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Sample records for tot actl ipr

  1. IPR 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rate Cases Rate Information Residential Exchange Program Surplus Power Sales Reports 2014 Integrated Program Review The IPR process allows interested parties to see all relevant...

  2. TOT Measurement Implemented in FPGA TDC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huanhuan Fan; Ping Cao; Shubin Liu; Qi An

    2015-01-26

    Time measurement plays a crucial rule for the purpose of particle identification in high energy physical experiments. With the upgrading of physical goal and the developing of electronics, modern time measurement system meets the requirement of excellent resolution specification as well as high integrity. Due to Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), FPGA time-to-digital converter (TDC) becomes one of mature and prominent time measurement methods in recent years. For correcting time-walk effect caused by leading timing, time-over-threshold (TOT) measurement should be added in the FPGA TDC. TOT can be obtained by measuring the interval time of signal leading and trailing edge. Unfortunately, a traditional TDC can recognize only one kind of signal edge, the leading or the trailing. Generally, to measure the interval, two TDC channels can be used at the same time, one for leading, the other for trailing. However, this method will increase the amount of used FPGA resource and reduce the TDC's integrity unavoidably. This paper presents one method of TOT measurement implemented in a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA. In this method, TOT measure can be achieved in only one TDC input channel. The consumed resources and time resolution can both be guaranteed. Test shows that this TDC can achieve resolution better than 15 ps for leading edge measurement and 37 ps for TOT measurement. Furthermore, the TDC measuring dead time is about 2 clock cycles, which makes it be good for applications of higher physical event rate

  3. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-386 IPR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Suez Energy Marketing (Gsemna) Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-386 IPR-GDF Suez Energy Marketing (Gsemna) Application from IPR-GDF SUEZ (GSEMNA) to export...

  4. Toys for Tots | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en SignatureThanksgivingToys for Tots

  5. TOT Measurement Implemented in FPGA TDC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Huanhuan; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Time measurement plays a crucial rule for the purpose of particle identification in high energy physical experiments. With the upgrading of physical goal and the developing of electronics, modern time measurement system meets the requirement of excellent resolution specification as well as high integrity. Due to Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), FPGA time-to-digital converter (TDC) becomes one of mature and prominent time measurement methods in recent years. For correcting time-walk effect caused by leading timing, time-over-threshold (TOT) measurement should be added in the FPGA TDC. TOT can be obtained by measuring the interval time of signal leading and trailing edge. Unfortunately, a traditional TDC can recognize only one kind of signal edge, the leading or the trailing. Generally, to measure the interval, two TDC channels can be used at the same time, one for leading, the other for trailing. However, this method will increase the amount of used FPGA resource and reduce the TDC's integrity unavoidably...

  6. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-386 IPR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Register Notice, Volume 77, No. 129 - July 5, 2012 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-386 IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing (GSEMNA): Federal...

  7. Cesium Delivery System for Negative Ion Source at IPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, G.; Pandya, K.; Soni, J.; Gahlaut, A.; Parmar, K. G. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, 382 428 (India); Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.; Singh, M. J. [ITER- India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, Sector 25, GIDC, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2011-09-26

    The technique of surface production of negative ions using cesium, Cs, has been efficiently exploited over the years for producing negative ion beams with increased current densities from negative ion sources used on neutral beam lines. Deposition of Cs on the source walls and the plasma grid lowers the work function and therefore enables a higher yield of H{sup -}, when hydrogen particles (H and/or H{sub x}{sup +}) strike these surfaces.A single driver RF based (100 kW, 1 MHz) negative ion source test bed, ROBIN, is being set up at IPR under a technical collaboration between IPR and IPP, Germany. The optimization of the Cs oven design to be used on this facility as well as multidriver sources is underway. The characterization experiments of such a Cs delivery system with a 1 g Cs inventory have been carried out using surface ionization technique. The experiments have been carried by delivering Cs into a vacuum chamber without plasma. The linear motion of the surface ionization detector, SID, attached with a linear motion feedthrough allows measuring the angular distribution of the Cs coming out of the oven. Based on the experimental results, a Cs oven for ROBIN has been proposed. The Cs oven design and experimental results of the prototype Cs oven are reported and discussed in the paper.

  8. BPA's closes out the 2015 IPR2 process, decides to move EE capital...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cooperation debt. In the IPR2 close-out letter to the region, BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer stressed to the region that moving the EE funding from capital to expense is...

  9. TOT, a Fast Multivariate Public Key Cryptosystem with Basic Secure Trapdoor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    TOT, a Fast Multivariate Public Key Cryptosystem with Basic Secure Trapdoor Wuqiang Shen-way trapdoor function, and then propose a new multivariate public key cryptosystem called TOT, which can though C was broken, its high speed has been affirmed). Keywords: TOT; multivariate public key

  10. Simulation of integrated pollutant removal (IPR) water-treatment system using ASPEN Plus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harendra, Sivaram; Oryshcyhn, Danylo [U.S. DOE Ochs, Thomas [U.S. DOE Gerdemann, Stephen; Clark, John

    2013-01-01

    Capturing CO2 from fossil fuel combustion provides an opportunity for tapping a significant water source which can be used as service water for a capture-ready power plant and its peripherals. Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have patented a process—Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR®)—that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO2 stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Water condensed from oxy-combustion flue gas via the IPR system has been analyzed for composition and an approach for its treatment—for in-process reuse and for release—has been outlined. A computer simulation model in ASPEN Plus has been developed to simulate water treatment of flue gas derived wastewater from IPR systems. At the field installation, water condensed in the IPR process contains fly ash particles, sodium (largely from spray-tower buffering) and sulfur species as well as heavy metals, cations, and anions. An IPR wastewater treatment system was modeled using unit operations such as equalization, coagulation and flocculation, reverse osmosis, lime softening, crystallization, and pH correction. According to the model results, 70% (by mass) of the inlet stream can be treated as pure water, the other 20% yields as saleable products such as gypsum (CaSO4) and salt (NaCl) and the remaining portion is the waste. More than 99% of fly ash particles are removed in the coagulation and flocculation unit and these solids can be used as filler materials in various applications with further treatment. Results discussed relate to a slipstream IPR installation and are verified experimentally in the coagulation/flocculation step.

  11. IPR 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. IPR 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch88 Sign In About | Careers | Contact |9

  13. IPR 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. IPR 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch88 Sign In About | Careers | Contact2

  15. IPR 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities - ACTL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos andSeminarsDesignIn theWorking with Aiken County

  17. Studies of Intermittency-like Phenomena in Plasma turbulence at IPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, R.; Das, A.; Bisai, N.; Kaw, P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Near Indira Bridge, Gandhinagar-382428 (India)

    2010-11-23

    The observation of intermittency in the turbulent scrape-off layer plasma of ADITYA tokamak was first reported about one and a half decade ago. In the last decade or so, several aspects of intermittency-like phenomena have been observed on tokamaks and other fusion devices throughout the world. A review of the research carried out at the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) is presented, which closely follow the research trend on intermittency-like phenomena in plasmas worldwide. We also present our analysis of particle flux data in order to test the recently proposed fluctuation theorem, which states that the probability of 'entropy consuming' flux events falls off exponentially with the averaging time. This theorem, proposed in the context of small systems, is applied to macroscopic system like tokamak edge plasma by invoking an 'effective temperature' of the bath of drift waves from which, plasma objects take energy and carry out work of transporting matter

  18. Data-driven modelling of the inositol trisphosphate receptor (IPR) and its role in calcium induced calcium release (CICR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivo Siekmann; Pengxing Cao; James Sneyd; Edmund J. Crampin

    2015-07-22

    We give a review of the current state of the art of data-driven modelling of the inositol trisphosphate receptor (IPR). After explaining that the IPR plays a crucial role as a central regulator in calcium dynamics, several sources of relevant experimental data are introduced. Single ion channels are best studied by recording single-channel currents under different ligand concentrations via the patch-clamp technique. The particular relevance of modal gating, the spontaneous switching between different levels of channel activity that occur even at constant ligand concentrations, is highlighted. In order to investigate the interactions of IPRs, calcium release from small clusters of channels, so-called calcium puffs, can be used. We then present the mathematical framework common to all models based on single-channel data, aggregated continuous-time Markov models, and give a short review of statistical approaches for parameterising these models with experimental data. The process of building a Markov model that integrates various sources of experimental data is illustrated using two recent examples, the model by Ullah et al. and the "Park-Drive" model by Siekmann et al., the only models that account for all sources of data currently available. Finally, it is demonstrated that the essential features of the Park-Drive model in different models of calcium dynamics are preserved after reducing it to a two-state model that only accounts for the switching between the inactive "park" and the active "drive" mode. This highlights the fact that modal gating is the most important mechanism of ligand regulation in the IPR. It also emphasises that data-driven models of ion channels do not necessarily have to lead to detailed models but can be constructed so that relevant data is selected to represent ion channels at the appropriate level of complexity for a given application.

  19. Conceptual Design, Implementation and Commissioning of Data Acquisition and Control System for Negative Ion Source at IPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, Jignesh; Gahlaut, A.; Bansal, G.; Parmar, K. G.; Pandya, K.; Chakraborty, A.; Yadav, Ratnakar; Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-09-26

    Negative ion Experimental facility has been setup at IPR. The facility consists of a RF based negative ion source (ROBIN)--procured under a license agreement with IPP Garching, as a replica of BATMAN, presently operating in IPP, 100 kW 1 MHz RF generators and a set of low and high voltage power supplies, vacuum system and diagnostics. 35 keV 10A H- beam is expected from this setup. Automated successful operation of the system requires an advanced, rugged, time proven and flexible control system. Further the data generated in the experimental phase needs to be acquired, monitored and analyzed to verify and judge the system performance. In the present test bed, this is done using a combination of PLC based control system and a PXI based data acquisition system. The control system consists of three different Siemens PLC systems viz. (1) S-7 400 PLC as a Master Control, (2) S-7 300 PLC for Vacuum system control and (3) C-7 PLC for RF generator control. Master control PLC directly controls all the subsystems except the Vacuum system and RF generator. The Vacuum system and RF generator have their own dedicated PLCs (S-7 300 and C-7 respectively). Further, these two PLC systems work as a slave for the Master control PLC system. Communication between PLC S-7 400, S-7 300 and central control room computer is done through Industrial Ethernet (IE). Control program and GUI are developed in Siemens Step-7 PLC programming software and Wincc SCADA software, respectively. There are approximately 150 analog and 200 digital control and monitoring signals required to perform complete closed loop control of the system. Since the source floats at high potential ({approx}35 kV); a combination of galvanic and fiber optic isolation has been implemented. PXI based Data Acquisition system (DAS) is a combination of PXI RT (Real time) system, front end signal conditioning electronics, host system and DAQ program. All the acquisition signals coming from various sub-systems are connected and acquired by the PXI RT system, through only fiber optics link for signal conditioning, electrical isolation and better noise immunity. Real time and Host application programs are developed in LabVIEW and the data shall be stored with a facility of online display of selected parameters. Mathematical calculations and report generation will take place at the end of each beam shot. The paper describes in detail about the design approach, implementation strategy, program development, commissioning and operational test result of ROBIN through a data acquisition and control system.

  20. Toys for Tots

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6 5 1GeologySeismicity8/%2A

  1. ipr61c3.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th AnnualHistoryM aterials S cience a nd * Research and Energy

  2. TOT: the association strength heuristic 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hyun

    2005-11-01

    at the moment. Participants also made subjective judgments as to how many times they saw the picture and name of the animal co-occur on the same screen at the study phase, and then they performed a recognition test at the end. The results indicated...

  3. 2014 IPR Workshop Additional Follow Ups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. A Symbolic Model Checker for ACTL* A. Fantechi^'^, S. Gnesi^, F. Mazzanti^, R. Pugliese^ and E. Tronci^

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    of dependability. It appears that, due to the lower costs of training and innovation, industries are more keen computer systems requires the adoption of innovative validation techniques. In the validation of software

  5. Property:Tot cons | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url JumpTechnology Jump to: navigation, searchcons Jump to:

  6. The stability of coerced economic reform : the case of IPR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Trudy

    2005-01-01

    Theories in international relations posit, and empirical evidence has verified, that unwilling states can be compelled by another state or by an international institution to enact domestic policy reform. However, these ...

  7. INTERNAL PROPOSAL REVIEW FORM (IPR) I. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    .: PI Title: Dept. Contact: Phone: Phone: Unit: Email: Co-I #1: NetID: Academic Dept.: Co-I #2: Net Subjects Yes No Recombinant DNA Yes No Animal Subjects Yes No Radioactive Materials and/or Radiation Devices Yes No Human Stem Cells Yes No Subject to Export Control Laws Yes No OSP INFORMATION OSP Proposal

  8. INTERNAL PROPOSAL REVIEW FORM (IPR) I. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    .: PI Title: Dept. Contact: Phone: Phone: Fax: Unit: Email: Co-I #1: EMP ID: Academic Dept.: Co-I #2 No Animal Subjects Yes No Chemical Hazards Yes No Human Embryonic Stem Cells Yes No Laser (Class 3b or 4 Materials and/or Radiation Devices Yes No OSP INFORMATION OSP Proposal #: Reviewer Initials: Approval Date

  9. Proefschri voorgedragen tot het behalen van het doctoraat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leuven (Heverlee) CLUSTERING OF SCIENTIFIC FIELDS BY INTEGRATING TEXT MINING AND BIBLIOMETRICS Promotoren) CLUSTERING OF SCIENTIFIC FIELDS BY INTEGRATING TEXT MINING AND BIBLIOMETRICS Jury: Prof. dr. ir. Y. Willems Ingenieurswetenschappen Arenbergkasteel, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium) Alle rechten voorbehouden

  10. Property:Tot rev (thousand $) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration Jump to:SpatialResolution Jump to:ResourceToolComplexity

  11. Property:Tot sales (mwh) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration Jump to:SpatialResolution Jump to:ResourceToolComplexitysales

  12. Inflow Performance Relationships (IPR) for Solution Gas Drive Reservoirs -- a Semi-Analytical Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nass, Maria A.

    2010-07-14

    dimensionless) pressure and mobility functions. This formulation is proven with an exhaustive numerical simulation study consisting of over 900 different cases. We considered 9 different pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) sets, and 13 different relative...

  13. IPR and Development in a Knowledge Economy: An Overview of Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yiming

    2007-01-01

    the pace of product and process innovation in many domainsto produce product and process innovation, usually assistedfor innovation in an era of nine-month product cycles.

  14. EA-386 IPR-GDF Suez Energy Marketing North America, Inc. (GSEMNA) |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  15. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-386 IPR-GDF SUEZ

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u tCorporation |Inc.: FederalEnergy, LLCMarketing

  16. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-386 IPR-GDF Suez

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u tCorporation |Inc.: FederalEnergy, LLCMarketingEnergy

  17. Implications of final L3 measurement of {sigma}{sub tot}({gamma}{gamma}{yields}bb)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chyla, Jiri

    2006-02-01

    The excess of data on the total cross section of bb production in {gamma}{gamma} collisions over QCD predictions, observed by L3, OPAL and DELPHI Collaborations at LEP2, has so far defied explanation. The recent final analysis of L3 data has brought important new information concerning the dependence of the observed excess on the {gamma}{gamma} collisions energy W{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}. The implications of this dependence are discussed.

  18. Table 17. Estimated natural gas plant liquids and dry natural gas content of tot

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price toStocks 2009CubicAnalysisYear Jana. Coal

  19. Screen and slotted liner horizontal completion: : correcting for wellbore pressure drop in the inflow performance relationships (IPR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agbongiator, Eddie Osarenmwida

    2002-01-01

    Error (P.E.) correlation. The correlation, which was simplified using the Table Curve program, is a function of horizontal well length, viscosity, well diameter, wellbore roughness, and production rate. The validation of two commonly used...

  20. I\\pr? ()~l'J~I}l l.lNlVf;,'tSiIl( 1\\.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    \\T.D 'UNI\\~n' l\\.ii01STiUt.R CHEM 2114 and CHEM 2124 Analytical Chemistry (3)_ (1)_Analytical Chemistry Lab General Microbiology (3)_ BIOL 2614 General Microbiology Lab. (1)_ CHEM 10351036 General Chemistry (3)_(3)_ or CHEM 10551056 General Chemistry for Majors (4)_(4)_ and CHEM 10451046 Gen. Chemistry Lab (1

  1. 2011 Strategic Capital Discussions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 IPR 2009 IPR 2008 Capital Investment Review CIR 2012 Quarterly Business Review 2011 Strategic Capital Discussions Access to Capital Debt Optimization Asset Management Cost...

  2. Essays on intellectual property rights policy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hackett, Petal Jean

    2012-11-27

    This dissertation will take a theoretical approach to analyzing certain challenges in the design of intellectual property rights (`IPR') policy. The first essay looks the advisability of introducing IPR into a market ...

  3. netlognews

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxy-combustionIntegrated Pollutant Removal (IPR TM ) Receives European Patent 7 Divisional Patent Issued for High Temperature NETL Alloy...

  4. Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01

    the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), in Gujarat, India.Physics Institute for Plasma Research International Tokamak

  5. Microsoft Word - Tilted-Rig-TP-Definition-Version1-Aug-14-2012A...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ) 4) Total turbulence kinetic energy, TOT k . This is defined as follows. The total kinetic energy is 2 1 2 2 2 2 where with TOT TOT x x x y z z x z x...

  6. Mantle helium along the Newport-Inglewood fault zone, Los Angeles basin, California-A leaking paleo-subduction zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boles, J. R; Garven, G.; Camacho, H.; Lupton, J. E

    2015-01-01

    4 + 4 ]. The total helium production term J tot (reactiveal. [1997], the total helium production term J tot (reactive= radiogenic helium production rate from the crust (~

  7. B y R o b e r t C e r v e r o a n d C a t h l e e n S u l l i v a n TODsfor TotsWhat's good

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    , and a variety of energy-saving feamres. The project's ample open space, mixed land uses, and well for singles and retirees is even better for children. :ÍÍ^J*'. W^^J ^« #12;Gardens and play space replace markedng wisdom, it's these groups that most value the convenience and stxiahility of a walkible urban

  8. Codice persoMatricola Cognome-Nome Insegn. Es 1 Es 2 Es 3 Es 4 Es 5 Tot VOTO 10379001 759980 A ALGORITMI E PRINCIPI DELL'INFORMATICA 4 0 1 1.5 0 6.5 ins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gini, Giuseppina

    A ALGORITMI E PRINCIPI DELL'INFORMATICA 4 0 1 1.5 0 6.5 ins 10398816 774198 ALGORITMI E PRINCIPI DELL'INFORMATICA 4 4 1 5 10.5 24.5 25 10343117 758097 ALGORITMI E PRINCIPI DELL'INFORMATICA 1 1 0 0.5 6 8.5 ins 10387779 773720 ALGORITMI E PRINCIPI DELL'INFORMATICA 4 4 1 5 5 19 19 10324444 743460 ALGORITMI E PRINCIPI

  9. The Science of the Tot6l EnDi.onne'1, 40 (1984) 61-81 Elsevier SciencePublGhe6 8.V.. Amstedam Printed in The Ntherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    1984-01-01

    of the lowlevel liquid effluent from the British Nuclear Fuelsplc reprocessingplant at Sella that radioactivity will be remobilisedand be retumed to man, dependson a large number of factors. Of particular

  10. RAMATION V=W Ot TOTS= t sAy VnoffZW COMM1 AV 10i90 2M3 AM=W V A CLSI~LL331M A1N2UW

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology OUTSIDE FRONT7a.R : . . .t9, S. nTCmI

  11. ORLIB: a computer code that produces one-energy group, time- and spatially-averaged neutron cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blink, J.A.; Dye, R.E.; Kimlinger, J.R.

    1981-12-01

    Calculation of neutron activation of proposed fusion reactors requires a library of neutron-activation cross sections. One such library is ACTL, which is being updated and expanded by Howerton. If the energy-dependent neutron flux is also known as a function of location and time, the buildup and decay of activation products can be calculated. In practice, hand calculation is impractical without energy-averaged cross sections because of the large number of energy groups. A widely used activation computer code, ORIGEN2, also requires energy-averaged cross sections. Accordingly, we wrote the ORLIB code to collapse the ACTL library, using the flux as a weighting function. The ORLIB code runs on the LLNL Cray computer network. We have also modified ORIGEN2 to accept the expanded activation libraries produced by ORLIB.

  12. catalystRX Chem 115Myers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Fan Liu The Stille Reaction Williams, R. Org. Synth. 2011, 88, 197­201. Selig, R.; Schollmeyer, D palladium intermediates. This typically requires a syn coplanar alignment of hydride and palladium%) MeO2C H3C CH3 CH3 iPr iPr iPr P Buchwald, S.L.; Naber, J.R. Adv. Synth. Catal. 2008, 350, 957-961 N N

  13. Joint Press Release TWELFTH ITER NEGOTIATION MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @mail.most.gov.cn India Institute for Plasma Research Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 Prof. P.K. Kaw Kaw@ipr.res.in Japan 12

  14. CIR-2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    prior to the Integrated Program Review (IPR). The CIR will cover transmission, federal hydro, facilities, information technology, energy efficiency, fish and wildlife, security,...

  15. (N-heterocyclic-carbene)Copper(I)-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation using carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirokman, Gergely

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents work towards the development of a new catalytic C-C bond forming reaction. Alkynes and olefins insert into [(IPr)CuH]2 (IPr = N,N-bis-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-1,3-imidazol-2-ylidene) to give copper vinyl ...

  16. Status and Plans for the Array Control and Data Acquisition System of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oya, I; Schwanke, U; Wegner, P; Balzer, A; Berge, D; Borkowski, J; Camprecios, J; Colonges, S; Colome, J; Champion, C; Conforti, V; Gianotti, F; Flour, T Le; Lindemann, R; Lyard, E; Mayer, M; Melkumyan, D; Punch, M; Tanci, C; Schmidt, T; Schwarz, J; Tosti, G; Verma, K; Weinstein, A; Wiesand, S; Wischnewski, R

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next-generation atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray observatory. CTA will consist of two installations, one in the northern, and the other in the southern hemisphere, containing tens of telescopes of different sizes. The CTA performance requirements and the inherent complexity associated with the operation, control and monitoring of such a large distributed multi-telescope array leads to new challenges in the field of the gamma-ray astronomy. The ACTL (array control and data acquisition) system will consist of the hardware and software that is necessary to control and monitor the CTA arrays, as well as to time-stamp, read-out, filter and store -at aggregated rates of few GB/s- the scientific data. The ACTL system must be flexible enough to permit the simultaneous automatic operation of multiple sub-arrays of telescopes with a minimum personnel effort on site. One of the challenges of the system is to provide a reliable integration of the control of a large and heterogene...

  17. Policing Access to Knowledge: An Analysis of the Intellectual Property Prohibition Regime 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, Paul Lucas

    2014-12-08

    This dissertation is an analysis of criminal enforcement of digital copyrights. I argue that an international prohibition regime to govern intellectual property rights (IPR) has emerged through systems of international trade and law enforcement...

  18. Asymmetric Amplification and Autocatalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    , 2005 · 147 Noyes, 8 PM N N O H i-Pr2Zn (2 eq.) N N OH O (9.5 mol%) 96% yield 95% e.e. Ph H 1.3% ee #12

  19. Fundamental Studies of Molybdenum and Tungsten Methylidene and Metallacyclobutane Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard Royce

    Addition of ethylene to Mo(NAr)(CHCMe2Ph)(OHIPT)(Pyr) (NAr = N-2,6-i-Pr2C6H3, OHIPT = O-2,6-(2,4,6-i-Pr3C6H2)2C6H3, Pyr = NC4H4) led to the trigonal-bipyramidal metallacyclobutane complex Mo(NAr)(C3H6)(OHIPT)(Pyr), in which ...

  20. EA-1573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    improvements tot he RFHP consisting of construction and operation of an onsite woodchip fuel storage silo and an expansion of woodchip fuel sources to a regional scale....

  1. Dissertatio Philosophica Inauguralis de fundamentis et obligatione legis naturae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, Hugh

    1739-01-01

    Inter tot, tamque varia, quibus Natura undique reserta est, opera nullum videmus temere vagari sed omnia, sub ratis legibus comprehensa, & ad certos fines ordinata, munus suum rite exsequi.

  2. UNIVERSITAT DE BARCELONA Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    , en Javi Casta~neda, la Neus, l'`Angels, l'Adolfo, l'H´ector...b´e, a tots els DAMeros. Gr`acies per

  3. SCIPP-04/03 Characterization the Front-End electronics in order to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    SCIPP-04/03 Characterization the Front-End electronics in order to Calibrate the PTSM Completed by-End electronics of the PTSM, data was collected on the gain of the system. This was done using known quantities a value known as Time Over Threshold (TOT). The TOT is measured by the PTSM Front-End (FE) electronics

  4. rofessor Annemie Vandamme, van de Afdeling Klinische en Epi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jesse

    -Gedragslijn voor studenten De grens tussen kunnen en mogen 6 Therapie voor arachnofoben Spin-off neemt spinfobie van U tot Z 10 Alumnikrant Vorming: mens en milieu, ver- vuiling en gezondheid 11 Alumnikrant

  5. A universal low-noise analog receiver baseband in 65-nm CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tekin, Ahmet; Elwan, Hassan; Pedrotti, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    ð ð BW Á C tot Þ=N Þ Á ð ð Pwr Þ= ð N Á BW Þ Þ where DR isamount of capacitance used, Pwr is the power consumption and

  6. Big Bang Expansion A textbook example of how observations drive theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korn, Andreas

    of structure seeds. The cosmic web will later form out of these sedes. #12;II. Observing the CMB Variations WMAP tot = 1 Dark matter: 23% Dark energy (): 73% #12;Big Bang: a self-consistent theory? Big Bang

  7. Kanker, krijg de straling Prof.dr. F.J. Beekman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    . De Technische Universiteit Delft heeft mij vorig jaar benoemd tot hoogleraar "Radiation Detection meer naar de achtergrond worden gedrongen. Figuur 1. Helium atoom. Bron: WIKI 1 #12;1. Straling Wij en

  8. Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Adam; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

    2008-01-01

    = target tot = total w = water 11 References K. W. Feindel,M. Hilpert and C. T. Miller, Water Resources Research, 40 (C. Payatakes, Advances in Water Resources, 24, 385 (2001).

  9. Effect of availability on multi-period planning of subsea oil and gas production systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz Vasquez, Karla Liliana

    2009-05-15

    .............................................................................. 81 Figure 5.5 Correlations for PVT matched data................................................... 83 Figure 5.6 IPR input screen ................................................................................ 85 Figure 5.7 Inflow... performance. For the reservoir description purpose, well testing, well log, seismic analysis, PVT and rock properties, will be the key elements to the forecasting of reservoir performance. In addition, reservoir characterization is essential to achieve...

  10. Mitigating FPGA Interconnect Soft Errors by In-Place LUT Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Lei

    , power and perfor- mance. Recent logic re-synthesis techniques, such as ROSE [2], IPR [3], IPD [4] and R2Mitigating FPGA Interconnect Soft Errors by In-Place LUT Inversion Naifeng Jing1 , Ju-Yueh Lee2 the Soft Error Rate (SER) at chip level, and reveal a locality and NP-Hardness of the IPV problem. We

  11. University of South Carolina Columbia Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of South Carolina Columbia Campus 2004-2005 Mini Fact Book Office of Institutional: http://ipr.sc.edu The University of South Carolina provides equal opportunity and affirmative action-century buildings. #12;Table of Contents History of the University of South Carolina

  12. University of South Carolina Columbia Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of South Carolina Columbia Campus 2002-2003 Mini Fact Book Office of Institutional: http://kudzu.ipr.sc.edu/index.htm The University of South Carolina provides equal opportunity gallery. #12;Table of Contents History of the University of South Carolina

  13. University of South Carolina Columbia Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of South Carolina Columbia Campus 2001-2002 Mini Fact Book Office of Institutional: http://kudzu.ipr.sc.edu/index.htm The University of South Carolina provides equal opportunity, South Carolina College was chartered as one of the nation's first publicly supported institutions

  14. University of South Carolina Columbia Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of South Carolina Columbia Campus 2003-2004 Mini Fact Book Office of Institutional: http://ipr.sc.edu The University of South Carolina provides equal opportunity and affirmative action Administration Building A national leader in primary care medical education, the University of South Carolina

  15. University of South Carolina Columbia Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of South Carolina Columbia Campus 2000-2001 Mini Fact Book Office of Institutional: http://kudzu.ipr.sc.edu/index.htm The University of South Carolina provides equal opportunity pertaining to South Carolina, and was renamed South Caroliniana Library when McKissick Memorial Library

  16. New inflow performance relationships for gas condensate reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Castillo Maravi, Yanil

    2004-09-30

    - similar to the Vogel IPR trends (the Vogel (quadratic) rate-pressure profile is generally presumed for the case of a solution gas-drive reservoir system). However, in the case of a gas-condensate reservoir system, the coefficients in the quadratic...

  17. Rides et Dunes de Sable Alexandre Valance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Carine - Le Laboratoire de Mathématiques

    1 Rides et Dunes de Sable Alexandre Valance Institut de Physique de Rennes (IPR), CNRS UMR 6251-linéaire: murissement, saturation Dunes transverses, Barkhanes, Rides éoliennes Sources: · A. Valance: « Dynamique Fluviatile » (Cours M2 Systèmes Complexes, Rennes) · F. Charru et al. : « Ripples and Sand dunes » (Annual

  18. Novel Methodology Towards the Indole Core and Iron-Catalyzed Electrophilic Hydroamination of Alkenes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huehls, Christopher Bryan

    2014-04-18

    ............................................................................................ 40 5.3 Scope ...................................................................................................................... 42 5.4 Proposed mechanism for hydroamination .............................................................. 44 5.5... Benzoyl DBU 1,8-Diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene DCM Dichloromethane, methylene chloride DMF N,N’-Dimethylformamide EDTA Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid Et Ethyl i-Pr iso-Propyl LG Leaving group M Metal atom mCPBA meta-chloroperbenzoic acid Me...

  19. Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen J. Gerdemann; John Clark

    2011-10-16

    Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizing available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.

  20. Copyright reform on the EU level European Network for Copyright in support of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlen, Rainer

    Copyright reform on the EU level European Network for Copyright in support of Education and Budapest Business School #12;Copyright reform on the EU level What can science and education expect from a copyright reform on the EU level? Rainer Kuhlen University of Konstanz, HumboldtUniversity Berlin, IPR

  1. University of Leeds Lecture Capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    University of Leeds Lecture Capture As part of your study lectures will be recorded Recording for Educational Purposes (see http://www.leeds.ac.uk/secretariat/documents/0Audio (see http://www.leeds.ac.uk/secretariat/documents/ipr_policy.pdf) in general where staff or students

  2. Essays on International Finance and Trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Li

    2009-01-01

    1973M 1-20 09M7 Real oil prices TOT 1973M 1-20 09M7 1973M 1-1973M 1-20 09M7 REER Real oil prices 1973M 1-20 09M7 1973M1975M 1-20 09M7 Real oil prices TOT 1975M 1-20 09M7 1975M 1-

  3. 5. Only a single coil is in the ground 6. Heat transfer up to the coil wall is axially symmetrical. /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    (r, x = 0) = To(t) (9) At r = r0, To(t) is a known function of time t that represents the heat pump operation. For a given heat pump, if we know the fluid h(T, - Tf) = K TP (4) inlet temperature and flow rate the manufacturer's published heat pump performance At r = r, in winter: data. The heat pump exit fluid represents

  4. Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    in series The pressure losses are added. Be aware of that the flow velocity w changes (and hence Re) whenloss,2pump,1loss,1 ... 2.2 januari 2014 nVVVVVV ...4321tot if density is constant i for connections in parallel n V VVVV n tot 321 ... nloss,loss,3loss,2loss,1 ... pppp 2.4 januari 2014 Shell

  5. Aggie Band - Unknown Date - 19 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-11-22

    3044g3290uni0020g3288g3276g3299 g3404uni0031g3398g4666uni0031g3398g1848g4667g4672 g3043g3298g3281 g3043g3267 g4673g3398g1848g4672 g3043g3298g3281 g3043g3267 g4673 g2870.???????????????..(eq.1.6) If V = 0 barb2right straight-line IPR, V = 0.8 barb2... on the inflow performance relationship (IPR), the well vertical lift performance (VLP), and the facilities network performance (Economides et al., 1993). 5 Fig. 1.2?A production system (Economides et al., 1993) uni2206g1868 g3404 uni2206g1868g3045g3032...

  6. Ligand variation in molybdenum imido alkylidene complexes : a synthetic, structural, and catalytic study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichtscheidl, Alejandro G. (Alejandro Gaston)

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 1. A general introduction is given. Chapter 2. The biscarboxylate species, Mo(NR)(CHCMe 2Ph)(O 2CPh3)2 (R = 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3, 2,6- Me2C6H3, 2-t-BuC 6H4, or 1 -adamantyl) are compared to newly synthesized bis(terphen ...

  7. The evolution of molybdenum and tungsten olefin metathesis catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Annie Jinying Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Chapter 1: Reaction of Mo(NR)(CHR')(OTf)2(dme) (R = 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3 (Ar), 2,6-Me2C6H3 (Ar'), 2,6-Cl2C6H3 (ArCl), 1-adamantyl (Ad); R' = CMe2Ph, CMe3; dme = dimethoxyethane) with the lithium salt of ArCl-nacnac ([2,6-Cl2C6H ...

  8. Tensor Correlations Measured in 3He(e,e'pp)n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Baghdasaryan; L. B. Weinstein; J. M. Laget; K. P. Adhikari; M. Aghasyan; M. Amarian; M. Anghinolfi; H. Avakian; J. Ball; M. Battaglieri; I. Bedlinskiy; B. L. Berman; A. S. Biselli; C. Bookwalter; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; S. Bültmann; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; A. Daniel; N. Dashyan; R. DeVita; E. DeSanctis; A. Deur; B. Dey; R. Dickson; C. Djalali; G. E. Dodge; D. Doughty; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; P. Eugenio; S. Fegan; M. Y. Gabrielyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; W. Gohn; R. W. Gothe; K. A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; L. Guo; V. Gyurjyan; H. Hakobyan; C. Hanretty; C. E. Hyde; K. Hicks; M. Holtrop; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; K. Joo; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; P. Khetarpal; A. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; P. Konczykowski; V. Kubarovsky; S. E. Kuhn; S. V. Kuleshov; V. Kuznetsov; N. D. Kvaltine; K. Livingston; H. Y. Lu; I. J. D. MacGregor; N. Markov; M. Mayer; J. McAndrew; B. McKinnon; C. A. Meyer; K. Mikhailov; V. Mokeev; B. Moreno; K. Moriya; B. Morrison; H. Moutarde; E. Munevar; P. Nadel-Turonski; C. Nepali; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; R. Paremuzyan; K. Park; S. Park; E. Pasyuk; S. Anefalos Pereira; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; D. Protopopescu; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; F. Sabatié; C. Salgado; R. A. Schumacher; H. Seraydaryan; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. S. Stepanyan; S. Stepanyan; P. Stoler; S. Strauch; M. Taiuti; W. Tang; C. E. Taylor; D. J. Tedeschi; M. Ungaro; M. F. Vineyard; E. Voutier; D. P. Watts; D. P. Weygand; M. H. Wood; B. Zhao; Z. W. Zhao

    2010-08-18

    We have measured the 3He(e,e'pp)n reaction at an incident energy of 4.7 GeV over a wide kinematic range. We identified spectator correlated pp and pn nucleon pairs using kinematic cuts and measured their relative and total momentum distributions. This is the first measurement of the ratio of pp to pn pairs as a function of pair total momentum, $p_{tot}$. For pair relative momenta between 0.3 and 0.5 GeV/c, the ratio is very small at low $p_{tot}$ and rises to approximately 0.5 at large $p_{tot}$. This shows the dominance of tensor over central correlations at this relative momentum.

  9. Supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. II. The correlation with near-infrared luminosity revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Läsker, Ronald; Van de Ven, Glenn [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ferrarese, Laura [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E2E7 (Canada); Shankar, Francesco, E-mail: laesker@mpia.de [GEPI Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Univ. Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2014-01-01

    We present an investigation of the scaling relations between supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses, M {sub •}, and their host galaxies' K-band bulge (L {sub bul}) and total (L {sub tot}) luminosities. The wide-field WIRCam imager at the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope was used to obtain the deepest and highest resolution near-infrared images available for a sample of 35 galaxies with securely measured M {sub •}, selected irrespective of Hubble type. For each galaxy, we derive bulge and total magnitudes using a two-dimensional image decomposition code that allows us to account, if necessary, for large- and small-scale disks, cores, bars, nuclei, rings, envelopes, and spiral arms. We find that the present-day M {sub •}-L {sub bul} and M {sub •}-L {sub tot} relations have consistent intrinsic scatter, suggesting that M {sub •} correlates equally well with bulge and total luminosity of the host. Our analysis provides only mild evidence of a decreased scatter if the fit is restricted to elliptical galaxies. The log-slopes of the M {sub •}-L {sub bul} and M {sub •}-L {sub tot} relations are 0.75 ± 0.10 and 0.92 ± 0.14, respectively. However, while the slope of the M {sub •}-L {sub bul} relation depends on the detail of the image decomposition, the characterization of M {sub •}-L {sub tot} does not. Given the difficulties and ambiguities of decomposing galaxy images into separate components, our results indicate that L {sub tot} is more suitable as a tracer of SMBH mass than L {sub bul}, and that the M {sub •}-L {sub tot} relation should be used when studying the co-evolution of SMBHs and galaxies.

  10. BcBeaker's Caf Breakfastserved from 7 a.m. -10:30 a.m. Monday -Friday

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    eggs made your way, choice of ham, bacon or sausage, with either white or wheat toast Breakfast Quesadilla $4.99 Choice of bacon, ham or sausage with scrambled eggs, diced tater tots and shredded Monterey your way, choice of ham, bacon or sausage, with cheese on either Texas toast or croissant Without ham/bacon

  11. Weak decays of 4He-Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Parker; M. J. Athanas; P. D. Barnes; S. Bart; B. Bassalleck; R. Chrien; G. Diebold; G. B. Franklin; K. Johnston; P. Pile; B. Quinn; F. Rozon; R. Sawafta; R. A. Schumacher; R. Stearns; I. Sukaton; R. Sutter; J. J. Szymanski; V. J. Zeps

    2007-09-13

    We measured the lifetime and the mesonic and non-mesonic decay rates of the 4He-Lambda hypernucleus. The hypernuclei were created using a 750 MeV/c momentum K- beam on a liquid 4He target by the reaction 4He(K-,pi-)4He-Lambda. The 4He-Lambda lifetime was directly measured using protons from Lambda p -> n p non-mesonic decay (also referred to as proton-stimulated decay) and was found to have a value of tau = 245 +/- 24 ps. The mesonic decay rates were determined from the observed numbers of pi-'s and pi0's as Gamma_pi-/Gamma_tot = 0.270 +/- 0.024 and Gamma_pi0/Gamma_tot = 0.564 +/- 0.036, respectively, and the values of the proton- and neutron-stimulated decay rates were extracted as Gamma_p/Gamma_tot = 0.169 +/- 0.019 and Gamma_n/Gamma_tot <= 0.032 (95% CL), respectively. The effects of final-state interactions and possible 3-body Lambda N N decay contributions were studied in the context of a simple model of nucleon-stimulated decay. Nucleon-nucleon coincidence events were observed and were used in the determination of the non-mesonic branching fractions. The implications of the results of this analysis were considered for the empirical Delta I = 1/2 rule and the decay rates of the 4H-Lambda hypernucleus.

  12. The global approach to thermodynamics: Try it, you'll like it Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    ;800 400tot sys wtS S S S S For thermal reservoirs TE S T , where TE is the thermal energy, 0wtS . Using the information from the figure we calculate a negative value for the total entropy

  13. The global approach to thermodynamics Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    The global statement for the second law is #12;800 400tot sys wtS S S S S For thermal reservoirs TE its entropy, therefore 0wtS . Using the information from the figure we calculate a negative value

  14. Van Expo 58 Fernand Mortelmans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jesse

    causa uit aan Claude Mandil, voormalig directeur van het Internationaal Energieagentschap (IEA). Met dit rol van het IEA en het werk van Claude Mandil in het bijzonder. Ingenieur Claude Mandil kreeg zijn Director van het IEA van februari 2003 tot september 2007. In die periode is hij erin geslaagd om het IEA

  15. Working with GAMS Vikas Argod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

    Display statement (optional) Echo Print Reference Maps Equation Listings Status Reports Results #12;blend;Blend_model.gms: variables variables tot_cost total cost in $ x(i) fraction of each Gasoline set ; Every_input_filename is an ASCII file with GAMS commands and has an extension `.gms' e.g. blend_model.gms · Command to run GAMS

  16. Table of tables: A database design tool for SYBASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B.C.; Coulter, K.; Glass, H.D.; Glosson, R.; Hanft, R.W.; Harding, D.J.; Trombly-Freytag, K.; Walbridge, D.G.C.; Wallis, D.B. ); Allen, M.E. )

    1991-01-04

    The Table of Tables' application system captures in a set of SYBASE tables the basic design specification for a database schema. Specification of tables, columns (including the related defaults and rules for the stored values) and keys is provided. The feature which makes this application specifically useful for SYBASE is the ability to automatically generate SYBASE triggers. A description field is provided for each database object. Based on the data stored, SQL scripts for creating complete schema including the tables, their defaults and rules, their indexes, and their SYBASE triggers, are written by TOT. Insert, update and delete triggers are generated from TOT to guarantee integrity of data relations when tables are connected by single column foreign keys. The application is written in SYBASE's APT-SQL and includes a forms based data entry system. Using the features of TOT we can create a complete database schema for which the data integrity specified by our design is guaranteed by the SYBASE triggers generated by TOT. 3 refs.

  17. El Consell Social de la UPF convoca una nova edici del Premi UPF Emprn a la iniciativa i a la capacitat empresarial, per incentivar la cultura emprenedora dels joves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la vida, comunicació i tecnologies de la informació o disseny i arquitectura). Tots els candidats inexistent, millores de productes o serveis existents, aplicació de noves tecnologies a diferents processos d serveis existents, aplicació de noves tecnologies a diferents processos d'empresa, ...) c) viabilitat

  18. Context Objectives Methodology : Thermo-environomic optimization -Systematic framework for process analysis design and optimization.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrendt, Wolfgang

    improvements identification 90% Post-combustion CO2 capture in natural gas fuelled power plant Q+ LP Q+ reheat recompression integration Pre-combustion CO2 capture in biomass fed power plant System No MVR MVR tot [%] 27 Physical model CO2 capture model Generic reheat GT model T, P, Xi, MFG Q+ Q- Natural gas Biomass Natural

  19. Umweltphysik W. Aeschbach-Hertig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    : [ ]1Energie J N m Gewicht - = h: Piezometerhöhe, hydraulic head, ... 6 Definition der Piezometerhöhe h aus Fitts, 2002. Groundwater Science, Academic Press Tot. Energie auf Höhe z : E pV mgz= + E p h z. "Piezometerhöhe" engl.: hydraulic head #12;7 Hydraulischer Head und Aquifertypen aquifer aquitard impermeable

  20. BULGARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES CYBERNETICS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES Volume 12, No 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    and robots used vary. With this in mind, we have used an open-source, 3D printed quadruped robot called. The open source, 3D printed QuadraTot robot used in this research. The white printed booties are new

  1. La presente Tesis Doctoral ha sido financiada de forma conjunta por el Ministerio de Educacin y Ciencia de Espaa y por los fondos FEDER de la Comisin Europea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimaldo, Francisco

    La presente Tesis Doctoral ha sido financiada de forma conjunta por el Ministerio de Educación y Consolider Ingenio-2010 CSD2006-00046, respectivamente. #12;#12;#12;Departament d'Informàtica TESIS DOCTORAL realitzar una tesi doctoral, l'autor necessita la col·laboració de tot un seguit de persones per poder

  2. Wat is Lean Six Sigma? Lean Six Sigma is een standaard-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rooij, Robert

    Wat is Lean Six Sigma? Lean Six Sigma is een standaard- aanpak voor het organiseren van kwaliteits standaardmodellen voor programmamanagement en de organisatiestructuur, schrijft de Lean Six Sigma aanpak een uitvoering van hun projecten en faciliteren project- tracking. Tot slot biedt Lean Six Sigma een uitgebreide

  3. Wat is Lean Six Sigma? Lean Six Sigma is een standaard-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rooij, Robert

    Wat is Lean Six Sigma? Lean Six Sigma is een standaard- aanpak voor het organiseren van kwaliteits standaardmodellen voor programmamanagement en de organisatiestructuur, schrijft de Lean Six Sigma aanpak een uitvoering van hun projecten en faciliteren project- tracking.Tot slot biedt Lean Six Sigma een uitgebreide

  4. Toy to the World: Savannah River Site Celebrates 21 Years of Bringing Joy to Kids

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    AIKEN, S.C. – Santa Claus and his elves are getting a lot of help from DOE’s Savannah River Site (SRS) this year. Federal employees and contractors donated more than 14,200 toys to support the U.S. Marine Reserves Toys for Tots campaign.

  5. RENORM Predictions of Diffraction at LHC Confirmed Konstantin Goulianos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (non-exponentially suppressed) rapidity gap, and thereby its integral over all phase space saturates when it reaches unity. Differential cross sections are expressed in terms of the IP-trajectory (t) = 1 is then calculated as ND = (tot -el)-(2SD +DD +CD). Diffraction 2014 AIP Conf. Proc. 1654, 050006-1­050006-4; doi: 10

  6. Manuel Palomar comparteix amb els exrectors l'actual situaci de la UA Alacant, 30 de novembre de 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    Manuel Palomar comparteix amb els exrectors l'actual situació de la UA Alacant, 30 de novembre de Manuel Palomar s'han reunit aquest matí en el despatx rectoral en una trobada històrica de tots els Palomar, ha volgut compartir amb els seus predecessors la situació per la qual travessa la UA i fer

  7. Ampliacio de Models Matem`atics de la Fisica Llicenciatura de Matem`atiques / M`aster de Matem`atica Aplicada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gràcia, Xavier

    Complements Matem`atics 3 1 Connexions. Varietats riemannianes 3 2 Fibrats vectorials. Estructures geom Mec`anica 14 1 Mec`anica newtoniana 14 2 Mec`anica en una varietat riemanniana 16 3 Formalisme tot camp vectorial X, es t´e XT = 0. 4. La diferencial covariant. Sigui M una varietat amb connexi

  8. Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Edwin

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after Targeted Ablation of Hair Cells with Diphtheria Toxin Justin S. Golub,1 Ling Tong,1 Tot B. Ngyuen,1 Cliff R. Hume,1 Richard utricle by inserting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) gene into the Pou4f3 gene, which encodes

  9. Solution to Final from 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-12-19

    71r. = -"i'trtrr'l. *-oog-l\\11 -,1/t-118. =-oosr 918 tl .&"'Fl - ,. dnloF ,- {td :-s. Acr^. ble* t5"-) ... )sr o .- . _0t. -\\l t) \\P c\\t t- tr[u to.t. (s) (" k.c.,*"--\\ v'/ la \\t. I. -P-t. *P;". D .B) tlx.

  10. School voor Informatietechnologie Kennistechnologie, Informatica, Wiskunde, ICT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morik, Katharina

    Pattern Mining Proefschrift voorgelegd tot het behalen van de graad van Doctor in de Wetenschappen passed on to me. I am much in debt to my office-mate Floris Geerts. His help, encourage- ment Acknowledgements i 1 Introduction 1 2 Survey on Frequent Pattern Mining 5 2.1 Problem Description

  11. Development of Alternative Rheological Measurements for DWPF Slurry Samples (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D. c.

    2005-09-01

    Rheological measurements are used to evaluate the fluid dynamic behavior of Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, slurry samples. Measurements are currently made on non-radioactive simulant slurries using two state-of-the-art rheometers located at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory, ACTL. Measurements are made on plant samples using a rheometer in the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, Shielded Cells facility. Low activity simulants or plant samples can be analyzed using a rheometer located in a radioactive hood in SRNL. Variations in the rheology of SB2 simulants impacted the interpretation of results obtained in a number of related studies. A separate rheological study was initiated with the following four goals: (1) Document the variations seen in the simulant slurries, both by a review of recent data, and by a search for similar samples for further study. (2) Attempt to explain the variations in rheological behavior, or, failing that, reduce the number of possible causes. In particular, to empirically check for rheometer-related variations. (3) Exploit the additional capabilities of the rheometers by developing new measurement methods to study the simulant rheological properties in new ways. (4) Formalize the rheological measurement process for DWPF-related samples into a series of protocols. This report focuses on the third and fourth goals. The emphasis of this report is on the development and formalization of rheological measurement methods used to characterize DWPF slurry samples. The organization is by rheological measurement method. Progress on the first two goals was documented in a concurrent technical report, Koopman (2005). That report focused on the types and possible causes of unusual rheological behavior in simulant slurry samples. It was organized by the sample being studied. The experimental portion of this study was performed in the period of March to April 2004. A general rheology protocol for routine DWPF slurry samples, Koopman (2004b), was drafted in addition to the companion technical report to this document.

  12. Universal Behavior of Charged Particle Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Steinberg; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2002-11-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/pbar-p and e+e- data. N_tot/(N_part/2) in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with sqrt(s) in a similar way as N_tot in e+e- collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  13. Universal Behavior of Charged Particle Production in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Steinberg; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2002-10-17

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/pbar-p and e+e- data. N_tot/(N_part/2) in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with sqrt(s) in a similar way as N_tot in e+e- collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  14. Comprehensive fits to high energy data for $\\sigma$, $\\rho$, and $B$ and the asymptotic black-disk limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Martin M; Ha, Phuoc; Halzen, Francis

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the entirety of the data on proton--proton and antiproton--proton forward scattering between 6 GeV and 57 TeV center-of-mass energy is sufficient to show that $\\sigma_{\\rm elas}/\\sigma_{\\rm tot} \\rightarrow 1/2$, and that $8\\pi B/\\sigma_{\\rm tot}\\rightarrow 1$ at very high energies, where $B$ the forward slope parameter for the differential elastic scattering cross sections. The relations demonstrate convincingly that the asymptotic $pp$ and $\\bar{p}p$ scattering amplitudes approach those of scattering from a black disk. We regard this as definitive. This result obviously has implications for any new physics that modifies the forward scattering amplitudes.

  15. Pyroelectric response mechanism of barium strontium titanate ceramics in dielectric bolometer mode: The underlying essence of the enhancing effect of direct current bias field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Chaoliang; Cao, Sheng; Yan, Shiguang; Yao, Chunhua; Cao, Fei; Wang, Genshui; Dong, Xianlin; Hu, Xu; Yang, Chunli

    2013-06-17

    Pyroelectric response mechanism of Ba{sub 0.70}Sr{sub 0.30}TiO{sub 3} ceramics under dielectric bolometer (DB) mode was investigated by dielectric and pyroelectric properties measurement. The variations of total, intrinsic, and induced pyroelectric coefficients (p{sub tot}, p{sub int}, p{sub ind}) with temperatures and bias fields were analyzed. p{sub int} plays the dominant role to p{sub tot} through most of the temperature range and p{sub ind} will be slightly higher than p{sub int} above T{sub 0}. The essence of the enhancing effect of DC bias field on pyroelectric coefficient can be attributed to the high value of p{sub int}. This mechanism is useful for the pyroelectric materials (DB mode) applications.

  16. Obtaining the Specific Heat of Hadronic Matter from CERN/RHIC Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram Mekjian

    2005-03-03

    The specific heat of hot hadronic matter is related to particle production yields from experiments done at CERN/RHIC. The mass fluctuation of excited hadrons plays an important role. Connections of the specific heat, mean hadronic mass excited and its fluctuation with properties of baryon and electric chemical potentials (value, slope and curvature) are also developed. A possible divergence of the specific heat as 1/(To-T)^2 is discussed. Some connections with net charge fluctuations are noted.

  17. Electron-Cloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL Main Injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, Miguel .A.

    2008-08-25

    We present a summary on ongoing simulation results for the electron-cloud (EC) buildup in the context of the proposed FNAL Main Injector (MI) intensity upgrade effort [1]. Most of the results presented here are for the field-free region at the location of the retarding field analyzer (RFA) electron detector [2-4]. The primary input variable we exercise is the peak secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max}, which we let vary in the range 1.2 {le} {delta}{sub max} {le} 1.7. By combining our simulated results for the electron flux at the vacuum chamber wall with the corresponding RFA measurements we infer that 1.25 {approx}< {delta}{sub max} {approx}< 1.35 at this location. From this piece of information we estimate features of the EC distribution for various fill patterns, including the average electron number density n{sub e}. We then compare the behavior of the EC for a hypothetical RF frequency f{sub RF} = 212 MHz with the current 53 MHz for a given total beam population N{sub tot}. The density n{sub e} goes through a clear threshold as a function of N{sub tot} in a field-free region. As expected, the higher frequency leads to a weaker EC effect: the threshold in N{sub tot} is a factor {approx} 2 higher for f{sub RF} = 212 MHz than for 53 MHz, and ne is correspondingly lower by a factor {approx} 2 when N{sub tot} is above threshold. We briefly describe further work that needs to be carried out, sensitivities in the calculation, and puzzles in the results that remain to be addressed.

  18. MFR PAPER 1094 Some solutions to menhaden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - A Growing Concern JAMES S. YOUNG INTRODUCTION The energ~ crl\\l\\ In the nlted tatC'>. at lea t the pl1rtion-fou rth 01 the totJI energ\\ con\\umed \\\\a u ed to produce electrlclt~ B~ the \\ear 2000 It 1\\ e\\tlmated that -II per- cent 01 "hat "III be a more than t\\\\ 1 and one-half fold Increa e 0\\ er the total energ~ u

  19. Revisiting the effect of H2, HD and LiH molecules in the cooling of primordial gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joaquin P. Prieto; Leopoldo Infante; Raul Jimenez

    2009-02-13

    We use a non-equilibrium chemical network to revisit and study the effect of H_{2}, HD and LiH molecular cooling on a primordial element of gas. We solve both the thermal and chemical equations for a gas element with an initial temperature T\\approx 1000K and a gas number density in the range n_{tot}=1-10^{4} cm^{-3}. At low densities, n_{tot}10^{2} cm^{-3}, the HD molecule dominates the gas temperature evolution. The effect of LiH is negligible in all cases. We studied the effect of D abundance on the gas cooling. The D abundance was set initially to be in the range n_{D}/n_{H}=10^{-7}-10^{-4.5}, with n_{HD}/n_{H}={D^{+}}/n_{H}=10^{-10}. The simulations show that at n_{tot}>10^{2} cm^{-3} the HD cooling dominates the temperature evolution for D abundances greater than 10^{-5}n_{H}. This number decrease at higher densities. Furthermore, we studied the effect of electrons and ionized particules on the gas temperature. We followed the gas temperature evolution with n_{H_{+}}/n_{H}=10^{-4}-10^{-1} and n_{D^{+}}/n_{H^{+}}=10^{-5}. The gas temperature reached lower values at high ionization degree because electrons, H^{+} and D^{+} are catalizers in the formation paths of the H_{2} and HD molecules, which are the main coolers at low temperatures. Finaly, we studied the effect of an OB star, with T_{eff}=4\\times 10^{4}K, would have on gas cooling. It is very difficult for a gas with n_{tot} in the range between 1-100 cm^{-3} to drop its temperature if the star is at a distance less than 100 pc.

  20. 12/05/2010 SAC meeting IRAM Grenoble 1 Testing of current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leclercq, Samuel

    /2 better but cloudy weather Results Colors = GISMO Contours = MAMBO J1849+670 J1849+670 - 1st PC Dark sky Dark sky - 1st PC Shutter closed Shutter closed - 1st PC 0.1 1 10 100 100 1000 1000 noise [pA/Hz1 Mounted on a XY table Pchopped · det · tTOT Pdet Pixel maps Noise spectra NEP & NET - 32 pixels - 10

  1. hi i-pt.CP SiLICA DgpoSl.Tl; IN lB?,'; t Cl;: INSlIR 1 FOIl I. It. ito t L end 2 5. Buds-uid 5 -011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

    = friction inc tot, dirsens ionloss c = radius, is 2 -- B fouling rc.;istanco, (hW/n; 14) 1 2 U os''r,ill heat transfer coefficient hW/si K = xl ;`p] e 505OiO , n (unless otherwise stated) = toughiess iunoti the Bern te; ire,, -co nC pne;sure of tir i'se:veSr, i;uri;,;- uti]frrl'''.; the w;,:ci'a nrc ant b-rn;.e t

  2. Universal Properties of Response Functions of Nonequilibrium States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizu, Akira

    (pump field). timeJin Jout NESS . current A nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) is realized for [tinJin Jout NESS . current J0 J B(J) · Response of the NESS to f(t): see the response, A(t) A t F+f - A F · ) : expectation value in the NESS ( ^F Tr [ ^tot F (t) ]) This relation is general and universal! #12;Example

  3. Provo City Corp (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 1,368 18,290 30,311 1,749 28,411 4,779 437 10,070 1 3,554 56,771 35,091 2009-02 1,552 20,914 30,371 1,847 31,146 4,792 451 10,886 1 3,850 62,946 35,164...

  4. Molecular structure, vibrational, electronic structure and nonlinear optical properties of L-threoninium picrate: an excellent nonlinear optical material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AlFaify, S; Arora, Manju; Algarni, H; Abbas, Haider; Muhammad, Shabbir; Irfanc, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In this work, different computational methods such as HF, B3LYP, range separated functionals (CAM-B3LYP and LC-BLYP) at 6-31G* basis set were applied to investigate the electronic, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of L-threoninium picrate (LTHP) molecule for the first time. The calculated values of IR and Raman vibrational frequencies were found to be in a good agreement with the experimental results. Time dependent density functional theory has been applied to calculate the electronic and photophysical properties such as excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energies of LTHP molecule. The excitation energy values calculated by range separated functional CAM-B3LYP (LC-BLYP) were found to be at 262 and 351 nm in close agreement with the experimental values. The total dipole moment ({\\mu}tot), static total and anisotropy of polarizability ({\\alpha}tot, {\\Delta}{\\alpha}) and static first hyperpolarizability (\\b{eta}0, \\b{eta}tot) values were calculated and compared w...

  5. CMB quadrupole suppression: II. The early fast roll stage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Boyanovsky; H. J. de Vega; N. G. Sanchez

    2007-03-12

    Within the effective field theory of inflation, an initialization of the classical dynamics of the inflaton with approximate equipartition between the kinetic and potential energy of the inflaton leads to a brief fast roll stage that precedes the slow roll regime. The fast roll stage leads to an attractive potential in the wave equations for the mode functions of curvature and tensor perturbations. The evolution of the inflationary perturbations is equivalent to the scattering by this potential and a useful dictionary between the scattering data and observables is established.Implementing methods from scattering theory we prove that this attractive potential leads to a suppression of the quadrupole moment for CMB and B-mode angular power spectra. The scale of the potential is determined by the Hubble parameter during slow roll. Within the effective field theory of inflation at the grand unification (GUT) energy scale we find that if inflation lasts a total number of efolds N_{tot} ~ 59, there is a 10-20% suppression of the CMB quadrupole and about 2-4% suppression of the tensor quadrupole. The suppression of higher multipoles is smaller, falling off as 1/l^2. The suppression is much smaller for N_{tot} > 59, therefore if the observable suppression originates in the fast roll stage, there is the upper bound N_{tot} ~ 59.

  6. The hierarchy problem and the cosmological constant problem in the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred Jegerlehner

    2015-03-03

    We argue that the SM in the Higgs phase does not suffer form a "hierarchy problem" and that similarly the "cosmological constant problem" resolves itself if we understand the SM as a low energy effective theory emerging from a cut-off medium at the Planck scale. We discuss these issues under the condition of a stable Higgs vacuum, which allows to extend the SM up to the Planck length. The bare Higgs boson mass then changes sign below the Planck scale, such the the SM in the early universe is in the symmetric phase. The cut-off enhanced Higgs mass term as well as the quartically enhanced cosmological constant term trigger the inflation of the early universe. The coefficients of the shift between bare and renormalized Higgs mass as well as of the shift between bare and renormalized vacuum energy density exhibit close-by zeros at some point below the Planck scale. The zeros are matching points between short distance and the renormalized low energy quantities. Since inflation tunes the total energy density to take the critical value of a flat universe Omega_tot=rho_tot/rho_crit=Omega_Lambda+Omega_matter+Omega_radiation}=1 it is obvious that Omega_Lambda today is of order Omega_tot given that 1>Omega_matter, Omega_radiation>0, which saturate the total density to about 26 % only, the dominant part being dark matter(21 %).

  7. Ultrahigh energy predictions of proton-air cross sections from accelerator data: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, M. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2011-11-01

    At {radical}(s)=57{+-}7 TeV, the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) measured the p-air inelastic production cross section, {sigma}{sub p-air}{sup prod}=475{+-}22(stat){+-}{sub 15}{sup 20}(syst) mb, assuming a proton cosmic ray beam with a 25% helium contamination. From a Glauber calculation, they found the inelastic pp cross section, {sigma}{sub inel}=90{+-}7(stat){+-}{sub 11}{sup 9}(syst){+-}1.5(Glaub) mb. Our parameterization of pp and pp total cross sections, {sigma}{sub tot}, using analyticity constraints and unitarity gives accurate extrapolations to ultrahigh energies, and after using a Glauber calculation, accurate predictions for {sigma}{sub p-air}{sup prod}. We find (i) a pp total cross section, {sigma}{sub tot}=133.4{+-}1.6 mb and (ii) {sigma}{sub p-air}{sup prod}=483{+-}3 mb, independently determining a 19% helium contamination. Using our 57 TeV value for pp {sigma}{sub tot}[M. M. Block and F. Halzen, arXiv:1109-2041], we find a pp inelastic cross section, {sigma}{sub inel}=92.9{+-}1.6 mb, agreeing with POA.

  8. Accurate evolutions of unequal-mass neutron-star binaries: properties of the torus and short GRB engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciano Rezzolla; Luca Baiotti; Bruno Giacomazzo; David Link; Jose A. Font

    2010-05-13

    We present new results from accurate and fully general-relativistic simulations of the coalescence of unmagnetized binary neutron stars with various mass ratios. The evolution of the stars is followed through the inspiral phase, the merger and prompt collapse to a black hole, up until the appearance of a thick accretion disk, which is studied as it enters and remains in a regime of quasi-steady accretion. Although a simple ideal-fluid equation of state with \\Gamma=2 is used, this work presents a systematic study within a fully general relativistic framework of the properties of the resulting black-hole--torus system produced by the merger of unequal-mass binaries. More specifically, we show that: (1) The mass of the torus increases considerably with the mass asymmetry and equal-mass binaries do not produce significant tori if they have a total baryonic mass M_tot >~ 3.7 M_sun; (2) Tori with masses M_tor ~ 0.2 M_sun are measured for binaries with M_tot ~ 3.4 M_sun and mass ratios q ~ 0.75-0.85; (3) The mass of the torus can be estimated by the simple expression M_tor(q, M_tot) = [c_1 (1-q) + c_2](M_max-M_tot), involving the maximum mass for the binaries and coefficients constrained from the simulations, and suggesting that the tori can have masses as large as M_tor ~ 0.35 M_sun for M_tot ~ 2.8 M_sun and q ~ 0.75-0.85; (4) Using a novel technique to analyze the evolution of the tori we find no evidence for the onset of non-axisymmetric instabilities and that very little, if any, of their mass is unbound; (5) Finally, for all the binaries considered we compute the complete gravitational waveforms and the recoils imparted to the black holes, discussing the prospects of detection of these sources for a number of present and future detectors.

  9. Test of universal rise of hadronic total cross sections based on {pi}p, Kp and pp, pp scatterings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishida, Muneyuki; Igi, Keiji [Department of Physics, School of Science and Engineering, Meisei University, Hino, Tokyo 191-8506 (Japan); Theoretical Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2009-05-01

    Recently, there have been several evidences that the hadronic total cross section {sigma}{sub tot} is proportional to Blog{sup 2}s, which is consistent with the Froissart unitarity bound. The COMPETE Collaboration has further assumed {sigma}{sub tot}{approx_equal}Blog{sup 2}(s/s{sub 0})+Z to extend its universal rise with the common values of B and s{sub 0} for all hadronic scatterings to reduce the number of adjustable parameters. It was suggested that the coefficient B was universal in the arguments of the color glass condensate of QCD in recent years. However, there has been no rigorous proof yet based only on QCD. We attempt to investigate the value of B for {pi}{sup {+-}}p, K{sup {+-}}p and pp, pp scatterings, respectively, through the search for the simultaneous best fit to the experimental {sigma}{sub tot} and {rho} ratios at high energies. The {sigma}{sub tot} at the resonance- and intermediate-energy regions has also been exploited as a duality constraint based on the special form of the finite-energy sum rule. We estimate the values of B, s{sub 0}, and Z individually for {pi}{sup {+-}}p, K{sup {+-}}p and pp, pp scatterings without using the universality hypothesis. It turns out that the values of B are mutually consistent within 1 standard deviation. It has to be stressed that we cannot obtain such a definite conclusion without the duality constraint. It is also interesting to note that the values of Z for {pi}p, Kp, and p(p)p approximately satisfy the ratio 2 ratio 2 ratio 3 predicted by the quark model. The obtained value of B for p(p)p is B{sub pp}=0.280{+-}0.015 mb, which predicts {sigma}{sub tot}{sup pp}=108.0{+-}1.9 mb and {rho}{sup pp}=0.131{+-}0.0025 at the LHC energy {radical}(s)=14 TeV.

  10. Fabrication of Message Digest to Authenticate Audio Signals with Alternation of Coefficients of Harmonics in Multi-Stages (MDAC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mondal, Uttam Kr

    2012-01-01

    Providing security to audio songs for maintaining its intellectual property right (IPR) is one of chanllenging fields in commercial world especially in creative industry. In this paper, an effective approach has been incorporated to fabricate authentication of audio song through application of message digest method with alternation of coefficients of harmonics in multi-stages of higher frequency domain without affecting its audible quality. Decomposing constituent frequency components of song signal using Fourier transform with generating secret code via applying message digest followed by alternating coefficients of specific harmonics in multi-stages generates a secret code and this unique code is utilized to detect the originality of the song. A comparative study has been made with similar existing techniques and experimental results are also supported with mathematical formula based on Microsoft WAVE (".wav") stereo sound file.

  11. A refined deflected gradient search program for solving nonlinear maximization problems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Raymond Earl

    1972-01-01

    '!"'6SEI!T STATUS QE SE'"lh'SI" TECH;I[IILiES I5 i3r". ". ' . . b J pr'ob le, ", s . '0 . in I I; hP. I ~ con cinua I ly 5oo!Ping so I 0 Lions . ' ', '. b '': r, oi oi I on, l?rIPr soIOP. 0!"I t'=5'I 3 of goodncs !Io!3erally the object of r ar... ) T ! 1 a is e act ly i'be salrle as (1!1) . F1etcher anoI I'or;, all f6] piesent an 1ri!uct1!re prooi tbat 'lie vcr. toes '. X. are 1! iiear1y 1:Ide;&erident eIaervectors of II g ', ll c;:rr r-c; o. II!e ! !1 . c'er! era, ''ierII 'e " ', iree '', e...

  12. Specimen Catalog, Numbers 2800-6091 (1937-1960) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, William B.

    2012-04-09

    W. B. DAVIS NUMBERS 2800 - 6091 1937 - I960 \\*lQo O / J 3/?}/. '5? S ^y iy 'i. 3/-??,z o.s C2o ., /e.x??.5. tS g ^ g /w j^2&-o/$f*tZ0-?>2$ 2**3 S' 28oV^ 1 8 ? > lget. l&ol? ?$66$ a^lcxto " 1 Gr&$'l:ec/ fi'/yCod?cbe r* f^y/or^chc/s C/J/tot?<*3,

  13. Factors affecting prices of lamb and sheep 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coston, Ocie

    1937-01-01

    &king Points . . VI. The Effects of Change in Prices Upon sheep Population on Farms ~ ~ ~ ~ a ~ ~ ~ a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 84 VIX. The Economic lelations Between Price and D%, 2)nd and ' Upp+ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 58 VXII ~ Ma)or Paotors . .ffeoting..., United -'tatea Department of Agriculture, 1925. pa 877 ~ Ntlltona 55 OTHFR l+AIQcET REcElPT5 10 1955 19RR 19' 1955 1959 1980 1951 195R 1955 1954 1955 FIQUB-' lo TfK iiNNU~L NUNN'2t Ot' . ". KKKP MMKETKD IN NINE ?C, ZOR MARK:;P, ' AND TOT J...

  14. Evolution equation for soft physics at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Brogueira; J. Dias de Deus

    2010-05-20

    Based on the non-linear logistic equation we study, in a qualitative and semi-quantitative way, the evolution with energy and saturation of the elastic differential cross-section in $pp(\\bar{p}p)$ collisions at high energy. Geometrical scaling occurs at the black disk limit, and scaling develops first for small values of the scaling variable $|t|\\sigma_{tot.}$. Our prediction for $d \\sigma / \\ d t$ at LHC, with two zeros and a minimum at large $|t|$ differs, as far as we know, from all existing ones.

  15. Responses of bitterweed (Hymenoxys odorata) to 2, 4-D in relation to soil moisture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sultemeier, George Wayne

    1961-01-01

    aawesas of sasssssso {smwoas oaeam) VO 2y~ ZS lSLATIQl XO SOKL COOTIES Sabaltted to tha Oraduate Sohool of the 4@Caaltaral ead Xacdeeloal Collage of Teaaa ia Partial falflllaeat of tha ragyalreaeata for the degree of kgeaty 1961 acawaeea... eed aeweecriya pwyeratkoae 0~4 ls gltm 0o Qe teaeheea 1a Star11aa llaeAt tot yereiLeekoa to eetehLieh research @Late m their reaohee ead to Sr. Soaa14 L? Saee aad Ori Leo Si MerrA11 for eooyeratioa eith reeoaroh oa the %eeoc AgrLeaLtaral Seyeriaeet...

  16. In Search of the f0 (or "sigma") Meson: New data on pi0 pi0 Production by pi- and K- on Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. K. Nefkens; S. Prakhov; A. Starostin

    2002-02-11

    We present preliminary results on the cross sections and Dalitz-plot densities for the process pi- p -> pi0 pi0 n from threshold to p(pi)=750 MeV/c as well as for K- p -> pi0 pi0 Lambda and K- p -> pi0 pi0 Sigma0 at p(K)=520 to 750 MeV/c. We have found that sigma(tot)(pi- p -> pi0 pi0 n) ~= 2sigma(tot)(K- p -> pi0 pi0 Lambda). The pi0 pi0 n Dalitz plots are very nonuniform, expecially for the higher p(pi), with a high concentration of events on an "island" around m(pi n) ~= 1.2 GeV and Gamma ~= 0.1 GeV peaking at high pi0 pi0 invariant mass. This is indicative of the dominant role of the Delta0(1234)(3/2^+) resonance in the final state. The pi0 pi0 Lambda Dalitz plots are strikingly similar to the ones for pi0 pi0 n except that the island is concentrated at m(pi Lambda) ~= 1.38 GeV and has a narrower width, Gamma ~= 0.05 GeV. This indicates the dominant role of the Sigma0(1385)(3/2+) resonance. The similarity in the Dalitz plots and the proportionality of the total cross sections are an impressive testimony of the applicability of broken SU(3) flavor symmetry to reaction dynamics. We have measured sigma(tot)(K- p -> pi0 pi0 Lambda) ~= 6sigma(tot)(K- p -> pi0 pi0 Sigma0) and observed that the Dalitz plots for these processes are very different. The Dalitz plots for pi0 pi0 Sigma0 show some enhancement at low pi0 pi0 invariant mass, and there is good indication for the Lambda(1405) intermediate state but there is no island; at the highest p(K), there is some evidence for the Lambda(1520) intermediate state. The above features of pi0 pi0 production by pi- and K- can all be understood if f0 production is small.

  17. Energy-dependent dipole form factor in a QCD-inspired model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahia, C A S; Luna, E G S

    2015-01-01

    We consider the effect of an energy-dependent dipole form factor in the high-energy behavior of the forward amplitude. The connection between the semihard parton-level dynamics and the hadron-hadron scattering is established by an eikonal QCD-based model. Our results for the proton-proton ($pp$) and antiproton-proton ($\\bar{p}p$) total cross sections, $\\sigma_{tot}^{pp,\\bar{p}p}(s)$, obtained using the CTEQ6L1 parton distribution function, are consistent with the recent data from the TOTEM experiment.

  18. Ener t Global SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of theClimateElgin,Wind UK Jump to:Rotors Jump to:t Global

  19. Ener1 Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of theClimateElgin,Wind UK Jump to:Rotors Jump to:t

  20. Relativistic electrons and magnetic fields of the M87 jet on the ?10 Schwarzschild radii scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kino, M.; Takahara, F.; Hada, K.; Doi, A.

    2014-05-01

    We explore energy densities of the magnetic fields and relativistic electrons in the M87 jet. Since the radio core at the jet base is identical to the optically thick surface against synchrotron self-absorption (SSA), the observing frequency is identical to the SSA turnover frequency. As a first step, we assume the radio core has a simple uniform sphere geometry. Using the observed angular size of the radio core measured by the Very Long Baseline Array at 43 GHz, we estimate the energy densities of magnetic fields (U{sub B} ) and relativistic electrons (U{sub e} ) on the basis of the standard SSA formula. Imposing the condition that the Poynting power and kinetic power of relativistic electrons should be smaller than the total power of the jet, we find that (1) the allowed range of the magnetic field strength (B {sub tot}) is 1 G ? B {sub tot} ? 15 G and that (2) 1 × 10{sup –5} ? U{sub e} /U{sub B} ? 6 × 10{sup 2} holds. The uncertainty of U{sub e} /U{sub B} comes from the strong dependence on the angular size of the radio core and the minimum Lorentz factor of non-thermal electrons (? {sub e,min}) in the core. It is still unsettled whether resultant energetics are consistent with either the magnetohydrodynamic jet or the kinetic power dominated jet even on the ?10 Schwarzschild radii scale.

  1. Accuracy of the centrifugal sudden approximation in the H + CHD{sub 3} ? H{sub 2} + CD{sub 3} reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Chen, Jun; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.

    2014-06-14

    The initial state selected time-dependent wave packet method has been extended to calculate the coupled-channel reaction probabilities with total angular momentum J{sub tot} > 0 for the title reaction with seven degrees of freedom included. Fully converged integral cross sections were obtained for the ground and a number of vibrational excited initial states on a new potential energy surface recently constructed by this group using neural network fitting. As found from a previous study with the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation, all these initial vibrational excitations investigated in this study enhance the reactivity considerably at a given collision energy, in particular the CH stretch excited state. The energy initially deposited in CH stretch motion is more effective than translational energy on promoting the reaction in the entire energy region, while for CH bending or CD{sub 3} umbrella excitations only at the high collision energy the vibrational energy becomes more effective. Our calculations also revealed that the accuracy of the CS approximation considerably deteriorates with the increase of J{sub tot}, in particular on the threshold energy. The CS approximation underestimates the integral cross sections for all these initial states, albeit not very severely. In general, it works better at high collision energies and for vibrationally excited initial states, with the increase of integral cross section.

  2. Simulations of fast ion wall loads in ASDEX Upgrade in the presence of magnetic perturbations due to ELM mitigation coils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asunta, Otto; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Koskela, Tuomas; Sipilä, Seppo; Snicker, Antti; Garcia-Muñoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The effect of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) ELM mitigation coils on fast ion wall loads was studied with the fast particle following Monte Carlo code ASCOT. Neutral beam injected (NBI) particles were simulated in two AUG discharges both in the presence and in the absence of the magnetic field perturbation induced by the eight newly installed in-vessel coils. In one of the discharges (#26476) beams were applied individually, making it a useful basis for investigating the effect of the coils on different beams. However, no ELM mitigation was observed in #26476, probably due to the low plasma density. Therefore, another discharge (#26895) demonstrating clear ELM mitigation was also studied. The magnetic perturbation due to the in-vessel coils has a significant effect on the fast particle confinement, but only when total magnetic field, $B_{tot}$, is low. When $B_{tot}$ was high, the perturbation did not increase the losses, but merely resulted in redistribution of the wall power loads. Hence, it seems to be possible to ac...

  3. Small scatter and nearly-isothermal mass profiles to four half-light radii from two-dimensional stellar dynamics of early-type galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappellari, Michele; Brodie, Jean P; Forbes, Duncan A; Strader, Jay; Foster, Caroline; Kartha, Sreeja S; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Spitler, Lee R; Usher, Christopher; Arnold, Jacob A

    2015-01-01

    We study the total mass-density profile for a sample of 14 fast-rotator early-type galaxies (stellar masses $10.2light radii $R_e$ (or 10 kpc), and a maximum radius of 2.0-6.2 $R_e$ (or 4-21 kpc). We use axisymmetric dynamical models based on the Jeans equations, which allow for a spatially varying anisotropy, and employ quite general profiles for the dark halos, and in particular do not place any restriction on the profile slope. This is made possible by the availability of spatially extended two-dimensional kinematics. We find that our relatively simple models provide a remarkably good description of the observed kinematics. The resulting total density profiles are well described by a nearly-isothermal power law $\\rho_{\\rm tot}(r)\\propto r^{-\\gamma}$ from $R_e$/10 to at least 4$R_e$, the largest average deviatio...

  4. Wartime problems of financial statements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodgers, Claude Wayman

    1943-01-01

    %~ tot Xn ths case of costylne-fXxe8-fee cemtxecta table paasea to th? grnrsmaecA pxCox thsreto ang the cmda~&e eight to yetkeL ~ beooaea accoagt~ %4Xe 5. t Rs yenateeQke to aecme the fee ea kt of aeykethm The ~es of cotp01%te XLxlsllcD@ blpoftb Ac...'chewer. on the accsxeey of tub uerxxxCm Sa @mage has bsm ingLictuC on the yxuyedIrr euC Xusuzxrucs o1atus spy hare beau %loca the ulttxrats outuurxs of ehiuh is uuu~? Xn syits of aQ. these difficrxLttus enC uucsutsRaties+ ftuuuuiiL atatexouts xxxat ba yseLrsxerL sn...

  5. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1994-01-29

    This was the ninth quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) continued processing the seismic data, (2) collected additional logs to aid in the interpretation, and (3)began modeling some of the P-wave amplitude anomalies that we see in the data. The study area is located at the southern end of the powder river Basin in Converse county in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both has and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due tot he low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara; a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier, a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contract with it by an unconformity.

  6. Saturation in diffractive deep inelastic eA scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Kugeratski; V. P. Goncalves; F. S. Navarra

    2006-02-24

    In this paper we investigate the saturation physics in diffractive deep inelastic electron-ion scattering. We estimate the energy and nuclear dependence of the ratio $\\sigma^{diff}/\\sigma^{tot}$ and predict the $x_{\\pom}$ and $\\beta$ behavior of the nuclear diffractive structure function $F_{2,A}^{D(3)}(Q^2, \\beta, x_{IP})$. Moreover, we analyze the ratio $R^{diff}_{A1,A2}(Q^2, \\beta, x_{IP}) = F_{2,A1} ^{D(3)}/F_{2,A2} ^{D(3)}$, which probes the nuclear dependence of the structure of the Pomeron. We show that saturation physics predicts that approximately 37 % of the events observed at eRHIC should be diffractive.

  7. A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B M; Prakhov, S; Aguar-Bartolom??, P; Annand, J R; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Bergh??user, H; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Danilkin, I V; Denig, A; Demissie, B; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Fix, A; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; K??ser, A; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A; Kruglov, S; Krusche, B; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J; Maghrbi, Y; Mancel, J; Manley, D M; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Mushkarenkov, A; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Oberle, M; Ortega, H; Ostrick, M; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, T; Suarez, I M; Supek, I; Tarbert, C M; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L

    2014-08-01

    A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

  8. A Tale of Two Timescales: Mixing, Mass Generation, and Phase Transitions in the Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dienes, Keith R; Thomas, Brooks

    2015-01-01

    Light scalar fields such as axions and string moduli can play an important role in early-universe cosmology. However, many factors can significantly impact their late-time cosmological abundances. For example, in cases where the potentials for these fields are generated dynamically --- such as during cosmological mass-generating phase transitions --- the duration of the time interval required for these potentials to fully develop can have significant repercussions. Likewise, in scenarios with multiple scalars, mixing amongst the fields can also give rise to an effective timescale that modifies the resulting late-time abundances. Previous studies have focused on the effects of either the first or the second timescale in isolation. In this paper, by contrast, we examine the new features that arise from the interplay between these two timescales when both mixing and time-dependent phase transitions are introduced together. First, we find that the effects of these timescales can conspire to alter not only the tot...

  9. Income tax treatment of real estate and security transactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnham, William Jesse

    1952-01-01

    ~fir wed 17~~ ('~5) "". ". 8+ C ~ tact;on 117(, , ) (;) t lT'riu . 4 T ~ C ~ 43 ~ capita% gaicaa acai Xeeeee eeye eaaeae4 as' eill ayyig te @came begiaalctc afbe %Rebec 85, X~, l ~ eca~akoa ef the aea attest-C?m capital Naia ee lese ia tW eaae ae i4 eae.... :5 of ~~3:. '. ) of %ho lan, =. ;tm a e~pitel . Mitre ap8 looa68 ia +~a+oA into accelnC ~ c. ~ . : 6r '"Bolts p i ft'3D /+oat ii oo". ? ie 'illa'@:~3 to ":-'~' of tn? ~~em~~ of t&~ s~t lan. , ?&ra i-, . ital p~etn ovot t~~o m;t sn~r t-tots cs...

  10. Natural Daylighting - An Energy Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrell, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    humid summer air is reduced. In winter, AS stated, thearchitectwascharged thep~~~iblel~~~~fheatthr~~ghe~fil- with designing a facility with two iden- tration is reduced by eliminatijlg the tical towers. To improve the constructs- large amount... AASSH-R A Fi--l ~oad 9-779 ~alcul -,-- - -- ation --- ------ MU LWD m LORD TOT& LWD --------- --------- --- JH 67,134,003 -2,787,923 69,921,926 FEB M, 161,188 -1,583,624 65,744,812 WIR 76,496,995 -648,647 77,195,642 R 80,936,670 -2,400 80...

  11. A primary rhetoric of discovery: the use of classification as a method for conceiving composition theses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Barbara Taylor

    1970-01-01

    and content by: r o o ee) em er spar en ABST1V. GT -" r' Lerv ++e ' or . c of Dl cove T11e i' so G. Gss37 lcsi . ' OIl Bs -" . I'ie allo(2 ' o ' ori . '! 'vj o~ Comp;osltion. Theses. j jammer f lo70) 3arb-ra T;-y" or ~lord, i. A. ?"he U'size: s1...';'. lg I. ' ' ILI)L & . "" . "L ! ' i-j S I I'' uc ~ ''le ' ':; 'tot'1 iIl '::. . lc 1- . . ' Ci ' III eI ' ' ' j "':0 I. 'SU classi. "ication skills for constructing those rel. . tion- chips himself, and then j2) i;o consider them as possible...

  12. The electronic structure of angular polyphenes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Lindsay Flynt

    1967-01-01

    ! . ,nd ti =. Deleh prcvi&1ei f&?s. oinl ec&pp!ort lb. t! e foes& o!. a feli::"!!&. ;&:. T: & 1 ata pret . . sin" Den'er, Texas A&:. ' Dr ivc!!!i&y, p!cvi '. . . co&tputttiun sc!--;. 1&!e ~ . $(cs 1, a! 't u'&! 1! 1 & ty!'. d h' th 1 f' '&' e t...! ' [ idio ye&rabies o. . t'!e author. She ale&, tot p1&&tcd h:r ov; 'dv"!. deora& bco"r!n. car d f & t?!ree won!' "; 1 & itt'e -" 1& ' c e!!v '- . , :u!t doris. the au! Loc's res ar n and st& d. "; ti;itl -' . T. !! a!&d& ) on & Lyu pa . I. v TAB1E GE...

  13. Characteristics of the positive ion source at reduced gas feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, S. K. Bharathi, P.; Prahlad, V.; Patel, P. J.; Choksi, B.; Jana, M. R.; Bansal, L. K.; Qureshi, K.; Sumod, C. B.; Vadher, V.; Thakkar, D.; Gupta, L. N.; Rambabu, S.; Parmar, S.; Contractor, N.; Sahu, A. K.; Pandya, B.; Sridhar, B.; Pandya, S.; Baruah, U. K.

    2014-11-15

    The neutral beam injector of steady state superconducting tokamak (SST1-NBI) at IPR is designed for injecting upto 1.7 MW of neutral beam (Hº, 30–55 keV) power to the tokamak plasma for heating and current drive. Operations of the positive ion source (PINI or Plug-In-Neutral-Injector) of SST1-NBI were carried out on the NBI test stand. The PINI was operated at reduced gas feed rate of 2–3 Torr l/s, without using the high speed cryo pumps. Experiments were conducted to achieve a stable beam extraction by optimizing operational parameters namely, the arc current (120–300 A), acceleration voltage (16–40 kV), and a suitable control sequence. The beam divergence, power density profiles, and species fractions (H{sup +}:H{sub 2}{sup +}:H{sub 3}{sup +}) were measured by using the diagnostics such as thermal calorimetry, infrared thermography, and Doppler shift spectroscopy. The maximum extracted beam current was about 18 A. A further increase of beam current was found to be limited by the amount of gas feed rate to the ion source.

  14. Intern experience at Phillips Petroleum Company: an internship report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Craig Douglas, 1956-

    2013-03-13

    L7Psrpl7Pv bjL7 ?kv,7iI Lsrf7L rfsi spLI N7 mjbbPp7A r? OpipOpd7 rf7 iprL?,7i ApPjrp?i pi rf7 bL?C7mm ,sm mrL7sO. 'spirspipi, C?irL?PP7A C?ONjmrp?i pi rf7 L7r?Lr .N7A pi si ?kv,7iRfvAL?,7i OpkrjL7 m77O7A LpmTv sr N7mr siA rf7 0N?ONRPpT70 isrjL7 ?c...ipC ?brp?i x?jPA PpT7Pv N7 Cf?m7i ?l7L rf7 /qw jipr Aj7 r? prm P?x7L ?b7Lsrpi, C?mrm siA fp,f7L 41 bjLprv bL?AjCrm FnSD lm. n-D bjLprv ui 4. af7 nSD bjLprv xsm rf7L7c?L7 m7P7Cr7A c?L rf7 L7OspiA7L ?c rfpm mrjAv. :pl7i rfsr rf7 C?ONjmr?L pm C...

  15. How to Measure Specific Heat Using Event-by-Event Average $p_T$ Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Tannenbaum; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2005-12-01

    A simple way to visualize event-by-event average $p_T$ fluctuations is by assuming that each collision has a different temperature parameter (inverse $p_T$ slope) and that the ensemble of events has a temperature distribution about the mean, $$, with standard deviation $\\sigma_T$. PHENIX characterizes the non-random fluctuation of $M_{p_T}$, the event-by-event average $p_T$, by $F_{p_T}$, the fractional difference of the standard deviation of the data from that of a random sample obtained with mixed events. This can be related to the temperature fluctuation: \\[ F_{p_T}=\\sigma^{\\rm data}_{M_{p_T}}/\\sigma^{\\rm random}_{M_{p_T}}-1\\simeq( -1) \\sigma^2_{T}/^2 \\] Combining this with the Gavai, {\\it et al.},\\cite{Gavai05} and Korus, {\\it et al.},\\cite{Korus} definitions of the specific heat per particle, a simple relationship is obtained: \\[ c_v/T^3={\\mean{n}\\over \\mean{N_{tot}}} {1\\over F_{p_T}} \\] $F_{p_T}$ is measured with a fraction $\\mean{n}/\\mean{N_{tot}}$ of the total particles produced, a purely geometrical factor representing the fractional acceptance, $\\sim 1/33$ in PHENIX. Gavai, {\\it et al.} predict that $c_v/T^3=15$, which corresponds to $F_{p_T}\\sim 0.20$% in PHENIX, which may be accessible by measurements of $M_{p_T}$ in the range $0.2\\leq p_T\\leq 0.6$ GeV/c. In order to test the Gavai, {\\it et al.} prediction that $c_v/T^3$ is reduced in a QGP compared to the ideal gas value (15 compared to 21), precision measurements of $F_{p_T}$ in the range 0.20% for $0.2\\leq p_T\\leq 0.6$ GeV/c may be practical.

  16. THE KINEMATICS OF THE LOCAL GROUP IN A COSMOLOGICAL CONTEXT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forero-Romero, J. E.; Hoffman, Y.; Bustamante, S.; Gottloeber, S.; Yepes, G.

    2013-04-10

    Recent observations constrained the tangential velocity of M31 with respect to the Milky Way to be v{sub M31,tan} < 34.4 km s{sup -1}and the radial velocity to be in the range v{sub M31,rad} = -109 {+-} 4.4 km s{sup -1}. In this study we use a large volume high-resolution N-body cosmological simulation (Bolshoi) together with three constrained simulations to statistically study this kinematics in the context of the {Lambda} cold dark matter ({Lambda}CDM). The comparison of the ensembles of simulated pairs with the observed Local Group (LG) at the 1{sigma} level in the uncertainties has been done with respect to the radial and tangential velocities, the reduced orbital energy (e{sub tot}), angular momentum (l{sub orb}), and the dimensionless spin parameter, {lambda}. Our main results are (1) the preferred radial and tangential velocities for pairs in {Lambda}CDM are v{sub r} = -80 {+-} 20 km s{sup -1} and v{sub t} = 50 {+-} 10 km s{sup -1}, (2) pairs around that region are 3-13 times more common than pairs within the observational values, (3) 15%-24% of LG-like pairs in {Lambda}CDM have energy and angular momentum consistent with observations, while (4) 9%-13% of pairs in the same sample show similar values in the inferred dimensionless spin parameter. It follows that within current observational uncertainties the quasi-conserved quantities that characterize the orbit of the LG, i.e., e{sub tot}, l{sub orb}, and {lambda}, do not challenge the standard {Lambda}CDM model, but the model is in tension with regard to the actual values of the radial and tangential velocities. This might hint to a problem of the {Lambda}CDM model to reproduce the observed LG.

  17. DISCOVERY OF A STRONG LENSING GALAXY EMBEDDED IN A CLUSTER AT z = 1.62

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Suyu, Sherry H.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Papovich, Casey J.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Brodwin, Mark; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Rudnick, Gregory H.; Halkola, Aleksi

    2014-07-10

    We identify a strong lensing galaxy in the cluster IRC 0218 (also known as XMM-LSS J02182–05102) that is spectroscopically confirmed to be at z = 1.62, making it the highest-redshift strong lens galaxy known. The lens is one of the two brightest cluster galaxies and lenses a background source galaxy into an arc and a counterimage. With Hubble Space Telescope (HST) grism and Keck/LRIS spectroscopy, we measure the source redshift to be z {sub S} = 2.26. Using HST imaging in ACS/F475W, ACS/F814W, WFC3/F125W, and WFC3/F160W, we model the lens mass distribution with an elliptical power-law profile and account for the effects of the cluster halo and nearby galaxies. The Einstein radius is ?{sub E}=0.38{sub ?0.01}{sup +0.02} arcsec (3.2{sub ?0.1}{sup +0.2} kpc) and the total enclosed mass is M {sub tot}(tot}=2.1{sub ?0.3}{sup +0.4}. The source has at least one bright compact region offset from the source center. Emission from Ly? and [O III] are likely to probe different regions in the source.

  18. DWPF SIMULANT CPC STUDIES FOR SB7B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.

    2011-11-01

    Lab-scale DWPF simulations of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) processing were performed. Testing was performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory - Aiken County Technology Laboratory (SRNL-ACTL). The primary goal of the simulations was to define a likely operating window for acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). In addition, the testing established conditions for the SRNL Shielded Cells qualification simulation of SB7b-Tank 40 blend, supported validation of the current glass redox model, and validated the coupled process flowsheet at the nominal acid stoichiometry. An acid window of 105-140% by the Koopman minimum acid (KMA) equation (107-142% DWPF Hsu equation) worked for the sludge-only flowsheet. Nitrite was present in the SRAT product for the 105% KMA run at 366 mg/kg, while SME cycle hydrogen reached 94% of the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle limit in the 140% KMA run. The window was determined for sludge with added caustic (0.28M additional base, or roughly 12,000 gallons 50% NaOH to 820,000 gallons waste slurry). A suitable processing window appears to be 107-130% DWPF acid equation for sludge-only processing allowing some conservatism for the mapping of lab-scale simulant data to full-scale real waste processing including potentially non-conservative noble metal and mercury concentrations. This window should be usable with or without the addition of up to 7,000 gallons of caustic to the batch. The window could potentially be wider if caustic is not added to SB7b. It is recommended that DWPF begin processing SB7b at 115% stoichiometry using the current DWPF equation. The factor could be increased if necessary, but changes should be made with caution and in small increments. DWPF should not concentrate past 48 wt.% total solids in the SME cycle if moderate hydrogen generation is occurring simultaneously. The coupled flowsheet simulation made more hydrogen in the SRAT and SME cycles than the sludge-only run with the same acid stoichiometric factor. The slow acid addition in MCU seemed to alter the reactions that consumed the small excess acid present such that hydrogen generation was promoted relative to sludge-only processing. The coupled test reached higher wt.% total solids, and this likely contributed to the SME cycle hydrogen limit being exceeded at 110% KMA. It is clear from the trends in the SME processing GC data, however, that the frit slurry formic acid contributed to driving the hydrogen generation rate above the SME cycle limit. Hydrogen generation rates after the second frit addition generally exceeded those after the first frit addition. SRAT formate loss increased with increasing acid stoichiometry (15% to 35%). A substantial nitrate gain which was observed to have occurred after acid addition (and nitrite destruction) was reversed to a net nitrate loss in runs with higher acid stoichiometry (nitrate in SRAT product less than sum of sludge nitrate and added nitric acid). Increased ammonium ion formation was also indicated in the runs with nitrate loss. Oxalate loss on the order 20% was indicated in three of the four acid stoichiometry runs and in the coupled flowsheet run. The minimum acid stoichiometry run had no indicated loss. The losses were of the same order as the official analytical uncertainty of the oxalate concentration measurement, but were not randomly distributed about zero loss, so some actual loss was likely occurring. Based on the entire set of SB7b test data, it is recommended that DWPF avoid concentrating additional sludge solids in single SRAT batches to limit the concentrations of noble metals to SB7a processing levels (on a grams noble metal per SRAT batch basis). It is also recommended that DWPF drop the formic acid addition that accompanies the process frit 418 additions, since SME cycle data showed considerable catalytic activity for hydrogen generation from this additional acid (about 5% increase in stoichiometry occurred from the frit formic acid). Frit 418 also does not appear to need formic acid addition to prevent gel formation in

  19. Superdiffusive Transport and Energy Localization in Disordered Granular Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro J. Martínez; P. G. Kevrekidis; Mason A. Porter

    2015-09-11

    We study the spreading of initially localized excitations in 1D disordered granular crystals. We thereby investigate localization phenomena in strongly nonlinear systems, which we demonstrate to be fundamentally different from localization in linear and weakly nonlinear systems. We compare wave dynamics in chains with 3 different types of disorder: an uncorrelated (Anderson-like) disorder and 2 types of correlated disorders (random dimer arrangements), and for 2 types of initial conditions: displacement excitations and velocity excitations. For strongly precompressed chains, the dynamics depend strongly on the initial condition. For displacement excitations, the long-time behavior of the second moment $\\tilde{m}_2$ has oscillations that depend on the type of disorder, with a complex trend that differs markedly from a power law and which is particularly evident for an Anderson disorder. For velocity excitations, we find a scaling $\\tilde{m}_2\\sim t^{\\gamma}$ (for a constant $\\gamma$) for all 3 types of disorder. For weakly precompressed (strongly nonlinear) chains, $\\tilde{m}_2$ and the inverse participation ratio $P^{-1}$ satisfy $\\tilde{m}_2\\sim t^{\\gamma}$ and $P^{-1}\\sim t^{-\\eta}$, and the dynamics is superdiffusive for all examined cases. When precompression is strong, the IPR decreases slowly for all 3 types of disorder, and we observe a partial localization around the core and the leading edge of the wave. For an Anderson disorder, displacement perturbations lead to localization of energy primarily in the core, and velocity perturbations cause the energy to be divided between the core and the leading edge. This localization phenomenon does not occur in the sonic-vacuum regime, which yields the surprising result that the energy is no longer contained in strongly nonlinear waves but instead is spread across many sites. In this regime, the exponents are very similar in all cases.

  20. RF-Plasma Source Commissioning in Indian Negative Ion Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Yadava, Ratnakar; Chakraborty, A. K. [ITER- India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, Sector 25, GIDC, Gandhinagar, Gujrat (India); Bansal, G.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujrat (India); Kraus, W.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Obermayer, S.; Martens, C.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-09-26

    The Indian program of the RF based negative ion source has started off with the commissioning of ROBIN, the inductively coupled RF based negative ion source facility under establishment at Institute for Plasma research (IPR), India. The facility is being developed under a technology transfer agreement with IPP Garching. It consists of a single RF driver based beam source (BATMAN replica) coupled to a 100 kW, 1 MHz RF generator with a self excited oscillator, through a matching network, for plasma production and ion extraction and acceleration. The delivery of the RF generator and the RF plasma source without the accelerator, has enabled initiation of plasma production experiments. The recent experimental campaign has established the matching circuit parameters that result in plasma production with density in the range of 0.5-1x10{sup 18}/m{sup 3}, at operational gas pressures ranging between 0.4-1 Pa. Various configurations of the matching network have been experimented upon to obtain a stable operation of the set up for RF powers ranging between 25-85 kW and pulse lengths ranging between 4-20 s. It has been observed that the range of the parameters of the matching circuit, over which the frequency of the power supply is stable, is narrow and further experiments with increased number of turns in the coil are in the pipeline to see if the range can be widened. In this paper, the description of the experimental system and the commissioning data related to the optimisation of the various parameters of the matching network, to obtain stable plasma of required density, are presented and discussed.

  1. Combined heat recovery and dry scrubbing for MWCs to meet the new EPA guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finnis, P.J.; Heap, B.M.

    1997-12-01

    Both the UK and US Municipal Waste Combuster (MWC) markets have undergone upgraded regulatory control. In the UK, the government`s Integrated Pollution Control (IPC) regime, enforced by the 1990 Environmental Protection Act (EPA) Standard IPR5/3 moved control of emissions of MWCs from local councils to the government Environmental Authority (EA). Existing MWCs had until December 1, 1996 to complete environmental upgrades. Simultaneously, the European Community (EC) was finalizing more stringent legislation to take place in the year 2001. In the US, the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to issue emission guidelines for new and existing facilities. Existing facilities are likely to have only until the end of 1999 to complete upgrades. In North America, Procedair Industries Corp had received contracts from Kvaerner EnviroPower AB, for APC systems of four new Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) fluid bed boilers that incorporated low outlet temperature economizers as part of the original boiler equipment. The Fayetteville, North Carolina facility was designed for 200,000 tpy. What all these facilities have in common is low economizer outlet temperatures of 285{degrees}F coupled with a Total Dry Scrubbing System. MWC or RDF facilities using conventional spray dryer/fabric filter combinations have to have economizer gas outlet temperatures about 430{degrees}F to allow for evaporation of the lime slurry in the spray dryer without the likelihood of wall build up or moisture carry over. Since the Totally Dry Scrubbing System can operate with economizer gas outlet temperatures about 285{degrees}F, the added energy available for sale from adding low outlet temperature economizer heat recovery can be considerable. This paper focuses on Procedair`s new plant and retrofit experience using `Dry Venturi Reactor/Fabric Filter` combinations with the lower inlet temperature operating conditions.

  2. Polymerization of trialkoxysilanes. Effect of the organic substituent on the formation of gels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Baugher, B.M.; Schneider, D.A.

    1998-09-01

    Hydrolysis and condensation of trialkoxysilanes, R-Si(OR{prime}){sub 3}, generally leads to the formation of silsesquioxane oligomers and polymers. These polymers are composed of a monomer repeat unit, [R-SiO{sub 1.5}]{sub n}, with a single silicon atom attached to other repeat units in the polymer through one to three siloxane bonds. The remaining substituent is an organic group attached to the silicon through a silicon-carbon single bond. Silsesquioxanes have been the subject of intensive study in the past and are becoming important again as a vehicle for introducing organic functionalities into hybrid organic-inorganic materials through sol-gel processing. Despite all of this interest, there has not been a systematic study of the ability of trialkoxysilanes to form gels through the sol-gel process. In fact, it has been noted that silsesquioxanes are generally isolated as soluble resins rather than the highly crosslinked network polymers (gels) one would expect from a tri-functional monomer. In this study, the authors have examined the sol-gel chemistry of a variety of trialkoxysilanes with different organic substituents (R = H, Me, Et, n-Pr, i-Pr, n-Bu, i-Bu, t-Bu, n-octadecyl, n-dodecyl, cyclohexyl, vinyl, phenyl, benzyl, phenethyl), with methoxide or ethoxide substituents on silicon, at varying monomer concentrations ranging up to neat monomer, and with different catalysts (HCl, NaOH, formic acid, fluoride). Gels were prepared from tetramethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane at identical concentrations for purposes of comparison.

  3. Noise, sampling, and the number of projections in cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Z.; Gang, G. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the number of projection views on image noise in cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector. Methods: This fairly fundamental consideration in CBCT system design and operation was addressed experimentally (using a phantom presenting a uniform medium as well as statistically motivated “clutter”) and theoretically (using a cascaded systems model describing CBCT noise) to elucidate the contributing factors of quantum noise (?{sub Q}), electronic noise (?{sub E}), and view aliasing (?{sub view}). Analysis included investigation of the noise, noise-power spectrum, and modulation transfer function as a function of the number of projections (N{sub proj}), dose (D{sub tot}), and voxel size (b{sub vox}). Results: The results reveal a nonmonotonic relationship between image noise andN{sub proj} at fixed total dose: for the CBCT system considered, noise decreased with increasing N{sub proj} due to reduction of view sampling effects in the regime N{sub proj} tot}, and b{sub vox}. Conclusions: The work elucidates fairly basic elements of CBCT noise in a manner that demonstrates the role of distinct noise components (viz., quantum, electronic, and view sampling noise). For configurations fairly typical of CBCT with a flat-panel detector (FPD), the analysis reveals a “sweet spot” (i.e., minimum noise) in the rangeN{sub proj} ? 250–350, nearly an order of magnitude lower in N{sub proj} than typical of multidetector CT, owing to the relatively high electronic noise in FPDs. The analysis explicitly relates view aliasing and quantum noise in a manner that includes aspects of the object (“clutter”) and imaging chain (including nonidealities of detector blur and electronic noise) to provide a more rigorous basis for commonly held intuition and heurism in CBCT system design and operation.

  4. THE DUST PROPERTIES OF z {approx} 3 MIPS-LBGs FROM PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, X. L. [School of Physics and Electronics Information, Hubei University of Education, 430205 Wuhan (China); Pipino, A. [Institut fur Astronomie, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Matteucci, F., E-mail: fan@oats.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sezione di Astronomia, Universit a di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-05-10

    The stacked spectral energy distribution (SED) 24 {mu}m Lyman break galaxies (MIPS-LBGs) detected by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) is fitted by means of the spectrophotometric model GRASIL with an ''educated'' fitting approach which benefits from the results of chemical evolution models. The star formation rate-age-metallicity degeneracies of SED modeling are broken by using star formation history (SFH) and chemical enrichment history suggested by chemical models. The dust mass, dust abundance, and chemical pattern of elements locked in the dust component are also directly provided by chemical models. Using our new ''fitting'' approach, we derive the total mass M{sub tot}, stellar mass M{sub *}, gas mass M{sub g} , dust mass M{sub d} , age, and star formation rate (SFR) of the stacked MIPS-LBG in a self-consistent way. Our estimate of M{sub *} = 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} of the stacked MIPS-LBG agrees with other works based on UV-optical SED fitting. We suggest that the MIPS-LBGs at z {approx} 3 are young (0.3-0.6 Gyr), massive (M{sub tot} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }), dusty (M{sub d} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }), and metal-rich (Z {approx} Z{sub Sun }) progenitors of elliptical galaxies undergoing a strong burst of star formation (SFR {approx} 200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). Our estimate of M{sub d} = 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} of the stacked MIPS-LBG is about a factor of eight lower than the estimated value based on single temperature graybody fitting, suggesting that self-consistent SED models are needed to estimate dust mass. By comparing with Milky Way molecular cloud and dust properties, we suggest that denser and dustier environments and flatter dust size distribution are likely in high-redshift massive star-forming galaxies. These dust properties, as well as the different types of SFHs, can cause different SED shapes between high-redshift star-forming ellipticals and local starburst templates. This discrepancy of SED shapes could in turn explain the non-detection at submillimeter wavelengths of IR luminous (L{sub IR} Succeeds-Above-Single-Line-Equals-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }) MIPS-LBGs.

  5. Bounds on Higgs-Portal models from the LHC Higgs data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingman Cheung; P. Ko; Jae Sik Lee; Po-Yan Tseng

    2015-10-14

    In a number of Higgs-portal models, an $SU(2)$ isospin-singlet scalar boson generically appears at the electroweak scale and can mix with the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson with a mixing angle $\\alpha$. This singlet scalar boson can have renormalizable couplings to a pair of dark matter particles, vectorlike leptons or quarks, or new gauge bosons, thereby modifying the Higgs signal strengths in a nontrivial way. In this work, we perform global fits to such models using the most updated LHC Higgs-boson data and discuss the corresponding implications on Higgs-portal-type models. In particular we find that the current LHC Higgs-boson data slightly favors the SM over the Higgs-portal singlet-scalar models, which has to be further examined using the upcoming LHC Higgs-boson data. Finally the Higgs-portal models are constrained as follows: $\\cos\\alpha \\gtrsim 0.86$ and $\\Delta \\Gamma_{\\rm tot} \\lesssim 1.9$ MeV at 95 \\% CL.

  6. Enrichment of the Intracluster Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Thomas

    1998-11-25

    The relevance of galaxies of different luminosity and mass for the chemical enrichment of the intracluster medium (ICM) is analysed. For this purpose, I adopt the composite luminosity function of cluster galaxies from Trentham (1998), which exhibits a significant rise at the very faint end. The model - adopting a universal Salpeter IMF - is calibrated on reproducing the M_Fe/L_tot, M_Fe/M_*, and alpha/Fe ratios observed in clusters. Although the contribution to total luminosity and ICM metals peaks around L* galaxies (M* approx -20), faint objects with M_B>-18 still provide at least 30 per cent of the metals present in the ICM. In consistency with the solar alpha/Fe ratios determined by {ASCA}, the model predicts that 60 per cent of the ICM iron comes from Type Ia supernovae. The predicted slope of the relation between intracluster gas mass and cluster luminosity emerges shallower than the observed one, indicating that the fraction of primordial gas increases with cluster richness.

  7. New insight into $nd\\rightarrow$ $^3H?$ process at thermal energy with pionless effective field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Moeini Arani; H. Nematollahi; N. Mahboubi; S. Bayegan

    2014-06-25

    We take a new look at the neutron radiative capture by a deuteron at thermal energy with the pionless effective field theory (EFT($\\pi\\!\\!\\!/$)) approach. We present in detail the calculation of $nd\\rightarrow$ $^3H\\gamma$ amplitudes for incoming doublet and quartet channels leading to the formation of a triton fully in the projection method based on the cluster-configuration space approach. In the present work, we consider all possible one-body and two-body photon interaction diagrams. In fact, additional diagrams that make significant changes in the results of the calculation of the total cross section in the $nd\\rightarrow$ $^3H\\gamma$ process are included in this study. The properly normalized triton wave function is calculated and taken into consideration. We compare the cross section of the dominant magnetic M1-transition of $nd\\rightarrow$ $^3H\\gamma$ up to next-to-next-to-leading order $\\textrm{N}^2\\textrm{LO}$ with the results of the previous model-dependent theoretical calculations and experimental data. The more acceptable results for cross section $\\sigma^{(2)}_{tot}=0.297\\;(\\textrm{LO})+0.124\\;(\\textrm{NLO})+0.048\\;(\\textrm{N}^2\\textrm{LO})=[0.469\\pm0.033]\\:\\textrm{mb}$ show order by order convergence and cutoff independence. No three-body currents are needed to renormalize observables up to $\\textrm{N}^2\\textrm{LO}$ in this process.

  8. Astrophysical S factor of {$^{12}$C($?,?$)$^{16}$O} Calculated with the Reduced R-matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen-Dong An; Zhen-Peng Chen; Yu-Gang Ma; Jian-Kai Yu; Ye-Ying Sun; Gong-Tao Fan; Yong-Jiang Li; Hang-Hua Xu; Bo-Song Huang; Kan Wang

    2015-09-02

    Determination of the accurate astrophysical S factor of {$^{12}$C($\\alpha,\\gamma$)$^{16}$O} reaction has been regarded as a holy grail of nuclear astrophysics for decades. In current stellar models, a knowledge of that value to better than 10\\% is desirable. Due to the practical issues, tremendous experimental and theoretical efforts over nearly 50 years are not able to reach this goal, and the published values contradicted with each other strongly and their uncertainties are 2 times larger than the required precision. To this end we have developed a Reduced R-matrix Theory, based on the classical R-matrix theory of Lane and Thomas, which treats primary transitions to ground state and four bound states as the independent reaction channels in the channel spin representation. With the coordination of covariance statistics and error propagation theory, a global fitting for almost all available experimental data of $^{16}$O system has been multi-iteratively analyzed by our powerful code. A reliable, accurate and self-consistent astrophysical S factor of {$^{12}$C($\\alpha,\\gamma$)$^{16}$O} was obtained with a recommended value $S_{tot}$ (300) = 162.7 $\\pm$ 7.3 keV b (4.5\\%) which could meet the required precision.

  9. Highly Luminescent Lanthanide Complexes of 1 Hydroxy-2-pyridinones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California, Berkeley; Lawrence National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Moore, Evan G.; Xu, Jide; Jocher, Christoph J.; Castro-Rodriguez, Ingrid; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-11-01

    The synthesis, X-ray structure, stability, and photophysical properties of several trivalent lanthanide complexes formed from two differing bis-bidentate ligands incorporating either alkyl or alkyl ether linkages and featuring the 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO) chelate group in complex with Eu(III), Sm(III) and Gd(III) are reported. The Eu(III) complexes are among some of the best examples, pairing highly efficient emission ({Phi}{sub tot}{sup Eu} {approx} 21.5%) with high stability (pEu {approx} 18.6) in aqueous solution, and are excellent candidates for use in biological assays. A comparison of the observed behavior of the complexes with differing backbone linkages shows remarkable similarities, both in stability and photophysical properties. Low temperature photophysical measurements for a Gd(III) complex were also used to gain insight into the electronic structure, and were found to agree with corresponding TD-DFT calculations for a model complex. A comparison of the high resolution Eu(III) emission spectra in solution and from single crystals also revealed a more symmetric coordination geometry about the metal ion in solution due to dynamic rotation of the observed solid state structure.

  10. Me-3,2-HOPO Complexes of Near Infra-Red (NIR) Emitting Lanthanides: Efficient Sensitization of Yb(III) and Nd(III) in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Evan G.; Xu, Jide; Dodani, Sheel; Jocher, Christoph; D'Aleo, Anthony; Seitz, Michael; Raymond, Kenneth

    2009-11-10

    The synthesis, X-ray structure, solution stability, and photophysical properties of several trivalent lanthanide complexes of Yb(III) and Nd(III) using both tetradentate and octadentate ligand design strategies and incorporating the 1-methyl-3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (Me-3,2-HOPO) chelate group are reported. Both the Yb(III) and Nd(III) complexes have emission bands in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) region, and this luminescence is retained in aqueous solution ({Phi}{sub tot}{sup Yb} {approx} 0.09-0.22%). Furthermore, the complexes demonstrate very high stability (pYb {approx} 18.8-21.9) in aqueous solution, making them good candidates for further development as probes for NIR imaging. Analysis of the low temperature (77 K) photophysical measurements for a model Gd(III) complex were used to gain an insight into the electronic structure, and were found to agree well with corresponding TD-DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G{sup ++}(d,p) level of theory for a simplified model monovalent sodium complex.

  11. The Origin of Superflares on G-Type Dwarf Stars of Various Ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsova, M M

    2015-01-01

    We analyze new observations of superflares on G-stars discovered in the optical and near IR ranges with the Kepler mission. An evolution of solar-type activity is discussed. We give an estimate of the maximal total energy, $E_{tot} = 10^{34}\\;\\mbox{erg}$ of a flare that can occur on the young Sun at its age of 1 Gyr when the cycle was formed. We believe that the main source of the flare optical continuum is a low-temperature condensation forming in the course of the response of the chromosphere to an impulsive heating. For a superflare on the young Sun, we adopt the accelerated electron flux, $F_e (E>\\mbox{20 keV}) = 3 \\times 10^{11} \\: \\mbox{erg} \\; \\mbox{cm}^{-2} \\; \\mbox{s}^{-1}$, that is limited by the return current, and obtain the area of the optical continuum source on a G star, $S \\approx 10^{19} \\:\\mbox{cm}^2$. This value is close to the area of the $H_\\alpha$-ribbons in the largest solar flares, while the area of bright patches of a white-light flare on the contemporary Sun is smaller by about two o...

  12. Standard test method for determination of uranium or plutonium isotopic composition or concentration by the total evaporation method using a thermal ionization mass spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This method describes the determination of the isotopic composition and/or the concentration of uranium and plutonium as nitrate solutions by the thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) total evaporation method. Purified uranium or plutonium nitrate solutions are loaded onto a degassed metal filament and placed in the mass spectrometer. Under computer control, ion currents are generated by heating of the filament(s). The ion beams are continually measured until the sample is exhausted. The measured ion currents are integrated over the course of the run, and normalized to a reference isotope ion current to yield isotopic ratios. 1.2 In principle, the total evaporation method should yield isotopic ratios that do not require mass bias correction. In practice, some samples may require this bias correction. When compared to the conventional TIMS method, the total evaporation method is approximately two times faster, improves precision from two to four fold, and utilizes smaller sample sizes. 1.3 The tot...

  13. A populous intermediate-age open cluster and evidence of an embedded cluster among the FSR globular cluster candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bica, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    We study the nature of the globular cluster (GC) candidates FSR 1603 and FSR 1755 selected from the catalogue of \\citet{FSRcat}. Their properties are investigated with 2MASS field-star decontaminated photometry, which is used to build colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and stellar radial density profiles (RDPs). FSR 1603 has the open cluster (OC) Ruprecht 101 as optical counterpart, and we show it to be a massive intermediate age cluster (IAC). Relevant parameters of FSR 1603 are the age $\\approx1$ Gyr, distance from the Sun $\\ds\\approx2.7$ kpc, Galactocentric distance $\\dgc\\approx6.4$ kpc, core radius $\\rc\\approx1.1$ pc, mass function slope $\\chi\\approx1.8$, observed stellar mass (for stars with mass in the range $\\rm 1.27 \\ms\\leq m\\leq2.03 \\ms$) $\\mObs\\approx500 \\ms$, and a total (extrapolated to $\\rm m=0.08 \\ms$) stellar mass $\\mTot\\approx2300 \\ms$. FSR 1755, on the other hand, is not a populous cluster. It may be a sparse young cluster embedded in the H II region Sh2-3, subject to an absorption $\\aV\\approx...

  14. Comment on ;Valence state of titanium in the Wark?Lovering rim of a Leoville CAI as a record of progressive oxidation in the early Solar Nebula; by K.A. Dyl, J.I. Simon and E.D. Young

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, S.B.; Grossman, L.; Sutton, S.R. (UC)

    2012-05-29

    Dyl et al. (2011) state that their results confirm the conclusion of J. Simon et al. (2005) that the pyroxene in Wark-Lovering rims (Wark and Lovering, 1977) found on Ca-, Al-rich refractory inclusions has lower Ti{sup 3+}/Ti{sup tot} ratios than the primary pyroxene in the interiors of inclusions. While true, the claim is misleading because J. Simon et al. (2005) concluded that there was no Ti{sup 3+} in the rims, whereas Dyl et al. (2011) found Ti{sup 3+} in 41 of 42 new rim analyses. In addition, J. Simon et al. (2005) concluded that rims formed under much more oxidizing conditions, log fO{sub 2} {ge} IW-1, or {ge} 6-7 log units higher, than inclusion interiors. The conclusions of J. Simon et al. (2005) were disputed by S. Simon et al. (2007) and are not supported by the new data of Dyl et al. (2011). The present work is intended for clarification of this and other issues.

  15. Neutron spectrometry-An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ashabranner, R.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carpenter, A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Doeppner, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Friedrich, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2012-10-15

    DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}), and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the complementarity required for reliable measurements of Y{sub n}, T{sub i}, and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined through the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) Multiplication-Sign dsr{sub 10-12MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation, and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration of the as-built spectrometers, which are now performing to the required accuracy. Recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental ignition threshold factor (ITFx), which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

  16. BARYON LOADING OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS MEDIATED BY NEUTRONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toma, K.; Takahara, F.

    2012-08-01

    Plasmas of geometrically thick, black hole (BH) accretion flows in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are generally collisionless for protons, and involve magnetic field turbulence. Under such conditions a fraction of protons can be accelerated stochastically and create relativistic neutrons via nuclear collisions. These neutrons can freely escape from the accretion flow and decay into protons in the dilute polar region above the rotating BH to form relativistic jets. We calculate geometric efficiencies of the neutron energy and mass injections into the polar region, and show that this process can deposit luminosity as high as L{sub j}{approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M-dot c{sup 2} and mass loading M-dot{sub j}{approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M-dot for the case of the BH mass M {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate. The terminal Lorentz factors of the jets are {Gamma} {approx} 3, and they may explain the AGN jets having low luminosities. For higher luminosity jets, which can be produced by additional energy inputs such as Poynting flux, the neutron decay still can be a dominant mass loading process, leading to, e.g., {Gamma} {approx} 50 for L{sub j,tot}{approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M-dot c{sup 2}.

  17. Testing a model of variability of X-ray reprocessing features in Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. T. Zycki; A. Rozanska

    2001-02-13

    A number of recent results from X-ray observations of Active Galactic Nuclei involving the Fe K alpha line (reduction of line variability compared to the X-ray continuum variability, the X-ray ``Baldwin effect'') were attributed to a presence of a hot, ionized skin of an accretion disc, suppressing emission of the line. The ionized skin appears as a result of the thermal instability of X-ray irradiated plasma. We test this hypothesis by computing the Thomson thickness of the hot skin on top of the 'alpha P_tot' Shakura-Sunyaev disc, by simultaneously solving the vertical structure of both the hot skin and the disc. We then compute a number of relations between observable quantities, e.g. the hard X-ray flux, amplitude of the observed reprocessed component, relativistic smearing of the K alpha line, the r.m.s. variability of the hard X-rays. These relations can be compared to present and future observations. We point out that this mechanism is unlikely to explain the behaviour of the X-ray source in MCG-6-30-15, where there is a number of arguments against the existence of a thick hot skin, but it can work for some other Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  18. A Historical Evaluation of the U15 Complex, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drollinger, Harold; Holz, Barbara A; Bullard, Thomas F; Goldenberg, Nancy G; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2014-01-09

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U15 Complex on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Three underground nuclear tests and two underground nuclear fuel storage experiments were conducted at the complex. The nuclear tests were Hard Hat in 1962, Tiny Tot in 1965, and Pile Driver in 1966. The Hard Hat and Pile Driver nuclear tests involved different types of experiment sections in test drifts at various distances from the explosion in order to determine which sections could best survive in order to design underground command centers. The Tiny Tot nuclear test involved an underground cavity in which the nuclear test was executed. It also provided data in designing underground structures and facilities to withstand a nuclear attack. The underground nuclear fuel storage experiments were Heater Test 1 from 1977 to 1978 and Spent Fuel Test - Climax from 1978 to 1985. Heater Test 1 was used to design the later Spent Fuel Test - Climax experiment. The latter experiment was a model of a larger underground storage facility and primarily involved recording the conditions of the spent fuel and the surrounding granite medium. Fieldwork was performed intermittently in the summers of 2011 and 2013, totaling 17 days. Access to the underground tunnel complex is sealed and unavailable. Restricted to the surface, four buildings, four structures, and 92 features associated with nuclear testing and fuel storage experiment activities at the U15 Complex have been recorded. Most of these are along the west side of the complex and next to the primary access road and are characteristic of an industrial mining site, albeit one with scientific interests. The geomorphological fieldwork was conducted over three days in the summer of 2011. It was discovered that major modifications to the terrain have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to the tests and experiments, and construction of drill pads and retention ponds. Six large trenches for exploring across the Boundary geologic fault are also present. The U15 Complex, designated historic district 143 and site 26NY15177, is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under Criteria A, C, and D of 36 CFR Part 60.4. As a historic district and archaeological site eligible to the National Register of Historic Places, the Desert Research Institute recommends that the area defined for the U15 Complex, historic district 143 and site 26NY15117, be left in place in its current condition. The U15 Complex should also be included in the NNSS cultural resources monitoring program and monitored for disturbances or alterations.

  19. In situ dehydration behavior of zeolite-like pentagonite: A single-crystal X-ray study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danisi, Rosa Micaela; Armbruster, Thomas; Lazic, Biljana

    2013-01-15

    The structural modifications upon heating of pentagonite, Ca(VO)(Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}){center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (space group Ccm2{sub 1}, a=10.3708(2), b=14.0643(2), c=8.97810(10) A, V=1309.53(3) A{sup 3}) were investigated by in situ temperature dependent single-crystal X-ray structure refinements. Diffraction data of a sample from Poona district (India) have been measured in steps of 25 up to 250 Degree-Sign C and in steps of 50 Degree-Sign C between 250 and 400 Degree-Sign C. Pentagonite has a porous framework structure made up by layers of silicate tetrahedra connected by V{sup 4+}O{sub 5} square pyramids. Ca and H{sub 2}O molecules are extraframework occupants. Room temperature diffraction data allowed refinement of H positions. The hydrogen-bond system links the extraframework occupants to the silicate layers and also interconnects the H{sub 2}O molecules located inside the channels. Ca is seven-fold coordinated forming four bonds to O of the tetrahedral framework and three bonds to extraframework H{sub 2}O. The H{sub 2}O molecule at O9 showing a high displacement parameter is not bonded to Ca. The dehydration in pentagonite proceeds in three steps. At 100 Degree-Sign C the H{sub 2}O molecule at O8 was released while O9 moved towards Ca. As a consequence the displacement parameter of H{sub 2}O at O9 halved compared to that at room temperature. The unit-cell volume decreased to 1287.33(3) A{sup 3} leading to a formula with 3H{sub 2}O per formula unit (pfu). Ca remained seven-fold coordinated. At 175 Degree-Sign C Ca(VO)(Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}){center_dot}3H{sub 2}O transformed into a new phase with 1H{sub 2}O molecule pfu characterized by doubling of the c axis and the monoclinic space group Pn. Severe bending of specific T--O--T angles led to contraction of the porous three-dimensional framework. In addition, H{sub 2}O at O9 was expelled while H{sub 2}O at O7 approached a position in the center of the channel. The normalized volume decreased to 1069.44(9) A{sup 3}. The Ca coordination reduced from seven- to six-fold. At 225 Degree-Sign C a new anhydrous phase with space group Pna2{sub 1} but without doubling of c had formed. Release of H{sub 2}O at O7 caused additional contraction of T--O--T angles and volume reduction (V=1036.31(9) A{sup 3}). Ca adopted five-fold coordination. During heating excursion up to 400 Degree-Sign C this anhydrous phase remained preserved. Between room temperature and 225 Degree-Sign C the unit-cell volume decreased by 21% due to dehydration. The dehydration steps compare well with the thermo-gravimetric data reported in the literature. - Graphical abstract: Pentagonite structure at room temperature and at 225 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the relationship between the removal of H{sub 2}O molecules and structural modifications of the framework of pentagonite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pentagonite undergoes phase transitions upon heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze similarities and differences between pentagonite and related structures.

  20. SHOCK-ENHANCED C{sup +} EMISSION AND THE DETECTION OF H{sub 2}O FROM THE STEPHAN'S QUINTET GROUP-WIDE SHOCK USING HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleton, P. N.; Lord, S.; Lu, N.; Guillard, P.; Boulanger, F.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Cluver, M. E.; Konstantopoulos, I.; Ogle, P.; Falgarone, E.; Duc, P.-A.; Gallagher, S.; Gao, Y.; Jarrett, T.; Lisenfeld, U.; Peterson, B. W.; Struck, C.; Sturm, E.; Tuffs, R.; and others

    2013-11-01

    We present the first Herschel spectroscopic detections of the [O I] 63 ?m and [C II] 158 ?m fine-structure transitions, and a single para-H{sub 2}O line from the 35 × 15 kpc{sup 2} shocked intergalactic filament in Stephan's Quintet. The filament is believed to have been formed when a high-speed intruder to the group collided with a clumpy intergroup gas. Observations with the PACS spectrometer provide evidence for broad (>1000 km s{sup –1}) luminous [C II] line profiles, as well as fainter [O I] 63 ?m emission. SPIRE FTS observations reveal water emission from the p-H{sub 2}O (1{sub 11}-0{sub 00}) transition at several positions in the filament, but no other molecular lines. The H{sub 2}O line is narrow and may be associated with denser intermediate-velocity gas experiencing the strongest shock-heating. The [C II]/PAH{sub tot} and [C II]/FIR ratios are too large to be explained by normal photo-electric heating in photodissociation regions. H II region excitation or X-ray/cosmic-ray heating can also be ruled out. The observations lead to the conclusion that a large fraction the molecular gas is diffuse and warm. We propose that the [C II], [O I], and warm H{sub 2} line emission is powered by a turbulent cascade in which kinetic energy from the galaxy collision with the intergalactic medium is dissipated to small scales and low velocities, via shocks and turbulent eddies. Low-velocity magnetic shocks can help explain both the [C II]/[O I] ratio, and the relatively high [C II]/H{sub 2} ratios observed. The discovery that [C II] emission can be enhanced, in large-scale turbulent regions in collisional environments, has implications for the interpretation of [C II] emission in high-z galaxies.

  1. Licensing of spent fuel dry storage and consolidated rod storage: A Review of Issues and Experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1990-02-01

    The results of this study, performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), respond to the nuclear industry's recommendation that a report be prepared that collects and describes the licensing issues (and their resolutions) that confront a new applicant requesting approval from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for dry storage of spent fuel or for large-scale storage of consolidated spent fuel rods in pools. The issues are identified in comments, questions, and requests from the NRC during its review of applicants' submittals. Included in the report are discussions of (1) the 18 topical reports on cask and module designs for dry storage fuel that have been submitted to the NRC, (2) the three license applications for dry storage of spent fuel at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) that have been submitted to the NRC, and (3) the three applications (one of which was later withdrawn) for large-scale storage of consolidated fuel rods in existing spent fuel storage pools at reactors that were submitted tot he NRC. For each of the applications submitted, examples of some of the issues (and suggestions for their resolutions) are described. The issues and their resolutions are also covered in detail in an example in each of the three subject areas: (1) the application for the CASTOR V/21 dry spent fuel storage cask, (2) the application for the ISFSI for dry storage of spent fuel at Surry, and (3) the application for full-scale wet storage of consolidated spent fuel at Millstone-2. The conclusions in the report include examples of major issues that applicants have encountered. Recommendations for future applicants to follow are listed. 401 refs., 26 tabs.

  2. Temperature-dependent structural study of microporous CsAlSi{sub 5}O{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, Martin; Armbruster, Thomas Kolesov, Boris

    2008-03-15

    CsAlSi{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals were synthesized at high temperature by slow cooling of a vanadium oxide flux. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure analysis and electron microprobe analyses yielded the microporous CAS zeolite framework structure of Cs{sub 0.85}Al{sub 0.85}Si{sub 5.15}O{sub 12} composition. High-temperature single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction studies were utilized to analyze anisotropic thermal expansion. Rietveld refined cell constants from powder diffraction data, measured in steps of 25 deg. C up to 700 deg. C, show a significant decrease in expansion above 500 deg. C. At 500 deg. C, a displacive, static disorder-dynamic disorder-type phase transition from the acentric low-temperature space group Ama2 to centrosymmetric Amam (Cmcm in standard setting) was found. Thermal expansion below the phase transition is governed by rigid-body TO{sub 4} rotations accompanied by stretching of T-O-T angles. Above the phase transition at 500 deg. C all atoms, except one oxygen (O6), are fixed on mirror planes. Temperature-dependent polarized Raman single-crystal spectra between -270 and 300 deg. C and unpolarized spectra between room temperature and 1000 deg. C become increasingly less resolved with rising temperature confirming the disordered static-disordered dynamic type of the phase transition. - Graphical abstract: Temperature-dependent structural evolution of microporous CsAlSi{sub 5}O{sub 12} has been investigated by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, as well as Raman spectroscopy. Results yielded a phase transition of order-disorder type.

  3. Studies of the physical aspects of intumescence using advance diagnostics methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeed, Hussain, E-mail: Mep09hss@sheffield.ac.uk; Huang, Hua Wei, E-mail: Mep09hss@sheffield.ac.uk; Zhang, Yang, E-mail: Mep09hss@sheffield.ac.uk [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Combustion and Flame Diagnostics Research Group, Room D132, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sir Frederick Mappin Building, University of Sheffield, SI 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-11

    The use of intumescent paints as an active fire protection method has gained immense interest in recent years. A significant aspect of research has focused on studying the chemical aspects of the system to improve performance. The dynamics and physical aspects of intumescence in real time fire conditions are still unclear. The present research uses an experimental approach where diagnostics techniques such as thermal imaging camera was used to study intumescent characteristics that have been not been reported in great detail. T-panels are a substitute to the most commonly used part in construction, the I-beam. Studies were conducted using a cone calorimeter that provided a uniform heat flux through radiation on steel T-panel samples. The complex nature of char movement was recorded and a novel algorithm was used to track the growing char laye07r. The samples are designed to cater to different fire conditions. Therefore, the degree of intumescence was observed to be very different in the samples. The samples designed for low temperature cellulosic fires focus on high degree of intumesce. Whereas, mechanical strength is the focus for samples used in high temperature turbulent hydrocarbon fire conditions. The variation in the internal structure of the sample is presented. Furthermore, the phenomenon is phase shift is discussed. The phase shift is an essential part of the process of intumescence when the majority of intumescence occurs. It was observed to be different in all the samples. The movement of the samples is a property of great interest. This is because if any part of the substrate is exposed then the formulation does not meet strict commercialisation criterion. The movement was diagonal in nature as compared to flat panels where it is perpendicular. This is due tot the heating pattern of the plate that results in the web part of the panel to influence the growth of char on the flange part of the panel. A special case of char cracking is also highlighted and using image processing algorithm on the thermal imaging data. A quantitative method of analsysis is presented to an otherwise commonly qualitative nature of experimental study in this field.

  4. THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2012-06-19

    Verification of commercial low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel takes place at the fuel fabrication facility as part of the overall international nuclear safeguards solution to the civilian use of nuclear technology. The fissile mass per unit length is determined nondestructively by active neutron coincidence counting using a neutron collar. A collar comprises four slabs of high density polyethylene that surround the assembly. Three of the slabs contain {sup 3}He filled proportional counters to detect time correlated fission neutrons induced by an AmLi source placed in the fourth slab. Historically, the response of a particular collar design to a particular fuel assembly type has been established by careful cross-calibration to experimental absolute calibrations. Traceability exists to sources and materials held at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 35 years. This simple yet powerful approach has ensured consistency of application. Since the 1980's there has been a steady improvement in fuel performance. The trend has been to higher burn up. This requires the use of both higher initial enrichment and greater concentrations of burnable poisons. The original analytical relationships to correct for varying fuel composition are consequently being challenged because the experimental basis for them made use of fuels of lower enrichment and lower poison content than is in use today and is envisioned for use in the near term. Thus a reassessment of the correction factors is needed. Experimental reassessment is expensive and time consuming given the great variation between fuel assemblies in circulation. Fortunately current modeling methods enable relative response functions to be calculated with high accuracy. Hence modeling provides a more convenient and cost effective means to derive correction factors which are fit for purpose with confidence. In this work we use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with neutron coincidence tallies to calculate the influence of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable poison on the measurement of fresh pressurized water reactor fuel. To empirically determine the response function over the range of historical and future use we have considered enrichments up to 5 wt% {sup 235}U/{sup tot}U and Gd weight fractions of up to 10 % Gd/UO{sub 2}. Parameterized correction factors are presented.

  5. Following the movement of Cu ions in a SSZ-13 zeolite during dehydration, reduction and adsorption: a combined in situ TP-XRD, XANES/DRIFTS study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Varga, Tamas; Peden, Charles HF; Gao, Feng; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Szanyi, Janos

    2014-05-05

    Cu-SSZ-13 has been shown to possess high activity and superior N2 formation selectivity in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx under oxygen rich conditions. Here, a combination of synchrotron-based (XRD and XANES) and vibrational (DRIFTS) spectroscopy tools have been used to follow the changes in the location and coordination environment of copper ions in a Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite during calcinations, reduction with CO, and adsorption of CO and H2O. XANES spectra collected during these procedures provides critical information not only on the variation in the oxidation state of the copper species in the zeolite structure, but also on the changes in the coordination environment around these ions as they interact with the framework, and with different adsorbates (H2O and CO). Time-resolved XRD data indicate the movement of copper ions and the consequent variation of the unit cell parameters during dehydration. DRIFT spectra provide information about the adsorbed species present in the zeolite, as well as the oxidation states of and coordination environment around the copper ions. A careful analysis of the asymmetric T-O-T vibrations of the CHA framework perturbed by copper ions in different coordination environments proved to be especially informative. The results of this study will aid the identification of the location, coordination and oxidation states of copper ions obtained during in operando catalytic studies. Financial support was provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Part of this work (sample preparation) was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The EMSL is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE, Office of Biological and Environmental Research. PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for the US DOE by Battelle. All of the spectroscopy work reported here was carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). NSLS is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE.

  6. GRB 090227B: THE MISSING LINK BETWEEN THE GENUINE SHORT AND LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muccino, M.; Ruffini, R.; Bianco, C. L.; Izzo, L.; Penacchioni, A. V. [Dip. di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)] [Dip. di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    The time-resolved spectral analysis of GRB 090227B, made possible by the Fermi-GBM data, allows us to identify in this source the missing link between the genuine short and long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Within the Fireshell model of the GRBs we predict genuine short GRBs: bursts with the same inner engine of the long bursts but endowed with a severely low value of the baryon load, B {approx}< 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}. A first energetically predominant emission occurs at the transparency of the e {sup +} e {sup -} plasma, the Proper-GRB (P-GRB), followed by a softer emission, the extended afterglow. The typical separation between the two emissions is expected to be of the order of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2} s. We identify the P-GRB of GRB 090227B in the first 96 ms of emission, where a thermal component with the temperature kT = (517 {+-} 28) keV and a flux comparable with the non-thermal part of the spectrum is observed. This non-thermal component as well as the subsequent emission, where there is no evidence for a thermal spectrum, is identified with the extended afterglow. We deduce a theoretical cosmological redshift z = 1.61 {+-} 0.14. We then derive the total energy E{sup tot}{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}}= (2.83{+-}0.15) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 53} erg, the baryon load B = (4.13 {+-} 0.05) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}, the Lorentz {Gamma} factor at transparency {Gamma}{sub tr} = (1.44 {+-} 0.01) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4}, and the intrinsic duration {Delta}t' {approx} 0.35 s. We also determine the average density of the circumburst medium (CBM), (n {sub CBM}) = (1.90 {+-} 0.20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} particles cm{sup -3}. There is no evidence of beaming in the system. In view of the energetics and of the baryon load of the source, as well as of the low interstellar medium and of the intrinsic timescale of the signal, we identify the GRB progenitor as a binary neutron star. From the recent progress in the theory of neutron stars, we obtain masses of the stars m {sub 1} = m {sub 2} = 1.34 M {sub Sun} and their corresponding radii R {sub 1} = R {sub 2} = 12.24 km and thickness of their crusts {approx}0.47 km, consistent with the above values of the baryon load, of the energetics and of the time duration of the event.

  7. THE COLLISIONAL EVOLUTION OF DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaspar, Andras; Rieke, George H.; Balog, Zoltan E-mail: grieke@as.arizona.edu

    2013-05-01

    We explore the collisional decay of disk mass and infrared emission in debris disks. With models, we show that the rate of the decay varies throughout the evolution of the disks, increasing its rate up to a certain point, which is followed by a leveling off to a slower value. The total disk mass falls off {proportional_to}t {sup -0.35} at its fastest point (where t is time) for our reference model, while the dust mass and its proxy-the infrared excess emission-fades significantly faster ({proportional_to}t {sup -0.8}). These later level off to a decay rate of M{sub tot}(t){proportional_to}t {sup -0.08} and M{sub dust}(t) or L{sub ir}(t){proportional_to}t {sup -0.6}. This is slower than the {proportional_to}t {sup -1} decay given for all three system parameters by traditional analytic models. We also compile an extensive catalog of Spitzer and Herschel 24, 70, and 100 {mu}m observations. Assuming a log-normal distribution of initial disk masses, we generate model population decay curves for the fraction of stars harboring debris disks detected at 24 {mu}m. We also model the distribution of measured excesses at the far-IR wavelengths (70-100 {mu}m) at certain age regimes. We show general agreement at 24 {mu}m between the decay of our numerical collisional population synthesis model and observations up to a Gyr. We associate offsets above a Gyr to stochastic events in a few select systems. We cannot fit the decay in the far-infrared convincingly with grain strength properties appropriate for silicates, but those of water ice give fits more consistent with the observations (other relatively weak grain materials would presumably also be successful). The oldest disks have a higher incidence of large excesses than predicted by the model; again, a plausible explanation is very late phases of high dynamical activity around a small number of stars. Finally, we constrain the variables of our numerical model by comparing the evolutionary trends generated from the exploration of the full parameter space to observations. Amongst other results, we show that erosive collisions are dominant in setting the timescale of the evolution and that planetesimals on the order of 100 km in diameter are necessary in the cascades for our population synthesis models to reproduce the observations.

  8. EXPLORING THE z = 3-4 MASSIVE GALAXY POPULATION WITH ZFOURGE: THE PREVALENCE OF DUSTY AND QUIESCENT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitler, Lee R.; Rees, Glen; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Labbé, Ivo; Glazebrook, Karl; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Papovich, Casey; Kawinwanichakij, Lalitwadee; Mehrtens, Nicola; Tilvi, Vithal; Tomczak, Adam R.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Persson, S. Eric; Kelson, Daniel D.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Monson, Andrew J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Allen, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    Our understanding of the redshift z > 3 galaxy population relies largely on samples selected using the popular ''dropout'' technique, typically consisting of UV-bright galaxies with blue colors and prominent Lyman breaks. As it is currently unknown if these galaxies are representative of the massive galaxy population, we here use the FOURSTAR Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) survey to create a stellar mass-limited sample at z = 3-4. Uniquely, ZFOURGE uses deep near-infrared medium-bandwidth filters to derive accurate photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. The mass-complete sample consists of 57 galaxies with log M >10.6, reaching below M {sup *} at z = 3-4. On average, the massive z = 3-4 galaxies are extremely faint in the observed optical with median R{sub tot}{sup AB}=27.48±0.41 (rest-frame M {sub 1700} = –18.05 ± 0.37). They lie far below the UV luminosity-stellar mass relation for Lyman break galaxies and are about ?100 × fainter at the same mass. The massive galaxies are red (R – K {sub s} {sub AB} = 3.9 ± 0.2; rest-frame UV-slope ? = –0.2 ± 0.3) likely from dust or old stellar ages. We classify the galaxy spectral energy distributions by their rest-frame U–V and V–J colors and find a diverse population: 46{sub ?6?17}{sup +6+10}% of the massive galaxies are quiescent, 40{sub ?6?5}{sup +6+7}% are dusty star-forming galaxies, and only 14{sub ?3?4}{sup +3+10}% resemble luminous blue star-forming Lyman break galaxies. This study clearly demonstrates an inherent diversity among massive galaxies at higher redshift than previously known. Furthermore, we uncover a reservoir of dusty star-forming galaxies with 4 × lower specific star-formation rates compared to submillimeter-selected starbursts at z > 3. With 5 × higher numbers, the dusty galaxies may represent a more typical mode of star formation compared to submillimeter-bright starbursts.

  9. On the interaction of the PKS B1358–113 radio galaxy with the A1836 cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stawarz, ?.; Simionescu, A.; Hagino, K.; Szostek, A.; Kozie?-Wierzbowska, D.; Ostrowski, M.; Cheung, C. C.; Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D. E.; Werner, N.; Madejski, G.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-10-20

    Here we present the analysis of multifrequency data gathered for the Fanaroff-Riley type-II (FR II) radio galaxy PKS B1358-113, hosted in the brightest cluster galaxy in the center of A1836. The galaxy harbors one of the most massive black holes known to date, and our analysis of the acquired optical data reveals that this black hole is only weakly active, with a mass accretion rate M-dot {sub acc}?2×10{sup ?4} M-dot {sub Edd}?0.02 M{sub ?} yr{sup –1}. Based on analysis of new Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations and archival radio data, and assuming the well-established model for the evolution of FR II radio galaxies, we derive the preferred range for the jet kinetic luminosity L {sub j} ? (1-6) × 10{sup –3} L {sub Edd} ? (0.5-3) × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}. This is above the values implied by various scaling relations proposed for radio sources in galaxy clusters, being instead very close to the maximum jet power allowed for the given accretion rate. We also constrain the radio source lifetime as ?{sub j} ? 40-70 Myr, meaning the total amount of deposited jet energy E {sub tot} ? (2-8) × 10{sup 60} erg. We argue that approximately half of this energy goes into shock heating of the surrounding thermal gas, and the remaining 50% is deposited into the internal energy of the jet cavity. The detailed analysis of the X-ray data provides indication for the presence of a bow shock driven by the expanding radio lobes into the A1836 cluster environment. We derive the corresponding shock Mach number in the range M{sub sh}?2--4, which is one of the highest claimed for clusters or groups of galaxies. This, together with the recently growing evidence that powerful FR II radio galaxies may not be uncommon in the centers of clusters at higher redshifts, supports the idea that jet-induced shock heating may indeed play an important role in shaping the properties of clusters, galaxy groups, and galaxies in formation. In this context, we speculate on a possible bias against detecting stronger jet-driven shocks in poorer environments, resulting from inefficient electron heating at the shock front, combined with a relatively long electron-ion temperature equilibration timescale.

  10. THE SLOAN LENS ACS SURVEY. X. STELLAR, DYNAMICAL, AND TOTAL MASS CORRELATIONS OF MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auger, M. W.; Treu, T.; Marshall, P. J.; Bolton, A. S.; Gavazzi, R.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Moustakas, L. A.

    2010-11-20

    We use stellar masses, surface photometry, strong-lensing masses, and stellar velocity dispersions ({sigma}{sub e/2}) to investigate empirical correlations for the definitive sample of 73 early-type galaxies (ETGs) that are strong gravitational lenses from the SLACS survey. The traditional correlations (fundamental plane (FP) and its projections) are consistent with those found for non-lens galaxies, supporting the thesis that SLACS lens galaxies are representative of massive ETGs (dimensional mass M{sub dim} = 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} M{sub sun}). The addition of high-precision strong-lensing estimates of the total mass allows us to gain further insights into their internal structure: (1) the average slope of the total mass-density profile ({rho}{sub tot}{proportional_to}r{sup -}{gamma}') is ({gamma}') = 2.078 {+-} 0.027 with an intrinsic scatter of 0.16 {+-} 0.02; (2) {gamma}' correlates with effective radius (r{sub e}) and central mass density, in the sense that denser galaxies have steeper profiles; (3) the dark matter (DM) fraction within r{sub e} /2 is a monotonically increasing function of galaxy mass and size (due to a mass-dependent central cold DM distribution or due to baryonic DM-stellar remnants or low-mass stars-if the initial mass function is non-universal and its normalization increases with mass); (4) the dimensional mass M{sub dim} {identical_to} 5r{sub e} {sigma}{sup 2}{sub e/2}/G is proportional to the total (lensing) mass M{sub r{sub e/2}}, and both increase more rapidly than stellar mass M{sub *} (M{sub *{proportional_to}}M{sub r{sub e/2}{sup 0.8}); (5) the mass plane (MP), obtained by replacing surface brightness with surface mass density in the FP, is found to be tighter and closer to the virial relation than the FP and the M{sub *}P, indicating that the scatter of those relations is dominated by stellar population effects; (6) we construct the fundamental hyper-plane by adding stellar masses to the MP and find the M{sub *} coefficient to be consistent with zero and no residual intrinsic scatter. Our results demonstrate that the dynamical structure of ETGs is not scale invariant and that it is fully specified by M{sub r{sub e/2}}, r{sub e} , and {sigma}{sub e/2}. Although the basic trends can be explained qualitatively in terms of varying star formation efficiency as a function of halo mass and as the result of dry and wet mergers, reproducing quantitatively the observed correlations and their tightness may be a significant challenge for galaxy formation models.

  11. Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport at the Climax Mine sub-CAU, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Pohlmann; M. Ye; D. Reeves; M. Zavarin; D. Decker; J. Chapman

    2007-09-28

    The Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU) on the Nevada Test Site comprises 747 underground nuclear detonations, all but three of which were conducted in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate rocks in Yucca Flat. The remaining three tests were conducted in the very different hydrogeologic setting of the Climax Mine granite stock located in Area 15 at the northern end of Yucca Flat. As part of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU, models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will be developed for Yucca Flat. However, two aspects of these CAU-scale models require focused modeling at the northern end of Yucca Flat beyond the capability of these large models. First, boundary conditions and boundary flows along the northern reaches of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU require evaluation to a higher level of detail than the CAU-scale Yucca Flat model can efficiently provide. Second, radionuclide fluxes from the Climax tests require analysis of flow and transport in fractured granite, a unique hydrologic environment as compared to Yucca Flat proper. This report describes the Climax Mine sub-CAU modeling studies conducted to address these issues, with the results providing a direct feed into the CAI for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU. Three underground nuclear detonations were conducted for weapons effects testing in the Climax stock between 1962 and 1966: Hard Hat, Pile Driver, and Tiny Tot. Though there is uncertainty regarding the position of the water table in the stock, it is likely that all three tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone. In the early 1980s, the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercial nuclear reactor wastes. Detailed mapping of fractures and faults carried out for the SFT-C studies greatly expanded earlier data sets collected in association with the nuclear tests and provided invaluable information for subsequent modeling studies at Climax. The objectives of the Climax Mine sub-CAU work are to (1) provide simulated heads and groundwater flows for the northern boundaries of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model, while incorporating alternative conceptualizations of the hydrogeologic system with their associated uncertainty, and (2) provide radionuclide fluxes from the three tests in the Climax stock using modeling techniques that account for groundwater flow in fractured granite. Meeting these two objectives required two different model scales. The northern boundary groundwater fluxes were addressed using the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model (Belcher, 2004) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey as a modeling framework, with refined hydrostratigraphy in a zone north of Yucca Flat and including Climax stock. Radionuclide transport was simulated using a separate model confined to the granite stock itself, but linked to regional groundwater flow through boundary conditions and calibration targets.

  12. Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

    2008-05-01

    This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE Order 435.1 and DOE Manual (DOE M) 435.1-1. The primary objective of the SA is to evaluate if inadvertent disposal of limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 RWMS is in compliance with the existing, approved Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued under DOE M 435.1-1. In addition, supplemental analyses are performed to determine if there is reasonable assurance that the requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses provide supplemental information regarding the risk to human health and the environment of leaving the TRU waste in T04C. In 1989, waste management personnel reviewing classified materials records discovered that classified materials buried in trench T04C at the Area 5 RWMS contained TRU waste. Subsequent investigations determined that a total of 102 55-gallon drums of TRU waste from Rocky Flats were buried in trench T04C in 1986. The disposal was inadvertent because unclassified records accompanying the shipment indicated that the waste was low-level. The exact location of the TRU waste in T04C was not recorded and is currently unknown. Under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.5, low-level waste disposal facilities must obtain a DAS. The DAS specifies conditions that must be met to operate within the radioactive waste management basis, consisting of a performance assessment (PA), composite analysis (CA), closure plan, monitoring plan, waste acceptance criteria, and a PA/CA maintenance plan. The DOE issued a DAS for the Area 5 RWMS in 2000. The Area 5 RWMS DAS was, in part, based on review of a CA as required under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.(3). A CA is a radiological assessment required for DOE waste disposed before 26 September 1988 and includes the radiological dose from all sources of radioactive material interacting with all radioactive waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS. The approved Area 5 RWMS CA, which includes the inventory of TRU waste in T04C, indicates that the Area 5 RWMS waste inventory and all interacting sources of radioactive material can meet the 0.3 mSv dose constraint. The composite analysis maximum annual dose for a future resident at the Area 5 RWMS was estimated to be 0.01 mSv at 1,000 years. Therefore, the inadvertent disposal of TRU in T04C is protective of the public and the environment, and compliant with all the applicable requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated 40 CFR 191 to establish standards for the planned disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high level, and transuranic wastes in geologic repositories. Although not required, the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office requested a supplemental analysis to evaluate the likelihood that the inadvertent disposal of TRU waste in T04C meets the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The SA evaluates the likelihood of meeting the 40 CFR 191 containment requirements (CRs), assurance requirements, individual protection requirements (IPRs), and groundwater protection standards. The results of the SA indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of meeting all the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The conclusion of the SA is that the Area 5 RWMS with the TRU waste buried in T04C is in compliance with all requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. Compliance with the DAS is demonstrated by the results of the Area 5 RWMS CA. Supplemental analyses in the SA indicate there is a