. Scenario 2 - Existing CHP equipment installed with blackout ride-through capability to replace approximately the same capacity of diesel generators. In Scenario 2 the cost of the replaced diesel units is saved, however additional capital cost for the controls and switchgear for blackout ride-through capability is necessary. Scenario 3 - Fully optimized site analysis, allowing DER-CAM to specify the number of diesel and CHP/CCHP units (with blackout ride-through capability) that should be installed ignoring any constraints on backup generation. Scenario 3 allows DER-CAM to optimize scheduling and number of generation units from the currently available technologies at a particular site. The results of this analysis, using real data to model the optimal schedulding of hypothetical and actual CHP systems for a brewery, data center, and hospital, lead to some interesting conclusions. First, facilities with high heating loads will typically prove to be the most appropriate for CHP installation from a purely economic standpoint. Second, absorption/adsorption cooling systems may only be economically feasible if the technology for these chillers can increase above current best system efficiency. At a coefficient of performance (COP) of 0.8, for instance, an adsorption chiller paired with a natural gas generator with waste heat recovery at a facility with large cooling loads, like a data center, will cost no less on a yearly basis than purchasing electricity and natural gas directly from a utility. Third, at marginal additional cost, if the reliability of CHP systems proves to be at

Norwood, Zack; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris; Kammen, Dan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Preliminary Study on Designing Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System for the University Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) systems are an evolving technology that is at the front of the energy conservation movement. With the reduction in energy consumption and green house gas emissions, CHP systems are improving the efficiency of power generation. Our goal for this research is to develop a specification for a CHP System that will improve the University of Louisiana at Lafayettes operating efficiency. This system will reduce the operating cost of the university and provide reliable, clean energy to the College of Engineering and surrounding buildings. If this system is implemented correctly, it has the ability to meet the economic and reliability needs of the university. CHP systems are the combination of various forms of equipment to meet the electrical and thermal needs from one single fuel source. Major steps involved in the development of a CHP system including data collection and analysis, system calculations and system specifications will be discussed. This research also examines the barriers that CHP systems encounter with environmental regulations and grid interconnection.

Kozman, T. A.; Reynolds, C. M.; Lee, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Novel Direct Steelmaking by Combining Microwave, Electric Arc, and Exothermal Heating Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Steel is a basic material broadly used by perhaps every industry and individual. It is critical to our nation's economy and national security. Unfortunately, the American steel industry is losing competitiveness in the world steel production field. There is an urgent need to develop the next generation of steelmaking technology for the American steel industry. Direct steelmaking through the combination of microwave, electric arc, and exothermal heating is a revolutionary change from current steelmaking technology. This technology can produce molten steel directly from a shippable agglomerate, consisting of iron oxide fines, powdered coal, and ground limestone. This technology is projected to eliminate many current intermediate steelmaking steps including coking, pellet sintering, blast furnace (BF) ironmaking, and basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steelmaking. This technology has the potential to (a) save up to 45% of the energy consumed by conventional steelmaking; (b) dramatically reduce the emission of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, VOCs, fine particulates, and air toxics; (c) substantially reduce waste and emission control costs; (d) greatly lower capital cost; and (e) considerably reduce steel production costs. This technology is based on the unique capability of microwaves to rapidly heat steelmaking raw materials to elevated temperature, then rapidly reduce iron oxides to metal by volumetric heating. Microwave heating, augmented with electric arc and exothermal reactions, is capable of producing molten steel. This technology has the components necessary to establish the ''future'' domestic steel industry as a technology leader with a strong economically competitive position in world markets. The project goals were to assess the utilization of a new steelmaking technology for its potential to achieve better overall energy efficiency, minimize pollutants and wastes, lower capital and operating costs, and increase the competitiveness of the U.S. steel industry. The objectives associated with this goal were to (a) generate a solid base of technical, marketing, economic, and policy data, (b) develop energy, environmental, and economic targets, (c) more definitively assess opportunities and barriers, (d) accumulate knowledge and experience for defining direction for the next phase of development, and (e) promote learning and training of students.

Dr. Xiaodi Huang; Dr. J. Y. Hwang

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the othernatural-gas-fired combined cycle plants. This assumptionplants were efficient combined cycle plants. The four

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,037 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 371 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 Food Sales ................................ 208 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 Food Service .............................

275

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

50.7 50.7 2.4 6.9 6.2 1.3 19.1 0.3 5.4 1.0 2.2 6.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 60.6 2.9 6.8 2.8 1.7 14.8 1.1 21.2 1.2 1.8 6.0 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 44.0 2.6 5.7 2.8 1.1 14.3 0.7 8.6 0.9 1.4 5.8 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 38.8 2.1 4.4 4.1 1.1 14.7 0.2 4.5 0.8 1.6 5.1 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 43.7 2.0 6.8 6.1 1.3 15.4 0.2 4.0 0.8 1.9 5.3 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 50.9 2.7 7.5 7.6 1.4 19.6 0.3 3.4 0.7 2.0 5.8 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 57.7 2.3 8.0 8.9 1.1 23.0 0.1 2.9 1.3 3.2 6.7 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 51.8 1.5 7.4 7.5 0.8 23.0 0.2 1.3 1.1 2.7 6.2 Over 500,000 ............................. 65.4 3.0 9.0 8.8 1.5 28.7 0.3 2.4 1.2 3.2 7.3 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 37.6 1.5

276

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,043 ,043 49 141 128 26 393 7 112 20 46 122 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 115 6 13 5 3 28 2 40 2 3 11 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 86 5 11 5 2 28 1 17 2 3 11 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 142 8 16 15 4 54 1 17 3 6 19 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 116 5 18 16 3 41 (*) 11 2 5 14 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 153 8 22 23 4 59 1 10 2 6 17 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 172 7 24 27 3 68 (*) 9 4 10 20 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 112 3 16 16 2 50 (*) 3 2 6 13 Over 500,000 ............................. 147 7 20 20 3 64 1 5 3 7 16 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 109 4 22 24 3 33 (*) 5 1 9 6 Food Sales ................................ 61 2 4 2 Q 14 1 35 1 1 3 Food Service ............................. 63 3 8 7 3 12 4 20 (*) 1 4 Health Care ...............................

277

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,559 3,559 167 481 436 88 1,340 24 381 69 156 418 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 392 19 44 18 11 96 7 138 8 12 39 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 293 18 38 18 8 95 4 57 6 10 39 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 485 26 55 52 14 184 3 57 10 20 63 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 397 18 62 55 12 140 2 37 7 17 48 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 523 28 77 78 15 202 3 35 7 20 59 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 587 23 82 91 11 234 1 30 14 33 68 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 381 11 55 56 6 170 2 10 8 20 46 Over 500,000 ............................. 501 23 69 67 12 220 2 19 9 25 56 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 371 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 Food Sales ................................ 208 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 Food Service .............................

278

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

48.0 48.0 1.8 6.3 6.1 0.8 18.1 0.3 5.6 1.0 2.3 5.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 60.8 2.9 6.8 2.9 1.7 14.6 1.1 21.6 1.2 1.9 6.0 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 42.2 2.0 5.6 2.8 0.9 13.3 0.7 9.0 0.9 1.5 5.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 35.8 1.7 4.1 3.9 0.7 13.3 0.3 4.6 0.8 1.7 4.7 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 41.8 1.8 6.6 6.0 1.0 14.4 0.2 4.1 0.8 1.9 5.0 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 44.8 1.8 6.4 7.2 0.8 17.5 0.3 3.3 0.7 2.0 5.0 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 53.5 1.8 6.9 8.8 0.5 21.7 0.1 2.7 Q 3.5 6.2 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 51.2 1.2 7.2 7.6 0.7 23.0 0.2 1.2 1.1 2.7 6.1 Over 500,000 ............................. 64.9 1.4 7.9 9.5 0.5 30.6 0.3 2.1 1.4 3.9 7.3 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 37.6 1.5 7.5

279

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

89.8 89.8 34.0 6.7 5.9 6.9 17.6 2.6 5.5 1.0 2.3 7.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 98.9 30.5 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.7 7.1 20.2 1.2 1.7 8.1 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 78.3 30.0 5.4 2.6 6.1 12.5 5.2 8.4 0.8 1.4 5.9 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 67.3 28.1 4.1 3.9 3.7 13.1 2.1 4.6 0.8 1.6 5.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 77.6 30.2 6.6 5.8 6.3 13.9 1.6 3.9 0.8 1.9 6.7 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 83.8 32.4 6.5 7.2 6.0 17.4 1.2 3.3 0.7 2.0 7.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 103.0 41.3 7.1 8.8 7.9 21.5 0.9 2.7 Q 3.4 8.0 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 101.0 39.0 7.6 7.5 9.4 22.6 1.9 1.2 1.1 2.7 8.1 Over 500,000 ............................. 129.7 44.9 11.5 9.5 11.7 30.6 2.2 2.1 Q 3.9 11.9 Principal Building Activity Education ..................................

280

Two well storage systems for combined heating and airconditioning by groundwater heatpumps in shallow aquifers  

SciTech Connect

The use of soil and ground water as an energy source and heat storage systems for heat pumps in order to conserve energy in heating and air conditioning buildings is discussed. Information is included on heat pump operation and performance, aquifer characteristics, soil and ground water temperatures, and cooling and heating demands. Mathematical models are used to calculate flow and temperature fields in the aquifer. It is concluded that two well storage systems with ground water heat pumps are desirable, particularly in northern climates. (LCL)

Pelka, W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) plants are widely used in industrial applications. In the aftermath of the recession, many of the associated production processes are under-utilized, which challenges the competitiveness of chemical companies. However, under-utilization can be a chance for tighter interaction with the power grid, which is in transition to the so-called smart grid, if the CHP plant can dynamically react to time-sensitive electricity prices. In this paper, we describe a generalized mode model on a component basis that addresses the operational optimization of industrial CHP plants. The mode formulation tracks the state of each plant component in a detailed manner and can account for different operating modes, e.g. fuel-switching for boilers and supplementary firing for gas turbines, and transitional behavior. Transitional behavior such as warm and cold start-ups, shutdowns and pre-computed start-up trajectories is modeled with modes as well. The feasible region of operation for each component is described based on input-output relationships that are thermodynamically sound, such as the Willans line for steam turbines. Furthermore, we emphasize the use of mathematically efficient logic constraints that allow solving the large-scale models fast. We provide an industrial case study and study the impact of different scenarios for under-utilization. 1

Sumit Mitra; Ignacioe. Grossmann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compared to adsorption/absorption chiller systems. Expensiveonsite (without absorption chiller offset) Effectiveonsite (includes absorption chiller offset) Heating Load

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Thermo economic comparison of conventional micro combined heat and power systems with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat and power systems (CHP) on this scale is called micro CHP (mCHP). First, the energy consumption-family household. The SOFC-mCHP system provides electricity as well as hot water for use and space heating heating located in larger cities. Secondly, there are CHP systems used in a decentralized form

Liso, Vincenzo

284

An Engineering-Economic Analysis of Combined Heat and Power Technologies in a Grid Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of increased overall conversion efficiency. First, carbon emissions from power plants and generators would be reduced. Second, the environmental problem of disposing of power plant waste heat into the environment of heat using conventional separate heat and power. For typical electrical and thermal efficiencies, CHP

285

Energy and cost analysis of a solar-hydrogen combined heat and power system for remote power supply using a computer simulation  

SciTech Connect

A simulation program, based on Visual Pascal, for sizing and techno-economic analysis of the performance of solar-hydrogen combined heat and power systems for remote applications is described. The accuracy of the submodels is checked by comparing the real performances of the system's components obtained from experimental measurements with model outputs. The use of the heat generated by the PEM fuel cell, and any unused excess hydrogen, is investigated for hot water production or space heating while the solar-hydrogen system is supplying electricity. A 5 kWh daily demand profile and the solar radiation profile of Melbourne have been used in a case study to investigate the typical techno-economic characteristics of the system to supply a remote household. The simulation shows that by harnessing both thermal load and excess hydrogen it is possible to increase the average yearly energy efficiency of the fuel cell in the solar-hydrogen system from just below 40% up to about 80% in both heat and power generation (based on the high heating value of hydrogen). The fuel cell in the system is conventionally sized to meet the peak of the demand profile. However, an economic optimisation analysis illustrates that installing a larger fuel cell could lead to up to a 15% reduction in the unit cost of the electricity to an average of just below 90 c/kWh over the assessment period of 30 years. Further, for an economically optimal size of the fuel cell, nearly a half the yearly energy demand for hot water of the remote household could be supplied by heat recovery from the fuel cell and utilising unused hydrogen in the exit stream. Such a system could then complement a conventional solar water heating system by providing the boosting energy (usually in the order of 40% of the total) normally obtained from gas or electricity. (author)

Shabani, Bahman; Andrews, John; Watkins, Simon [School of Aerospace Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

1?10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential: Independent Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This independent review examines the status and technical potential of 1-10 kW stationary combined heat and power fuel cell systems and analyzes the achievability of the DOE cost, efficiency, and durability targets for 2012, 2015, and 2020.

Maru, H. C.; Singhal, S. C.; Stone, C.; Wheeler, D.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","All Sources",4,85.9,80.09  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

STATE_CODE","PRODUCER_TYPE","FUEL_SOURCE","GENERATORS","NAMEPLATE_CAPACITY STATE_CODE","PRODUCER_TYPE","FUEL_SOURCE","GENERATORS","NAMEPLATE_CAPACITY (Megawatts)","SUMMER_CAPACITY (Megawatts)" 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","All Sources",4,85.9,80.09 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","Coal",3,65.5,61.1 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","Petroleum",1,20.4,18.99 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Industrial Power","All Sources",23,229.4,204.21 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Industrial Power","Natural Gas",28,159.32,136.67 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Industrial Power","Petroleum",8,68.28,65.86

289

Business Case for a Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System in Commercial Applications  

SciTech Connect

Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and hot water with greater efficiency and lower emissions than alternative sources. These systems can be used either as baseload, grid-connected, or as off-the-grid power sources. This report presents a business case for CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50 kWe. Systems in this power range are considered micro-CHP-FCS. For this particular business case, commercial applications rather than residential or industrial are targeted. To understand the benefits of implementing a micro-CHP-FCS, the characteristics that determine their competitive advantage must first be identified. Locations with high electricity prices and low natural gas prices are ideal locations for micro-CHP-FCSs. Fortunately, these high spark spread locations are generally in the northeastern area of the United States and California where government incentives are already in place to offset the current high cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs. As a result of the inherently high efficiency of a fuel cell and their ability to use the waste heat that is generated as a CHP, they have higher efficiency. This results in lower fuel costs than comparable alternative small-scale power systems (e.g., microturbines and reciprocating engines). A variety of markets should consider micro-CHP-FCSs including those that require both heat and baseload electricity throughout the year. In addition, the reliable power of micro-CHP-FCSs could be beneficial to markets where electrical outages are especially frequent or costly. Greenhouse gas emission levels from micro-CHP-FCSs are 69 percent lower, and the human health costs are 99.9 percent lower, than those attributed to conventional coal-fired power plants. As a result, FCSs can allow a company to advertise as environmentally conscious and provide a bottom-line sales advantage. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, micro-CHP-FCSs are currently more expensive than alternative technologies. As the technology gains a foothold in its target markets and demand increases, the costs will decline in response to improved manufacturing efficiencies, similar to trends seen with other technologies. Transparency Market Research forecasts suggest that the CHP-FCS market will grow at a compound annual growth rate of greater than 27 percent over the next 5 years. These production level increases, coupled with the expected low price of natural gas, indicate the economic payback period will move to less than 5 years over the course of the next 5 years. To better understand the benefits of micro-CHP-FCSs, The U.S. Department of Energy worked with ClearEdge Power to install fifteen 5-kWe fuel cells in the commercial markets of California and Oregon. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating these systems in terms of economics, operations, and their environmental impact in real-world applications. As expected, the economic analysis has indicated that the high capital cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than typically is acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, a payback period of less than 3 years may be expected as increased production brings system cost down, and CHP incentives are maintained or improved.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Anderson, David M.; Amaya, Jodi P.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Srivastava, Viraj; Upton, Jaki F.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Use of Time-Aggregated Data in Economic Screening Analyses of Combined Heat and Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) projects (also known as cogeneration projects) usually undergo a series of assessments and viability checks before any commitment is made. A screening analysis, with electrical and thermal loads characterized on an annual basis, may be performed initially to quickly determine the economic viability of the proposed project. Screening analyses using time-aggregated data do not reflect several critical cost influences, however. Seasonal and diurnal variations in electrical and thermal loads, as well as time-of-use utility pricing structures, can have a dramatic impact on the economics. A more accurate economic assessment requires additional detailed data on electrical and thermal demand (e.g., hourly load data), which may not be readily available for the specific facility under study. Recent developments in CHP evaluation tools, however, can generate the needed hourly data through the use of historical data libraries and building simulation. This article utilizes model-generated hourly load data for four potential CHP applications and compares the calculated cost savings of a CHP system when evaluated on a time-aggregated (i.e., annual) basis to the savings when evaluated on an hour-by-hour basis. It is observed that the simple, aggregated analysis forecasts much greater savings (i.e., greater economic viability) than the more detailed hourly analysis. The findings confirm that the simpler tool produces results with a much more optimistic outlook, which, if taken by itself, might lead to erroneous project decisions. The more rigorous approach, being more reflective of actual requirements and conditions, presents a more accurate economic comparison of the alternatives, which, in turn, leads to better decision risk management.

Hudson II, Carl Randy [ORNL

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hot water tank for use with a combination of solar energy and heat-pump desuperheating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water heater or system is described which includes a hot water tank having disposed therein a movable baffle to function as a barrier between the incoming volume of cold water entering the tank and the volume of heated water entering the tank which is heated by the circulation of the cold water through a solar collector and/or a desuperheater of a heat pump so as to optimize the manner in which heat is imparted to the water in accordance to the demand on the water heater or system. A supplemental heater is also provided and it is connected so as to supplement the heating of the water in the event that the solar collector and/or desuperheater cannot impart all of the desired heat input into the water.

Andrews, J.W.

1980-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hot water tank for use with a combination of solar energy and heat-pump desuperheating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water heater or system which includes a hot water tank having disposed therein a movable baffle to function as a barrier between the incoming volume of cold water entering the tank and the volume of heated water entering the tank which is heated by the circulation of the cold water through a solar collector and/or a desuperheater of a heat pump so as to optimize the manner in which heat is imparted to the water in accordance to the demand on the water heater or system. A supplemental heater is also provided and it is connected so as to supplement the heating of the water in the event that the solar collector and/or desuperheater cannot impart all of the desired heat input into the water.

Andrews, John W. (Sag Harbor, NY)

1983-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

293

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secondly, waste heat driven thermal cooling systems are onlyelectricity and thermal energy for cooling and heatingrecovery and cooling technologies, including the thermal-

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shaded regions represent power generation costs . . 11 Heat-against conventional power generation technologies when thephotovoltaic and wind power generation have recently seen

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysed at NBVC Electricity Tariff Natural Gas Tariff Nopurchase any electricity under the tariff. This is simplytheir electricity and heat requirements, the tariffs they

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling loads using absorption chillers. Utility rates andvia heat exchangers. Absorption chillers are considered inof single- effect absorption chillers is only one seventh (

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vacuum tube liquid-vapor (heat-pipe) collectors. Proceedingsheat rejection in a condenser across a temperature gradient. This cycle ignores pressure losses in the pipes,

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with CombinedHeat and Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of solar thermal and heat storage systems can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP) and contribute to enhanced CO2 reduction. However, the interactions between solar thermal collection and storage systems and CHP systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of solar thermal and heat storage on CO2 emissions and annual energy costs, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program. The objective is minimization of annual energy costs. This paper focuses on analysis of the optimal interaction of solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the California service territory of San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). Contrary to typical expectations, our results indicate that despite the high solar radiation in southern California, fossil based CHP units are dominant, even with forecast 2020 technology and costs. A CO2 pricing scheme would be needed to incent installation of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and no heat storage systems are adopted. This research also shows that photovoltaic (PV) arrays are favored by CO2 pricing more than solar thermal adoption.

Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future  

SciTech Connect

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) solutions represent a proven and effective near-term energy option to help the United States enhance energy efficiency, ensure environmental quality, promote economic growth, and foster a robust energy infrastructure. Using CHP today, the United States already avoids more than 1.9 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of fuel consumption and 248 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions annually compared to traditional separate production of electricity and thermal energy. This CO{sub 2} reduction is the equivalent of removing more than 45 million cars from the road. In addition, CHP is one of the few options in the portfolio of energy alternatives that combines environmental effectiveness with economic viability and improved competitiveness. This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its effectiveness and holds promise for the future as an: (1) Environmental Solution: Significantly reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through greater energy efficiency; (2) Competitive Business Solution: Increasing efficiency, reducing business costs, and creating green-collar jobs; (3) Local Energy Solution: Deployable throughout the US; and (4) Infrastructure Modernization Solution: Relieving grid congestion and improving energy security. CHP should be one of the first technologies deployed for near-term carbon reductions. The cost-effectiveness and near-term viability of widespread CHP deployment place the technology at the forefront of practical alternative energy solutions such as wind, solar, clean coal, biofuels, and nuclear power. Clear synergies exist between CHP and most other technologies that dominate the energy and environmental policy dialogue in the country today. As the Nation transforms how it produces, transports, and uses the many forms of energy, it must seize the clear opportunity afforded by CHP in terms of climate change, economic competitiveness, energy security, and infrastructure modernization. The energy efficiency benefits of CHP offer significant, realistic solutions to near- and long-term energy issues facing the Nation. With growing demand for energy, tight supply options, and increasing environmental constraints, extracting the maximum output from primary fuel sources through efficiency is critical to sustained economic development and environmental stewardship. Investment in CHP would stimulate the creation of new 'green-collar' jobs, modernize aging energy infrastructure, and protect and enhance the competitiveness of US manufacturing industries. The complementary roles of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and responsible use of traditional energy supplies must be recognized. CHP's proven performance and potential for wider use are evidence of its near-term applicability and, with technological improvements and further elimination of market barriers, of its longer term promise to address the country's most important energy and environmental needs. A strategic approach is needed to encourage CHP where it can be applied today and address the regulatory and technical challenges preventing its long-term viability. Experience in the United States and other countries shows that a balanced set of policies, incentives, business models, and investments can stimulate sustained CHP growth and allow all stakeholders to reap its many well-documented benefits.

Shipley, Ms. Anna [Sentech, Inc.; Hampson, Anne [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Hedman, Mr. Bruce [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Garland, Patricia W [ORNL; Bautista, Paul [Sentech, Inc.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by CHP heat output P e Electrical power output of system Qratio of thermal to electrical power output R d Desiredratio of thermal to electrical power output T a Ambient

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fired natural gas absorption chiller (kW) Turnkey cost offired natural gas absorption chiller ($) Set of end-usesexchanger or an absorption chiller) The amount of heat (in

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decreased cost of heat and electricity grid (Casten andgrid. Chapter 1 begins with analysis of the relative demand for electricity and heatheat can be cost-effectively stored with available technologies. (c) DCS-CHP thus can ameliorate grid-

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1 ? QR) where Q1 is the apparent ...

Mircea Grecu; William S. Olson; Chung-Lin Shie; Tristan S. LEcuyer; Wei-Kuo Tao

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.85. The test site load profiles described in this report3.1: Electric-Only Sample Load Profile A.S. Siddiqui et al.Space Heating Sample Load Profile Figure 3.3: Sample Cooling

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Combined Operation of Solar Energy Source Heat Pump, Low-vale Electricity and Floor Radiant System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today energy sources are decreasing and saving energy conservation becomes more important. Therefore, it becomes an important investigative direction how to use reproducible energy sources in the HVAC field. The feasibility and necessity of using solar energy, low-vale electricity as heat sources in a floor radiant system are analyzed. This paper presents a new heat pump system and discusses its operational modes in winter.

Liu, G.; Guo, Z.; Hu, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

1…10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential: Independent Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-10 kW Stationary Combined Heat 1-10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program NREL/BK-6A10-48265 November 2010 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

307

CFD MODELING OF ITER CABLE-IN-CONDUIT SUPERCONDUCTORS. PART V: COMBINED MOMENTUM AND HEAT TRANSFER IN RIB ROUGHENED PIPES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques have been proposed and applied in a series of papers to analyze cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Previous work on the pressure drop in the central channel of ITER CICC is extended here to the problem of combined heat and momentum transfer. The CFD model, solved by the FLUENT commercial code, is first validated against 2D and 3D data from compact heat exchangers, showing good agreement. The Colburn analogy between the friction factor f and the Nusselt number Nu is not verified in the considered 2D geometries, as shown by both experiment and simulation. The validated CFD model is finally applied to the 3D analysis of central channel-like geometries relevant for ITER CICC. It is shown that the heat transfer coefficient on the central channel side stays relatively close to the smooth-pipe (Dittus-Boelter) value.

Zanino, R.; Giors, S. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico Torino, I-10129 (Italy)

2008-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Analysis of community solar systems for combined space and domestic hot water heating using annual cycle thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified design procedure is examined for estimating the storage capacity and collector area for annual-cycle-storage, community solar heating systems in which 100% of the annual space heating energy demand is provided from the solar source for the typical meteorological year. Hourly computer simulations of the performance of these systems were carried out for 10 cities in the United States for 3 different building types and 4 community sizes. These permitted the use of design values for evaluation of a more simplified system sizing method. Results of this study show a strong correlation between annual collector efficiency and two major, location-specific, annual weather parameters: the mean air temperature during daylignt hours and the total global insolation on the collector surface. Storage capacity correlates well with the net winter load, which is a measure of the seasonal variation in the total load, a correlation which appears to be independent of collector type.

Hooper, F.C.; McClenahan, J.D.; Cook, J.D.; Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Proposing a decision-making model using analytical hierarchy process and fuzzy expert system for prioritizing industries in installation of combined heat and power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Restructuring electric power and increasing energy cost encourage large energy consumers to utilize combined heat and power (CHP) systems. In addition to these two factors, the gradual exclusion of subsidies is the third factor intensifying the utilization ... Keywords: Analytic hierarchy process, Combined heat and power, Decision making, Fuzzy expert system, Industry

Mehdi Piltan; Erfan Mehmanchi; S. F. Ghaderi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009, Appendix 6: Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87 DOE Industrial Technologies Program 87 DOE Industrial Technologies Program Appendix 6: Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities u CHP Table........................................................................................................................................................................................... 189 Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities Industrial Distributed Energy, a cross-cutting activity within the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), builds on activities conducted by DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies

311

Combined cycle electric power plant and a heat recovery steam generator having improved boiler feed pump flow control  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant is described that includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes an economizer tube and a high pressure evaporator tube and a boiler feed pump for directing the heat exchange fluid serially through the aforementioned tubes. A condenser is associated with the steam turbine for converting the spent steam into condensate water to be supplied to a deaerator for removing undesired air and for preliminarily heating the water condensate before being pumped to the economizer tube. Condensate flow through the economizer tube is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the boiler feed pump at a predetermined, substantially constant rate. A bypass conduit is provided to feed back a portion of the flow heated in the economizer tube to the deaerator; the portion being equal to the difference between the constant flow through the economizer tube and the flow to be directed through the high pressure evaporator tube as required by the steam turbine for its present load.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1976-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

312

Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating  

SciTech Connect

Homebuilders are exploring more cost effective combined space and water heating systems (combo systems) with major water heater manufacturers that are offering pre-engineered forced air space heating combo systems. In this project, unlike standardized tests, laboratory tests were conducted that subjected condensing tankless and storage water heater based combo systems to realistic, coincidental space and domestic hot water loads with the following key findings: 1) The tankless combo system maintained more stable DHW and space heating temperatures than the storage combo system. 2) The tankless combo system consistently achieved better daily efficiencies (i.e. 84%-93%) than the storage combo system (i.e. 81%- 91%) when the air handler was sized adequately and adjusted properly to achieve significant condensing operation. When condensing operation was not achieved, both systems performed with lower (i.e. 75%-88%), but similar efficiencies. 3) Air handlers currently packaged with combo systems are not designed to optimize condensing operation. More research is needed to develop air handlers specifically designed for condensing water heaters. 4) System efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved only on days where continual and steady space heating loads were required with significant condensing operation. For days where heating was more intermittent, the system efficiencies fell below 90%.

Kingston, T.; Scott, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Analysis of combined hydrogen, heat, and power as a bridge to a hydrogen transition.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined hydrogen, heat, and power (CHHP) technology is envisioned as a means to providing heat and electricity, generated on-site, to large end users, such as hospitals, hotels, and distribution centers, while simultaneously producing hydrogen as a by-product. The hydrogen can be stored for later conversion to electricity, used on-site (e.g., in forklifts), or dispensed to hydrogen-powered vehicles. Argonne has developed a complex-adaptive-system model, H2CAS, to simulate how vehicles and infrastructure can evolve in a transition to hydrogen. This study applies the H2CAS model to examine how CHHP technology can be used to aid the transition to hydrogen. It does not attempt to predict the future or provide one forecast of system development. Rather, the purpose of the model is to understand how the system works. The model uses a 50- by 100-mile rectangular grid of 1-square-mile cells centered on the Los Angeles metropolitan area. The major expressways are incorporated into the model, and local streets are considered to be ubiquitous, except where there are natural barriers. The model has two types of agents. Driver agents are characterized by a number of parameters: home and job locations, income, various types of 'personalities' reflective of marketing distinctions (e.g., innovators, early adopters), willingness to spend extra money on 'green' vehicles, etc. At the beginning of the simulations, almost all driver agents own conventional vehicles. They drive around the metropolitan area, commuting to and from work and traveling to various other destinations. As they do so, they observe the presence or absence of facilities selling hydrogen. If they find such facilities conveniently located along their routes, they are motivated to purchase a hydrogen-powered vehicle when it becomes time to replace their present vehicle. Conversely, if they find that they would be inconvenienced by having to purchase hydrogen earlier than necessary or if they become worried that they would run out of fuel before encountering a facility, their motivation to purchase a hydrogen-powered vehicle decreases. At vehicle purchase time, they weigh this experience, as well as other factors such as social influence by their peers, fuel cost, and capital cost of a hydrogen vehicle. Investor agents build full-service hydrogen fueling stations (HFSs) at different locations along the highway network. They base their decision to build or not build a station on their (imperfect) estimates of the sales the station would immediately generate (based on hydrogen-powered vehicle traffic past the location and other factors), as well as the growth in hydrogen sales they could expect throughout their investment horizon. The interaction between driver and investor agents provides the basis for growth in both the number of hydrogen vehicles and number of hydrogen stations. For the present report, we have added to this mix smaller, 'bare-bones' hydrogen dispensing facilities (HDFs) of the type that owners of CHHP facilities could provide to the public. The locations of these stations were chosen to match existing facilities that might reasonably incorporate CHHP plants in the future. Unlike the larger commercial stations, these facilities are built according to exogenously supplied timetables, and no attempt has been made to model the financial basis for the facilities. Rather, our objective is to understand how the presence of these additional stations might facilitate the petroleum-to-hydrogen transition. We discuss a base case in which the HDFs are not present, and then investigate the effects of introducing HDFs in various numbers; according to different timetables; with various production capacities; and with hydrogen selling at prices above, equal to, and below the commercial stations selling price. We conclude that HDFs can indeed be helpful in accelerating a petroleum-to-hydrogen transition. Placed in areas where investors might not be willing to install large for-profit HFSs, HDFs can serve as a bridge until demand for hydrogen increases to the point where l

Mahalik, M.; Stephan, C. (Decision and Information Sciences)

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Subcontract Report: Modular Combined Heat & Power System for Utica College: Design Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utica College, located in Utica New York, intends to install an on-site power/cogeneration facility. The energy facility is to be factory pre-assembled, or pre- assembled in modules, to the fullest extent possible, and ready to install and interconnect at the College with minimal time and engineering needs. External connections will be limited to fuel supply, electrical output, potable makeup water as required and cooling and heat recovery systems. The proposed facility will consist of 4 self-contained, modular Cummins 330kW engine generators with heat recovery systems and the only external connections will be fuel supply, electrical outputs and cooling and heat recovery systems. This project was eventually cancelled due to changing DOE budget priorities, but the project engineers produced this system design specification in hopes that it may be useful in future endeavors.

Rouse, Greg [Gas Technology Institute

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FOR A COLLEGE CAMPUS THE HARRISONBURG, VIRGINIA WASTE-TO-ENERGY FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of installing the super-heaters, cooling towers, condensers and auxiliary equipment needed to make and cooling needs of the campus. This facility also has a small turbine that can be brought on line to produce Madison University central heating & cooling system. This facility uses a mass-burn style waste combustion

Columbia University

316

Microgrids for Commercial Building Combined Heat and Power and Power and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuels), photovoltaics (PV), fuel cells, local heat and electricity storage, etc. Trends emerging at a consistent level of PQR throughout large regions. For example, PQR targets are consistent virtually all cost, point A, which in Fig. 3 occurs to the left of the current U.S. target of about 3-4 nines, point

317

Emissions Performance of an 85 kWe Packaged Combined Heat and Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DER) offer industrial, commercial, institutional, and residential customers a means of providing electric power close to the load while at the same time increasing their electrical reliability, energy efficiency, and power quality. In most cases, the cost to fuel a continuously operating generator with natural gas or distillate is greater than the value of the electricity generated. It is only when co-generated heat is recovered from the generator and used to reduce fuel cos...

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Combined Heat and Power: Coal-Fired Air Turbine (CAT)-Cycle Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By combining an integrated system with a gas turbine, coal-fired air turbine cycle technology can produce energy at an efficiency rate of over 40%, with capital and operating costs below those of competing conventional systems. Read this fact sheet to discover the additional benefits of this exciting new technology.

Recca, L.

1999-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

319

Review of Potential Federal and State Green House Gas Policy Drivers for Combined Heat and Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power generation sector contributes about one-third of all green house gas (GHG) emissions in the United States. To curb the reduction of green house gas emissions, all options in the electric power value chain must be considered and evaluated. The more efficient utilization of natural gas fuel via use of distributed combined cooling, heating, and power (CHP) systems in the end-use sector may be one option to mitigating GHG emissions. This research project was undertaken to assess the extent...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

The flip-side of galaxy formation: A combined model of Galaxy Formation and Cluster Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Only ~10% of baryons in the universe are in the form of stars, yet most models of luminous structure formation have concentrated on the properties of the luminous stellar matter. In this paper we focus on the "flip side" of galaxy formation and investigate the properties of the material that is not presently locked up in galaxies. This "by-product" of galaxy formation can be observed as an X-ray emitting plasma (the intracluster medium, hereafter ICM) in groups and clusters, and we present a version of the Durham semi-analytic galaxy formation model GALFORM that allows us to investigate the properties of the ICM. As we would expect on the basis of gravitational scaling arguments, the previous model (presented in Bower et al. 2006) fails to reproduce even the most basic observed properties of the ICM; however, we present a simple modification to the model to allow for heat input into the ICM from the AGN "radio mode" feedback. This heating acts to expel gas from the X-ray luminous central regions of the host halo. With this modification, the model reproduces the observed gas mass fractions and luminosity-temperature relation of groups and clusters. Introducing the heating process into the model requires changes to a number of model parameters in order to retain a good match to the observed galaxy properties. With the revised parameters, the best fitting luminosity function is comparable to that presented in Bower et al. (2006). The new model makes a fundamental step forward, providing a unified model of galaxy and cluster ICM formation. However, the detailed comparison with the data is not completely satisfactory, and we highlight key areas for improvement.

Richard G. Bower; Ian G. McCarthy; Andrew J. Benson

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application, the coolant is pumped to a heat recovery system. A water-to-air heat exchange system or water-to-water heat

Victoria, University of

322

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Case Study: Fuel Cells Provide Combined Heat and Power at Verizon's Garden Central Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Study: Fuel Case Study: Fuel Cells Provide Com- bined Heat and Power at Verizon's Garden City Central Office With more than 67 million customers nationwide, Verizon Communications is one of the largest telecommunica- tions providers in the U.S. Power inter- ruptions can severely impact network operations and could result in losses in excess of $1 million/minute. 1 In 2005, Verizon Communications installed a 1.4 MW phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) system, consisting of seven 200 kW units, at its Central Office in Garden City, New York. This fuel cell power plant, the largest in the United States at the time, is reaping environmental benefits and demonstrating the viabil- ity of fuel cells in a commercial, critical telecommunications setting. Background Verizon's Central Office in Garden City,

324

Combined Heating and Power Using Microturbines in a Major Urban Hotel  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a cooperative effort to install and operate a Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at a major hotel in San Francisco, CA. The packaged CHP System integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller was directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, and could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 Refrigeration Tons (RT) of chilled water at a 59oF (15oC) ambient temperature. For the year, the CHP efficiency was 54 percent. Significant lessons learned from this test and verification project are discussed as well as measured performance and economic considerations.

Sweetser, Richard [Exergy Partners Corp.; Wagner, Timothy [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC); Leslie, Neil [Gas Technology Institute; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an investigation at Ernesto Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) of the potential for coupling combined heat and power (CHP) with on-site electricity generation to provide power and heating, and cooling services to customers. This research into distributed energy resources (DER) builds on the concept of the microgrid (mGrid), a semiautonomous grouping of power-generating sources that are placed and operated by and for the benefit of its members. For this investigation, a hypothetical small shopping mall (''Microgrid Oaks'') was developed and analyzed for the cost effectiveness of installing CHP to provide the mGrid's energy needs. A mGrid consists of groups of customers pooling energy loads and installing a combination of generation resources that meets the particular mGrid's goals. This study assumes the mGrid is seeking to minimize energy costs. mGrids could operate independently of the macrogrid (the wider power network), but they are usually assumed to be connected, through power electronics, to the macrogrid. The mGrid in this study is assumed to be interconnected to the macrogrid, and can purchase some energy and ancillary services from utility providers.

Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Willamina Project Report : Indirect-Fired, Biomass-Fueled, Combined-Cycle, Gas Turbine Power Plant Using a Ceramic Heat Exchanger. Volume 1. Conceptual Plant Design and Analysis. Final report. [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

A new technology for a wood-fueled electrical generation plant was evaluated. The proposed plant utilizes an indirectly fired gas turbine (IFGT) using a ceramic heat exchanger for high efficiency, due to its high temperature capability. The proposed plant utilizes a wood-fueled furnace with a ceramic heat exchanger to heat compressed air for a gas turbine. The configuration proposed is a combined cycle power plant that can produce 6 to 12 MW, depending upon the amount of wood used to supplementally fire a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), which in turn powers a steam turbine. Drawings, specifications, and cost estimates based on a combined cycle analysis and wood-fired HRSG were developed. The total plant capital cost was estimated to be $13.1 million ($1640/kW). The heat rate for a 8-MW plant was calculated to be 10,965 Btu/kW when using wood residues with a 42% moisture content. Levelized electric energy costs were estimated to be 6.9 cents/kWh.

F.W. Braun Engineers.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part II of II, case study results.  

SciTech Connect

Innovative energy system optimization models are deployed to evaluate novel fuel cell system (FCS) operating strategies, not typically pursued by commercial industry. Most FCS today are installed according to a 'business-as-usual' approach: (1) stand-alone (unconnected to district heating networks and low-voltage electricity distribution lines), (2) not load following (not producing output equivalent to the instantaneous electrical or thermal demand of surrounding buildings), (3) employing a fairly fixed heat-to-power ratio (producing heat and electricity in a relatively constant ratio to each other), and (4) producing only electricity and no recoverable heat. By contrast, models discussed here consider novel approaches as well. Novel approaches include (1) networking (connecting FCSs to electrical and/or thermal networks), (2) load following (having FCSs produce only the instantaneous electricity or heat demanded by surrounding buildings), (3) employing a variable heat-to-power ratio (such that FCS can vary the ratio of heat and electricity they produce), (4) co-generation (combining the production of electricity and recoverable heat), (5) permutations of these together, and (6) permutations of these combined with more 'business-as-usual' approaches. The detailed assumptions and methods behind these models are described in Part I of this article pair.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Optimizal design and control strategies for novel Combined Heat and Power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part II of II, case study results.  

SciTech Connect

Innovative energy system optimization models are deployed to evaluate novel fuel cell system (FCS) operating strategies, not typically pursued by commercial industry. Most FCS today are installed according to a 'business-as-usual' approach: (1) stand-alone (unconnected to district heating networks and low-voltage electricity distribution lines), (2) not load following (not producing output equivalent to the instantaneous electrical or thermal demand of surrounding buildings), (3) employing a fairly fixed heat-to-power ratio (producing heat and electricity in a relatively constant ratio to each other), and (4) producing only electricity and no recoverable heat. By contrast, models discussed here consider novel approaches as well. Novel approaches include (1) networking (connecting FCSs to electrical and/or thermal networks), (2) load following (having FCSs produce only the instantaneous electricity or heat demanded by surrounding buildings), (3) employing a variable heat-to-power ratio (such that FCS can vary the ratio of heat and electricity they produce), (4) co-generation (combining the production of electricity and recoverable heat), (5) permutations of these together, and (6) permutations of these combined with more 'business-as-usual' approaches.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

COMBINED ACTIVE/PASSIVE DECAY HEAT REMOVAL APPROACH FOR THE 24 MWt GAS-COOLED FAST REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Decay heat removal at depressurized shutdown conditions has been regarded as one of the key areas where significant improvement in passive response was targeted for the GEN IV GFR over the GCFR designs of thirty years ago. It has been recognized that the poor heat transfer characteristics of gas coolant at lower pressures needed to be accommodated in the GEN IV design. The design envelope has therefore been extended to include a station blackout sequence simultaneous with a small break/leak. After an exploratory phase of scoping analysis in this project, together with CEA of France, it was decided that natural convection would be selected as the passive decay heat removal approach of preference. Furthermore, a double vessel/containment option, similar to the double vessel/guard vessel approach of the SFR, was selected as the means of design implementation to reduce the PRA risks of the depressurization accident. However additional calculations in conjunction with CEA showed that there was an economic penalty in terms of decay heat removal system heat exchanger size, elevation heights for thermal centers, and most of all in guard containment back pressure for complete reliance on natural convection only. The back pressure ranges complicated the design requirements for the guard containment. Recognizing that the definition of a loss-of-coolant-accident in the GFR is a misnomer, since gas coolant will always be present, and the availability of some driven blower would reduce fuel temperature transients significantly; it was decided instead to aim for a hybrid active/passive combination approach to the selected BDBA. Complete natural convection only would still be relied on for decay heat removal but only after the first twenty four hours after the initiation of the accident. During the first twenty four hour period an actively powered blower would be relied on to provide the emergency decay power removal. However the power requirements of the active blower/circulators would be kept low by maintaining a pressurized system coolant back pressure of {approx}7-8 bars through the design of the guard containment for such a design pressure. This approach is termed the medium pressure approach by both CEA and the US. Such a containment design pressure is in the range of the LWR experience, both PWRs and BWRs. Both metal containments and concrete guard containments are possible in this pressure range. This approach is then a time-at-risk approach as the power requirements should be low enough that battery/fuel cell banks without diesel generator start-up failure rate issues should be capable of providing the necessary power. Compressed gas sources are another possibility. A companion PRA study is being conducted to survey the reliability of such systems.

CHENG,L.Y.; LUDEWIG, H.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings.............................. Buildings.............................. 1,644 1,429 131 Q 72 0.10 0.09 0.01 Q (*) Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 228 Q (*) Q 0.41 0.38 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 237 Q 1 Q 0.36 0.32 Q (*) Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 201 179 11 (*) Q 0.19 0.17 0.01 (*) Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 124 115 Q (*) 4 0.14 0.13 Q (*) (*) 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 209 188 10 Q 7 0.11 0.10 0.01 Q (*) 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 270 250 Q Q 10 0.09 0.08 Q Q (*) 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 258 183 Q Q 11 0.08 0.05 0.02 Q (*) Over 500,000 ............................. 72 Q Q Q 15 0.02 Q Q Q (*) Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 342 322 11 Q Q 0.18 0.17 0.01 Q (*) Food Sales ................................

331

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

636 636 580 46 1 Q 114.0 103.9 8.3 0.2 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 165 154 10 Q Q 118.1 109.9 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 123 112 11 Q Q 121.2 110.2 10.5 Q Q Over 500,000 ............................. 171 147 16 Q Q 93.6 80.6 8.9 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 134 122 8 Q Q 116.6 106.6 6.9 Q Q Food Service ............................. N N N N N N N N N N Health Care ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Inpatient ..................................

332

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

28 28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 34 32 Q (*) Q 56.9 52.2 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 36 33 Q (*) Q 49.4 44.7 Q 0.1 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 28 25 1 (*) Q 26.7 23.8 1.4 0.1 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 17 16 Q (*) 1 19.1 17.8 Q (*) 0.6 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 29 26 1 Q 1 15.6 14.1 0.7 Q 0.5 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 37 35 Q Q 1 12.5 11.5 Q Q 0.5 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 36 25 Q Q 2 10.5 7.4 2.4 Q 0.5 Over 500,000 ............................. 10 Q Q Q 2 2.1 Q Q Q 0.4 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 47 45 2 Q Q 25.4 23.9 0.8 Q 0.3 Food Sales ................................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Food Service ............................. Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q

333

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

634 634 578 46 1 Q 116.4 106.3 8.4 0.2 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 165 154 10 Q Q 118.1 109.9 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 123 112 11 Q Q 121.2 110.2 10.5 Q Q Over 500,000 ............................. 169 146 16 Q Q 99.9 86.2 9.5 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 134 122 8 Q Q 116.6 106.6 6.9 Q Q Food Service ............................. N N N N N N N N N N Health Care ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Inpatient ..................................

334

Assessment of the Current Level of Automation in the Manufacture of Fuel Cell Systems for Combined Heat and Power Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in supporting manufacturing research and development (R&D) for fuel cell systems in the 10-1,000 kilowatt (kW) power range relevant to stationary and distributed combined heat and power applications, with the intent to reduce manufacturing costs and increase production throughput. To assist in future decision-making, DOE requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide a baseline understanding of the current levels of adoption of automation in manufacturing processes and flow, as well as of continuous processes. NREL identified and visited or interviewed key manufacturers, universities, and laboratories relevant to the study using a standard questionnaire. The questionnaire covered the current level of vertical integration, the importance of quality control developments for automation, the current level of automation and source of automation design, critical balance of plant issues, potential for continuous cell manufacturing, key manufacturing steps or processes that would benefit from DOE support for manufacturing R&D, the potential for cell or stack design changes to support automation, and the relationship between production volume and decisions on automation.

Ulsh, M.; Wheeler, D.; Protopappas, P.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Estimating market penetration of new district heating and cooling systems using a combination of economic cost and diffusion models  

SciTech Connect

The economic-cost model and the diffusion model are among the many market-penetration forecasting approaches that are available. These approaches have been used separately in many applications. In this paper, the authors briefly review these two approaches and then describe a methodology for forecasting market penetration using both approaches sequentially. This methodology is illustrated with the example of market-penetration forecasting of new district heating and cooling (DHC) systems in the Argonne DHC Market Penetration Model, which was developed and used over the period 1979--1983. This paper discusses how this combination approach, which incorporates the strengths of the economic-cost and diffusion models, has been superior to any one approach for market forecasts of DHC systems. Also discussed are the required modifications for revising and updating the model in order to generate new market-penetration forecasts for DHC systems. These modifications are required as a result of changes in DHC engineering, economic, and market data from 1983 to 1990. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Karvelas, D.E.

1991-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

336

Heating  

SciTech Connect

According to The Hydronics Institute, the surge in gas-fired boiler shipments brought about 3 years ago by high oil prices and the availability of natural gas after years of curtailment has almost competely subsided. Gas prices continue to escalate and the threat of decontrol by 1985 continues. Likewise, the Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association reports that shipments of gas-fired unit heaters, duct furnaces, and wall furnaces have also dropped as homeowners adopt a wait-and-see attitude toward conversion. However, the market for high- and ultra-high-efficiency furnaces appears to hold potential for expansion. Because of the rebounding home market, a steady replacement market, and increased sales for reasons of efficiency, GAMA expects the total (gas, oil, and electric) central furnace market to increase by 16% in 1983.

1983-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

337

Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas -BACKGROUND: In December 2009, the Combined Heat and Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas University began operating with natural gas, instead of the coal-fired generators of the coal that had been stockpiled, the Plant is running completely on natural gas

Keinan, Alon

338

Results of heat tests of the TGE-435 main boiler in the PGU-190/220 combined-cycle plant of the Tyumen' TETs-2 cogeneration plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Special features of operation of a boiler operating as a combined-cycle plant and having its own furnace and burner unit are descried. The flow of flue gases on the boiler is increased due to feeding of exhaust gases of the GTU into the furnace, which intensifies the convective heat exchange. In addition, it is not necessary to preheat air in the convective heating surfaces (the boiler has no air preheater). The convective heating surfaces of the boiler are used for heating the feed water, thus replacing the regeneration extractions of the steam turbine (HPP are absent in the circuit) and partially replacing the preheating of condensate (the LPP in the circuit of the unit are combined with preheaters of delivery water). Regeneration of the steam turbine is primarily used for the district cogeneration heating purposes. The furnace and burner unit of the exhaust-heat boiler (which is a new engineering solution for the given project) ensures utilization of not only the heat of the exhaust gases of the GTU but also of their excess volume, because the latter contains up to 15% oxygen that oxidizes the combustion process in the boiler. Thus, the gas temperature at the inlet to the boiler amounts to 580{sup o}C at an excess air factor a = 3.50; at the outlet these parameters are utilized to T{sub out} = 139{sup o}C and a{sub out} = 1.17. The proportions of the GTU/boiler loads that can actually be organized at the generating unit (and have been checked by testing) are presented and the proportions of loads recommended for the most efficient operation of the boiler are determined. The performance characteristics of the boiler are presented for various proportions of GTU/boiler loads. The operating conditions of the superheater and of the convective trailing heating surfaces are presented as well as the ecological parameters of the generating unit.

A.V. Kurochkin; A.L. Kovalenko; V.G. Kozlov; A.I. Krivobok [Engineering Center of the Ural Power Industry (Russian Federation)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heatingsolar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. Zhou, (2007), Distributed Generation with Heat Recoveryoutputs the optimal Distributed Generation (DG) and storageand sizing of distributed generation and electric storage

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Heat pipe heat amplifier  

SciTech Connect

In a heat pipe combination consisting of a common condenser section with evaporator sections at either end, two working fluids of different vapor pressures are employed to effectively form two heat pipe sections within the same cavity to support an amplifier mode of operation.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Op%mal Scheduling of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Plants1 under Time-sensi%ve Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Co-genera8on of electricity and heat Storage Microgrids2 1. "Systema%c u. A microgrid refers to a "local grid" that can work autonomously from the central

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

343

Improvement of xenon purification system using a combination of a pulse tube refrigerator and a coaxial heat exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a compact cryogenic system with a pulse tube refrigerator and a coaxial heat exchanger. This liquefaction-purification system not only saves the cooling power used to reach high gaseous recirculation rate, but also reduces the impurity level with high speed. The heat exchanger operates with an efficiency of 99%, which indicates the possibility for fast xenon gas recirculation in a highpressurized large-scale xenon storage with much less thermal losses.

Chen, Wan-Ting; Cussonneau, J -P; Donnard, J; Duval, S; Lemaire, O; Calloch, M Le; Ray, P Le; Mohamad-Hadi, A -F; Morteau, E; Oger, T; Scotto-Lavina, L; Stutzmann, J -S; Thers, D; Briend, P; Haruyama, T; Mihara, S; Tauchi, T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Combined cycle electric power plant and heat recovery steam generator having improved multi-loop temperature control of the steam generated  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant is described that includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes a superheater tube and a steam drum from which heated steam is directed through the superheater to be additionally heated into superheated steam by the exhaust gas turbine gases. An afterburner serves to further heat the exhaust gas turbine gases passed to the superheater tube and a bypass conduit is disposed about the superheater tube whereby a variable steam flow determined by a bypass valve disposed in the bypass conduit may be directed about the superheater tube to be mixed with the superheated steam therefrom, whereby the temperature of the superheated steam supplied to the steam turbine may be accurately controlled. Steam temperature control means includes a first control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for regulating the position of the bypass valve with respect to a first setpoint, and a second control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for controlling the fuel supply to the afterburner with respect to a second setpoint varying in accordance with the bypass valve position. In particular, as the bypass valve position increases, the second setpoint, originally higher, is lowered toward a value substantially equal to that of the first setpoint.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

345

Heat delivery in a low carbon economy Jamie Speirs1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are currently met through the direct combustion of fossil fuels, primarily natural gas (DECC 2009a). Heat that natural gas combined cycle combined heat and power (NGCCCHP) can achieve 84-88% total efficiency demand. The flexibility of that thermal storage can also provide mechanisms by which intermittent

346

Modelling and computation for designs of multistage heat exchanger systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multistage heat exchanger system is formed when it is desired to heat a single cold fluid stream with the help of several available hot streams. Usually only one specific size combination will lead to total minimum cost. The determination of these ... Keywords: Heat Exchangers, multistage, optimisation

A. Malhotra; S. B. Muhaddin

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Combined Use of Vegetation Density, Friction Velocity, and Solar Elevation to Parameterize the Scalar Roughness for Sensible Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monin-Obukhov similarity was used to calculate sensible heat fluxes (Hc) at an array of up to 20 surface flux measurement sites on five days in 1987 and 1989 during the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field ...

Russell Qualls; Thomas Hopson

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Understanding the Impact of Large-Scale Penetration of Micro Combined Heat & Power Technologies within Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increase with the incorporation of additional features such as a hot water storage unit integrated ........................................................................................................ 30 FIGURE 2.2.4: FUEL CELL BASIC OPERATION............................................................................................................ 32 FIGURE 3.1.1: RESIDENTIAL HEATING & ELECTRIC SYSTEM USING A MICRO-CHP UNIT UNDER A HOT

Rudnick, Hugh

349

A Hot Plate Solar Cooker with Electricity Generation - Combining a Parabolic Trough Mirror with a Sidney Tube and Heat Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar cookers supply clean and sustainable energy for cooking and so limit the use of wood or charcoal. A new type of solar cooker is developed with a hot plate. The hot plate offers comfortable access to the food under preparation. The hot plate opens ... Keywords: Sidney Tube, TEG, heat pipe, hot plate, solar cooker

A. D. J. Kaasjager; G. P. G. Moeys

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and noon solar thermal and absorption chiller adoption in 2020,used to supply an absorption chiller. In the CO 2 price run,

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Combined cycle and waste heat recovery power systems based on a novel thermodynamic energy cycle utilizing low-temperature heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A new thermodynamic energy cycle has been developed, using a multicomponent working agent. Condensation is supplemented with absorption, following expansion in the turbine. Several combined power systems based on this cycle have been designed and cost-estimated. Efficiencies of these new systems are 1.35 to 1.5 times higher than the best Rankine Cycle system, at the same border conditions. Investment cost per unit of power output is about two-thirds of the cost of a comparable Rankine Cycle system. Results make cogeneration economically attractive at current energy prices. The first experimental installation is planned by Fayette Manufacturing Company and Detroit Diesel Allison Division of General Motors.

Kalina, A.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

THERMOSIPHON WATER HEATERS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 ector connecting pipes header heat exchanger insulationLt total connecting pipe length, m (ft) total number of heat

Mertol, Atila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

354

Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Shutdown, Layup, and Startup of Combined Cycle Units with Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complete optimization of cycle chemistry in a combined-cycle unit requires more than proper selection and optimization of operating chemistry. Protection of the steam-water cycle also is essential during shutdown, layup, and startup phases. These guidelines consider protection of steam- and water-touched components at these times, consistent with the operating cycle chemistries in use.

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ontario Power Generation's 250 kWe Class Atmospheric Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC): Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the demonstration experiences and lessons learned from a 250 kW solid oxide fuel cell system in a combined heat and power demonstration operating on natural gas. The project was a collaboration initiative between Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) and Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to install and test a first-of-a-kind SOFC system at OPG site in Toronto, Canada. This test and evaluation case study is one of several distributed generation project case studies under res...

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

356

A combined heat transfer and quartz dissolution/deposition model for a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A kinetic model of silica transport has been coupled to a heat transfer model for a Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir to examine the effect of silica rock-water interactions on fracture aperture and permeability. The model accounts for both the dissolution and deposition of silica. Zones of local dissolution and deposition were predicted, but their effect on aperture and permeability were fairly small for all cases studied. Initial rock temperature, reservoir size, and the ratio of rock surface area to fluid volume have the largest effect on the magnitude of silica mass transferred between the liquid and solid phases. 13 refs., 6 figs.

Robinson, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Dynamic simulation of a solar-driven carbon dioxide transcritical power system for small scale combined heat and power production  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide is an environmental benign natural working fluid and has been proposed as a working media for a solar-driven power system. In the current work, the dynamic performance of a small scale solar-driven carbon dioxide power system is analyzed by dynamic simulation tool TRNSYS 16 and Engineering Equation Solver (EES) using co-solving technique. Both daily performance and yearly performance of the proposed system have been simulated. Different system operating parameters, which will influence the system performance, have been discussed. Under the Swedish climatic condition, the maximum daily power production is about 12 kW h and the maximum monthly power production is about 215 kW h with the proposed system working conditions. Besides the power being produced, the system can also produce about 10 times much thermal energy, which can be used for space heating, domestic hot water supply or driving absorption chillers. The simulation results show that the proposed system is a promising and environmental benign alternative for conventional low-grade heat source utilization system. (author)

Chen, Y.; Lundqvist, Per [Div. of Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration, Department of Energy Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Pridasawas, Wimolsiri [King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Bangkok (Thailand)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Proceedings: Ninth International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil and Combined Cycle Plants with Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper selection, application, and optimization of cycle chemistry have long been recognized as integral to ensuring the highest possible levels of component availability and reliability in fossil-fired generating plant units. These proceedings of the Ninth EPRI International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants address state-of-the-art practices in conventional and combined-cycle plants. The content provides a worldwide perspective on cycle chemistry practices and insight on industry issues an...

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco Combined Heat and Power Project  

SciTech Connect

Under collaboration between DOE and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), UTC Power partnered with Host Hotels and Resorts to install and operate a PureComfort 240M Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at the Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco. This packaged CHP system integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller, directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 RT of chilled water at a 59F ambient temperature.

Rosfjord, Thomas J [UTC Power

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.  

SciTech Connect

Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Urban Heat Catastrophes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The curve shows the heat index, which reflects the combined effect of temperature and humidity. Last year's Chicago heat wave created a great deal of human discomfort and,...

362

The Confusing Allure of Combined Heat and Power: The Financial Attraction and Management Challenge of Reducing Energy Spend and Resulting Carbon Emissions Through Onsite Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixty-one percent of global executives surveyed by McKinsey & Co. (in 2008) expect the issues associated with climate change to boost profitsif managed well. What these executives recognize is that new regulations, higher energy costs, and increased scrutiny by private gate-keepers (such as Wal-Mart) offer an opportunity to identify and implement more efficient practices in commercial and industrial environments. One of the most impactful solutions for the industrial sectorfrom the perspective of reducing energy spending and energy-related carbon emissionsis combined heat and power ("CHP"), sometimes referred to as cogeneration. However, the results of CHP deployment to date have been mixedlargely because companies do not fully appreciate the challenges of maintaining and operating a CHP system, optimizing its performance, and taking full advantage of the many benefits it offers. Despite these challenges, the slogan for CHP should perhaps be: "CHP, now more than ever".

Davis, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

364

" "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," " " "," " ," " "NAICS Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","Establishments with Any Cogeneration Technology in Use(c)","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

365

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

366

Collaborative National Program for the Development and Performance Testing of Distributed Power Technologies with Emphasis on Combined Heat and Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

A current barrier to public acceptance of distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies is the lack of credible and uniform information regarding system performance. Under a cooperative agreement, the Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) and the U.S. Department of Energy have developed four performance testing protocols to provide a uniform basis for comparison of systems. The protocols are for laboratory testing, field testing, long-term monitoring and case studies. They have been reviewed by a Stakeholder Advisory Committee made up of industry, public interest, end-user, and research community representatives. The types of systems covered include small turbines, reciprocating engines (including Stirling Cycle), and microturbines. The protocols are available for public use and the resulting data is publicly available in an online national database and two linked databases with further data from New York State. The protocols are interim pending comments and other feedback from users. Final protocols will be available in 2007. The interim protocols and the national database of operating systems can be accessed at www.dgdata.org. The project has entered Phase 2 in which protocols for fuel cell applications will be developed and the national and New York databases will continue to be maintained and populated.

Soinski, Arthur; Hanson, Mark

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Effects of a Carbon Tax on Combined Heat and Power Adoption by a Chris Marnay, Jennifer L. Edwards, Ryan M. Firestone, Srijay Ghosh, Afzal S. Siddidqui, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the µ engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild of generation based closer to heating and/or cooling loads 4. customers' requirements for service quality

368

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy; Grid systems; Optimization; Heat flow; Financialof grid power and by utilizing combined heat and power (CHP)

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Heat collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, Michael A. (Santa Cruz, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Heat collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, M.A.

1981-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

371

Heating Degree Day Data Applied to Residential Heating Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific total electric energy and heating oil consumption for individual residences show a very high correlation with National Weather Service airport temperature data when transformed to heating degree days. Correlations of regional total ...

Robert G. Quayle; Henry F. Diaz

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approach for Generating Renewable Energy with SimultaneousCombining Recovery of Renewable Energy with Geologic Storageof this abundant and renewable resource, geothermal energy

Pruess, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A versatile procedure for calculating heat transfer through windows  

SciTech Connect

Advances in window technologies and the desire to standardize the reporting of standard window heat transfer indices have necessitated the development of a comprehensive analytical procedure for calculating heat transfer through windows. This paper shows how complete window heat transfer can be considered as the area-weighted sum of the three window component areas: the center-of-glass area, the edge-of-glass area, and the frame area. Algorithms for calculating heat transfer through each of these areas and for combining these to calculate total window indices are presented. 36 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Arasteh, D.K.; Reilly, M.S.; Rubin, M.D.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Combined Diagram: A Graphical Representation of Combination Evaporation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combination methods estimate the partition of sensible and latent heat fluxes at the surface by combining the surface energy balance equation with the transfer equations for temperature and water vapor in the atmospheric surface layer. This paper ...

Ricardo C. Muoz

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Crude Distillation Unit Heat Recovery Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Baytown's Pipe Still 3 is a 95,000 barrel per day crude distillation unit. A comprehensive heat recovery and energy utilization study was done on Pipe Still 3 after a preliminary cursory study had indicated that an overall look at the total picture could produce much better results than a series of improvements done piecemeal. The study did meet its objective by identifying the maximum heat recovery that is technically and economically feasible. It showed a potential for dramatic improvement - a 39 percent reduction in fuel, plus a 43 percent increase in the quantity of process steam generated, equivalent to a 48 percent reduction in net energy consumed. Techniques employed included a Source/Sink Profile (which is described later); a combining of oil heating, steam generation, and air preheat to best advantage; and a computer program to design the required heat exchanger trains.

John, P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Proceedings: Eighth International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil and Combined Cycle Plants with Heat Recovery Steam Generators, June 20-22, 2006, Calgary, Alberta Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper selection, application, and optimization of the cycle chemistry have long been recognized as integral to ensuring the highest possible levels of component availability and reliability in fossil-fired generating plant units. These proceedings of the Eighth EPRI International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants address state-of-the-art practices in conventional and combined cycle plants. The content provides a worldwide perspective on cycle chemistry practices, and insight as to industry ...

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

378

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but solar thermal and absorption cooling are attractive, andthermal heat collection, and heat-activated cooling can befrom solar thermal Total heat load Heat for cooling Heat

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doubling combined heat and power capacity in the UnitedCost Savings from Heat Storage Capacity Figure 49. LargeR 2 = 0.6683 Heat Storage Capacity (kWh) Fig. 48 Weekday

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage with Embedded Heat Pipes for Concentrating Solar Power Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? An innovative, novel concept of combining heat pipes with latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications is explored. The (more)

Robak, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Heat Management Strategy Trade Study  

SciTech Connect

This Heat Management Trade Study was performed in 2008-2009 to expand on prior studies in continued efforts to analyze and evaluate options for cost-effectively managing SNF reprocessing wastes. The primary objective was to develop a simplified cost/benefit evaluation for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing that combines the characteristics of the waste generated through reprocessing with the impacts of the waste on heating the repository. Under consideration were age of the SNF prior to reprocessing, plutonium and minor actinide (MA) separation from the spent fuel for recycle, fuel value of the recycled Pu and MA, age of the remaining spent fuel waste prior to emplacement in the repository, length of time that active ventilation is employed in the repository, and elemental concentration and heat limits for acceptable glass waste form durability. A secondary objective was to identify and qualitatively analyze remaining issues such as (a) impacts of aging SNF prior to reprocessing on the fuel value of the recovered fissile materials, and (b) impact of reprocessing on the dose risk as developed in the Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Results of this study can be used to evaluate different options for managing decay heat in waste streams from spent nuclear fuel.

Nick Soelberg; Steve Priebe; Dirk Gombert; Ted Bauer

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

OpenEI - Water Heating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm560 en Residential Energy Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode59

Provides total and average...

383

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings Speaker(s): Thomas Durkin Date: February 23, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Moira Howard-Jeweler This seminar presentation will be video-conferenced from our Washington, DC Projects office.) According to USGBC, LBNL, and CBECS data, commercial/institutional buildings use one quarter of all the energy consumed in the US. Depending on the geographic area of the country, heating can be as little as 30% (Houston), or as much as 68% (Minneapolis) of the building total. Mr. Durkin will share his experience in dramatically reducing the heating energy in buildings using a combination of low temperature boilers, heat recovery strategies and a new approach to geo-thermal systems. His data from completed projects shows 50 to 60%

384

Radiant Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Radiant heating systems involve supplying heat directly to the floor or to panels in the walls or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer: the delivery of heat...

385

Compare All CBECS Activities: District Heat Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District Heat Use District Heat Use Compare Activities by ... District Heat Use Total District Heat Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 433 trillion Btu of district heat (district steam or district hot water) in 1999. There were only five building types with statistically significant district heat consumption; education buildings used the most total district heat. Figure showing total district heat consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. District Heat Consumption per Building by Building Type Health care buildings used the most district heat per building. Figure showing district heat consumption per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

386

Efficiency combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

387

Forecast Combinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast combinations have frequently been found in empirical studies to produce better forecasts on average than methods based on the ex-ante best individual forecasting model. Moreover, simple combinations that ignore correlations between forecast errors often dominate more refined combination schemes aimed at estimating the theoretically optimal combination weights. In this chapter we analyze theoretically the factors that determine the advantages from combining forecasts (for example, the degree of correlation between forecast errors and the relative size of the individual models forecast error variances). Although the reasons for the success of simple combination schemes are poorly understood, we discuss several possibilities related to model misspecification, instability (non-stationarities) and estimation error in situations where thenumbersofmodelsislargerelativetothe available sample size. We discuss the role of combinations under asymmetric loss and consider combinations of point, interval and probability forecasts. Key words: Forecast combinations; pooling and trimming; shrinkage methods; model misspecification, diversification gains

Allan Timmermann; Jel Codes C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

美国能源部(DOE) 美国能源部(DOE) 工业技术项目(ITP) 工业分布式能源: 热电联产 (CHP) Richard Sweetser 高级顾问 美国能源部大西洋中西部清洁能源应用中心 2011年5月5-6日|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 32% 利用高效的能源管理措施和新兴节 能技术帮助工厂节能 促进热电联产和其他分布式能源 解决方案的广泛商用 10% 制造业 能源系统 33% 未来新兴产业 研发工作,主要针对美国高能耗产 业中最重要的领域以及跨行业中可 应用到多个工业领域的生产活动 25% 工业分布式能源 工业技术

389

Heat rejection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

Smith, Gregory C. (Richland, WA); Tokarz, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Parry, Jr., Harvey L. (Richland, WA); Braun, Daniel J. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

392

Environmental Forcing of Supertyphoon Pakas (1997) Latent Heat Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution and intensity of total (i.e., combined stratified and convective processes) rain rate/latent heat release (LHR) were derived for Tropical Cyclone Paka during the period 921 December 1997 from the F-10, F-11, F-13, and F-14 ...

Edward Rodgers; William Olson; Jeff Halverson; Joanne Simpson; Harold Pierce

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Heating Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are used in many varied applications--from small household appliances to large industrial process heating systems and furnaces. In appliances or industrial process heating, the heating elements are usually either open

394

Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid geothermal heat pump systems offer many of the benefits of full geothermal systems but at lower installed costs. A hybrid geothermal system combines elements of a conventional water loop heat pump system in order to reduce the geothermal loop heat exchanger costs, which are probably the largest cost element of a geothermal system. These hybrid systems have been used successfully where sufficient ground space to install large heat exchangers for full geothermal options was unavailable, or where the...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

395

Optimization of Heat Exchanger Cleaning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of heat integration systems is quantified in terms of the amount of heat that is recovered. This decreases with time due to increased fouling of the heat exchange surface. Using the "Total Fouling Related Expenses (TFRE)" approach, economic incentives for heat exchanger cleaning are evaluated using linear, exponential, and exponential finite decrease models of the heat recovery decay. A mathematical comparison of mechanical and chemical cleaning of heat exchangers has identified the most significant parameters which affect the choice between the two methods.

Siegell, J. H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A variety of heating technologies are available today. In addition to heat pumps, which are discussed separately, many homes and buildings use the following approaches:

397

Energy Department Turns Up the Heat and Power on Industrial Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy What is Combined Heat and Power? Often called cogeneration or CHP, a combined heat and power system provides both electric power and thermal...

398

Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source scheme in economical, technical, and environmental aspects, it is determined that the scheme of the groundwater source heat pump has better energy efficiency than others. The GHPWTS can take full advantage of the heat source from groundwater and benefit of electricity difference pricing during a day. Its character is a combination of a strength and another strength. It is the lowest cycle cost of all chide and heat source schemes. The GHPWTS has the best economic benefit and runs stably and reliably. Its advantage is clearly compared with other schemes. There is a real value for the project that is similar to the characteristic of this project and the condition of the water source.

Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reducing the heating energy in buildings using a combination of low temperature boilers, heat recovery strategies and a new approach to geo-thermal systems. His data from...

400

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) Provides total and average annual residential energy consumption for water heating in U.S. households in 2005, measured in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Heat Pump Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heaters Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters May 4, 2012 - 5:21pm Addthis A diagram of a heat pump water heater. A diagram of a heat pump water heater. What does this mean for me? Heat pump water heaters can be two to three times more energy efficient than conventional electric storage water heaters. Heat pump water heaters work in locations that remain in the 40º-90ºF range year-round. Most homeowners who have heat pumps use them to heat and cool their homes. But a heat pump also can be used to heat water -- either as stand-alone water heating system, or as combination water heating and space conditioning system. How They Work Heat pump water heaters use electricity to move heat from one place to another instead of generating heat directly. Therefore, they can be two to

402

Distributed Generation Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic and environmental drivers are promoting the adoption of combined heat and power (CHP) systems. Technology advances have produced new and improved distributed generation (DG) units that can be coupled with heat recovery hardware to create CHP systems. Performance characteristics vary considerably among DG options, and it is important to understand how these characteristics influence the selection of CHP systems that will meet both electric and thermal site loads.

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

403

Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium. A combination of weak and rich liquor working solution is used as the heat transfer medium.

Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI); Zawacki, Thomas S. (St. Joseph, MI)

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

404

Integrating preconcentrator heat controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for controlling the electric resistance heating of a metallic chemical preconcentrator screen, for example, used in portable trace explosives detectors. The length of the heating time-period is automatically adjusted to compensate for any changes in the voltage driving the heating current across the screen, for example, due to gradual discharge or aging of a battery. The total deposited energy in the screen is proportional to the integral over time of the square of the voltage drop across the screen. Since the net temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, of the screen, from beginning to end of the heating pulse, is proportional to the total amount of heat energy deposited in the screen during the heating pulse, then this integral can be calculated in real-time and used to terminate the heating current when a pre-set target value has been reached; thereby providing a consistent and reliable screen temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, from pulse-to-pulse.

Bouchier, Francis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Arakaki, Lester H. (Edgewood, NM); Varley, Eric S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

405

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quad. The estimates for total energy usage are within 12% ofthe total heating and cooling energy usages represented bythe total heating and cooling energy usages represented by

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams  

SciTech Connect

The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

408

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

409

Solar heat pipe feedback turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of radiant heat to electricity by a heat pipe-turbogenerator combination is described. The heat pipe-tubogenerator assembly is suitably externally insulated, as by a vacuum shield, to prevent heat losses and heat is recovered from the condenser portion of the heat pipe and returned to the evaporator portions. An application of the generic invention is discussed which it is employed on wall or roof portions of a building and serves as at least a partial supporting structure for these. In another application the solar heat pipe feedback turbogenerator may be incorporated in or used with reflective means, such as reflective sheet material of large area positioned to direct solar radiation onto the evaporator section of the heat pipe. The reflective means may be changed in position to follow the sun to produce maximum power during operation.

Decker, B.J.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

410

Heat Conduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Differential equations for heat conduction in solids...conduction in solids General form with variable thermal properties General form with constant thermal properties General form, constant properties, without heat

411

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

412

The specific heat of pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of data for heat capacity samples. T S is the growthSummary of HWCVD a-Si:H heat capacity results. The data forv Total measured heat capacity c T of a 50 nm thick device

Queen, Daniel Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

Daman, Ernest L. (Westfield, NJ); McCallister, Robert A. (Mountain Lakes, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

415

Water Heating | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Heating Water Heating Dataset Summary Description Provides total and average household expenditures on energy for water heating in the United States in 2005. Source EIA Date Released September 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated January 01st, 2009 (6 years ago) Keywords Energy Expenditures Residential Water Heating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Total.Expenditures.for_.Water_.Heating_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 70.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Avg.Expenditures.for_.Water_.Heating_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 69.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

416

national average for heating oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Propane Missouri North Dakota X South Dakota TOTAL List of States included on Winter Heating Fuels Survey (SHOPP) Release date: January 2012 22.00 24.00. Author: MRO

417

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

selection of on-site power generation with combined heat andsingle-cycle thermal power generation is typically lesshighly centralized power generation and delivery system

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Process Heating Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boiler Tune-Up Energy-Efficiency Opportunity Assessment Tool for Chemical Plants and Refineries Mechanical Insulation Assessment and Design Calculators Combined Heat and Power...

419

Heating Oil Imports Strong in 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Notes: Although total distillate imports have been unusually strong this winter, heating oil (high-sulfur distillate) imports have grown by a proportionately greater amount. As...

420

Table C37. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

HVAC Maintenance ..... 60 5,154 86 612 6,987 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ..... 18 2,782 158 320 3,636 Equipment Usage Reduced When ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Total Building Air Management: When Dehumidification Counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry trends toward stringent indoor air quality codes, spearheaded by ASHRAE 62-89: Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, present four challenges to the building industry in hot and humid climates: 1. Infusion of large quantities of make-up air to code based on zone requirements 2. Maintenance of tight wet bulb and dry bulb temperature tolerances within zones based on use 3. Energy management and cost containment 4. Control of mold and mildew and the damage they cause Historically, total air management of sensible and latent heat, filtration and zone pressure was brought about through the implementation of non-integrated, composite systems. Composite systems typically are built up of multi-vendor equipment each of which perform specific, independent functions in the total control of the indoor air environment. Composite systems have a high up-front cost, are difficult to maintain and are costly to operate. Today, emerging technologies allow the implementation of fully integrated system for total building air management. These systems provide a single-vendor solution that is cost effective to purchase, maintain and operate. Operating saving of 23% and ROIs of 2.3 years have been shown. Equipment specification is no longer based primarily on total building load. Maximum benefits of these dynamic systems are realized when systems are designed with a total operating strategy in mind. This strategy takes into consideration every factor of building air management including: 1. Control of sensible heat 2. Balance management of heat rejection 3. Latent heat management 4. Control of process hot water 5. Indoor air quality management 6. Containment of energy consumption 7. Load shedding

Chilton, R. L.; White, C. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 * November 2010 3 * November 2010 Electricity Natural Gas Power Heat Natural Gas or Biogas Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Hydrogen Natural Gas Converted to hydrogen on site via steam-methane reforming electrolyzer peak burner heat sink FC SYSTEM + H 2 Renewables H 2 -FC H 2 -storage 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) * Grid electricity (hourly) * Fuel prices * Water price 0 2 4

423

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

424

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

425

Cogeneration Plant is Designed for Total Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes application considerations, design criteria, design features, operating characteristics and performance of a 200 MW combined cycle cogeneration plant located at Occidental Chemical Corporation's Battleground chlorine-caustic plant at La Porte, Texas. This successful application of a total energy management concept utilizing combined cycle cogeneration in an energy intensive electrochemical manufacturing process has resulted in an efficient reliable energy supply that has significantly reduced energy cost and therefore manufacturing cost.

Howell, H. D.; Vera, R. L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Thermodynamic properties of pulverized coal during rapid heating devolatilization processes  

SciTech Connect

The thermodynamic properties of coal under conditions of rapid heating have been determined using a combination of UTRC facilities including a proprietary rapid heating rate differential thermal analyzer (RHR-DTA), a microbomb calorimeter (MBC), an entrained flow reactor (EFR), an elemental analyzer (EA), and a FT-IR. The total heat of devolatilization, was measured for a HVA bituminous coal (PSOC 1451D, Pittsburgh No. 8) and a LV bituminous coal (PSOC 1516D, Lower Kittaning). For the HVA coal, the contributions of each of the following components to the overall heat of devolatilization were measured: the specific heat of coal/char during devolatilization, the heat of thermal decomposition of the coal, the specific heat capacity of tars, and the heat of vaporization of tars. Morphological characterization of coal and char samples was performed at the University of Pittsburgh using a PC-based image analysis system, BET apparatus, helium pcynometer, and mercury porosimeter. The bulk density, true density, CO{sub 2} surface area, pore volume distribution, and particle size distribution as a function of extent of reaction are reported for both the HVA and LV coal. Analyses of the data were performed to obtain the fractal dimension of the particles as well as estimates for the external surface area. The morphological data together with the thermodynamic data obtained in this investigation provides a complete database for a set of common, well characterized coal and char samples. This database can be used to improve the prediction of particle temperatures in coal devolatilization models. Such models are used both to obtain kinetic rates from fundamental studies and in predicting furnace performance with comprehensive coal combustion codes. Recommendations for heat capacity functions and heats of devolatilization for the HVA and LV coals are given. Results of sample particle temperature calculations using the recommended thermodynamic properties are provided.

Proscia, W.M.; Freihaut, J.D. [United Technologies Research Center, E. Hartford, CT (United States); Rastogi, S.; Klinzing, G.E. [Univ. of Pittsburg, PA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Study of Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump systems often combine a traditional geothermal system with either a cooling tower or fluid cooler for heat rejection and a boiler or solar heat collector for heat addition to the loop. These systems offer the same energy efficiency benefits as full geothermal systems to utilities and their customers but at a potentially lower first cost. Many hybrid systems have materialized to resolve heat buildup in full geothermal system loops where loop temperatures continue to rise as ...

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

429

Search Combinators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to model search in a constraint solver can be an essential asset for solving combinatorial problems. However, existing infrastructure for defining search heuristics is often inadequate. Either modeling capabilities are extremely limited or users are faced with a general-purpose programming language whose features are not tailored towards writing search heuristics. As a result, major improvements in performance may remain unexplored. This article introduces search combinators, a lightweight and solver-independent method that bridges the gap between a conceptually simple modeling language for search (high-level, functional and naturally compositional) and an efficient implementation (low-level, imperative and highly non-modular). By allowing the user to define application-tailored search strategies from a small set of primitives, search combinators effectively provide a rich domain-specific language (DSL) for modeling search to the user. Remarkably, this DSL comes at a low implementation cost to the...

Schrijvers, Tom; Wuille, Pieter; Samulowitz, Horst; Stuckey, Peter J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan...

431

Commissioning : The Total Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, most new buildings have been equipped with increasingly sophisticated heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, energy conservation equipment, lighting systems, security systems, and environmental control devices that rely on electronic control. Very frequently these systems and design features have not performed as expected. This can result in energy-efficiency losses. occupant complaints about comfort, indoor air quality problems. high operating costs, and increased liability for building owners, operators, employers, and design professionals. Building commissioning was developed in response to these concerns. Commissioning involves the examining and testing of building systems to verify aspects of the building design, ensure that the building is constructed in accordance with the contract documents, and verify that the building and its systems function according to the design intent documents. The process helps to integrate and organize the design, construction, operations, and maintenance of a building's systems to produce a healthy, comfortable, and efficient facility.

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Geothermal shell and tube heat exchanger augmentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat exchangers for a moderate temperature geothermal plant represent a major portion of the plant capital cost. Therefore, reduction in heat exchanger size will significantly improve the electrical power economics. The potential heat exchanger size reduction that could be achieved by reducing any combination heat transfer resistance terms is evaluated. A literature survey of heat transfer augmentation schemes is summarized and equations for evaluating the impact of cleaning frequency on heat exchanger size are presented. Recommendations are made specifically for the Raft River Thermal Loop, however, the techniques are applicable to any other geothermal plant or heat transfer system.

Neill, D.T.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Foundation Heat Exchanger Model and Design Tool Development and Validation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Feasibility of foundation heat exchangers in ground source heat pump systems in the United States. ASHRAE systems, with an estimated 1.7 million installed units with total installed heating capacity on the order Heat Exchangers for Residential Ground Source Heat Pump Systems - Numerical Modeling and Experimental

434

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

435

Waste Heat Recapture from Supermarket Refrigeration Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the potential energy savings associated with improved utilization of waste heat from supermarket refrigeration systems. Existing and advanced strategies for waste heat recovery in supermarkets were analyzed, including options from advanced sources such as combined heat and power (CHP), micro-turbines and fuel cells.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Heat Pump Markets UK in Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,000 units Total: 200,000 units 48% 19% 26% 0% 7% boilers heat pumps solar thermal micro chp & FC district% boilers heat pumps solar thermals micro chp & FC district heating 2010 2020Sales to new build 15% 51% 18 to Renewables Boiler non- con. Boilers con. Boiler Boiler + ST ST Boiler condensing Boiler non-condensing Boiler

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

437

Heat Stroke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stress, from exertion or hot environments, places stress, from exertion or hot environments, places workers at risk for illnesses such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Heat Stroke A condition that occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature, and can cause death or permanent disability. Symptoms ■ High body temperature ■ Confusion ■ Loss of coordination ■ Hot, dry skin or profuse sweating ■ Throbbing headache ■ Seizures, coma First Aid ■ Request immediate medical assistance. ■ Move the worker to a cool, shaded area. ■ Remove excess clothing and apply cool water to their body. Heat Exhaustion The body's response to an excessive loss of water and salt, usually through sweating. Symptoms ■ Rapid heart beat ■ Heavy sweating ■ Extreme weakness or fatigue ■

438

Heat reclaimer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A device for reclaiming heat from stove pipes and the like. A semi-circular shaped hollow enclosed housing with a highly thermal-conductive concave surface is mounted contactingly to surround approximately one-half of the circumference of the stove pipe. The concave surface is formed to contact the pipe at a maximum number of points along that surface. The hollow interior of the housing contains thin multi-surfaced projections which are integral with the concave surface and conductively transfer heat from the stove pipe and concave surface to heat the air in the housing. A fan blower is attached via an air conduit to an entrance opening in the housing. When turned on, the blower pushes the heated interior air out a plurality of air exit openings in the ends of the housing and brings in lower temperature outside air for heating.

Parham, F.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

439

Heat transfer. [heat transfer roller employing a heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A heat transfer roller embodying a heat pipe is disclosed. The heat pipe is mounted on a shaft, and the shaft is adapted for rotation on its axis.

Sarcia, D.S.

1978-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

440

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions. ...

442

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector diagram image Footnotes: 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public.

443

Flat plate heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect

A lightweight flat plate heat exchanger comprised of two or more essentially parallel flat plates which are formed and arranged to provide fluid flow passages between the plates. New combinations of plastic plates include the usage of transparent plastic foam and honeycomb structures. Improved shapes of flow passages include the usage of flow nozzles, flow diffusers, and jet pumps to increase fluid flow and heat transfer. The invention includes the usage of transparent plastic foam plates which are shaped to concentrate solar energy onto plastic tubes. Clear plastic tubes containing black heat transfer fluid are included. The invention includes the usage of spiral flow channels within plastic foam plates. Six different embodiments of the invention are included. Five of the embodiments could be used as efficient lightweight solar collectors.

Berringer, R.T.

1981-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

444

Heat Pipes: An Industrial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the basics of heat pipe exchangers. Included are how they are constructed, how they operate, where they have application, and various aspects of evaluating a potential application. After discussing the technical aspects of heat pipe exchangers, an industrial case history is presented. The case history involves a retrofit project which added heat pipes to five natural draft process heaters with a combined heat duty of 150 M Btu/hr. A heat recovery of 15 M Btu/hr has resulted from the flue gas/combustion air interchange. The paper will include design considerations, and operating and maintenance history since early 1980. A second application for heat pipes with a 12 M Btu/hr duty installed in 1983 will also be discussed.

Murray, F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Solar space heating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heating heating Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of solar space heating technology.)[1] Contents 1 Space Heating 2 Passive Solar Space Heating 3 Active Solar Space Heating 4 References Space Heating A solar space-heating system can consist of a passive system, an active system, or a combination of both. Passive systems are typically less costly and less complex than active systems. However, when retrofitting a building, active systems might be the only option for obtaining solar energy. Passive Solar Space Heating Passive solar space heating takes advantage of warmth from the sun through design features, such as large south-facing windows, and materials in the floors or walls that absorb warmth during the day and release that warmth

446

Tips: Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Heating and cooling your home uses more energy and costs more money than any other system in your home -- typically making up about 54% of your

447

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

private lands owned by GZC. Operation of the proposed Combined Power and Biomass Heating System would help stabilize volatile fuel prices and provide economic development...

448

Energy Basics: Heat Pump Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating Heat...

449

Heat reclaimer  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for reclaiming heat from the discharge gas from a combustion fuel heating unit, which has: inlet and outlet sections; an expansion section whose circumference gradually increases in the direction of flow, thereby providing an increased area for heat transfer; flow splitter plates which lie within and act in conjunction with the expansion section wall to form flow compartments, which flow splitter plates and expansion section wall have a slope, with respect to the centroidal axis of the flow compartment not exceeding 0.1228, which geometry prevents a separation of the flow from the enclosing walls, thereby increasing heat transfer and maintaining the drafting function; and a reduction section which converges the flow to the outlet section.

Horkey, E.J.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

450

Process Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update uses real world examples to discuss applications of electrotechnology in industrial process heating and to highlight some of the emerging technologies in this field. These emerging technologies, when implemented in a plant, will provide significant energy savings as well as increase productivity. The report presents three case studies of successful implementation of two different electric process-heating technologies in three different industries. The case studies show that in some ...

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

451

HEAT EXCHANGER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

452

Corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIE STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER...

454

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

455

New and Existing Buildings Heating and Cooling Opportunities: Dedicated Heat Recovery Chiller  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Langfitt Langfitt U S Department of State Overseas Buildings Operations Mechanical Engineering Division *Engineers are working Harder AND Smarter *New Energy Economy *Heating Is Where The Opportunity Is  39% of total US energy goes into non-residential buildings.  Gas for heating is about 60% of energy used in a building  Gas for heating is at least 25% of total energy used in the US. Heat Generation System Heat Disposal System What's Wrong With This Picture? Keep the heat IN the system Don't run main plant equipment until necessary ! Less rejected heat Less gas consumption High Temp >160F with conventional boilers Hydronic heating... condensing style modular boilers. The entire heating system... designed for low temperature water, recommend maximum temperature of 135ºF.

456

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

457

Jobs, sustainable heating coming to Vermont city | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jobs, sustainable heating coming to Vermont city Jobs, sustainable heating coming to Vermont city Jobs, sustainable heating coming to Vermont city March 15, 2010 - 6:07pm Addthis A woodchip-fired combined heat and power system will be built in Montpelier, Vt. | File photo A woodchip-fired combined heat and power system will be built in Montpelier, Vt. | File photo Joshua DeLung What will the project do? Their new woodchip-fired combined heat and power system will heat the Capitol Complex, the city's schools, City Hall and as many as 156 other buildings in the downtown area. Montpelier, Vt., netted $8 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding in January for a woodchip-fired combined heat and power system. The money will help build a 1.8 million kWh-generating plant that will heat the Capitol Complex, the city's schools, City Hall and as many

458

Jobs, sustainable heating coming to Vermont city | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jobs, sustainable heating coming to Vermont city Jobs, sustainable heating coming to Vermont city Jobs, sustainable heating coming to Vermont city March 15, 2010 - 6:07pm Addthis A woodchip-fired combined heat and power system will be built in Montpelier, Vt. | File photo A woodchip-fired combined heat and power system will be built in Montpelier, Vt. | File photo Joshua DeLung What will the project do? Their new woodchip-fired combined heat and power system will heat the Capitol Complex, the city's schools, City Hall and as many as 156 other buildings in the downtown area. Montpelier, Vt., netted $8 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding in January for a woodchip-fired combined heat and power system. The money will help build a 1.8 million kWh-generating plant that will heat the Capitol Complex, the city's schools, City Hall and as many

459

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Own-Elasticities for Space Conditioning Equipment Equipmentthe choice of a space heat/air conditioning combination. Theutility from air conditioning and space heating alternative

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Table HC3-1a. Space Heating by Climate Zone, Million U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table HC3-1a. Space Heating by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone1 RSE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total combined heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Table CE2-5.1u. Space-Heating Energy Consumption and Expenditures ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Space-Heating Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Household Member and Demographics, 2001 Household ... Total Households Using a Major Space-Heating

462

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exchanger 1 . 3. The Condensers . Reboiler . . . . BoilerNet Power Waste Heat Trimmer Dist. Condenser Turbine SteamLeaks LP Turbine Condenser Misc. Heat Losses Total Waste

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

heat pump | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heat pump heat pump Dataset Summary Description View 2010 energy efficiency data from AeroSys Inc, Coaire, Cold Point, First Operations, LG Electronics, Nordyne, and Quietside manufacturers. Data includes cooling capacity, cooling performance, heating capacity, and heating performance. Spreadsheet was created by combining the tables in pdf files that are included in the zip file. Source Energy Applicance Data - United States Federal Trade Commission, www.ftc.gov Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords air conditioner central air conditioner efficiency efficient energy heat pump Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2010_CentralAC_All.xls (xls, 82.4 KiB) application/zip icon 2010CentralAirConditioner.zip (zip, 398.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

464

HEAT GENERATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Cooperation of heat pump and solar system in the common power unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper explains new possibilities of heat pumps usage in the common power units. The result of applied research is an examination of heat pump and active solar system cooperation eligibility. The aspects of such a cooperation are examined mainly from ... Keywords: combined heating system, heat pump, heating factor, heating factor increase, natural energy, solar system

Mastny Petr

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

467

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

468

Developing a total replacement cost index for suburban office projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the components of replacement costs for office developments, and how these components combine to create total development costs is essential for success in office real estate development. Surprisingly, the ...

Hansen, David John, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Combinatorial aspects of total positivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I study combinatorial aspects of an emerging field known as total positivity. The classical theory of total positivity concerns matrices in which all minors are nonnegative. While this theory was pioneered ...

Williams, Lauren Kiyomi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Total correlations and mutual information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In quantum information theory it is generally accepted that quantum mutual information is an information-theoretic measure of total correlations of a bipartite quantum state. We argue that there exist quantum states for which quantum mutual information cannot be considered as a measure of total correlations. Moreover, for these states we propose a different way of quantifying total correlations.

Zbigniew Walczak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

471

Heat reclaimer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heat reclaimer for the exhaust flue of a heating unit comprises a housing having an air input space, an air output space, and an exhaust space, with a plurality of tubes connected between and communicating the air input space with the air output space and extending through the exhaust space. The exhaust flue of the heating unit is connected into the exhaust space of the housing and an exhaust output is connected to the housing extending from the exhaust space for venting exhaust coming from the heater into the exhaust space to a chimney, for example. A float or level switch is connected to the housing near the bottom of the exhaust space for switching, for example, an alarm if water accumulates in the exhaust space from condensed water vapor in the exhaust. At least one hole is also provided in the housing above the level of the float switch to permit condensed water to leave the exhaust space. The hole is provided in case the float switch clogs with soot. A wiping device may also be provided in the exhaust space for wiping the exterior surfaces of the tubes and removing films of water and soot which might accumulate thereon and reduce their heat transfer capacity.

Bellaff, L.

1981-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

472

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

Wolowodiuk, Walter (New Providence, NJ)

1976-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

473

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume III, conceptual design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the work described in this volume was to conceptualize suitable designs for solar total energy systems for the following residential market segments: single-family detached homes, single-family attached units (townhouses), low-rise apartments, and high-rise apartments. Conceptual designs for the total energy systems are based on parabolic trough collectors in conjunction with a 100 kWe organic Rankine cycle heat engine or a flat-plate, water-cooled photovoltaic array. The ORC-based systems are designed to operate as either independent (stand alone) systems that burn fossil fuel for backup electricity or as systems that purchase electricity from a utility grid for electrical backup. The ORC designs are classified as (1) a high temperature system designed to operate at 600/sup 0/F and (2) a low temperature system designed to operate at 300/sup 0/F. The 600/sup 0/F ORC system that purchases grid electricity as backup utilizes the thermal tracking principle and the 300/sup 0/F ORC system tracks the combined thermal and electrical loads. Reject heat from the condenser supplies thermal energy for heating and cooling. All of the ORC systems utilize fossil fuel boilers to supply backup thermal energy to both the primary (electrical generating) cycle and the secondary (thermal) cycle. Space heating is supplied by a central hot water (hydronic) system and a central absorption chiller supplies the space cooling loads. A central hot water system supplies domestic hot water. The photovoltaic system uses a central electrical vapor compression air conditioning system for space cooling, with space heating and domestic hot water provided by reject heat from the water-cooled array. All of the systems incorporate low temperature thermal storage (based on water as the storage medium) and lead--acid battery storage for electricity; in addition, the 600/sup 0/F ORC system uses a therminol-rock high temperature storage for the primary cycle. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Energy Basics: Absorption Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating...

475

Energy Basics: Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating...

476

Definition: Ground Source Heat Pumps | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pumps Pumps Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Ground Source Heat Pumps A Ground Source Heat Pump is a central building heating and/or cooling system that takes advantage of the relatively constant year-round ground temperature to pump heat to or from the ground.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A geothermal heat pump or ground source heat pump (GSHP) is a central heating and/or cooling system that pumps heat to or from the ground. It uses the earth as a heat source (in the winter) or a heat sink (in the summer). This design takes advantage of the moderate temperatures in the ground to boost efficiency and reduce the operational costs of heating and cooling systems, and may be combined with solar heating to form a geosolar system with even greater efficiency. Ground source heat pumps

477

German central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central solar heating plants contribute to the reduction of CO{sub 2}-emissions and global warming. The combination of central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage enables high solar fractions of 50% and more. Several pilot central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage (CSHPSS) built in Germany since 1996 have proven the appropriate operation of these systems and confirmed the high solar fractions. Four different types of seasonal thermal energy stores have been developed, tested and monitored under realistic operation conditions: Hot-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Friedrichshafen), gravel-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Steinfurt-Borghorst), borehole thermal energy store (in Neckarsulm) and aquifer thermal energy store (in Rostock). In this paper, measured heat balances of several German CSHPSS are presented. The different types of thermal energy stores and the affiliated central solar heating plants and district heating systems are described. Their operational characteristics are compared using measured data gained from an extensive monitoring program. Thus long-term operational experiences such as the influence of net return temperatures are shown. (author)

Bauer, D.; Marx, R.; Nussbicker-Lux, J.; Ochs, F.; Heidemann, W. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Mueller-Steinhagen, H. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute of Technical Thermodynamics (ITT), German Aerospace Centre (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Solar heating apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure concerns a collector for solar heating apparatus which is adapted for vertical mounting and utilizes air as the heat exchange medium. The collector comprises a glazed insulated box containing a group of energy transfer units, each of which is formed by a pair of similar open top metal foil pans having flat bottom walls which are in abutment and outwardly flaring conical side walls. The pans carry a black energy-absorbing coating and preferably their abutting walls contain registering air flow openings. The energy transfer units are stacked in interfitting relationship in rows and columns, with the axes of adjacent interfitted units in each row and in each column extending in mutually perpendicular directions. The collector may be combined with a fan unit adapted to fit a standard window, thereby providing a portable, economical, auxiliary heater for a room of a building.

Decker, C.R.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

479

Heat transport system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

Harkness, Samuel D. (McMurray, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Numerical Simulations of Outdoor Heat Stress Index and Heat Disorder Risk in the 23 Wards of Tokyo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, the summertime outdoor heat stress hazard and heat disorder risks (HDRs) were simulated numerically using a mesoscale meteorological model combined with an urban canopy model and a building energy model. Model grid maps ...

Yukitaka OHASHI; Yukihiro KIKEGAWA; Tomohiko IHARA; Nanami SUGIYAMA

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