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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Annul Coal Consumption by Country (1980 -2009) Total annual coal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annul Coal Consumption by Country (1980 -2009) Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration...

2

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041 1054 1075 1086 1092 1092 1099 1104 AEO 1998 1009 1051 1044 1058 1087 1084 1090 1097 1112 1130 1142 1148 1160 1162 1180 AEO 1999 1040 1075 1092 1109 1113 1118 1120 1120 1133 1139 1150 1155 1156 1173 AEO 2000 1053 1086 1103 1124 1142 1164 1175 1184 1189 1194 1199 1195 1200 AEO 2001 1078 1112 1135 1153 1165 1183 1191 1220 1228 1228 1235 1240

3

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO 1996",,,937,942,954,962,983,990,1004,1017,1027,1033,1046,1067,1070,1071,1074,1082,1087 "AEO 1997",,,,948,970,987,1003,1017,1020,1025,1034,1041,1054,1075,1086,1092,1092,1099,1104 "AEO 1998",,,,,1009,1051,1043.875977,1058.292725,1086.598145,1084.446655,1089.787109,1096.931763,1111.523926,1129.833862,1142.338257,1148.019409,1159.695312,1162.210815,1180.029785

4

Coal consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal Coal consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_coal_consumption_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 38.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

5

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions. ...

6

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports of Coal Coke, 2011 State Coal Coal Coke Residential a Commercial Industrial Electric ...

7

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","10312013"...

8

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

9

Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

10

Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

-- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

11

EIA Data: Total International Primary Energy Consumption

This...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA Data: Total International Primary Energy Consumption

This table lists total primary energy consumption by country and region in Quadrillion Btu. Figures in this table...

12

South Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)...

13

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumptio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005)

14

Natural Gas Consumption by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas Consumption by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual dry natural gas consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information...

15

Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA).
...

16

"Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" 1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","(trillion","Row"

17

Utah Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

18

California Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

19

Ohio Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

20

Wisconsin Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Maine Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

22

Indiana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

23

Maryland Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

24

Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

25

Nebraska Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

26

West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

27

Washington Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

28

Tennessee Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

29

Minnesota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

30

New Hampshire Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

31

Montana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

32

New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

33

Nevada Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

34

Arizona Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Arizona Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

35

Kentucky Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

36

Kansas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

37

Oklahoma Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

38

North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

39

Hawaii Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Hawaii Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

40

Oregon Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wyoming Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

42

Florida Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

43

Arkansas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

44

Missouri Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

45

District of Columbia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

46

Louisiana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

47

Idaho Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

48

Vermont Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Vermont Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

49

Colorado Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

50

Illinois Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

51

New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

52

Texas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

53

"Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,...

54

Table US1. Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Part 1: Housing Unit Characteristics and Energy Usage Indicators Energy Consumption 2 Energy Expenditures 2 Total U.S. (quadrillion Btu) Per Household (Dollars) Per

55

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of Chinasof Chinas total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof Chinas total energy consumption, while others estimate

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

57

Table A20. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke",,"Shipments" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" " ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

58

Michigan Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 994,342: 876,444 ...

59

U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2001: 2,676,998: 2,309,464: 2,246,633: 1,807,170 ...

60

U.S. coals share of total net generation continues to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Amid historically low natural gas prices and the warmest March ever recorded in much of the United States, coal's share of total net generation dropped to 34%the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

U.S. coals share of total net generation continues to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Amid historically low natural gas prices and the warmest March ever recorded in much of the United States, coal's share of total net generation ...

62

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

63

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO 1995",,6398.45,6544.45,6555.4,6675.85,6745.2,6821.85,6887.55,6964.2,7048.15,7146.7,7245.25,7336.5,7405.85,7471.55,7537.25,7581.05,7621.2 "AEO 1996",,,6489.7,6526.2,6606.5,6708.7,6781.7,6854.7,6942.3,7008,7084.65,7175.9,7259.85,7329.2,7383.95,7449.65,7500.75,7544.55,7581.05 "AEO 1997",,,,6635.7,6694.1,6825.5,6953.25,7073.7,7183.2,7267.15,7369.35,7460.6,7548.2,7643.1,7730.7,7792.75,7832.9,7884,7924.15

64

Table CE1-4c. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Type ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Type of Housing Unit, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total ... where the end use is electric air-conditioning, ...

65

Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of coal for electricity generation in the United States....

66

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

67

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

68

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 21.20 21.42 21.60 21.99 22.37 22.63 22.95 23.22 23.58 23.82 24.09 24.13 24.02 24.14 AEO 1995 20.82 20.66 20.85 21.21 21.65 21.95 22.12 22.25 22.43 22.62 22.87 23.08 23.36 23.61 24.08 24.23 24.59 AEO 1996 21.32 21.64 22.11 22.21 22.26 22.34 22.46 22.74 23.14 23.63 24.08 24.25 24.63 25.11 25.56 26.00 26.63 AEO 1997 22.15 22.75 23.24 23.64 23.86 24.13 24.65 25.34 25.82 26.22 26.52 27.00 27.35 27.70 28.01 28.47 AEO 1998 21.84 23.03 23.84 24.08 24.44 24.81 25.33 25.72 26.22 26.65 27.22 27.84 28.35 28.84 29.17 AEO 1999 21.35 22.36 22.54 23.18 23.65 24.17 24.57 25.19 25.77 26.41 26.92 27.42 28.02 28.50

69

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

70

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

71

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

72

Table A22. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1994 "...

73

"Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent of","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(Percent)","(percent)","Factors"

74

"Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

75

"Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" 5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

76

"Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

77

"Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row"

78

"Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

79

"Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

80

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011...

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81

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

82

Overview of coal consumption and related environmental trends, and implications for greenhouse gas emissions  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews world and regional trends in coal consumption, and its growing contribution to greenhouse gas emissions. The paper then discusses a number of options within the coal system where greenhouse gas emissions, particularly CO{sub 2}, can be reduced. The commercial status and environmental performance of the main power plant technology options are briefly reviewed.

Johnson, C.J.; Wang, X.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

component of Chinas total energy consumption mix. However,China-specific factors were used to calculate the energy mix

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units Electricity (billion kWh) Natural Gas (billion cf) Fuel Oil

85

Table AP2. Total Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units U.S. Households (millions) Fuels Used (physical units) Electricity (billion kWh)

86

Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas (billion cf) Major Fuels Used 4 (physical units) Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units

87

U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970's: 21,139,386: 21,793,454: 22,101,451: 22,049,363: 21,223,133: 19,537,593: 19,946,496: 19,520,581: 19,627,478: ... Natural Gas Consumption (Annual Supply ...

88

"Table A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumsption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(PERCENT)","(percent)","Factors"

89

Rising Asian demand drives global coal consumption growth ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global coal demand has almost doubled since 1980, driven by increases in Asia, where demand is up over 400% from 1980-2010. In turn, Asian demand is ...

90

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 AEO 1997 6636 6694 6826 6953 7074 7183 7267 7369 7461 7548 7643 7731 7793 7833 7884 7924 AEO 1998 6895 6906 7066 7161 7278 7400 7488 7597 7719 7859 7959 8074 8190 8286 8361 AEO 1999 6884 7007 7269 7383 7472 7539 7620 7725 7841 7949 8069 8174 8283 8351 AEO 2000 7056 7141 7266 7363 7452 7578 7694 7815 7926 8028 8113 8217 8288

91

Form EIA-3 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report, Manufacturing and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report, Manufacturing and Transformation/Processing Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Coal Users Document Number: 001 Version: 2.0 June 2011 1 June 2011 Document History Number Date Section Description 1 2 May 2011 June 2011 Document initiation. Revised screen shots and remove external user references. Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Document Changes/Maintenance POC: Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Project References: Coal Internet Data Collection (CIDC) User's Manual, September 2007

92

Table CE1-1c. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE1-1c. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Climate Zone, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and --

93

Table CE1-10c. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE1-10c. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Midwest Census Region, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row

94

Table CE1-6.2u. Total Energy Consumption and Expenditures by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE1-6.2u. Total Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Square Feet and Usage Indicators, 2001 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor: Total End-Use Energy

95

Corresponding author: Tel. (617) 253-3901, Fax. (617) 253-9845, Email: jrm1@mit.edu THE FUTURE OF COAL CONSUMPTION IN A CARBON CONSTRAINED WORLD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal consumption in the US and European electric power sectors to carbon prices, natural gas prices and natural gas prices are determined endogenously. Coal consumption in the US electric power sector increases consumption is most highly dependent upon the carbon price. Coal consumption is less sensitive to natural gas

96

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

97

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

98

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

99

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

100

Table A14. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table A30. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" 0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" "Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," ","(million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

102

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

103

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

105

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

106

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

107

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

108

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

109

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

110

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

111

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (MMcf)" Total Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1490_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1490_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:45:27 PM"

112

Table A33. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" " Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "

113

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

114

Table CE1-4c. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Type ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE1-4c. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Type of Housing Unit, 1997 ... where the end use is electric air-conditioning, ...

115

Table 1. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Origin ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood (million cords) ..... 21.4 19.8 0.8 0.6 0.3 19.3 Million Btu per Household3 Total Btu Consumption per Household, Fuels Used: Electricity Primary ...

116

Coal industry annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Table A17. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.5,1.5,1,0.9,0.9,0.9 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1193,119,207,265,285,195,122,6

118

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

119

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry"," Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

120

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," "," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

122

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel Purposes by" Nonfuel Purposes by" " Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000 ","Other(d)","Row"

123

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel" Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu) " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

124

Table A32. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,," ","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ," "," "," ",,,,,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "

125

Form EIA-5 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality - Coke Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality - Coke Plants Document Number: 001 Version: 2.0 June 2011 i June 2011 Document History Number Date Section Description 1 2 June 2011 June 2011 Document initiation Revised screen shots and remove external user references. Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Document Changes/Maintenance POC: Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Project References: Coal Internet Data Collection (CIDC) User's Manual, September 2007 ii June 2011 Content 1. General System Overview ................................................................................. 1

126

AEO2011: World Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 144, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons. The data is broken down into total coal exports to Europe, Asia and America. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO coal EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: World Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries - Reference Case (xls, 104 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

127

Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,256 2,561 1,864 4,817 4,343 10.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 38 50 48 88 95 -7.7 313 Textile Mills 31 29 21 60 59 2.2 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w

128

"Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" 0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ," ------------------------------------",,," ------------------------------------",,," -------------------------------",,,"Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","Factors"

129

AEO2011: World Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries

130

Table 5a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using District Heat (thousand) Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu) District Heat Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 94 429 84 93 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 18 Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 11 Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 28 65 144 155 25,001 to 50,000 16 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 9 50 79 81 100,001 to 200,000 6 59 76 79 200,001 to 500,000 5 109 71 77 Over 500,000 1 65 62 80 Principal Building Activity Education 22 50 71 78 Food Sales and Service Q Q Q Q Health Care 3 57 100 142 Lodging 9 66 112 116 Mercantile and Service 9 Q Q Q Office 24 110 63 70 Public Assembly 10 23 64 66 Public Order and Safety Q Q Q Q Religious Worship Q Q Q Q Warehouse and Storage

131

Table 5b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using District Heat (thousand) Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu) District Heat Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 11 16 16 16 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 27 78 76 76 5,001 to 10,000 38 60 51 51 10,001 to 25,000 18 43 36 35 25,001 to 50,000 24 68 51 51 50,001 to 100,000 18 40 30 30 100,001 to 200,000 27 33 35 36 200,001 to 500,000 22 31 26 27 Over 500,000 42 26 14 10 Principal Building Activity Education 17 29 22 23 Food Sales and Service 67 93 207 150 Health Care 35 26 25 14 Lodging 30 40 30 29 Mercantile and Service 40 74 59 58 Office 23 28 26 27 Public Assembly 25 33 25 26 Public Order and Safety

132

Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 6 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 5 5 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 10 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 8 8 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 10 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 11 11 Over 500,000 26 18 18 21 Principal Building Activity Education 8 9 6 6 Food Sales and Service 8 9 8 7 Health Care 14 12 12 9 Lodging 11 22 16 16 Mercantile and Service 5 7 7 7 Office 6 10 7 6 Public Assembly 7 12 28 30 Public Order and Safety 18 29 18 18 Religious Worship 10 10 11 11 Warehouse and Storage

133

Table 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 10 14 13 13 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 10 16 11 11 5,001 to 10,000 15 22 18 18 10,001 to 25,000 15 24 19 19 25,001 to 50,000 13 25 29 29 50,001 to 100,000 14 27 21 22 100,001 to 200,000 13 36 34 34 200,001 to 500,000 13 37 33 33 Over 500,000 17 51 50 50 Principal Building Activity Education 17 17 16 17 Food Sales and Service 25 36 16 16 Health Care 29 48 47 47 Lodging 27 37 32 32 Mercantile and Service 14 25 26 26 Office 14 19 21 21 Public Assembly 23 46 35 34 Public Order and Safety 28 48 46 46 Religious Worship

134

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of energy consumed from coal, coke, liquid fuels, naturalwas expressed in terms of coal equivalency. 2.1.8.1 Tnational fuel inputs of coal, natural gas and petroleum were

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Estimation Methodology for Total and Elemental Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a tool for estimating total and speciated mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. The mercury emissions methodology is based on EPRI's analyses of the results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Mercury Information Collection Request (ICR). The Mercury ICR required owner/operators of coal-fired electric utility steam generating units to report for calendar year 1999 the quantity of fuel consumed and the mercury content of that fuel. In addition, 84 power plant...

2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

137

Optimization under Uncertainty for Water Consumption in a Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Pulverized coal (PC) power plants are widely recognized as major water consumers whose operability has started to be affected by drought conditions across some regions of the country. Water availability will further restrict the retrofitting of existing PC plants with water-expensive carbon capture technologies. Therefore, national efforts to reduce water withdrawal and consumption have been intensified. Water consumption in PC plants is strongly associated to losses from the cooling water cycle, particularly water evaporation from cooling towers. Accurate estimation of these water losses requires realistic cooling tower models, as well as the inclusion of uncertainties arising from atmospheric conditions. In this work, the cooling tower for a supercritical PC power plant was modeled as a humidification operation and used for optimization under uncertainty. Characterization of the uncertainty (air temperature and humidity) was based on available weather data. Process characteristics including boiler conditions, reactant ratios, and pressure ratios in turbines were calculated to obtain the minimum water consumption under the above mentioned uncertainties. In this study, the calculated conditions predicted up to 12% in reduction in the average water consumption for a 548 MW supercritical PC power plant simulated using Aspen Plus. Optimization under uncertainty for these large-scale PC plants cannot be solved with conventional stochastic programming algorithms because of the computational expenses involved. In this work, we discuss the use of a novel better optimization of nonlinear uncertain systems (BONUS) algorithm which dramatically decreases the computational requirements of the stochastic optimization.

Juan M. Salazar; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila Diwekar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Optimization Under Uncertainty for Water Consumption in a Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulverized coal (PC) power plants are widely recognized as major water consumers whose operability has started to be affected by drought conditions across some regions of the country. Water availability will further restrict the retrofitting of existing PC plants with water-expensive carbon capture technologies. Therefore, national efforts to reduce water withdrawal and consumption have been intensified. Water consumption in PC plants is strongly associated to losses from the cooling water cycle, particularly water evaporation from cooling towers. Accurate estimation of these water losses requires realistic cooling tower models, as well as the inclusion of uncertainties arising from atmospheric conditions. In this work, the cooling tower for a supercritical PC power plant was modeled as a humidification operation and used for optimization under uncertainty. Characterization of the uncertainty (air temperature and humidity) was based on available weather data. Process characteristics including boiler conditions, reactant ratios, and pressure ratios in turbines were calculated to obtain the minimum water consumption under the above mentioned uncertainties. In this study, the calculated conditions predicted up to 12% in reduction in the average water consumption for a 548 MW supercritical PC power plant simulated using Aspen Plus. Optimization under uncertainty for these large-scale PC plants cannot be solved with conventional stochastic programming algorithms because of the computational expenses involved. In this work, we discuss the use of a novel better optimization of nonlinear uncertain systems (BONUS) algorithm which dramatically decreases the computational requirements of the stochastic optimization.

Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water heating Technologies Electric heater Gas boilerCoal Boiler Small cogen Stove District heating Heat pumpElectric water heater Gas boiler Coal Boiler Small cogen Oil

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2020. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. Historically, trends in coal consumption have varied considerably by region. Despite declines in some regions, world coal consumption has increased from 84 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1985 to 93 quadrillion Btu in 1997. Regions that have seen increases in coal consumption include the United States, Japan, and developing Asia. Declines have occurred in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU). In Western Europe, coal consumption declined by 33 percent between 1985 and 1997, displaced in considerable measure by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Priority listing of industrial processes by total energy consumption and potential for savings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A survey of eight of the most energy-intensive segments of the U.S. industry is made to quantify the energy consumed in the principal process units, to identify areas in which significant improvement appear possible, and to rank the process units in terms of total energy consumption and the potential for improvement. Data on the steel, paper, aluminum, textile, cement, and glass industries, petroleum refineries, and olefins and derivative products industries were compiled to help plan the development of new energy sources and to provide targets for energy conservation activities. (MCW)

Streb, A.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

State coal profiles, January 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of State Coal Profiles is to provide basic information about the deposits, production, and use of coal in each of the 27 States with coal production in 1992. Although considerable information on coal has been published on a national level, there is a lack of a uniform overview for the individual States. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. While focusing on coal output, State Coal Profiles shows that the coal-producing States are major users of coal, together accounting for about three-fourths of total US coal consumption in 1992. Each coal-producing State is profiled with a description of its coal deposits and a discussion of the development of its coal industry. Estimates of coal reserves in 1992 are categorized by mining method and sulfur content. Trends, patterns, and other information concerning production, number of mines, miners, productivity, mine price of coal, disposition, and consumption of coal are detailed in statistical tables for selected years from 1980 through 1992. In addition, coal`s contribution to the State`s estimated total energy consumption is given for 1991, the latest year for which data are available. A US summary of all data is provided for comparing individual States with the Nation as a whole. Sources of information are given at the end of the tables.

1994-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

143

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

144

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

145

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

146

Table 3b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Natural Gas Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standards Errors per Sq Ft b. Relative Standards Errors per Sq Ft Table 3b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Natural Gas (thousand) Total Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu) Natural Gas Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 5 7 6 6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 7 12 11 11 5,001 to 10,000 5 9 8 8 10,001 to 25,000 6 18 18 18 25,001 to 50,000 9 21 18 18 50,001 to 100,000 8 12 9 9 100,001 to 200,000 8 13 13 13 200,001 to 500,000 11 21 16 16 Over 500,000 15 27 22 23 Principal Building Activity Education 12 11 9 8 Food Sales and Service 8 12 10 9 Health Care 15 21 17 13 Lodging 12 22 16 16 Mercantile and Service 6 17 14 14 Office 7 24 24 24 Public Assembly 10 18 14 13 Public Order and Safety

147

Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the overall research effort of the Existing Plants Research Program by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. A growing challenge to the economic production of electricity from coal-fired power plants is the demand for freshwater, particularly in light of the projected trends for increasing demands and decreasing supplies of freshwater. Nanotechnology uses the unique chemical, physical, and biological properties that are associated with materials at the nanoscale to create and use materials, devices, and systems with new functions and properties. It is possible that nanotechnology may open the door to a variety of potentially interesting ways to reduce freshwater consumption at power plants. This report provides an overview of how applications of nanotechnology could potentially help reduce freshwater use at coal-fired power plants. It was developed by (1) identifying areas within a coal-fired power plant's operations where freshwater use occurs and could possibly be reduced, (2) conducting a literature review to identify potential applications of nanotechnology for facilitating such reductions, and (3) collecting additional information on potential applications from researchers and companies to clarify or expand on information obtained from the literature. Opportunities, areas, and processes for reducing freshwater use in coal-fired power plants considered in this report include the use of nontraditional waters in process and cooling water systems, carbon capture alternatives, more efficient processes for removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, coolants that have higher thermal conductivities than water alone, energy storage options, and a variety of plant inefficiencies, which, if improved, would reduce energy use and concomitant water consumption. These inefficiencies include air heater inefficiencies, boiler corrosion, low operating temperatures, fuel inefficiencies, and older components that are subject to strain and failure. A variety of nanotechnology applications that could potentially be used to reduce the amount of freshwater consumed - either directly or indirectly - by these areas and activities was identified. These applications include membranes that use nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials for improved water purification and carbon capture; nano-based coatings and lubricants to insulate and reduce heat loss, inhibit corrosion, and improve fuel efficiency; nano-based catalysts and enzymes that improve fuel efficiency and improve sulfur removal efficiency; nanomaterials that can withstand high temperatures; nanofluids that have better heat transfer characteristics than water; nanosensors that can help identify strain and impact damage, detect and monitor water quality parameters, and measure mercury in flue gas; and batteries and capacitors that use nanotechnology to enable utility-scale storage. Most of these potential applications are in the research stage, and few have been deployed at coal-fired power plants. Moving from research to deployment in today's economic environment will be facilitated with federal support. Additional support for research development and deployment (RD&D) for some subset of these applications could lead to reductions in water consumption and could provide lessons learned that could be applied to future efforts. To take advantage of this situation, it is recommended that NETL pursue funding for further research, development, or deployment for one or more of the potential applications identified in this report.

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

148

Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plumbing System Upgrade ... Building Newer than 1980 ... 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: ...

149

Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Table 1. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This write-up presents 1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Origin of Householder. In 1997, there were 101.5 million residential ho ...

151

Table 3. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This write-up presents 1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Origin of Householder. In 1997, there were 101.5 million residential ...

152

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Coal Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Markets Coal Markets International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 5: World Coal Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world coal consumption nearly doubles from 2003 to 2030, with the non-OECD countries accounting for 81 percent of the increase. Coal’s share of total world energy consumption increases from 24 percent in 2003 to 27 percent in 2030. Figure 48. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Billion Short Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 49. Coal Share of World energy Consumption by Sector 2003, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Table 10. World Recoverable Coal Reserves (Billion Short Tons) Printer friendly version

153

U.S. exports of coking coal were nearly triple U.S. consumption in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... China, India, Japan, and South Korea during 2010. Substantial steel production growth in developing countries, combined with international coal supply ...

154

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2020. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is expected to continue. Although 1999 world consumption, at 4.7 billion short tons,9 was 15 percent higher than coal use in 1980, it was lower than in any year since 1984 (Figure 51). The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 1999 and 2020, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent, but with considerable variation among regions.

155

Coal's share of total U.S. electricity generation falls below 40% ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas combined-cycle units operate at higher efficiency than do older, coal-fired units, which increases the competitiveness of natural gas relative to coal.

156

Coal industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, distribution, coal stocks, quality, prices, coal production information, and emissions for a wide audience.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated April 28, 2004) Spot coal prices in the East rose steadily since Labor Day 2003, with rapid escalations ...

158

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 26) The average spot prices for reported coal purchases rose once again ...

159

Increased U.S. coal consumption met by burning through stockpiles ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal inventories at power plants dropped below the monthly five-year average in April, the first time this has happened since December 2011.

160

U.S. coal consumption fell while exports increased during the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exports to South Korea, Japan, China, and India together accounted for approximately one-fourth of all coal exports in the fourth quarter of 2011.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated August 12) According to Platts Coal Outlooks Weekly Price Survey (August 11), the ...

162

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 2) The average spot prices for coal traded last week were relatively ...

163

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.7...

164

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC4.7...

165

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC8.7...

166

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East North Central West North Central Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

167

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Characteristics Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC5.4 Space Heating...

168

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total embodied energy was highest for the hotel subsector,School Hotel The total non-operational embodied energy ofEnergy, Reference Case) Million Tonnes CO2 Hospital Hotel

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

170

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Central Government Buildings. Available at: http://Energy Commission, PIER Building End-Use Energy Efficiencythe total lifecycle of a building such as petroleum and

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review (Revised 5/6/2002) 1 by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration 1 This article has been revised, deleting 17.6 millions short tons of coal consumed by the manufacturers of synthetic coal from the consumption of coal by "other industrial plants." This change was made because the synthetic coal those plants produced was primarily consumed in the electric sector and reported as coal, resulting in an overstating of total coal consumption. Overview With the dawning of a new century came the beginning of a new era in the coal industry. Instead of the traditional prac- tice of only buying and selling produced coal in the United

172

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,000 to 79,999 80,000 or More Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

173

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated July 7, 2004) In the trading week ended July 2, the average spot coal prices tracked by EIA were mixed.

174

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections ‹ See all Coal Reports U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Consumption Preliminary data shows that total coal consumption rebounded in 2010, increasing by 5.1 percent from the 2009 level. Total U.S. coal consumption was 1,048.3 million short tons, an increase of 50.8 million short tons, with all coal-consuming sectors, except commercial and institutional users, having higher consumption for the year. The 2010 increase in consumption, over 2009, restored about 40 percent of the previous drop in consumption in 2009 from 2008 levels. The electric power sector (electric utilities and independent power producers), which consumes about 93 percent of all coal

175

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

176

Coal sector profile  

SciTech Connect

Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

177

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

178

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

179

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

180

Present coal potential of Turkey and coal usage in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Total coal reserve (hard coal + lignite) in the world is 984 billion tons. While hard coal constitutes 52% of the total reserve, lignite constitutes 48% of it. Turkey has only 0.1% of world hard coal reserve and 1.5% of world lignite reserves. Turkey has 9th order in lignite reserve, 8th order in lignite production, and 12th order in total coal (hard coal and lignite) consumption. While hard coal production meets only 13% of its consumption, lignite production meets lignite consumption in Turkey. Sixty-five percent of produced hard coal and 78% of produced lignite are used for electricity generation. Lignites are generally used for electricity generation due to their low quality. As of 2003, total installed capacity of Turkey was 35,587 MW, 19% (6,774 MW) of which is produced from coal-based thermal power plants. Recently, use of natural gas in electricity generation has increased. While the share of coal in electricity generation was about 50% for 1986, it is replaced by natural gas today.

Yilmaz, A.O. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Quarterly Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quarterly Coal Report Quarterly Coal Report Release Date: October 02, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | full report Previous Quarterly Coal Data historical data (PDF): 1st quarter 2013 4th quarter 2012 3rd quarter 2012 2nd quarter 2012 1st quarter 2012 4th quarter 2011 3rd quarter 2011 2nd quarter 2011 1st quarter 2011 prior to 2011 Go The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. coal production, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, quality, stocks, and refined coal. Data on U.S. coke production, consumption, stocks, imports, and exports are also provided. All data for 2011 and prior years are final. All data for 2012 and 2013 are preliminary. Highlights for second quarter 2013: U.S. coal production during second quarter 2013 totaled 243.1

182

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

183

Coal industry annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

186

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

188

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

189

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

190

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

191

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

192

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

193

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

194

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

195

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

196

Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) presents U.S. coal production, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, coal quality, and stocks data.

197

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

198

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

199

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

200

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Review 3 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration Overview U.S. coal production fell for the second year in a row in 2003, declining by 24.8 million short tons to end the year at 1,069.5 million short tons according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1), down 2.3 percent from the 2002 level of 1,094.3 million short tons. (Note: All percentage change calculations are done at the short ton level.) Total U.S. coal consumption rose in 2003, with all coal-consuming sectors increasing or remaining stable for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector increased by 2.4 percent. However, there were only slight gains in consumption by the other sectors. U.S. coal exports rose in 2003 for the first time in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Coal industry annual 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

202

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

203

Environmental and economic challenges to coal`s future in China  

SciTech Connect

Coal accounts for approximately 75% of China`s total primary energy consumption, and is by far the largest contributor to air pollution. The highest growth sector for coal consumption is the power sector, accounting for about 36 percent of total coal consumption in 1993. Over the 1994--2010 period most new, large power plants are expected to be coal-fired. Therefore, the availability and price of coal, as well as environmental constraints will be critical to foreign investors evaluating coal and power projects in China. The purpose of this paper is to provide useful technical, economic and environmental information and analysis on coal and the power sectors of China. The target audiences are potential investors and government energy and environmental policy people. This paper suggests a number of important energy and environmental policy issues that need to be addressed in a timely fashion in order to promote adequate levels of investment in coal and power developments in China. Although this paper highlights problems faced by foreign investors in coal and power, it is important to balance these problems against the large investment opportunities developing in these sectors.

Johnson, C.J.; Li, B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Introduction Coal production in the United States in 2010 increased to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an increase of 1.0 percent, or 10.4 million short tons above the 2009 level of 1,074.9 million short tons (Table 1). In 2010 U.S. coal consumption increased in all sectors except commercial and institutional while total coal stocks fell slightly for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector in 2010 was higher by 4.5 percent, while coking coal consumption increased by 37.9 percent and the other industrial sector increased by 7.1 percent. The commercial and

206

Outlook and Challenges for Chinese Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. The rapid growth of coal demand since 2001 has created deepening strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about supply security. Although China's coal is 'plentiful,' published academic and policy analyses indicate that peak production will likely occur between 2016 and 2029. Given the current economic growth trajectory, domestic production constraints will lead to a coal gap that is not likely to be filled with imports. Urbanization, heavy industry growth, and increasing per-capita consumption are the primary drivers of rising coal usage. In 2006, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement accounted for 71% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units could save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand. If China follows Japan, steel production would peak by 2015; cement is likely to follow a similar trajectory. A fourth wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. New demand from coal-to-liquids and coal-to-chemicals may add 450 million tonnes of coal demand by 2025. Efficient growth among these drivers indicates that China's annual coal demand will reach 4.2 to 4.7 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not been able to reduce China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Few substitution options exist: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth would require over 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas, 48 GW of nuclear, or 86 GW of hydropower capacity. While these alternatives will continue to grow, the scale of development using existing technologies will be insufficient to substitute significant coal demand before 2025. The central role of heavy industry in GDP growth and the difficulty of substituting other fuels suggest that coal consumption is inextricably entwined with China's economy in its current mode of growth. Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on its current growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Broadening awareness of the environmental costs of coal mining, transport, and combustion is raising the pressure on Chinese policy makers to find alternative energy sources. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China is short of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport. Transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transport oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 mt by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets. The looming coal gap threatens to derail China's growth path, possibly undermining political, economic, and social stability. High coal prices and domestic shortages will have regional and global effects. Regarding China's role as a global manufacturing center, a domestic coal gap will increase prices and constrain growth. Within the Asia-Pacific region, China's coal gap is likely to bring about increased competition with other coal-importing countries including Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and India. As with petroleum, China may respond with a government-supported 'going-out' strategy of resource acquisition and vertical integration. Given its population and growing resource constraints, China may favor energy security, competitiveness, and local environmental protection over global climate change mitigation. The possibility of a large coal gap suggests that Chinese and international policy makers should maximize institutional and financial support

Aden, Nathaniel T.; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

O A Section 2. Coal - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Section 2. Coal Coal Consumption Physical Units Coal in the United States is mostly consumed by the electric power sector. Data are collected by the ...

208

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

209

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

210

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

211

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

212

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

213

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by 2005, and by 2020 gas use exceeds coal by 29 percent. Oil currently provides a larger share of world energy consumption than any other energy source and is expected to remain in that position

214

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

215

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

216

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

217

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail sales, and electrical system energy losses.

218

Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide...

219

Quarterly Coal Report April-June 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides compre- hensive information about U.S. coal production, dis- tribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a...

220

Quarterly Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. coal production, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, quality, stocks, and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Annual Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Annual Coal Report (ACR) provides annual data on U.S. coal production, prices, recoverable reserves, employment, productivity, productive capacity, consumption ...

222

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2010 Coal In the IEO2010 Reference case, world coal consumption increases by 56 percent from 2007 to 2035, and coal's share of world energy consumption grows from 27 percent in 2007 to 28 percent in 2035. Figure 60. World coal consumption by country grouping, 1980-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Coal share of world energy consumption by sector, 2007, 2020, and 2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. OECD coal consumption by region, Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Non-OECD coal consumption by region, 1980,2007,2020, and 2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Coal consumption in China by sector, 2007, 2020, and 2035.

223

Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Census Division June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 Middle Atlantic w w w w East North Central 1,313 1,177 1,326 -1.0 South Atlantic w w w w East South Central w w w w U.S. Total 2,500 2,207 2,295 8.9 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants.'

224

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2000 Previous slide Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by

225

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2006 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2006 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2006. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2007 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2007 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2007. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

Estimated U.S. gasoline consumption low compared to five-year ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA ... Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal.

228

American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Coal Council American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum Dallas, Texas May 17-19, 2004 Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Presentation Outline * Background * Power plant-water issues * DOE/NETL R&D program * Conclusion/future plans ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Global Water Availability Ocean 97% Fresh Water 2.5% 0 20 40 60 80 100 Ice Groundwater Lakes and Rivers ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Three Things Power Plants Require 1) Access to transmission lines 2) Available fuel, e.g., coal or natural gas 3) Water ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Freshwater Withdrawals and Consumption Mgal / Day Irrigation 81,300 Irrigation 81,300 Thermoelectric 3,310 Consumption Sources: "Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 1995," USGS Circular 1200, 1998

229

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

230

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.jpg (1776 bytes) coal.jpg (1776 bytes) Coal’s share of world energy consumption falls slightly in the IEO99 forecast. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia, but it is projected to lose market share to natural gas in some other areas of the world. Historically, trends in coal consumption have varied considerably by region. Despite declines in some regions, world coal consumption has increased from 84 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1985 to 93 quadrillion Btu in 1996. Regions that have seen increases in coal consumption include the United States, Japan, and developing Asia. Declines have occurred in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In Western Europe, coal consumption declined by 30

231

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... New 2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) ...

232

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Glossary FAQS Overview Data Summary Prices Reserves Consumption Production Stocks Imports, Exports & Distribution Coal Transportation Rates International All Coal Data...

233

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

William Watson

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

CSV File Documentation: Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion factors: the CSV file contains all of the conversion factors used to convert data between physical units and Btu for all states and the United States, and the Excel file shows the state-level conversion factors for coal and natural gas in six Excel spreadsheets. Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named

235

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The gross output for the petroleum and coal products subsector grew by about 3 percent, ... Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey, MECS Definition of Fuel Use, ...

236

STEO December 2012 - coal demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in...

237

Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 153 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M060(2011) (Washington, DC, 2011). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

238

Coal Market Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M060(2012) (Washington, DC, 2012). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

239

SustainableCoal_FC.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is a vital energy resource, is a vital energy resource, not only for the United States, but also for many developed and developing economies around the world. Finding ways to use coal cleanly and more efficiently at lower costs is a major research and development (R&D) challenge, and an ongoing focus of activities by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). According to a Congressional Research Service analysis, coal represents 93 percent of total U.S. - and over half of world - fossil fuel reserves (expressed in barrels of oil equivalent). Based on recent rates of domestic consumption (averaging 1 billion tons annually, 2000-2010), estimated U.S. recoverable coal reserves of nearly 261 billion short tons are sufficient to last more than 2½ centuries.

240

Table 6. Coal production and number of mines by State and coal...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal production and number of mines by State and coal rank, 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Bituminous",,"Subbituminous",,"Lignite",,"Anthracite",,"Total" "Coal-Producing State and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

242

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources in Physical Units, 2011 State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power f Fuel Ethanol g...

243

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

244

Total Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Quarterly Coal Report Monthly Energy Review Residential Energy Consumption ... Solar Energy in ... testing but not to operate at full power.

245

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Consumption Total primary energy consumption in the AEO2008 reference case increases at an average rate of 0.9 percent per year, from 100.0 quadrillion Btu in 2006 to 123.8 quadrillion Btu in 2030—7.4 quadrillion Btu less than in the AEO2007 reference case. In 2030, the levels of consumption projected for liquid fuels, natural gas, and coal are all lower in the AEO2008 reference case than in the AEO2007 reference case. Among the most important factors resulting in lower total energy demand in the AEO2008 reference case are lower economic growth, higher energy prices, greater use of more efficient appliances, and slower growth in energy-intensive industries. Figure 2. Delivered energy consumption by sector, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

246

Modelling Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption in China has attracted considerable research interest since the middle 1990s. This is largely prompted by the environmental ramifications of the extensive use of fossil fuels in the country to propel two decades of high economic growth. Since the late 1980s, there has been an increasing awareness on the part of the Chinese government of the imperative for the balance of economic growth and environmental protection. The government has since taken various measures ranging from encouraging energy-saving practice, controlling waste discharges to financing R & D programs on improving energy efficiency. Against this backdrop has seen a constant decline of the energy intensity of the economy, measured as the ratio of total energy consumed in standard coal equivalent to the real GDP since 1989. Using the 1987 and 1997 input-output tables for China, the present study examines the impact of technical and structural changes in the economy on industry fuel consumption over the 10-year period. Technical changes are reflected in changes in direct input-output coefficients, which capture the technical evolvement of intermediate production processes. Structural changes refer to shifts in the pattern of final demand for energy, including the import and export composition of various fuels. Six fuels are included in the study, namely, coal, oil, natural gas, electricity, petroleum and coke and gas, which cover all of the energy types available in the input-output tables. It is found that the predominant force of falling energy intensity was changes in direct energy input requirements in various industries. Such changes were responsible for a reduction in the consumption of four of the six fuels per unit of total output. Structural changes were not conducive for improv...

Baiding Hu Department; Baiding Hu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

APPLICATION OF MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING MODELS TO COAL QUALITY CONTROL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The problem of utilizing blending techniques to control coal quality at the production-consumption phase is considered. Three blending models were developed to provide coal of (more)

BAAFI, ERNEST YAW.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The frequency of total use of manual and automatic low-consumption fixtures in the Langford Architecture Building at Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 mandated that bathroom plumbing fixtures manufactured in the United States after January 1, 1994 meet standards for maximum water consumption. Manufacturers have developed low-consumption valves to meet these standards. The performance of low-consumption fixtures has become an important issue for facilities managers because the water saving by retrofitting low-consumption fixtures is significant. The fixtures in the Langford Architecture Building A, Texas A&M University were used to conduct this study. An acoustic information retrieval system was utilized to collect the sound signals of each fixture and a speech recognition system was utilized to identify which fixture was in use. The data from this study were analyzed to determine whether location of fixture and type of fixtureâ??manual or automaticâ??caused a significant difference in frequency of use.

Chung, Woo Sung

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2008 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 65 percent and international coal trade increases by 53 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2005 to 29 percent in 2030. Figure 46. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 47. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 48. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

250

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 5 - Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 54. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 55. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2004, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to

251

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 5b. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 5b. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Million Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 19982 20022 20062 Total 3 17 16 13 Net Electricity 4 2 2 2 Natural Gas 5 5 4 Coal 7 6 4 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. Denominators represent the entire steel industry, not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, residual fuel oil or coal.

252

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

253

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power d Biomass e Other f Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/Losses g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Alabama 2,159.7 853.9 404.0 638.5 329.9 106.5 185.0 0.1 -358.2 393.7 270.2 1,001.1 494.7 Alaska 779.1 14.1 411.8 334.8 0.0 15.0 3.3 0.1 0.0 56.4 63.4 393.4 266.0 Arizona 1,436.6 425.4 354.9 562.8 293.1 69.9 8.7 3.6 -281.7 368.5 326.0 231.2 511.0 Arkansas 1,135.9 270.2 228.9 388.3 161.1 36.5 76.0 0.6 -25.7 218.3 154.7 473.9 288.9 California 8,364.6 68.9 2,474.2 3,787.8 315.6 342.2

254

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2009 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 49 percent from 2006 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2006 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 42. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 43. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 44. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

255

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installation Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & PostGWh total Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & 2 YearsInstall Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & 3 Years

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

257

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels (as commingled) Coal Natural Gas excluding Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Petroleum Total Natural Gas including Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Motor Gasoline including Fuel Ethanol a Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline excluding Fuel Ethanol a Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Alabama ........... 651.0 614.8 156.5 13.4 12.8 304.5 13.4 49.1 549.5 1,815.4 614.8 319.8 Alaska ............... 15.5 337.0 85.1 118.2 1.3 31.9 1.9 28.6 267.1 619.6 337.0 34.6 Arizona ............. 459.9 293.7 151.8 21.5 9.1 297.3 (s) 21.1 500.9 1,254.5 293.7 323.4 Arkansas ........... 306.1 288.6 134.9 5.9 9.4 165.4 0.2 19.8 335.7 930.5 288.6 175.6 California .......... 55.3 2,196.6 567.0 549.7 67.2 1,695.4 186.9 339.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 2,196.6

258

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

259

World energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategies impact on energy consumption in residentialBEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTION Nicola Combe 1 ,2 ,nearly 60% of domestic energy consumption and 27% of total

Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of...

262

Natural gas consumption reflects shifting sectoral patterns ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. natural gas consumption since 1997 reflects shifting patterns. Total U.S. natural gas consumption rose 7% between 1997 and 2011, but this modest ...

263

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household. RECS 2009 Release date: June 6, 2012. Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained ...

264

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Glossary Anthracite: A hard, black, lustrous coal containing a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter. Often referred to as hard coal. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass: Organic nonfossil material of biological origin constituting a renewable energy source. Bituminous Coal: A dense, black coal, often with well-defined bands of bright and dull material, with a moisture content usually less than 20 percent. Often referred to as soft coal. It is the most common coal. Blast Furnace: A shaft furnace in which solid fuel (coke) is burned with an air blast to smelt ore in a continuous operation. Blast Furnace Gas: The waste combustible gas generated in a blast furnace when iron ore is being reduced with coke to

265

Fuel blending with PRB coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many methods exist to accomplish coal blending at a new or existing power plant. These range from a basic use of the secondary (emergency) stockout/reclaim system to totally automated coal handling facilities with segregated areas for two or more coals. Suitable choices for different sized coal plant are discussed, along with the major components of the coal handling facility affected by Powder River Basin coal. 2 figs.

McCartney, R.H.; Williams, R.L. Jr. [Roberts and Schaefer, Chicago, IL (United States)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

face of oil and natural gas price rises, coals share may becoal consumption declined from 1996 to 2006, but rebounded in 2006; unless residential natural gas prices

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV i Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy j,k Electrical System Energy Losses l Total j,k Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste g Losses and Co- products h Alabama ........... 65.0 265.4 155.4 13.4 12.8 319.8 13.4 49.1 563.8 0.0 154.1 0.0 0.1 0.2 303.7 1,352.2 579.1 1,931.3 Alaska ............... 9.5 294.7 81.8 118.2 1.3 34.6 0.4 28.6 265.0 0.0 2.3 0.0 0.2 (s) 21.6 593.2 44.7 637.9 Arizona ............. 10.0 109.8 151.3 21.5 9.1 323.4 (s) 21.1 526.5 0.0 4.4 3.1 0.3 7.9 255.7 917.8 513.7 1,431.5 Arkansas ........... 5.6 179.4 134.5 5.9 9.4 175.6 0.1 19.8 345.4 0.0 82.6 0.0 0.7 0.2 163.5 777.4 339.8 1,117.1 California ..........

268

Energy Consumption and Potential for Energy Conservation in the Steel Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The domestic steel industry, being energy-use intensive, requires between 4 and 5 percent of total annual domestic energy consumption. More than two-thirds of total steel industry energy, however, is derived from coal. During the post-World War II era specific energy consumption exhibited a steady decline of slightly less than 1 percent per year. Potential for future savings is estimated at approximately 25 percent. Full realization of potential savings will require huge sums of capital. These needs will be in competition with other capital needs for modernizing existing facilities, for expansion, and for the large investments required to meet environmental regulations.

Hughes, M. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 32. U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Other Industrial Commercial and Institutional Year and Quarter Electric Power Sector 1 Coke Plants CHP 2 Non- CHP 3 Total CHP 4 Non- CHP 5 Total Total 2007 January - March 257,516 5,576 5,834 8,743 14,578 547 510 1,058 278,727 April - June 246,591 5,736 5,552 8,521 14,074 426 279 705 267,106 July - September 283,556 5,678 5,546 8,180 13,725 458 247 705 303,665 October - December 257,478 5,726 5,605 8,634 14,238 495 563 1,058 278,500 Total 1,045,141 22,715 22,537 34,078 56,615

270

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End Use Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011 U.S. Coal Consumption by End Use Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 26. U.S. Coal Consumption by End Use Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 2012 2011 Total Census Division and State Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional 2012 2011 Percent Change New England 1,920 81 - - 3,025 w - - 2,001 w w Connecticut 415 - - - 325 - - - 415 325 27.5 Maine 32 w - - 38 w - - w w -16.4 Massachusetts 954 w - - 1,763 w - - w w -44.4 New Hampshire 520 - - - 898 - - - 520 898 -42.2 Middle Atlantic 44,838 2,440 w w 53,970 2,926 w w 52,750

271

coal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coal coal Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

272

Blackout: coal, climate and the last energy crisis  

SciTech Connect

Coal fuels more than 30 per cent of UK electricity production, and about 50 per cent in the US, providing a significant portion of total energy output. China and India's recent ferocious economic growth has been based almost entirely on coal-generated electricity. Coal currently looks like a solution to many of our fast-growing energy problems. However, while coal advocates are urging us full steam ahead, the increasing reliance on this dirtiest of all fossil fuels has crucial implications for energy policy, pollution levels, the global climate, world economy and geopolitics. Drawbacks to a coal-based energy strategy include: Scarcity - new studies suggest that the peak of world coal production may actually be less than two decades away; Cost - the quality of produced coal is declining, while the expense of transportation is rising, leading to spiralling costs and increasing shortages; and, Climate impacts - our ability to deal with the historic challenge of climate change may hinge on reducing coal consumption in future years.

Heinberg, R. [Post Carbon Institute in California, CA (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Coal Consumption to Coal Generation Sources: * 1990-1997-EIA, Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report," and Form EIA-867, Annual Nonutility Power Producer Report. *...

274

One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Like the Other: Residential Consumption Variability Phillipthe total annual energy consumption. The behavior patternsin total residential energy consumption per home, even when

Kelsven, Phillip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 2003 Commercial Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type Consumption Percent of Total | Consumption Percent of Total Building Type (thousand BtuSF)...

276

Weekly Coal Production by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Weekly Coal Production Weekly Coal Production Data for week ended: December 14, 2013 | Release date: December 19, 2013 | Next release date: December 30, 2013 For the week ended December 14, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 18.9 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 3.1% higher than last week's estimate and 2.9% lower than the production estimate in the comparable week in 2012 Coal production east of the Mississippi River totaled 8.2 mmst Coal production west of the Mississippi River totaled 10.8 mmst U.S. year-to-date coal production totaled 957.1 mmst, 1.9% lower than the comparable year-to-date coal production in 2012 EIA revises its weekly estimates of state-level coal production using Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) quarterly coal production data.

277

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,407 184 231 - 1,822 Alabama Railroad 801 9 49 - 859 Alabama River 519 - - - 519 Alabama Truck 87 175 182 - 444 Georgia Total s - s - s Georgia Truck s - s - s Indiana Total - 98 - - 98 Indiana Railroad - 98 - - 98 Kentucky Total - - 12 - 12 Kentucky Truck - - 12 - 12 Ohio Total - 30 - - 30 Ohio

278

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,896 182 327 - 2,405 Alabama Railroad 1,192 2 74 - 1,268 Alabama River 655 - - - 655 Alabama Truck 50 180 253 - 482 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s Indiana Total - 72 - - 72 Indiana Railroad - 72 - - 72 Tennessee Total - - 7 - 7 Tennessee Truck - - 7 - 7 Origin State Total 1,896

279

Impact of 1980 scheduled capacity additions on electric-utility oil consumption  

SciTech Connect

The electric-utility sector currently consumes approximately 8% of the total oil used in the Nation. This oil represented about 15% of total fuel consumed by electric utilities in 1979. Two important factors that affect the level of utility oil consumption in 1980 are the substantial increase in coal-fired generating capacity and the uncertainty surrounding nuclear-plant licensing. With particular emphasis on these considerations, this report analyzes the potential for changes in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980 relative to the 1979 level. Plant conversions, oil to coal, for example, that may occur in 1980 are not considered in this analysis. Only the potential reduction in oil consumption resulting from new generating-capacity additions is analyzed. Changes in electric-utility oil consumption depend on, among other factors, regional-electricity-demand growth and generating-plant mix. Five cases are presented using various electricity-demand-growth rate assumptions, fuel-displacement strategies, and nuclear-plant-licensing assumptions. In general, it is likely that there will be a reduction in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980. Using the two reference cases of the report, this reduction is projected to amount to a 2 to 5% decrease from the 1979 oil-consumption level; 7% reduction is the largest reduction projected.

Gielecki, M.; Clark, G.; Roberts, B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Coal competition: prospects for the 1980s  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of 10 chapters which present an historical overview of coal and the part it has played as an energy source in the economic growth of the United States from prior to World War II through 1978. Chapter titles are: definition of coals, coal mining; types of coal mines; mining methods; mining work force; development of coal; mine ownership; production; consumption; prices; exports; and imports. (DMC)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Coal Production 1992  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1992 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In 1992, there were 3,439 active coal mining operations made up of all mines, preparation plants, and refuse operations. The data in Table 1 cover the 2,746 mines that produced coal, regardless of the amount of production, except for bituminous refuse mines. Tables 2 through 33 include data from the 2,852 mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10 thousand or more short tons of coal during the period, except for bituminous refuse, and includes preparation plants with 5 thousand or more employee hours. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 83 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1992.

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Table 2.1d Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 1949 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

System Energy Losses 12: Total: Fossil Fuels: Renewable Energy 2: Total Primary: Coal: Coal Coke Net Imports: Natural Gas 3: ... 8 Photovoltaic (PV) electricity net ...

283

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,486 155 328 - 1,970 Alabama Railroad 1,020 - 75 - 1,095 Alabama River 417 - - - 417 Alabama Truck 49 155 253 - 458 Colorado Total 195 - - - 195 Colorado Railroad 195 - - - 195 Illinois Total 127 - 18 - 145 Illinois Railroad 20 - - - 20 Illinois River 107 - 18 - 125 Indiana Total

284

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,942 160 335 - 2,437 Alabama Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 Alabama River 741 - - - 741 Alabama Truck 52 160 278 - 490 Colorado Total 621 2 - - 623 Colorado Railroad 621 2 - - 623 Illinois Total 113 - 11 - 123 Illinois River 113 - 11 - 123 Indiana Total 265 - - - 265 Indiana Railroad

285

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,896 182 327 - 2,405 Alabama Railroad 1,192 2 74 - 1,268 Alabama River 655 - - - 655 Alabama Truck 50 180 253 - 482 Colorado Total 468 - - - 468 Colorado Railroad 468 - - - 468 Illinois Total 90 - 26 - 116 Illinois River 90 - 26 - 116 Indiana Total 181 - - - 181 Indiana River 181 -

286

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,407 184 231 - 1,822 Alabama Railroad 801 9 49 - 859 Alabama River 519 - - - 519 Alabama Truck 87 175 182 - 444 Colorado Total 82 - - - 82 Colorado Railroad 82 - - - 82 Illinois Total 149 - 14 - 163 Illinois Railroad 44 - - - 44 Illinois River 105 - 14 - 119 Indiana Total 99 - - - 99

287

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

288

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

289

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Below are historical data tables from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). These tables cover the total number of households ...

290

Energy Consumption and Expenditures RECS 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Heating. Space Heating. Appliances. Air-Conditioning. About the Data. Tables: Total Energy Consumption in U.S ...

291

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

292

By Coal Destination State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 7,906 821 1,242 - 9,969 Alabama Railroad 3,604 49 285 - 3,938 Alabama River 3,979 - - - 3,979 Alabama Truck 322 773 957 - 2,051 Colorado Total 2,113 - - - 2,113 Colorado Railroad 2,113 - - - 2,113 Illinois Total 336 - - - 336 Illinois River 336 - - - 336 Indiana Total 1,076

293

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 11 Table C8. Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy Electrical System Energy Losses e Total Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Lubricants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama ............. 0.0 23.5 0.4 124.4 13.4 0.3 2.3 316.3 6.7 463.7 0.0 487.2 0.0 487.2 Alaska ................. 0.0 3.5 0.8 44.4 118.2 (s) 0.4 32.9 0.4 197.2 0.0 200.7 0.0 200.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 15.6 1.0 111.3 21.5 0.8 1.6 318.2 0.0 454.5 0.0 470.1 0.0 470.1 Arkansas ............. 0.0 11.5 0.4 99.7 5.9 0.4 2.0 171.3 0.0 279.8 (s) 291.2 (s) 291.2 California ............ 0.0 25.7 1.9 440.9 549.7 3.8 13.3 1,770.1 186.9 2,966.5 2.8 2,995.1 5.5 3,000.5 Colorado ............. 0.0 14.7 0.6 83.2 58.3 0.3

294

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C7. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power e Biomass Geo- thermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy h,i Electrical System Energy Losses j Total h,i Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste f Losses and Co- products g Alabama ............. 65.0 179.1 23.9 3.7 3.3 6.7 46.3 83.9 0.0 147.2 0.0 (s) 115.1 590.4 219.5 810.0 Alaska ................. 0.1 253.8 19.2 0.1 1.0 0.0 27.1 47.4 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 4.5 306.0 9.4 315.4 Arizona ............... 10.0 22.0 33.2 1.4 4.6 (s) 18.4 57.6 0.0 1.4 3.1 0.2 42.1 136.5 84.7 221.2 Arkansas ............. 5.6 93.1 31.1 2.6 4.0 0.1 17.4 55.1 0.0 72.7 0.0 (s) 58.0 284.5 120.5 405.0 California ............ 35.6 767.4 77.2 23.9 29.6 (s) 312.5

295

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C5. Residential Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV e Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG c Total Wood d Alabama ............. 0.0 37.2 0.1 0.1 6.0 6.2 6.0 0.1 0.2 112.6 162.2 214.7 376.9 Alaska ................. 0.0 20.5 8.1 0.1 0.5 8.8 1.9 0.1 (s) 7.3 38.6 15.1 53.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 39.1 (s) (s) 5.5 5.5 2.6 (s) 7.9 112.9 168.0 226.8 394.7 Arkansas ............. 0.0 34.2 0.1 (s) 5.2 5.3 8.6 0.7 0.2 64.1 113.1 133.2 246.3 California ............ 0.0 522.4 0.6 0.6 30.9 32.2 33.3 0.2 43.2 301.6 932.9 583.1 1,516.1 Colorado ............. 0.0 134.2 0.1 (s) 12.3 12.4 8.3 0.2 0.7 62.4 216.5 136.5 353.0 Connecticut ......... 0.0 46.0 59.6

296

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C9. Electric Power Sector Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydroelectric Power b Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV d Wind Net Electricity Imports e Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste c Alabama ............. 586.1 349.4 1.1 0.0 0.0 1.1 411.8 86.3 4.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,439.3 Alaska ................. 6.0 42.3 3.3 0.0 1.5 4.8 0.0 13.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 (s) 66.3 Arizona ............... 449.9 183.9 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.6 327.3 89.1 2.4 0.0 0.8 2.5 1.5 1,057.9 Arkansas ............. 300.5 109.2 0.5 0.0 0.1 0.6 148.5 28.7 1.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 588.9 California ............ 19.7 630.1 0.4 11.1 (s) 11.5 383.6 413.4 69.0 122.0 8.4 75.3 20.1 1,753.1 Colorado ............. 362.4 88.1 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 20.2 0.9

297

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 . Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2 California 7,858.4 55.3 2,196.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 383.6 928.5 868.6 20.1 1,516.1 1,556.1 1,785.7 3,000.5 Colorado 1,480.8 368.9 476.5 472.9 1,318.3

298

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,148 314 6 53 446 14 25 Q 291 20-49 1,018 297 13 22 381 18 97 5 185 50-99 1,095 305 7 13 440 6 130 9 186 100-249 1,728 411 16 11 793 7 131 7 353 250-499 1,916 391 16 11 583 3 185 5 722 500 and Over 7,323 720 21 21 2,569 21 300 348 3,323 Total 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 376 5,059 Employment Size Under 50 1,149 305 12 45 565 21 31

299

Table 33. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 33. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 3,051 2,997 3,092 6,048 6,156 -1.8 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 5,471 5,280 5,296 10,751 10,579 1.6 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants

300

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

302

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

303

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

304

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

305

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

306

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

307

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

308

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 914 12 66 - 992 Alabama River 949 - - - 949 Alabama Truck 78 189 237 - 504 Alabama Total 1,941 201 303 - 2,445 Georgia Railroad 23 - - - 23 Georgia Truck s - - - s Georgia Total 23 - - - 23 Indiana Railroad - 115 - - 115 Indiana Truck - 71 - - 71 Indiana Total - 186 - - 186 Tennessee Railroad - - 1 - 1 Tennessee Truck

309

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report on the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project discusses Lignite coal, natural gas, and by-products production as well as gas quality. A tabulation of raw material, product and energy consumption is provided for plant operations. Capital improvement projects and plant maintenance activities are detailed and summaries are provided for environmental, safety, medical, quality assurance, and qualtiy control activities.

Not Available

1988-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

310

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Quarterly coal report, October--December 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1996 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1990 through the third quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 72 tabs.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

By Coal Origin State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 7,906 821 1,242 - 9,969 Alabama Railroad 3,604 49 285 - 3,938 Alabama River 3,979 - - - 3,979 Alabama Truck 322 773 957 - 2,051 Florida Total - - 15 - 15 Florida Railroad - - 11 - 11 Florida Truck - - 3 - 3 Georgia Total 196 - 15 - 211 Georgia Railroad 189 - 1 - 190 Georgia Truck

313

Table F28: Wind Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F28: Wind Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total

314

Coal - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Most Requested Most Requested Change category... Most Requested Consumption Environment Imports & Exports Industry Characteristics Prices Production Projections Reserves Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Reports Today in Energy - Coal Short, timely articles with graphs about recent coal issues and trends Coal News & Markets Summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAP), Northern Appalachia (NAP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Power River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. Weekly Coal Production Estimates of U.S. coal production by State based on railroad car loadings data. (archived versions) Archived Versions Weekly Coal Production - Archive Weekly NYMEX Coal Futures

315

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding total residential transportation energy usageon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption total annual fuelUsage and Energy Consumption Gasoline-equivalent gallons per year total

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

317

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.gif (4423 bytes) coal.gif (4423 bytes) The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation: Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO60. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

318

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 5a. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5a 5a Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 5a. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) per Value of Production, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (1000 Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS2 331111) 1998 3 2002 3 2006 3 Total 4 30 27 17 Net Electricity5 3 4 3 Natural Gas 9 9 6 Coal 13 10 6 Notes:1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 3. Denominators represent the value of production for the entire iron and still mills (NAICS 331111), not those based mainly on electric, natural gas or coal.

319

Analysis of federal incentives used to stimulate energy consumption  

SciTech Connect

Conclusions of an analysis which identifies and quantifies Federal incentives that have increased the consumption of coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity are summarized. Data on estimated cost of incentives used to stimulate energy consumption by incentive type and energy source are tabulated for coal, oil, gas, and electricity. It is suggested that the examination of past incentives can be useful in developing guidelines and limits for the use of incentives to stimulate consumption of solar energy. (MCW)

Cole, R.J.; Cone, B.W.; Emery, J.C.; Huelshoff, M.; Lenerz, D.E.; Marcus, A.; Morris, F.A.; Sheppard, W.J.; Sommers, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: ...

322

Table 3.2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 257 12 22 579 6 182 2 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 56 * 1 121 * 126 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 25 * * 53 * 110 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 4 1 1 15 * 49 2 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 31 1 Q 100 1 2 0 4 3115 Dairy Products 105 33 2 2 66 1 * 0 2 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 212 69 5 3 125 2 Q 0 8 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 86 29 1 1 38 1 10 0 7 3121 Beverages

323

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Coal Graphic Data  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 Figure 46. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 Figure 46 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 47. Coal Share...

324

Coal stockpiles at electric power plants were above average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Increased competition between fuels as well as a warm winter 2011-12 led to lower consumption of coal and, thus, higher coal stockpiles at electric power plants in ...

325

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 944 16 77 - 1,037 Alabama River 781 - - - 781 Alabama Truck 77 224 220 - 521 Alabama Total 1,802 240 298 - 2,340 Colorado Railroad 385 - - - 385 Illinois River 15 - - - 15 Indiana Railroad 1 - - - 1 Indiana River 350 - - - 350 Indiana Total 351 - - - 351 Kentucky Railroad 682 - 2 - 685 Kentucky (East)

326

Natural gas consumption has two peaks each year - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption of natural gas is seasonal, with consumption patterns among end-use sectors highly driven by weather. Total natural gas consumption peaks during the ...

327

EIA - AEO2010 - Coal projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Projections Coal Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Coal Projections Figure 88. Coal production by region, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 89. U.S. coal production in six cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 90. Average annual minemouth coal prices by region, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 91. Average annual delivered coal prices in four cases, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 92. Change in U.S. coal consumption by end use in two cases, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Coal production increases at a slower rate than in the past In the AEO2010 Reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation, along with the startup of several CTL plants, leads to growth in coal production averaging 0.2 percent per year from 2008 to 2035. This is significantly less than the 0.9-percent average growth rate for U.S. coal production from 1980 to 2008.

328

Biofuels Consumption and Production by Country (2000 - 2010)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Consumption and Production by Country (2000 - 2010) Total annual biofuels consumption and production data by country was compiled by the Energy Information Administration...

329

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

| 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy...

330

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) Provides total and average annual residential energy consumption for water heating in U.S. households in 2005, measured in...

331

Annual Renewable Electricity Consumption by Country (2005 - 2009...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Electricity Consumption by Country (2005 - 2009) Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as...

332

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008,...

333

Combustion Behavior of Pulverized Coal Injection in Corex Melter ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to increase the utilization of fine coal, reduce coke consumption and enhance the competitiveness of the technology, the combustion behavior of...

334

Maximum Rate of Pulverized Coal Injection into Blast Furnace with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pulverized coal consumption efficiency is determined by means of microscopic and chemical analysis. The carbon structure of coke fines in the blast furnace...

335

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

because of independent rounding. Sources: Electric Power Sector: Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report;" Coke Plants: Form EIA-5, "Quarterly Coal Consumption and...

336

Prod. of Oil, Gas & Coal - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Production of oil, gas, and coal. Projected supply and disposition of crude oil. The model now uses the EIAs projections of production, imports, and consumption of ...

337

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C31A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

338

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C25A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

339

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C32A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

340

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C30A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C35A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption...

342

Biofuels Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Consumption Biofuels Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual biofuels consumption and production data by country was compiled by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Data is presented as thousand barrels per day. Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels Biofuels Consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_biofuels_production_2000_2010thousand_barrels_per_day.csv (csv, 9.3 KiB) text/csv icon total_biofuels_consumption_2000_2010thousand_barrels_per_day.csv (csv, 9.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2000 - 2010 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

343

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal receipts as provided in the Quarterly Coal Distribution Report for the Electricity Generation sector are less than the total quantities reported ...

344

Coal News and Markets - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal News and Markets Coal News and Markets Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 24, 2013 "Coal News and Markets Report" summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAPP), Northern Appalachia (NAPP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Powder River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. The report includes data on average weekly coal commodity spot prices, total monthly coal production, eastern monthly coal production, electric power sector coal stocks, and average cost of metallurgical coal at coke plants and export docks. The historical data for coal commodity spot market prices are proprietary and not available for public release. Average weekly coal commodity spot prices (dollars per short ton)

345

Map Data: Total Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total Production Map Data: Total Production totalprod2009final.csv More Documents & Publications Map Data: Renewable Production Map Data: State Consumption...

346

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table C6. Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric Power e Biomass Geothermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste f Alabama ............. 0.0 25.5 7.0 (s) 2.7 0.2 0.0 10.0 0.0 0.9 0.0 75.9 112.4 144.8 257.2 Alaska ................. 9.4 16.9 10.1 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.0 11.5 0.0 0.3 0.1 9.7 48.0 20.2 68.2 Arizona ............... 0.0 33.1 6.8 (s) 1.5 0.7 0.0 8.9 0.0 0.5 (s) 100.7 143.2 202.3 345.5 Arkansas ............. 0.0 40.6 3.6 (s) 1.2 0.4 0.0 5.2 0.0 1.3 0.0 41.4 88.6 86.1 174.7 California ............ 0.0 250.9 47.9 0.1 8.7 1.4 0.0 58.1 (s) 17.4 0.7 418.9 746.2 809.9 1,556.1 Colorado ............. 3.2 57.6 5.9 (s) 2.9 0.2 0.0 9.1 0.0 1.2 0.2

347

Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumption Trends Consumption Trends Data centers can consume up to 100 times more energy than a standard office building. Often, less than 15% of original source energy is used for the information technology equipment within a data center. Figure 1 outlines typical data center energy consumption ratios. An illustration that features a graphic of a coal container representing 100 units of coal. This enters a graphic of a power plant, where those 100 units of coal are turned into 35 units of energy. The 35 units of energy are distributed by power lines, represented by a graphic of power lines, where 33 units are delivered to a pie chart representing data typical data center energy end use. The data center pie chart features 48% representing server load and computing operation consumption; 43% representing cooling equipment consumption; and 9% representing power conversion and distribution consumption.

348

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

349

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

viii Figure 4.1: Electrical power usage breakdown for a3:30PM. The total HVAC electrical power consumption for thepower consumption, over Electrical Power Consumption (in kW)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Estimating coal production peak and trends of coal imports in China  

SciTech Connect

More than 20 countries in the world have already reached a maximum capacity in their coal production (peak coal production) such as Japan, the United Kingdom and Germany. China, home to the third largest coal reserves in the world, is the world's largest coal producer and consumer, making it part of the Big Six. At present, however, China's coal production has not yet reached its peak. In this article, logistic curves and Gaussian curves are used to predict China's coal peak and the results show that it will be between the late 2020s and the early 2030s. Based on the predictions of coal production and consumption, China's net coal import could be estimated for coming years. This article also analyzes the impact of China's net coal import on the international coal market, especially the Asian market, and on China's economic development and energy security. 16 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Bo-qiang Lin; Jiang-hua Liu [Xiamen University, Xiamen (China). China Center for Energy Economics Research (CCEER)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 1,040 18 80 - 1,138 Alabama River 668 - - - 668 Alabama Truck 52 164 223 - 438 Alabama Total 1,760 181 303 - 2,244 Colorado Railroad 600 - - - 600 Illinois River 203 - 13 - 217 Indiana River 180 - - - 180 Kentucky Railroad 465 - 10 - 475 Kentucky (West) Railroad 465 - 10 - 475 Utah Railroad 18 - - -

352

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 914 12 66 - 992 Alabama River 949 - - - 949 Alabama Truck 78 189 237 - 504 Alabama Total 1,941 201 303 - 2,445 Colorado Railroad 575 - - - 575 Illinois River 99 - - - 99 Indiana River 241 - - - 241 Kentucky Railroad 827 - 12 - 839 Kentucky (East) Railroad 76 - - - 76 Kentucky (West) Railroad

353

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 839 11 83 - 933 Alabama River 1,347 - - - 1,347 Alabama Truck 118 216 236 - 571 Alabama Total 2,304 227 320 - 2,850 Colorado Railroad 514 - - - 514 Illinois River 99 - - - 99 Indiana River 172 - - - 172 Kentucky Railroad 635 - 11 - 647 Kentucky (East) Railroad 45 - - - 45 Kentucky (West)

354

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 907 10 59 - 975 Alabama River 903 - - - 903 Alabama Truck 150 144 253 - 546 Alabama Total 1,960 153 311 - 2,424 Colorado Railroad 640 - - - 640 Illinois River 123 - - - 123 Indiana River 312 - - - 312 Kentucky Railroad 622 - 36 - 658 Kentucky (East) Railroad 96 - 36 - 132 Kentucky (West)

355

Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper estimates the quantity of hydrogen that could be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power by county in the United States. The study estimates that more than 72 million tonnes of hydrogen can be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power per year in the country (considering only 30% of their total annual production). The United States consumed about 396 million tonnes of gasoline in 2007; therefore, the report suggests the amount of hydrogen from these sources could displace about 80% of this consumption.

Milbrandt, A.; Mann, M.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA-M060(2002) (Washington, DC, January 2002). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

357

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA-M060(2001) January 2001. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

358

Electricity Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_consumption_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 50.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

359

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Maps by energy source and topic, includes ... Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy ...

360

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

may not sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Form EIA-871A of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

362

Figure 70. Delivered energy consumption for transportation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 70. Delivered energy consumption for transportation by mode, 2011 and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Total Rail Pipeline Marine ...

363

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum Weekly Petroleum Status Report Weekly Natural Gas ... Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively ...

364

All Consumption Tables - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a

365

Residential Energy Consumption Survey data show decreased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total U.S. energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the ...

366

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility (1990-2009) Electricity consumption by Utility company for Commercial, Residential, Ag & Water Pump, Streetlight, Industry, Mining & Construction and Total...

367

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,942 160 335 - 2,437 Alabama Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 Alabama River 741 - - - 741 Alabama Truck 52 160 278 - 490 Georgia Total s - 3 - 3 Georgia Truck s - 3 - 3 Ohio Total - 3 - - 3 Ohio River - 3 - - 3 Origin State Total 1,942 163 338 - 2,443 Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 River 741 3 - - 745 Truck 52 160

368

Study on leaching vanadium from roasted residue of stone coal  

SciTech Connect

In China, the total reserves of vanadium, reported as V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, in stone coal is 118 Mt (130 million st). Recovering vanadium from such a large resource is very important to China's vanadium industry. The technology now being used to recover vanadium from stone coal has the following two problems in the leaching process: a low recovery of vanadium and high acid consumption. To resolve these problems, a new leaching technology is proposed. The effects of factors such as H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration, liquid-solid ratio, temperature and time, and the types and additions of additives were studied. By adding 1.5% (by weight) CaF2 and leaching the roasted residue of stone coal with 5.4% (by weight) sulfuric acid at 90{sup o}C for 12 hours at a liquid-solid ratio of 2 mL/g, the leaching degree of vanadium reached 83.10%. This proposed leaching technology gives a feasible alternative for the processing of roasting residue of stone coal and can be applied in the comprehensive utilization of stone coal ores in China.

He, D.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, G.; Luo, W.; Ou, L. [Central South University, Changsha (China)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Annual Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Report Annual Coal Report Release Date: December 12, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report Previous Annual Coal / Coal Industry Annual Reports historical data (PDF): 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 before 2001 Industry Annual 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Go The Annual Coal Report (ACR) provides annual data on U.S. coal production, number of mines, productive capacity, recoverable reserves, employment, productivity, consumption, stocks, and prices. All data for 2012 and prior years are final. Highlights for 2012: U.S. coal production decreased 7.2 percent from 2011, driven by lower electric power sector demand, to roughly 1.02 billion short tons. Productive capacity of U.S. coal mines decreased 3.5 percent to 1.28

370

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ZIP (all tables) Release Date: January 11, 2013 : CE4.1 End-Use Consumption by Fuel Totals, U.S. Homes: XLS: CE4.2 End-Use Consumption by Fuel Totals, Northeast Homes ...

371

Table 23. Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 23. Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 3,189 2,679 3,225 5,867 5,993 -2.1 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 5,770 4,962 5,370 10,732 10,440 2.8 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants

372

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Coal Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Figure 54. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 Figure 54 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 55. Coal share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2004, 2015, and 2030 Figure 55 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 56. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2004, 2015, and 2030 Figure 56 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 57. Non-OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2004, 2015, and 2030 Figure 57 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 58. Coal Consumption in China by Sector, 2004, 2015, and 2030 Figure 58 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

373

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 944 16 77 - 1,037 Alabama River 781 - - - 781 Alabama Truck 77 224 220 - 521 Alabama Total 1,802 240 298 - 2,340 Florida Railroad - - 11 - 11 Georgia Railroad 52 - - - 52 Georgia Truck s - 5 - 5 Georgia Total 52 - 5 - 57 Indiana Railroad - 65 - - 65 Origin State Total 1,855 304 313 - 2,472 Railroad 996 81 89 - 1,165

374

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 1,040 18 80 - 1,138 Alabama River 668 - - - 668 Alabama Truck 52 164 223 - 438 Alabama Total 1,760 181 303 - 2,244 Georgia Truck s - 2 - 2 Indiana Railroad - 148 - - 148 Ohio Railroad - 25 - - 25 Ohio River - 18 - - 18 Ohio Total - 43 - - 43 Origin State Total 1,760 373 305 - 2,438 Railroad 1,040 191 80 - 1,311 River

375

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 907 10 59 - 975 Alabama River 903 - - - 903 Alabama Truck 150 144 253 - 546 Alabama Total 1,960 153 311 - 2,424 Florida Truck - - 3 - 3 Georgia Railroad 105 - 1 - 106 Georgia Truck s - 4 - 4 Georgia Total 105 - 5 - 110 Indiana Railroad - 106 - - 106 Tennessee Railroad - - 1 - 1 Origin State Total 2,065 259 321 - 2,644

376

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 839 11 83 - 933 Alabama River 1,347 - - - 1,347 Alabama Truck 118 216 236 - 571 Alabama Total 2,304 227 320 - 2,850 Georgia Railroad 9 - - - 9 Georgia Truck 7 - 5 - 12 Georgia Total 16 - 5 - 21 Indiana Railroad - 126 - - 126 Tennessee Truck - - 1 - 1 Origin State Total 2,320 353 325 - 2,998 Railroad 848 137 83 - 1,068

377

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

378

coal supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coal supply coal supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 15, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO coal coal supply disposition. prices EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Coal Supply, Disposition, and Prices- Reference Case (xls, 91.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

379

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 17 Table C12. Total Energy Consumption, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Total Energy Consumption Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP State Trillion Btu State Billion Chained (2005) Dollars State Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dollar 1 Texas 12,206.6 California 1,735.4 Louisiana 19.7 2 California 7,858.4 Texas 1,149.9 Wyoming 17.5 3 Florida 4,217.1 New York 1,016.4 North Dakota 15.4 4 Louisiana 4,055.3 Florida 661.1 Alaska 14.3 5 Illinois 3,977.8 Illinois 582.1 Mississippi 13.8 6 Ohio 3,827.6 Pennsylvania 500.4 Kentucky 13.5

380

OpenEI - Electricity Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/877 Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). License

Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of data

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

382

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

383

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997 CONSUMPTION AND ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

384

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Coal Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Reserves Consumption Production Stocks Imports, Exports & Distribution Coal Transportation Rates International All Coal Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Environment Imports & Exports Industry Characteristics Prices Production Projections Reserves Stocks All Reports EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for coal › image chart of U.S. Natural Gas Production and Imports projections as described in linked Short-Term Energy Outlook Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. U.S. coal production by quarter › Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Quarterly Coal Report. Quarterly data for coal shipments between states ›

385

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal 101 Lesson 1: Cleaning Up Coal Clean Coal COAL is our most abundant fossil fuel. The United States has more coal than the rest of the world has oil. There is still...

386

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Index (click to jump links) Coal Production and Prices Coal Mining Labor Productivity Coal Consumption Coal Production and Prices Emissions Caps Lead to More Use of Low-Sulfur Coal From Western Mines Continued improvements in mine productivity (which have averaged 5.9 percent per year since 1980) are projected to cause falling real minemouth prices throughout the forecast relative to historical levels. Higher electricity demand and lower prices, in turn, are projected to yield increasing coal demand, but the demand is subject to the overall sulfur emissions cap in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which encourages progressively greater reliance on the lowest sulfur coals (from Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, and Utah). Figure 106. Coal production by region, 1970-2025 (million short tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

387

Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage

388

Renewable Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

389

Energy Information Administration - Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of purchases, generation from renewable resources, and net transfers), and other energy that respondents indicated was used to produce heat and power. It is the fuel quantities across all end-uses.

390

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,695.2 Texas 3,756.9 Texas 5,934.3 Texas 1,283.1 2 Indiana 1,333.4 California 2,196.6 California 3,511.4 California 893.7 3 Ohio 1,222.6 Louisiana 1,502.9 Louisiana 1,925.7 Florida 768.0 4 Pennsylvania 1,213.0 New York 1,246.9 Florida 1,680.3 Ohio 528.0 5 Illinois 1,052.2 Florida 1,236.6 New York 1,304.0 Pennsylvania 507.6 6 Kentucky 1,010.6 Pennsylvania 998.6 Pennsylvania 1,255.6 New York 491.5

391

Coal pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for pressurizing pulverized coal and circulating a carrier gas is disclosed. This device has utility in a coal gasification process and eliminates the need for a separate collection hopper and eliminates the separate compressor.

Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Alameda County, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Coal Transportation Issues (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Most of the coal delivered to U.S. consumers is transported by railroads, which accounted for 64 percent of total domestic coal shipments in 2004. Trucks transported approximately 12 percent of the coal consumed in the United States in 2004, mainly in short hauls from mines in the East to nearby coal-fired electricity and industrial plants. A number of minemouth power plants in the West also use trucks to haul coal from adjacent mining operations. Other significant modes of coal transportation in 2004 included conveyor belt and slurry pipeline (12 percent) and water transport on inland waterways, the Great Lakes, and tidewater areas (9 percent).

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

393

Clean coal technologies in Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Asia`s growing need for cleaner coal technology will likely translate into increased opportunities for independent developers and equipment suppliers. Coal is projected to play a central role in meeting Asia`s rapidly growing electric power demand. In order to minimize the negative effects of coal comsumption, the application of clean coal technologies (CCTs) will be increasingly important for the viability of coal-fired plants developed by independent power producers. The environmental impact of coal consumption has created a growing market for clean coal technologies in Asia. A study commissioned by the US DOE estimates the market for new and retrofit installation of coal facilities in Asia to be between $410 billion and $560 billion between 1993 and 2010. Actual expenditures for CCTs during the same period are likely to be much less, but still significant. Cost continues to be a factor limiting the more wide spread application of these technologies. In most cases, the application of CCTs leads to a 15 percent to 20 percent increase in capital costs and 10 to 20 percent in operating costs.

Evans, P.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Proximate analysis of coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This lab experiment illustrates the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to perform proximate analysis on a series of coal samples of different rank. Peat and coke are also examined. A total of four exercises are described. These are dry exercises as students interpret previously recorded scans. The weight percent moisture, volatile matter, fixed carbon, and ash content are determined for each sample and comparisons are made. Proximate analysis is performed on a coal sample from a local electric utility. From the weight percent sulfur found in the coal (determined by a separate procedure the Eschka method) and the ash content, students calculate the quantity of sulfur dioxide emissions and ash produced annually by a large coal-fired electric power plant.

Donahue, C.J.; Rais, E.A. [University of Michigan, Dearborn, MI (USA)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

U.S. coal outlook in Asia  

SciTech Connect

Coal exports from the US to Asia are declining over time as a result of (1) increased competition from coal suppliers within the Asia-Pacific region, (2) changing steel making technologies, (3) decreased emphasis on security of coal supplies, and (4) deregulation of the energy industry--particularly electric utilities. There are no major changes on the horizon that are likely to alter the role of the US as a modest coal supplier to the Asia-Pacific region. The downward trend in US coal exports to Asia is expected to continue over the 1997--2010 period. But economic and policy changes underway in Asia are likely to result in periodic coal shortages, lasting a few months to a year, and short term increased export opportunities for US coal. US coal exports to Asia are projected to fluctuate within the following ranges over the 2000--2010 period: 10--17 million tons in total exports, 6--12 million tons in thermal coal exports, and 4--9 million tons in coking coal exports. The most important role for US coal, from the perspective of Asian coal importing countries, is to ensure a major alternative source of coal supplies that can be turned to in the event of unforeseen disruptions in coal supplies from the Asia-Pacific region or South Africa. However, the willingness of consumers to pay a premium to ensure US export capacity is declining, with increased emphasis on obtaining the lowest cost coal supplies.

Johnson, C.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Quarterly coal report, October--December 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities. This report presents detailed quarterly data for october through December 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the third quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 73 tabs.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report ... Electric Utilities and Independent Power Producers received approximately 92.2 percent of the total distrib ...

398

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 93. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 94. U.S. coal production, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Western Coal Production Continues To Increase Through 2030 In the AEO2008 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 0.3 percent per year from 2006 to 2015, when total production is 24.5 quadrillion Btu. In the absence of restrictions on CO2 emissions, the growth in coal production

399

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 78. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 79. U.S. coal production in four cases, 2007, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 80. Average minemouth coal prices by regionCoal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Total Coal Production Increases at a Slower Rate Than in the Past In the AEO2009 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at both new and existing plants and the startup of several CTL

400

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

402

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

403

EIA - Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Distribution Report > Annual Coal Distribution Archives Annual Coal Distribution Archive Release Date: February 17, 2011 Next Release Date: December 2011 Domestic coal...

404

China consumes nearly as much coal as the rest of the world ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal consumption in China grew more than 9% in 2011, continuing its upward trend for the 12th consecutive year, according to newly released ...

405

EIA projects lower coal use by U.S. power sector in 2012 - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, ... Coal consumption by the U.S. electric power sector in 2012 is expected to fall below 900 ...

406

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights ... Electric power sector consumption of coal by census region, 2010

407

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Japan, where higher coal prices justi?ed the higher costof the total O&M cost and the coal price remained relatively

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the total O&M cost and the coal price remained relativelyand Japan, where higher coal prices justi?ed the higher cost

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Factors of material consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

Silva Daz, Pamela Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

EIA - Natural Gas Consumption Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Consumption by End Use U.S. and State consumption by lease and plant, pipeline, and delivered to consumers by sector (monthly, annual). Number of Consumers Number of sales and transported consumers for residential, commercial, and industrial sectors by State (monthly, annual). State Shares of U.S. Deliveries By sector and total consumption (annual). Delivered for the Account of Others Commercial, industrial and electric utility deliveries; percentage of total deliveries by State (annual). Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Btu per cubic foot of natural gas delivered to consumers by State (annual) and other components of consumption for U.S. (annual). Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot.

412

Coal - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, Find statistics on coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, mining, and prices. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional formats Coal overview: PDF CSV XLS Monthly PDF XLS Annual Coke overview PDF XLS Coal-fired power plants Existing generating units in the U.S. by state, company and plant 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 Go Prices Additional formats Weekly spot prices (Coal News and Markets) Coal futures near-month contract final settlement price (weekly NYMEX) Average sales price: PDF XLSBy state and mine type PDF XLSBy state and disposition PDF XLSBy state and underground mining method PDF XLSBy state, county, and number of mines PDF XLSBy state and coal rank PDF XLSBy mine production range and mine type Average consumer prices by end use sector, Census division, and state,

413

All Consumption Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2010 Consumption Summary Tables. Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2010 (Trillion Btu) ... Ranked by State, 2010

414

Which states produce the most coal? - FAQ - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Which states produce the most coal? The five largest coal producing states, with production in million short tons, and share of total U.S. coal production, for 2012:

415

Canada Week: Canada is a declining market for U.S. coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exports of U.S. coal to Canada have declined in recent years as Canada has reduced its coal-fired electric generation. U.S. coal exports to Canada totaled 3.2 million ...

416

Modeling the Impact of Summer Temperatures on National Electricity Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National population-weighted weekly degree day totals, which have been used to model and assess temperature-related natural gas consumption, are compared with summertime electricity consumption. A very close relationship between national cooling ...

Douglas M. Le Comte; Henry E. Warren

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleanest Coal Technology Clean Coal 101 Lesson 5: The Cleanest Coal Technology-A Real Gas Don't think of coal as a solid black rock. Think of it as a mass of atoms. Most of the...

418

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Release Date: October 01, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 3, 2014 | full report The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of transportation, and consuming sector. Quarterly data for all years are preliminary and will be superseded by the release of the corresponding "Annual Coal Distribution Report." Highlights for the second quarter 2013: Total domestic coal distribution was an estimated 205.8 million short tons (mmst) in the second quarter 2013. This value is 0.7 mmst (i.e. 0.3 percent) higher than the previous quarter and 6.3 mmst (i.e. 3.1 percent) higher than the second quarter of 2012 estimates.

419

Annual Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Distribution Report Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report | Revision/Correction The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing state. All data for 2012 are final, and this report supersedes the 2012 quarterly coal distribution reports. Highlights for 2012: Total coal distributions for 2012 were 1,003.1 million short tons (mmst), a decrease of 7.9% compared to 2011. Distributions to domestic destinations were 877.3 mmst, a decrease of 104.1 mmst (i.e. 10.6% decrease) compared to 2011. Distributions to

420

Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Guide: WHAT IS COAL? Coal looks like a shiny black rock. Coal has lots of energy in it. When it is burned, coal makes heat and light energy. Th e cave men used coal for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

"Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.3;" 1.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

422

Consumption Technical Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

as street lighting and public services; and the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey covers only manufacturing establishments,

423

Energy consumption in the pipeline industry  

SciTech Connect

Estimates are developed of the energy consumption and energy intensity (EI) of five categories of U.S. pipeline industries: natural gas, crude oil, petroleum products, coal slurry, and water. For comparability with other transportation modes, it is desirable to calculate EI in Btu/Ton-Mile, and this is done, although the necessary unit conversions introduce additional uncertainties. Since water and sewer lines operate by lift and gravity, a comparable EI is not definable.

Banks, W. F.

1977-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative "Clean coal technology" describes a new generation of energy...

425

Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle  

SciTech Connect

A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

Weimer, Robert F. (Allentown, PA); Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use forft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use forTotal) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use for

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Iowa Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption 293,274 325,772 315,186...

428

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C29A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas...

429

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C28A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas...

430

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C27A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas...

431

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

432

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal",...

433

Quarterly coal report, January--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1994 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1986 through the fourth quarter of 1993. Appendix A displays, from 1986 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

Not Available

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

434

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 2012 PDF | previous editions September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 A report of historical annual energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, as well as financial and environmental indicators; and data unit conversion tables. About the data Previous Editions + EXPAND ALL Annual Energy Review 2011 Edition PDF (Full issue) Annual Energy Review 2011 - Released on September 27, 2012 PDF Annual Energy Review 2010 Edition PDF (Full issue) Annual Energy Review 2010 - Released on October 19, 2011 PDF Annual Energy Review 2009 Edition PDF (Full issue) Annual Energy Review 2009 - Released on August 19, 2010 PDF

435

Outlook and challenges to coal in Asia: 1994--2015  

SciTech Connect

The two key threats to coal`s long term dominance in Asia are: (1) its uneven distribution of reserves and lack of adequate rail transportation infrastructure, and (2) growing environmental concerns about coal-related pollution. Even with increased attention to emissions control for coal, continued growth in coal consumption is expected to result in further deterioration of the environment in Asia for another one to two decades. China will remain the largest polluter in Asia, but it`s believed it will become Asia`s largest user of emissions control technology by 2015. The authors have subjectively weighed the above constraints to increased coal use in preparing the projections of the future role of coal in the Asian region. This paper shows past trends in coal production and consumption, plus projections of coal production, consumption and trade over the 1994--2015 period. The projections in this paper are useful as a general indicator of long term patterns in Asia. However, there are too many uncertainties about economic growth rates and energy and environmental policies to suggest that the projections will be accurate for every economy. This paper concludes with the preliminary results of research under way, which suggests that increasing economic wealth in China is the most important factor in solving China`s coal-related pollution problems.

Johnson, C.J.; Li, B.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Fuel Consumption - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), 1994 Fuel Consumption

437

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

438

Pressure Acid Leaching Vanadium from Stone coal - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vanadium extraction from stone-coal was investigated by pressure acid ... The results show that with the leaching time for 3~4h, temperature at 150?, sulfuric acid consumption of 25%~30%, ... Calcium Reductants A historical review.

439

Coal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Coal Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 101. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 15. Coal Supply, Disposition and Price Table 21. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - New England Table 22. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic Table 23. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 24. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 25. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 26. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central Table 27. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South

440

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

reports reports Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector With Data through 2010 | Release Date: November 16, 2012 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | Correction Previous editions Year: 2011 2004 Go Figure 1. Deliveries from major coal basins to electric power plants by rail, 2010 Background In this latest release of Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) significantly expands upon prior versions of this report with the incorporation of new EIA survey data. Figure 1. Percent of total U.S. rail shipments represented in data figure data Previously, EIA relied solely on data from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB), specifically their confidential Carload Waybill Sample. While valuable, due to the statistical nature of the Waybill data,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Investigation on the Dual Influence of Pansteel Pulverized Coal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle size of pulverized coal was divided into three levels, X10, X50 and X90 which respectively accounted for 10%, 50% and 90% of total pulverized coal...

442

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA-M060(2004) (Washington, DC, 2004). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

443

EIA - Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination Glossary Home > Coal> Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination Release Date: January 2006 Next Release Date: 2006 Distribution of U.S Coal by Destination Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2004 (Thousand Short Tons) DESTINATION: ALASKA State of Origin by Method of Transportation Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants (Except Coke) Residential and Commercial Total Alaska 460 - - 497 957 Railroad 256 - - 497 753 Truck 204 - - * 204 State Total 460 - - 497 957 Railroad 256 - - 497 753 Truck 204 - - * 204 EIA - Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination

444

Annual Coal Distribution Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by Major Coal-Exporting States and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by Major Coal-Exporting States and Destination, 2001 Coal-Exporting State and Destination Metallurgical Steam Total Alaska - 761 761 South Korea - 761 761 Alabama 4,667 167 4,834 Argentina 155 - 155 Belgium 989 - 989 Brazil 1,104 - 1,104 Bulgaria 82 - 82 Egypt 518 - 518 Italy 115 - 115 Netherlands 56 83 139 Spain 412 84 496 Turkey 581 - 581 United Kingdom 654 - 654 Kentucky 2,130 - 2,130 Canada 920 - 920 France 22 - 22 Iceland 9 - 9 Italy 430 - 430 Netherlands 417 - 417 Spain 9 - 9 United Kingdom 323 - 323 Pennsylvania 1,086 14,326 15,722 Belgium - 203 203 Brazil 372 - 373 Canada - 12,141 12,418 France - 84 84 Germany 495 165 661 Ireland - 136 136 Netherlands 219 879 1,097 Norway - - 7 Peru - - 21 Portugal - 634 634 United Kingdom - 85 85 Venezuela - - 3 Utah - 1,420 1,420 Japan - 1,334 1,334 Taiwan - 86 86 Virginia 4,531

445

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

446

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid ...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC-) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid...

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Table WH2. Total Households by Water Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households by Water Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Table WH2.

449

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 3. Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 2,303 2,314 2,365 4,617 4,754 -2.9 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 4,152 4,098 4,104 8,249 8,233 0.2 Coke Total 3,954 3,841 3,863 7,795 7,721 1.0 Breeze Total 198 257 241 455 512 -11.2 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption Report - Coke Plants.'

450

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division 1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 41. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Census Division June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 Middle Atlantic w w w w East North Central 724 510 509 42.1 South Atlantic w w w w East South Central w w w w U.S. Total 914 690 674 35.6 Coke Total 757 573 594 27.5 Breeze Total 157 117 80 95.2 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants

451

Model documentation coal market module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the Coal Production Submodule (CPS). It provides a description of the CPS for model analysts and the public. The Coal Market Module provides annual forecasts of prices, production, and consumption of coal.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. States. State energy information, detailed and ... 2010 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 ... Table 5.7 By Region with Total Consumption of Electricity (physical ...

453

Table 10.1 Renewable Energy Production and Consumption by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Production equals consumption for all renewable energy sources except biofuels. 9 Wood and wood-derived fuels. 2 Total biomass inputs to the ...

454

Table A3. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table A3. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption and Biofuels Production, 1949-2011 (Million Btu per Barrel) Year: Total Petroleum 1 ...

455

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Buildings account for 73% of the total electricity consumption in the US. To get an in depth view of where this energy is consumed within (more)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

EIA Energy Kids - Coal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sometimes, coal-fired electric power plants are built near coal mines to lower ... industries and businesses with their own power plants use coal to generate ...

457

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 465 16,265 35 228 1,644 1,826 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 211 606 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 102 736 7 36 262 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 66 1,043 16 28 201 238 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 24 895 38 17 124 134 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 25 1,852 76 29 209 229

458

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Natural Gas Natural Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion cubic feet) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 2,538 48,473 19.1 2,100 2,037 16,010 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,134 3,175 2.8 257 249 2,227 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 531 3,969 7.5 224 218 1,830 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 500 7,824 15.6 353 343 2,897 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 185 6,604 35.8 278 270 2,054

459

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

460

Data Center Energy Consumption Trends | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Data Center Energy Efficiency » Data Center Program Areas » Data Center Energy Efficiency » Data Center Energy Consumption Trends Data Center Energy Consumption Trends October 8, 2013 - 10:09am Addthis Data centers can consume up to 100 times more energy than a standard office building. Often, less than 15% of original source energy is used for the information technology equipment within a data center. Figure 1 outlines typical data center energy consumption ratios. An illustration that features a graphic of a coal container representing 100 units of coal. This enters a graphic of a power plant, where those 100 units of coal are turned into 35 units of energy. The 35 units of energy are distributed by power lines, represented by a graphic of power lines, where 33 units are delivered to a pie chart representing data typical data center energy end use. The data center pie chart features 48% representing server load and computing operation consumption; 43% representing cooling equipment consumption; and 9% representing power conversion and distribution consumption.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Alaska Coal Geology: GIS Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Geology: GIS Data Coal Geology: GIS Data Dataset Summary Description Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet. Cretaceous resources, predominantly bituminous coal and lignite, are in the Northern Alaska-Slope coal province. Most of the Tertiary resources, mainly lignite to subbituminous coal with minor amounts of bituminous and semianthracite coals, are in the other two provinces. The combined measured, indicated, inferred, and hypothetical coal resources in the three areas are estimated to be 5,526 billion short tons (5,012 billion metric tons), which constitutes about 87 percent of Alaska's coal and surpasses the total coal resources of the conterminous United States by 40 percent. Available here: GIS shapefiles of relevant faults and geology, associated with the following report: http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-077/pdf/DDS-77.pdf

462

UK Energy Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists of five spreadsheets:"overall data tables"plusenergy consumption data for each of the following...

463

Table 8.2a Electricity Net Generation: Total (All Sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage 5: Renewable Energy: Other 10: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2: Natural Gas 3: Other Gases 4: Total: Conventional Hydroelectric Power ...

464

Coal, Smoke, and Death: Bituminous Coal and American Home Heating, 1920-1959  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air pollution was severe in many parts of the United States in the first half of the twentieth century. Much of the air pollution was attributable to bituminous coal. This paper uses newly digitized state-month mortality data to estimate the effects of bituminous coal consumption for heating on mortality rates in the U.S. between 1920 and 1959. The use of coal for heating was high until the mid-1940s, and then declined sharply. The switch to cleaner fuels was driven by plausibly exogenous changes in the availability of natural gas, the end of war-related supply restrictions, and a series of coal strikes from 1946-1950. The identification strategy leverages the fact that coal consumption for heating increases during cold weather. Specifically, the mortality effects are identified from differences in the temperature-mortality response functions in state-years with greater coal consumption. Cold weather spells in high coal state-years saw greater increases in the mortality rates than cold weather spells in low coal state-years. Our estimates suggest that reductions in the use of bituminous coal for heating between 1945 and 1959 decreased average annual mortality by 2.2-3.5 percent, January mortality by 3.2-5.1 percent, average annual infant mortality by 1.6-2.8 percent, and January infant mortality by 3.1-4.6 percent. Our estimates are likely to be a lower-bound, since they only capture short-run relationships between coal and mortality. We thank Leila Abu-Orf, Paula Levin, and Katherine Rudolph for excellent research assistance. We are grateful to

Alan Barreca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels................................................................................................... 145 Table C6. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels......................... 150 Table C7. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of

466

Connected Consumption: The hidden networks of consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the Connected Consumption Network (CCN) that allows a community of consumers to collaboratively sense the market from a mobile device, enabling more informed financial decisions in geo-local ...

Reed, David P.

467

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumed. Total energy consumption for hotels and hospitalshotels and hospitals, by contrast, the hot-water supply accounts for the majority o f total energyenergy consumption ratio per certain floor area is larger for hotels,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Kartlggning av energianvndning under byggfasen vid nyproduktion av flerbostadshus; Investigation of the energy consumption during production of apartment buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The energy consumption in the sectors of residential and public buildings is 40 % of the total energy consumption in Sweden. The main part, (more)

Hatami, Valid

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

470

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Knocking the NOx Out of Coal Clean Coal 101 Lesson 3: Knocking the NOx Out of Coal How NOx Forms NOx Formation Air is mostly nitrogen molecules (green in the above diagram) and...

471

Coal and bituminous reserves  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 5 of this book contains sections entitled: other coal processes; underground processing of coal; and other important energy sources.

NONE

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

California Energy and Consumption Projections 2005-2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US Gas/Diesel Foreign Gas/Diesel Biomass-Ethanol, Bio. D, H2 Solar - H2 Wind - H2 Geothermal - H2 3 Natural Gas - Heating Natural Gas - Electrical Generation Gas/Diesel Coal Non-Fossil Fuels Nuclear Large Hydro Renewable Energy Biomass Solar Wind Geothermal #12;Model Energy Consumption in Quads Take the 2005

Keller, Arturo A.

473

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 67 5,576 83 636 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 289 16 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 10 369 35 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8 574 70 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 9 1,399 148 165 Q

474

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, ... Regional totals do not include refuse recovery: Sections. Introduction; Coal Prices ...

475

Coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for liquefying a particulate coal feed to produce useful petroleum-like liquid products which comprises contacting; in a series of two or more coal liquefaction zones, or stages, graded with respect to temperature, an admixture of a polar compound; or compounds, a hydrogen donor solvent and particulate coal, the total effluent being passed in each instance from a low temperature zone, or stage to the next succeeding higher temperature zone, or stage, of the series. The temperature within the initial zone, or stage, of the series is maintained about 70.degree. F and 750.degree. F and the temperature within the final zone, or stage, is maintained between about 750.degree. F and 950.degree. F. The residence time within the first zone, or stage, ranges, generally, from about 20 to about 150 minutes and residence time within each of the remaining zones, or stages, of the series ranges, generally, from about 10 minutes to about 70 minutes. Further steps of the process include: separating the product from the liquefaction zone into fractions inclusive of a liquid solvent fraction; hydrotreating said liquid solvent fraction in a hydrogenation zone; and recycling the hydrogenated liquid solvent mixture to said coal liquefaction zones.

Maa, Peter S. (Baytown, TX)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Heating Degree Day Data Applied to Residential Heating Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific total electric energy and heating oil consumption for individual residences show a very high correlation with National Weather Service airport temperature data when transformed to heating degree days. Correlations of regional total ...

Robert G. Quayle; Henry F. Diaz

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants Associated With Coal Combustion. E.P.A.Control Guidelines for Coal-Derived Pollutants .Forms of Sulfur in Coal . . . . Coal Desulfurization

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

University Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Clean Coal Crosscutting Research University Coal Research University Coal Research Clean Coal Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Hydrogen from Coal Coal...

479

O A L Section 2. Coal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Section 2. Coal Coal prices are developed for the following three categories: coking coal; steam coal (all noncoking coal); and coal coke imports and exports.

480

The Overview and Prospect of Environmental Regulation Theory of Coal Enterprises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the international comparisons of economic growth and energy consumption, China's energy consumption per unit production is one of the world's highest, and the Chinese unit environmental cost of GDP is in the world forefront calculating energy consumption ... Keywords: coal enterprises, energy saving and emission reduction, environmental regulation, prospect

Wang Li-ping

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "total coal consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Market Share of Western Coal Continues To Increase U.S. coal production has remained near 1,100 million tons annually since 1996. In the AEO2006 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 1.1 percent per year from 2004 to 2015, when total production is 1,272 million tons. The growth in coal production is even stronger thereafter, averaging 2.0 percent per year from 2015 to 2030, as substantial amounts of new coal-fired generating capacity are added, and several CTL plants are brought on line. Figure 97. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

482

Investigation of plasma-aided bituminous coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of plasma-aided bituminous coal gasification. Distributions of concentrations, temperatures, and velocities of the gasification products along the gasifier are calculated. Carbon gasification degree, specific power consumptions, and heat engineering characteristics of synthesis gas at the outlet of the gasifier are determined at plasma air/steam and oxygen/steam gasification of Powder River Basin bituminous coal. Numerical simulation showed that the plasma oxygen/steam gasification of coal is a more preferable process in comparison with the plasma air/steam coal gasification. On the numerical experiments, a plasma vortex fuel reformer is designed.

Matveev, I.B.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Applied Plasma Technology, Mclean, VA (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

484

"End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke...

485

Energy Consumption by Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

petroleum but on natural gas as well. MD and VA also use natural gas, but also use coal and nuclear and some hydro power. These fuels are important in the production of electricity...

486

Rhode Island Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 117,707 130,751 118,001 2000's 88,419 95,607 87,805 78,456 72,609 80,764 77,204 87,972 89,256 92,743 2010's 94,110 100,467 - No Data Reported;...

487

Alabama Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2000's 353,614 332,693 379,343 350,345 382,367 353,156 391,093 418,512 404,157 454,456 2010's 534,779 598,068 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable; NA Not Available; W...

488

U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1,954: 1,743: 1,732: 1,918: 1,916: 1,756: 1,860-= No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of ...

489

Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.00 17.89 17.55 17.24 16.98 16.99 AEO 1983 15.82 16.13 16.37 16.50 16.56 16.63 17.37 AEO 1984 15.77 15.76 16.01...

490

Table 3a. Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

205 29 31 200,001 to 500,000 18 215 38 41 Over 500,000 6 163 33 38 Principal Building Activity Education 200 293 41 43 Food Sales and Service 273 183 108 116 Health Care 47 209 115...

491

Table US1. Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Quadrillion British Thermal Units (Btu) U.S. Households (millions) Other Appliances and Lighting Space Heating (Major Fuels) 4 Air-Conditioning 5 Water Heating 6 ...

492

Table C37. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

HVAC Maintenance ..... 60 5,154 86 612 6,987 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ..... 18 2,782 158 320 3,636 Equipment Usage Reduced When ...

493

Mississippi Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 255,475 241,342 306,733 2000's 300,652 332,589 343,890 265,842 282,051 301,663 307,305 364,067...

494

Iowa Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-9 1990's 254,489 232,057 230,691 2000's 232,565 224,336 226,457 230,161 226,819 241,340 238,454 293,274 325,772 315,186 2010's 311,075 306,909 - No Data Reported; -- ...

495

2 Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source and Total ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

47 Idaho 8.5 New Hampshire 62.6 South Dakota 118.5 New Hampshire 37.2 Connecticut 210.9 48 Maine 2.3 Delaware 56 ...

496

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 706,230: 644,017: 688,740: 2000's: 702,847: 634,794: 675,583: 689,992: 696,175 ...

497

U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 4,971 1950's 5,767 6,810 7,294 7,639 8,049 8,694 9,289 9,846 10,303 11,321 1960's 11,967 12,489...

498

"Table A2. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,32,1688,378,0,58,0,15.7 3274," Lime","Q",657,"W","Q",657,"W",0,0,0,33.9 3296," Mineral Wool","W","W","W",113,34,"W","W","W",0,2 33,"Primary Metal Industries","W",5117,"W",2433,494...

499

"Table A3. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"*",0,"*","*",0,0,0,"*",32.5 3274," Lime","*",0,0,"*",0,"Q","W","*",31.9 3296," Mineral Wool","*",0,"W","*","W",0,0,"*",2 33,"Primary Metal Industries",909,"W","*",22,"W",808,17,54...

500

"Table A3. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"*",0,21,"*",0,0,0,"*",32.5 3274," Lime","*",0,0,"*",0,"Q","W","*",31.9 3296," Mineral Wool","*",0,"W","*","W",0,0,"*",2 33,"Primary Metal Industries",909,"W",61,22,"W",30190,671,...