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1

Strike Point Control for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the first control algorithm for the inner and outer strike point position for a Spherical Torus (ST) fusion experiment and the performance analysis of the controller. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD) will be installed on NSTX which is believed to provide better pumping than lithium coatings on carbon PFCs. The shape of the plasma dictates the pumping rate of the lithium by channeling the plasma to LLD, where strike point location is the most important shape parameter. Simulations show that the density reduction depends on the proximity of strike point to LLD. Experiments were performed to study the dynamics of the strike point, design a new controller to change the location of the strike point to desired location and stabilize it. The most effective PF coils in changing inner and outer strike points were identified using equilibrium code. The PF coil inputs were changed in a step fashion between various set points and the step response of the strike point position was obtained. From the analysis of the step responses, PID controllers for the strike points were obtained and the controller was tuned experimentally for better performance. The strike controller was extended to include the outer-strike point on the inner plate to accommodate the desired low outer-strike points for the experiment with the aim of achieving "snowflake" divertor configuration in NSTX.

Kolemen, E.; Gates, D. A.; Rowley, C. W.; Kasdin, N. J.; Kallman, J.; Gerhardt, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mueller, D.

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

2

Overview of Results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of NSTX is the demonstration of the physics basis required to extrapolate to the next steps for the spherical torus (ST), such as a plasma facing component test facility (NHTX) or an ST based component test facility (ST-CTF), and to support ITER. Key issues for the ST are transport, and steady state high {beta} operation. To better understand electron transport, a new high-k scattering diagnostic was used extensively to investigate electron gyro-scale fluctuations with varying electron temperature gradient scale-length. Results from n = 3 braking studies confirm the flow shear dependence of ion transport. New results from electron Bernstein wave emission measurements from plasmas with lithium wall coating applied indicate transmission efficiencies near 70% in H-mode as a result of reduced collisionality. Improved coupling of High Harmonic Fast-Waves has been achieved by reducing the edge density relative to the critical density for surface wave coupling. In order to achieve high bootstrap fraction, future ST designs envision running at very high elongation. Plasmas have been maintained on NSTX at very low internal inductance l{sub i} {approx} 0.4 with strong shaping ({kappa} {approx} 2.7, {delta} {approx} 0.8) with {beta}{sub N} approaching the with-wall beta limit for several energy confinement times. By operating at lower collisionality in this regime, NSTX has achieved record non-inductive current drive fraction f{sub NI} {approx} 71%. Instabilities driven by super-Alfvenic ions are an important issue for all burning plasmas, including ITER. Fast ions from NBI on NSTX are super-Alfvenic. Linear TAE thresholds and appreciable fast-ion loss during multi-mode bursts are measured and these results are compared to theory. RWM/RFA feedback combined with n = 3 error field control was used on NSTX to maintain plasma rotation with {beta} above the no-wall limit. The impact of n > 1 error fields on stability is a important result for ITER. Other highlights are: results of lithium coating experiments, momentum confinement studies, scrape-off layer width scaling, demonstration of divertor heat load mitigation in strongly shaped plasmas, and coupling of CHI plasmas to OH ramp-up. These results advance the ST towards next step fusion energy devices such as NHTX and ST-CTF.

Gates, D; Ahn, J; Allain, J; Andre, R; Bastasz, R; Bell, M; Bell, R; Belova, E; Berkery, J; Betti, R; Bialek, J; Biewer, T; Bigelow, T; Bitter, M; Boedo, J; Bonoli, P; Bozzer, A; Brennan, D; Breslau, J; Brower, D; Bush, C; Canik, J; Caravelli, G; Carter, M; Caughman, J; Chang, C; Choe, W; Crocker, N; Darrow, D; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Diem, S; D'Ippolito, D; Domier, C; Dorland, W; Efthimion, P; Ejiri, A; Ershov, N; Evans, T; Feibush, E; Fenstermacher, M; Ferron, J; Finkenthal, M; Foley, J; Frazin, R; Fredrickson, E; Fu, G; Funaba, H; Gerhardt, S; Glasser, A; Gorelenkov, N; Grisham, L; Hahm, T; Harvey, R; Hassanein, A; Heidbrink, W; Hill, K; Hillesheim, J; Hillis, D; Hirooka, Y; Hosea, J; Hu, B; Humphreys, D; Idehara, T; Indireshkumar, K; Ishida, A; Jaeger, F; Jarboe, T; Jardin, S; Jaworski, M; Ji, H; Jung, H; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Katsuro-Hopkins, O; Kawahata, K; Kawamori, E; Kaye, S; Kessel, C; Kim, J; Kimura, H; Kolemen, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Krstic, P; Ku, S; Kubota, S; Kugel, H; La Haye, R; Lao, L; LeBlanc, B; Lee, W; Lee, K; Leuer, J; Levinton, F; Liang, Y; Liu, D; Luhmann, N; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Manickam, J; Mansfield, D; Maqueda, R; Mazzucato, E; McCune, D; McGeehan, B; McKee, G; Medley, S; Menard, J; Menon, M; Meyer, H; Mikkelsen, D; Miloshevsky, G; Mitarai, O; Mueller, D; Mueller, S; Munsat, T; Myra, J; Nagayama, Y; Nelson, B; Nguyen, X; Nishino, N; Nishiura, M; Nygren, R; Ono, M; Osborne, T; Pacella, D; Park, H; Park, J; Paul, S; Peebles, W; Penaflor, B; Peng, M; Phillips, C; Pigarov, A; Podesta, M; Preinhaelter, J; Ram, A; Raman, R; Rasmussen, D; Redd, A; Reimerdes, H; Rewoldt, G; Ross, P; Rowley, C; Ruskov, E; Russell, D; Ruzic, D; Ryan, P; Sabbagh, S; Schaffer, M; Schuster, E; Scott, S; Shaing, K; Sharpe, P; Shevchenko, V; Shinohara, K; Sizyuk, V; Skinner, C; Smirnov, A; Smith, D; Smith, S; Snyder, P; Soloman, W; Sontag, A; Soukhanovskii, V; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T; Stotler, D; Strait, T; Stratton, B; Stutman, D; Takahashi, R; Takase, Y; Tamura, N; Tang, X; Taylor, G; Taylor, C; Ticos, C; Tritz, K; Tsarouhas, D; Turrnbull, A; Tynan, G; Ulrickson, M; Umansky, M; Urban, J; Utergberg, E; Walker, M; Wampler, W; Wang, J; Wang, W; Weland, A

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and Planned Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. fusion energy sciences program began in 1996 to increase emphasis on confinement concept innovation. The NSTX [1,2] is being built at PPPL as a national fusion science research facility in response to this emphasis. NSTX is to test fusion science principles of the Spherical Torus (ST) plasmas, which include: (1) High plasma pressure in low magnetic field for high fusion power density, (2) Good energy confinement is a small-size plasma, (3) Nearly fully self-driven (bootstrap) plasma current, (4) Dispersed heat and particle fluxes, and (5) Plasma startup without complicated inboard solenoid magnet. These properties of the ST plasma, if verified, would lead to possible future fusion devices of high fusion performance, small size, feasible power handling, and improved economy. The design of NSTX is depicted in Fig.1. The device is designed to study plasmas with major radius up to 85 cm, minor radius up to 68 cm, elongation up to 2, with flexibility in forming double-null, single-null, and inboard limited plasmas. The nominal operation calls for a toroidal field of 0.3 T for 5 s at the major radius, and a plasma current at 1 MA with q {approximately} 10 at edge. It features a compact center stack containing the inner legs of the toroidal field coils, a full size solenoid capable of delivering 0.6 Wb induction, inboard vacuum vessel, and composite carbon tiles. The center stack can be replaced without disturbing the main device, diagnostics, and auxiliary systems. The vessel will be covered fully with graphite tiles and can be baked to 350 C. Other wall conditioning techniques are also planned.

Kaye, S.; Neumeyer, C.; Ono, M.; Peng, M.

1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

4

National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Power Supply Real Time Controller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

derivatives. II. POWER SUPPLIES & CIRCUITS TO BE CONTROLLED A. Power Supplies NSTX utilizes the PPPL "Power Supply Sections" (PSS) which are electrically isolated from each other but subject to the same "Firing PSS by phase controlling the thyristor firing pulses in accordance with a Control Word received

5

Efficient Coupling of Thermal Electron Bernstein Waves to the Ordinary Electromagnetic Mode on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient coupling of thermal electron Bernstein waves (EBW) to ordinary mode (Omode) electromagnetic radiation has been measured in plasmas heated by energetic neutral beams and high harmonic fast waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, S. Kaye, M. Peng, et al., Proceedings 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (IAEA, Vienna, Austria, 1999), Vol.3, p. 1135]. The EBW to electromagnetic mode coupling efficiency was measured to be 0.8 {+-} 0.2, compared to a numerical EBW modeling prediction of 0.65. The observation of efficient EBW coupling to O-mode, in relatively good agreement with numerical modeling, is a necessary prerequisite for implementing a proposed high power EBW current drive system on NSTX.

G. Taylor; P.C. Efthimion; B.P. LeBlanc; M.D. Carter; J.B. Caughman; J.B. Wilgen; J. Preinhaelter; R.W. Harvey; S.A. Sabbagh

2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

6

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Upgrade Project Execution Plan Revision 1 October 6, 2011 Submitted by: R. Strykowsky NSTX Upgrade Project Manager _____________________________ M. Williams Associate Director, PPPL

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

7

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Upgrade Project Execution Plan Revision 3 October 12, 2012 Administrative Change Submitted by: ______________________________ R. Strykowsky NSTX Upgrade Project Manager Anthony Indelicato

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

8

National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade Status and Plans*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fusion nuclear environment of copious neutrons to develop an experimental database on: ­ Nuclear is unique challenge for ST-based Fusion Nuclear Science Facility · NSTX-U goals: ­ Generate ~0.3-0.4MA fullNational Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade ­ Status and Plans* J. Menard, PPPL For the NSTX-U Team

9

Characteristics of Energy Transport of Li-conditioned and non-Li-conditioned Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transport properties of NSTX plasmas obtained during the 2008 experimental cam- paign have been studied and are reported here. Transport trends and dependences have been isolated, and it is found that both electron and ion energy transport coefficients have strong dependences on local values of n?T, which in turn is strongly dependent on local current density profile. Without identifying this dependence, it is difficult to identify others, such as the dependence of transport coefficients on Bp (or q), Ip and Pheat. In addition, a comparison between discharges with and without Lithium wall conditioning has been made. While the trends in the two sets of data are similar, the thermal transport loss, especially in the electron channel, is found to strongly depend on the amount of Lithium deposited, decreasing by up to 50% of its no-Lithium value.

Ding, S.; Kaye, S. M.; Bell, R. E.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Paul, S.; Wan, B.

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

10

National Spherical Torus Experiment NSTX UPGRADE PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

test plans, and operating procedures relevant to the safe conduct of operations. It will also include not be applicable. PPPL uses ESHD 5008 (PPPL Environment, Safety & Health Manual) Section 11 ("Operations Hazard) Guiding Principle for Operations Authorization of experimental projects. The PPPL approval process

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

11

Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

12

Modification Of The Electron Energy Distribution Function During Lithium Experiments On The National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has recently studied the use of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD). Divertor Langmuir probes have also been installed for making measurements of the local plasma conditions. A non-local probe interpretation method is used to supplement the classical probe interpretation and obtain measurements of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) which show the occurrence of a hot-electron component. Analysis is made of two discharges within a sequence that exhibited changes in plasma fueling efficiency. It is found that the local electron temperature increases and that this increase is most strongly correlated with the energy contained within the hot-electron population. Preliminary interpretative modeling indicates that kinetic effects are likely in the NSTX.

Jaworski, M A; Gray, T K; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B; McLean, A; Sabbagh, S A; Soukanovskii, V; Stotler, D P

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hardwired Control Changes For NSTX DC Power Feeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been designed and installed in the existing facilities at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Most of the hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, and power systems originally used for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used with suitable modifications to reflect NSTX needs. The original TFTR Hardwired Control System (HCS) with electromechanical relays was used for NSTX DC Power loop control and protection during NSTX operations. As part of the NSTX Upgrade, the HCS is being changed to a PLC-based system with the same control logic. This paper gives a description of the changeover to the new PLC-based system __________________________________________________

Ramakrishnan, S.

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

14

NSTX-U Digital Coil Protection System Software Detailed Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) currently uses a collection of analog signal processing solutions for coil protection. Part of the NSTX Upgrade (NSTX-U) entails replacing these analog systems with a software solution running on a conventional computing platform. The new Digital Coil Protection System (DCPS) will replace the old systems entirely, while also providing an extensible framework that allows adding new functionality as desired.

none,

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Physics Design of a 28 GHz Electron Heating System for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A megawatt-level, 28 GHz electron heating system is being designed to support non-inductive (NI) plasma current (I{sub p}) start-up and local heating and current drive (CD) in H-mode discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U). The development of fully NI I{sub p} start-up and ramp-up is an important goal of the NSTX-U research program. 28 GHz electron cyclotron (EC) heating is predicted to rapidly increase the central electron temperature (T{sub e}(0)) of low density NI plasmas generated by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI). The increased T{sub e}(0) will significantly reduce the Ip decay rate of CHI plasmas, allowing the coupling of fast wave heating and neutral beam injection. Also 28 GHz electron Bernstein wave (EBW) heating and CD can be used during the I{sub p} flat top in NSTX-U discharges when the plasma is overdense. Ray tracing and Fokker-Planck numerical simulation codes have been used to model EC and EBW heating and CD in NSTX-U. This paper presents a pre-conceptual design for the 28 GHz heating system and some of the results from the numerical simulations.

none,

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

A Megawatt-level 28z GHz Heating System For The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) will operate at axial toroidal fields of < 1 T and plasma currents, Ip < 2 MA. The development of non-inductive (NI) plasmas is a major long-term research goal for NSTX-U. Time dependent numerical simulations of 28 GHz electron cyclotron (EC) heating of low density NI start-up plasmas generated by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) in NSTX-U predict a significant and rapid increase of the central electron temperature (Te(0)) before the plasma becomes overdense. The increased Te(0) will significantly reduce the Ip decay rate of CHI plasmas, allowing the coupling of fast wave heating and neutral beam injection. A megawatt-level, 28 GHz electron heating system is planned for heating NI start-up plasmas in NSTX-U. In addition to EC heating of CHI start-up discharges, this system will be used for electron Bernstein wave (EBW) plasma start-up, and eventually for EBW heating and current drive during the Ip flattop.

Taylor, Gary [PPPL

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Impact Of Lithium Wall Coatings On NSTX Discharges And The Engineering Of The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown the benefits of solid lithium coatings on carbon PFC's to diverted plasma performance, in both Land H- mode confinement regimes. Better particle control, with decreased inductive flux consumption, and increased electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate were observed. Successive increases in lithium coverage resulted in the complete suppression of ELM activity in H-mode discharges. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD), which will employ the porous molybdenum surface developed for the LTX shell, is being installed on NSTX for the 2010 run period, and will provide comparisons between liquid walls in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) and liquid divertor targets in NSTX. LTX, which recently began operations at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, is the world's first confinement experiment with full liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs). All materials and construction techniques in LTX are compatible with liquid lithium. LTX employs an inner, heated, stainless steel-faced liner or shell, which will be lithium-coated. In order to ensure that lithium adheres to the shell, it is designed to operate at up to 500 - 600 oC to promote wetting of the stainless by the lithium, providing the first hot wall in a tokamak to operate at reactor-relevant temperatures. The engineering of LTX will be discussed.

R. Majeski, H. Kugel and R. Kaita

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

18

Physics design of a 28 GHz electron heating system for the National Spherical Torus experiment upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A megawatt-level, 28 GHz electron heating system is being designed to support non-inductive (NI) plasma current (I{sub p}) start-up and local heating and current drive (CD) in H-mode discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U). The development of fully NI I{sub p} start-up and ramp-up is an important goal of the NSTXU research program. 28 GHz electron cyclotron (EC) heating is predicted to rapidly increase the central electron temperature (T{sub e}(0)) of low density NI plasmas generated by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI). The increased T{sub e}(0) will significantly reduce the I{sub p} decay rate of CHI plasmas, allowing the coupling of fast wave heating and neutral beam injection. Also 28 GHz electron Bernstein wave (EBW) heating and CD can be used during the I{sub p} flat top in NSTX-U discharges when the plasma is overdense. Ray tracing and Fokker-Planck numerical simulation codes have been used to model EC and EBW heating and CD in NSTX-U. This paper presents a pre-conceptual design for the 28 GHz heating system and some of the results from the numerical simulations.

Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Ellis, R. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Hosea, J. C.; Poli, F. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, California 92014 (United States); Raman, R. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Smirnov, A. P. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

Modeling of Spherical Torus Plasmas for Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid metal walls have the potential to solve first-wall problems for fusion reactors, such as heat load and erosion of dry walls, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. In the near term, such walls can serve as the basis for schemes to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Furthermore, the low recycling characteristics of lithium walls can be used for particle control. Liquid lithium experiments have already begun in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U). Plasmas limited with a toroidally localized limiter have been investigated, and experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter are in progress. A liquid surface module (LSM) has been proposed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In this larger ST, plasma currents are in excess of 1 MA and a typical discharge radius is about 68 cm. The primary motivation for the LSM is particle control, and options for mounting it on the horizontal midplane or in the divertor region are under consideration. A key consideration is the magnitude of the eddy currents at the location of a liquid lithium surface. During plasma start up and disruptions, the force due to such currents and the magnetic field can force a conducting liquid off of the surface behind it. The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to estimate the magnitude of this effect. This program is a two dimensional, time dependent, free boundary simulation code that solves the MHD equations for an axisymmetric toroidal plasma. From calculations that match actual ST equilibria, the eddy current densities can be determined at the locations of the liquid lithium. Initial results have shown that the effects could be significant, and ways of explicitly treating toroidally local structures are under investigation.

R. Kaita; S. Jardin; B. Jones; C. Kessel; R. Majeski; J. Spaleta; R. Woolley; L. Zakharo; B. Nelson; M. Ulrickson

2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

20

NSTX Electrical Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been designed and installed in the existing facilities at Princeton Plasma Physic Laboratory (PPPL). Most of the hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, and power systems originally used for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used with suitable modifications to reflect NSTX needs. The design of the NSTX electrical power system was tailored to suit the available infrastructure and electrical equipment on site. Components were analyzed to verify their suitability for use in NSTX. The total number of circuits and the location of the NSTX device drove the major changes in the Power system hardware. The NSTX has eleven (11) circuits to be fed as compared to the basic three power loops for TFTR. This required changes in cabling to insure that each cable tray system has the positive and negative leg of cables in the same tray. Also additional power cabling had to be installed to the new location. The hardware had to b e modified to address the need for eleven power loops. Power converters had to be reconnected and controlled in anti-parallel mode for the Ohmic heating and two of the Poloidal Field circuits. The circuit for the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) System had to be carefully developed to meet this special application. Additional Protection devices were designed and installed for the magnet coils and the CHI. The thrust was to making the changes in the most cost-effective manner without compromising technical requirements. This paper describes the changes and addition to the Electrical Power System components for the NSTX magnet systems.

A. Ilic; E. Baker; R. Hatcher; S. Ramakrishnan; et al

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Construction, Commissioning, and Initial Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Poloidal Field (PF) coils, thermal insulation, and a center stack casing which forms the inner wall vacuum insulator assemblies which permit the use of Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) as one of the means, 5 sec Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) 50kA injection @ 1kV Neutral Beam Injection Upgrade (NBI) 5

22

National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Construction, Commissioning, and Initial Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cylinder, a pair of inner Poloidal Field (PF) coils, thermal insulation, and a center stack casing which of the machine via ceramic insulator assemblies which permit the use of Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) as one, 5 sec Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) 50kA injection @ 1kV Neutral Beam Injection Upgrade (NBI) 5

23

National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Power Supply Real Time Controller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems according to pre­programmed current derivatives. II. POWER SUPPLIES & CIRCUITS TO BE CONTROLLED isolated from each other but subject to the same "Firing Generator" (FG). Each PSS Magnets Power Supply

24

National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn Cyber Security Nuclear ForensicsScienceScience

25

National Spherical Torus Experiment NSTX CENTER STACK UPGRADE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis (FMEA) 14 2.6.3 Structural Design Criteria 15 2.7 Material Selection 15 2.8 General Electrical

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

26

NSTX Weekly Report (May 21, 2010) FY 2010 NSTX plasma operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagnostics for Liquid Lithium Divertor Studies on the National Spherical Torus Experiment" by V University), "Modeling the Polarization Properties of Propagating Electromagnetic Waves in NSTX" by J. Zhang Plasma Physics and Plasma Material Interactions in the Fusion Power Plant Regime" 20-21 May 2010 at UC

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

27

Intermittent Divertor Filaments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment and Their Relation to Midplane Blobs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While intermittent filamentary structures, also known as blobs, are routinely seen in the low-field-side scrape-off layer of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), fine structured filaments are also seen on the lower divertor target plates of NSTX. These filaments, not associated with edge localized modes, correspond to the interaction of the turbulent blobs seen near the midplane with the divertor plasma facing components. The fluctuation level of the neutral lithium light observed at the divertor, and the skewness and kurtosis of its probability distribution function, is similar to that of midplane blobs seen in D?; e.g. increasing with increasing radii outside the outer strike point (OSP) (separatrix). In addition, their toroidal and radial movement agrees with the typical movement of midplane blobs. Furthermore, with the appropriate magnetic topology, i.e. mapping between the portion of the target plates being observed into the field of view of the midplane gas puff imaging diagnostic, very good correlation is observed between the blobs and the divertor filaments. The correlation between divertor plate filaments and midplane blobs is lost close to the OSP. This latter observation is consistent with the existence of magnetic shear disconnection due to the lower X-point, as proposed by Cohen and Ryutov (1997 Nucl. Fusion 37 621).

R.J. Maqueda, D.P. Stotler and the NSTX Team.

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

28

Dynamical Evolution of Pedestal Parameters in ELMy H-mode in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizations of the pedestal parameter dynamics throughout the edge localized modes(ELM) cycles are performed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX, [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]). A clear buildup of the pedestal height is observed between ELMs for three di erent plasma currents, which tends to saturate prior to the onset of ELM at low and medium plasma current. Similarly, the pedestal width increases with no clear evidence of saturation during an ELM cycle. The maximum pedestal gradient increases as a function of plasma current, reaches a nominal value after the ELM crash, and remains constant until the end of the ELM cycle. The pedestal height just prior to the onset of ELM is shown to increase quadratically with plasma current. The pedestal width ? is proportional to the square-root of the poloidal ? at the top of the pedestal. Coherent density uctuations strongly increasing at the plasma edge are observed to be maximum after the ELM crash and to decay during the rest of the ELM cycle. Finally, the pedestal parameters evolution during the ELM cycle as well as the scaling with Ip of the pedestal pressure prior to the onset ELM are found to be qualitatively consistent with the peeling ballooning theory.

Diallo, A; Kubota, S; Sontag, A; Osborne, T; Podesta, M; Bell, R E; LeBlanc, B P; Menard, J

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

29

Direct X-B mode conversion for high-? national spherical torus experiment in nonlinear regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can be effective for heating and driving currents in spherical tokamak plasmas. Power can be coupled to EBW via mode conversion of the extraordinary (X) mode wave. The most common and successful approach to study the conditions for optimized mode conversion to EBW was evaluated analytically and numerically using a cold plasma model and an approximate kinetic model. The major drawback in using radio frequency waves was the lack of continuous wave sources at very high frequencies (above the electron plasma frequency), which has been addressed. A future milestone is to approach high power regime, where the nonlinear effects become significant, exceeding the limits of validity for present linear theory. Therefore, one appropriate tool would be particle in cell (PIC) simulation. The PIC method retains most of the nonlinear physics without approximations. In this work, we study the direct X-B mode conversion process stages using PIC method for incident wave frequency f{sub 0}?=?15?GHz, and maximum amplitude E{sub 0}?=?10{sup 5?}V/m in the national spherical torus experiment (NSTX). The modelling shows a considerable reduction in X-B mode conversion efficiency, C{sub modelling}?=?0.43, due to the presence of nonlinearities. Comparison of system properties to the linear state reveals predominant nonlinear effects; EBW wavelength and group velocity in comparison with linear regime exhibit an increment around ?36% and 17%, respectively.

Ali Asgarian, M., E-mail: maliasgarian@ph.iut.ac.ir, E-mail: maa@msu.edu [Physics Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824-1226 (United States); Parvazian, A.; Abbasi, M. [Physics Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Verboncoeur, J. P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824-1226 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

A feasibility study for the spherical torus experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) proposes to build the Spherical Torus Experiment (STX), a very low aspect ratio toroidal confinement device. This proposal concentrates on tokamak operation of the experiment; however, it can in principle be operated as a pinch or reversed-field pinch as well. As a tokamak, the spherical torus confines a plasma that is characterized by high toroidal beta, low poloidal beta, large natural elongation, high plasma current for a given edge q, and strong paramagnetism. These features combine to offer the possibility of a compact, low-field fusion device. The figure below shows that when compared to a conventional tokamak the spherical torus represents a major change in geometry. The primary goals of the experiment will be to demonstrate a capability for high beta (20%) in the first stability regime, to extend our knowledge of tokamak confinement scaling, and to test oscillating-field current drive. The experiment will operate in the high-beta, collisionless regime, which is achieved in STX at low temperatures because of the geometry. At a minimum, operation of STX will help to resolve fundamental questions regarding the scaling of beta and confinement in tokamaks. Complete success in this program would have a significant impact on toroidal fusion research in that it would demonstrate solutions to the problems of beta and steady-state operation in the tokamak. The proposed device has a major radius of 0.45 m, a toroidai field of 0.5 T, a plasma current of 900 kA, and heating by neutral beam injection. We estimate 30 months for design, construction, and assembly. The budget estimate, including contingency and escalation, is $6.8 million.

Lazarus, E [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade SAFETY ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-00 Revision 6 DECEMBER 2014 Prepared by: _______________________ Jerry Levine Head, PPPL ESH&S Reviewed by Chair, PPPL ES&H Executive Board #12;#12;NSTX-U SAFETY ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT (SAD) Table of Contents 1

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

32

Implementation of BN Control in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have designed and constructed a system for control of the normalized B in the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al., Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. A PID operator is applied to the difference between the present value of B N (from realtime equilibrium reconstruction) and a time-dependent request, in order to calculate the required injected power. This injected power request is then turned into modulations of the neutral beams. The details of this algorithm are described, including the techniques used to develop the appropriate control gains. Example uses of the system are shown

Gerhardt, S; Bell, M G; Cropper, M; Gates, D A; Koleman, E; Lawson, J; Marsala, B; Menard, J E; Mueller, D

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Plasma Response to Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have shown beneficial effects on the performance of divertor plasmas as a result of applying lithium coatings on the graphite and carbonfiber- composite plasma-facing components. These coatings have mostly been applied by a pair of lithium evaporators mounted at the top of the vacuum vessel which inject collimated streams of lithium vapor towards the lower divertor. In NBI-heated, deuterium H-mode plasmas run immediately after the application of lithium, performance modifications included decreases in the plasma density, particularly in the edge, and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron and ion temperatures and the energy confinement time. Reductions in the number and amplitude of ELMs were observed, including complete ELM suppression for periods up to 1.2 s, apparently as a result of altering the stability of the edge. However, in the plasmas where ELMs were suppressed, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities, although not of lithium itself which remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. The impurity buildup could be inhibited by repetitively triggering ELMs with the application of brief pulses of an n = 3 radial field perturbation. The reduction in the edge density by lithium also inhibited parasitic losses through the scrape-off layer of ICRF power coupled to the plasma, enabling the waves to heat electrons in the core of H-mode plasmas produced by NBI. Lithium has also been introduced by injecting a stream of chemically stabilized, fine lithium powder directly into the scrape-off layer of NBI-heated plasmas. The lithium was ionized in the SOL and appeared to flow along the magnetic field to the divertor plates. This method of coating produced similar effects to the evaporated lithium but at lower amounts.

M.G. Bell, H.W. Kugel, R. Kaita, L.E. Zakharov, H. Schneider, B.P. LeBlanc, D. Mansfield, R.E. Bell, R. Maingi, S. Ding, S.M. Kaye, S.F. Paul, S.P. Gerhardt, J.M. Canik, J.C. Hosea, G. Taylor and the NSTX Research Team

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

34

Analysis Efforts Supporting NSTX Upgrades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio, spherical torus (ST) configuration device which is located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) This device is presently being updated to enhance its physics by doubling the TF field to 1 Tesla and increasing the plasma current to 2 Mega-amperes. The upgrades include a replacement of the centerstack and addition of a second neutral beam. The upgrade analyses have two missions. The first is to support design of new components, principally the centerstack, the second is to qualify existing NSTX components for higher loads, which will increase by a factor of four. Cost efficiency was a design goal for new equipment qualification, and reanalysis of the existing components. Showing that older components can sustain the increased loads has been a challenging effort in which designs had to be developed that would limit loading on weaker components, and would minimize the extent of modifications needed. Two areas representing this effort have been chosen to describe in more details: analysis of the current distribution in the new TF inner legs, and, second, analysis of the out-of-plane support of the existing TF outer legs.

H.Zhang, P. Titus, P. Rogoff, A.Zolfaghari, D. Mangra, M. Smith

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

Electron Bernstein Wave Experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system to heat electrons and possibly drive off-axis field-aligned current is under development on the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP. Staged experiments have reached an input power of 150 kW at 3.6G Hz and have produced a localized increase in SXR emission during rf injection. This measured emission is consistent with modeling in its location, energy spectrum and dependence on radial diffusion within the plasma. The emission is strongest in the region where ray tracing predicts deposition of the injected power. The multi-chord SXR camera used is sensitive to 4-7 keV photons. Enhanced emission in this energy range is consistent with Fokker-Plank modeling of EBW injection. The enhanced SXR emission vanishes quickly when radial diffusion in the plasma is high (as indicated by m = 0 magnetic activity); this is also consistent with Fokker-Plank modeling. An increase of boron emission (and presumably boron within the plasma) is also observed during EBW injection. This presents an alternative explanation to the enhanced SXR emission. Subsequent experiments with a different antenna at 100 kW input showed a small increase in SXR emission near 3 keV. A higher frequency experiment (5.5 GHz) with more input power available is currently under construction. Initial tests are centered on a circular waveguide launcher which requires only a 5 cm circular port in the vacuum vessel and has a target launch power of 400 kW.

Anderson, J. K.; Burke, D. R.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Kaufman, M. C.; Seltzman, A. H. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 (United States)

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

Power Supply Changes for NSTX Resistive Wall Mode Coils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been designed and installed in the existing facilities at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Most of the hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, and power systems originally used for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used with suitable modifications to reflect NSTX needs. Prior to 2004, the NSTX power system was feeding twelve (12) circuits in the machine. In 2004 the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) Coils were installed on the machine to correct error fields. There are six of these coils installed around the machine in the mid-plane. Since these coils need fast and accurate controls, a Switching Power Amplifier (SPA) with three sub-units was procured, installed and commissioned along with other power loop components. Two RWM Coils were connected in series and fed from one SPA sub-unit. After the initial RWM campaign, operational requirements evolved such that each of the RWM coils now requires separate power and control. Hence a second SPA with three sub-units has been procured and installed. The second unit is of improved design and has the controls and power components completely isolated. The existing thyristor rectifier is used as DC Link to both of the Switching Power Amplifiers. The controls for the RWM are integrated into the overall computer control of the DC Power systems for NSTX. This paper describes the design changes in the RWM Power system for NSTX.

Ramakrishnan, S S.

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

37

Measured improvement of global magnetohydrodynamic mode stability at high-beta, and in reduced collisionality spherical torus plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global mode stability is studied in high-? National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas to avoid disruptions. Dedicated experiments in NSTX using low frequency active magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy of applied rotating n?=?1 magnetic fields revealed key dependencies of stability on plasma parameters. Observations from previous NSTX resistive wall mode (RWM) active control experiments and the wider NSTX disruption database indicated that the highest ?{sub N} plasmas were not the least stable. Significantly, here, stability was measured to increase at ?{sub N}?l{sub i} higher than the point where disruptions were found. This favorable behavior is shown to correlate with kinetic stability rotational resonances, and an experimentally determined range of measured E??B frequency with improved stability is identified. Stable plasmas appear to benefit further from reduced collisionality, in agreement with expectation from kinetic RWM stabilization theory, but low collisionality plasmas are also susceptible to sudden instability when kinetic profiles change.

Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Balbaky, A. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Manickam, J.; Menard, J. E.; Podest, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Parametric Dependence Of Fast-ion Transport Events On The National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutral-beam heated tokamak plasmas commonly have more than one third of the plasma kinetic energy in the non-thermal energetic beam ion population. This population of fast ions heats the plasma, provides some of the current drive, and can affect the stability (positively or negatively) of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. This population of energetic ions is not in thermodynamic equilibrium, thus there is free-energy available to drive instabilities, which may lead to redistribution of the fast ion population. Understanding under what conditions beam-driven instabilities arise, and the extent of the resulting perturbation to the fast ion population, is important for predicting and eventually demonstrating non-inductive current ramp-up and sustainment in NSTX-U, as well as the performance of future fusion plasma experiments such as ITER. This paper presents an empirical approach towards characterizing the stability boundaries for some common energetic-ion-driven instabilities seen on NSTX.

Fredrickson, Erik; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Podesta, M.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Bortolon, A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman, 1960 The ErnestLouisMichael J.| U.S.Nathaniel

40

Liquid Lithium Divertor and Scrape-Off-Layer Interactions on the National Spherical Torus Experiment: 2010 ? 2013 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The implementation of the liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in NSTX presented a unique opportunity in plasma-material interactions studies. A high density Langmuir Probe (HDLP) array utilizing a dense pack of triple Langmuir probes was built at PPPL and the electronics designed and built by UIUC. It was shown that the HDLP array could be used to characterize the modification of the EEDF during lithium experiments on NSTX as well as characterize the transient particle loads during lithium experiments as a means to study ELMs. With NSTX being upgraded and a new divertor being installed, the HDLP array will not be used in NSTX-U. However UIUC is currently helping to develop two new systems for depositing lithium into NSTX-U, a Liquid Lithium Pellet Dripper (LLPD) for use with the granular injector for ELM mitigation and control studies as well as an Upward-Facing Lithium Evaporator (U-LITER) based on a flash evaporation system using an electron beam. Currently UIUC has Daniel Andruczyk Stationed at PPPL and is developing these systems as well as being involved in preparing the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP) for use in LTX and NSTX-U. To date the MAPP preparations have been completed. New sample holders were designed by UIUC?s Research Engineer at PPPL and manufactured at PPPL and installed. MAPP is currently being used on LTX to do calibration and initial studies. The LLPD has demonstrated that it can produce pellets. There is still some adjustments needed to control the frequency and particle size. Equipment for the U-LITER has arrived and initial test are being made of the electron beam and design of the U-LITER in progress. It is expected to have these ready for the first run campaign of NSTX-U.

None

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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41

Dependence of Recycling and Edge Profiles on Lithium Evaporation in High Triangularity, High Performance NSTX H-mode Discharges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the effects of a pre-discharge lithium evaporation scan on highly shaped discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are documented. Lithium wall conditioning ('dose') was routinely applied onto graphite plasma facing components between discharges in NSTX, partly to reduce recycling. Reduced D[sub]? emission from the lower and upper divertor and center stack was observed, as well as reduced midplane neutral pressure; the magnitude of reduction increased with the pre-discharge lithium dose. Improved energy confinement, both raw ?[sub]E and H-factor normalized to scalings, with increasing lithium dose was also observed. At the highest doses, we also observed elimination of edge-localized modes. The midplane edge plasma profiles were dramatically altered, comparable to lithium dose scans at lower shaping, where the strike point was farther from the lithium deposition centroid. This indicates that the benefits of lithium conditioning should apply to the highly shaped plasmas planned in NSTX-U.

Maingi, R [PPPL; Osborne, T H [General Atomics; Bell, M G [PPPL; Bell, R E [PPPL; Boyle, D P [PPPL; Canik, J M [ORNL; Dialla, A [PPPL; Kaita, R [PPPL; Kaye, S M [PPPL; Kugel, H W [PPPL; LeBlanc, B P [PPPL; Sabbagh, S A [Applied Physics and Applied Math Dept., Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 USA; Skinner, C H [PPPL; Soukhanovskii, V A [LLNL

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Te (R,t) Measurements using Electron Bernstein Wave Thermal Emission on NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) routinely studies overdense plasmas with ne of (15) X 1019 m-3 and total magnetic field of <0.6 T, so that the first several electron cyclotron harmonics are overdense. The electrostatic electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can propagate in overdense plasmas, exhibits strong absorption, and is thermally emitted at electron cyclotron harmonics. These properties allow thermal EBW emission to be used for local Te measurement. A significant upgrade to the previous NSTX EBW emission diagnostic to measure thermal EBW emission via the oblique B-X-O mode conversion process has been completed. The new EBW diagnostic consists of two remotely steerable, quad-ridged horn antennas, each of which is coupled to a dual channel radiometer. Fundamental (818 GHz) and second and third harmonic (1840 GHz) thermal EBW emission and polarization measurements can be obtained simultaneously.

Diem, S J; Efthimion, P C; LeBlanc, B P; Carter, M; Caughman, J; Wilgen, J B; Harvey, R W; Preinhaelter, J; Urban, J

2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

Two-dimensional AXUV-based radiated power density diagnostics on NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new set of radiated-power-density diagnostics for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) tokamak have been designed to measure the two-dimensional poloidal structure of the total photon emissivity profile in order to perform power balance, impurity transport, and magnetohydrodynamic studies. Multiple AXUV-diode based pinhole cameras will be installed in the same toroidal angle at various poloidal locations. The local emissivity will be obtained from several types of tomographic reconstructions. The layout and response expected for the new radially viewing poloidal arrays will be shown for different impurity concentrations to characterize the diagnostic sensitivity. The radiated power profile inverted from the array data will also be used for estimates of power losses during transitions from various divertor configurations in NSTX-U. The effect of in-out and top/bottom asymmetries in the core radiation from high-Z impurities will be addressed.

Faust, I.; Parker, R. R. [MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B.; Kozub, T. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Tritz, K. [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21209 (United States); Stratton, B. C. [MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Physics Design Requirements for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Liquid Lithium Divertor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent NSTX high power divertor experiments have shown significant and recurring benefits of solid lithium coatings on PFC's to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. The next step in this work is installation of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) to achieve density control for inductionless current drive capability (e.g., about a 15-25% ne decrease from present highest non-inductionless fraction discharges which often evolve toward the density limit, ne/nGW~1), to enable ne scan capability (x2) in the H-mode, to test the ability to operate at significantly lower density for future ST-CTF reactor designs (e.g., ne/nGW = 0.25), and eventually to investigate high heat-flux power handling (10 MW/m2) with longpulse discharges (>1.5s). The first step (LLD-1) physics design encompasses the desired plasma requirements, the experimental capabilities and conditions, power handling, radial location, pumping capability, operating temperature, lithium filling, MHD forces, and diagnostics for control and characterization.

Kugel, W.; Bell, M.; Berzak,L.; Brooks, A.; Ellis, R.; Gerhardt, S.; Harjes, H.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Menard, J.; Nygren,R. E.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stotler, D.; Wakeland, P.; Zakharov L. E.

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

46

Flow and shear behavior in the edge and scrape-off layer of L-mode plasmas in National Spherical Torus Experiment  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Fluctuations in the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) of L-mode plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [S. M. Kaye et al.,Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] as observed by the gas puff imaging (GPI) diagnostic are studied. Calculation of local, time resolved velocity maps using the Hybrid Optical Flow and Pattern Matching Velocimetry (HOP-V) code enables analysis of turbulent flow and shear behavior. Periodic reversals in the direction of the poloidal flow near the separatrix are observed. Also, poloidal velocities and their radial shearing rate are found to be well correlated with the fraction of D? light contained in the SOL, which acts as a measure of turbulent bursts. The spectra of GPI intensity and poloidal velocity both have a strong feature near 3 kHz, which appears to correspond with turbulent bursts. This mode exhibits a poloidal structure with poloidal wavenumber of 7.7 m-1 for GPI intensity and 3.4 m-1 for poloidal velocity, and the poloidal velocity fluctuations near 3 kHz remain coherent over length scales in excess of the turbulent scales. Furthermore, recent SOL Turbulence (SOLT) simulations find a parameter regime that exhibits periodic bursty transport and shares many qualitative similarities with the experimental data. Strong correlations between the shearing rate and the turbulent bursts are observed for time periods of ~ 2 ms, but the relationship is complicated by several factors. Finally, measurements of the radial profiles of the Reynolds shear stresses are reported. These radial profiles exhibit many similarities for several shots, and a region with positive radial gradient is seen to be coincident with local flow shear.

Sechrest, Y. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Munsat, T. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); DIppolito, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Maqueda, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Russell, D. [Lodestar Research Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

Analysis of NSTX Upgrade OH Magnet and Center Stack  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new ohmic heating (OH) coil and center stack for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) upgrade are required to meet cooling and structural requirements for operation at the enhanced 1 Tesla toroidal field and 2 MA plasma current. The OH coil is designed to be cooled in the time between discharges by water flowing in the center of the coil conductor. We performed resistive heating and thermal hydraulic analyses to optimize coolant channel size to keep the coil temperature below 100 C and meet the required 20 minute cooling time. Coupled electromagnetic, thermal and structural FEA analyses were performed to determine if the OH coil meets the requirements of the structural design criteria. Structural response of the OH coil to its self-field and the field from other coils was analyzed. A model was developed to analyze the thermal and electromagnetic interaction of centerstack components such as the OH coil, TF inner legs and the Bellville washer preload mechanism. Torsional loads from the TF interaction with the OH and poloidal fields are transferred through the TF flag extensions via a torque transfer coupling to the rest of the tokamak structure. A 3D FEA analysis was performed to qualify this design. The results of these analyses, which will be presented in this paper, have led to the design of OH coil and centerstack components that meet the requirements of the NSTX-upgrade structural design criteria.

A. Zolfaghari, P. Titus, J. Chrzanowski, A. Salehzadeh, F. Dahlgren

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Surface Treatment of a Lithium Limiter for Spherical Torus Plasma Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. As part of investigations to determine the feasibility of this approach, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry are being addressed in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The first experiments involved a toroidally local lithium limiter (L3). Measurements of pumpout rates indicated that deuterium pumping was greater for the L3 compared to conventional boron carbide limiters. The difference in the pumpout rates between the two limiter types decreased with plasma exposure, but argon glow discharge cleaning was able to restore the pumping effectiveness of the L3. At no point, however, was the extremely low recycling regime reported in previous lithium experiments achieved. This may be due to the much larger lithium surfaces that were exposed to the plasma in the earlier work. The possibility will be studied in the next set of CDX-U experiments, which are to be conducted with a large area, fully toroidal lithium limiter.

Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.; Antar, G.; Timberlake, J.; Spaleta, J.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Kugel, H.; Taylor, G.; Stutman, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Molesa, S.; Efthimion, P.; Menard, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Luckhardt, S.

2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

49

Solenoid-free Plasma Startup in NSTX using Coaxial Helicity Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The favorable properties of the Spherical Torus (ST) arise from its very small aspect ratio. However, small aspect ratio devices have very restricted space for a substantial central solenoid. Thus methods for initiating the plasma current without relying on induction from a central solenoid are essential for the viability of the ST concept. Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) is a promising candidate for solenoid-free plasma startup in a ST. Recent experiments on the HIT-II ST at the University of Washington, have demonstrated the capability of a new method, referred to as transient CHI, to produce a high quality, closed-flux equilibrium that has then been coupled to induction, with a reduced requirement for transformer flux [R. Raman, T.R. Jarboe, B.A. Nelson, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (February 2003) 075005-1]. An initial test of this method on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has produced about 140 kA of toroidal current. Modifications are now underway to improve capability for transient CHI in NSTX.

Roger Raman; Thomas R. Jarboe; Michael G. Bell; Dennis Mueller; Brian A. Nelson; Benoit LeBlanc; Charles Bush; Masayoshi Nagata; Ted Biewer

2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Relationships Between ELM Suppression, Pedestal Profiles, and Lithium Wall Coatings in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), increasing lithium wall coatings suppressed edge localized modes (ELMs), gradually but not quite monotonically. This work details profile and stability analysis as ELMs disappeared throughout the lithium scan. While the quantity of lithium deposited between discharges did not uniquely determine the presence of ELMs, profile analysis demonstrated that lithium was correlated to wider density and pressure pedestals with peak gradients farther from the separatrix. Moreover, the ELMy and ELM-free discharges were cleanly separated by their density and pedestal widths and peak gradient locations. Ultimately, ELMs were only suppressed when lithium caused the density pedestal to widen and shift inward. These changes in the density gradient were directly reflected in the pressure gradient and calculated bootstrap current. This supports the theory that ELMs in NSTX are caused by peeling and/or ballooning modes, as kink/peeling modes are stabilized when the edge current and pressure gradient shift away from the separatrix. Edge stability analysis using ELITE corroborated this picture, as reconstructed equilibria from ELM-free discharges were generally farther from their kink/peeling stability boundaries than ELMy discharges. We conclude that density profile control provided by lithium is the key first step to ELM suppression in NSTX

D.P. Boyle, R. Maingi, P.B. Snyder, J. Manickam, T.H. Osborne, R.E. Bell, B.P. LeBlanc, and the NSTX Team

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

51

Recent Progress on Spherical Torus Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R0/a) reduced to A ~ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ? 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta ? (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as ? ~ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation ?, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two megaampere class ST facilities in 2000, National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) in the US and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than sixteen ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all of fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

Ono, Masayuki [PPPL; Kaita, Robert [PPPL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

NSTX High Field Side Gas Fueling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fueling National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas with gas injected from the high field side (HFS) has produced earlier, more reliable transitions to the H-mode, longer H-mode durations, higher toroidal rotation, and higher edge electron temperature compared with similar discharges using the low field side (LFS) gas fueling injectors. The HFS gas fueling system consists of a Center Stack midplane injector, and an injector at the inner, upper corner of the Center Stack. The challenging design and installation constraints for the HFS gas system involved placing the control components as close as possible to the machine-vacuum interface, devising a special feed-through flange, traversing through vessel regions whose temperatures during bake-out range from 150 to 350 degrees Centigrade, adapting the gas transport tubing size and route to the small instrumentation wire channels behind the existing graphite plasma facing component tiles on the Center Stack, and providing output orifices shielded from excessive plasma power depositions while concentrating the output flow to facilitate fast camera viewing and analysis. Design, recent performance, and future upgrades will be presented.

H.W. Kugel; M. Anderson; G. Barnes; M. Bell; W. Blanchard; L. Dudek; D. Gates; R. Gernhardt; R. Maingi; D. Mueller; T. Provost; R. Raman; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Winston

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

53

Techniques for the measurement of disruption halo currents in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

This paper describes techniques for measuring halo currents, and their associated toroidal peaking, in the National Spherical Torus Experiments [M. Ono, et. al, Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The measurements are based on three techniques: (i) measurement of the toroidal field created by the poloidal halo current, either with segmented Rogowski coils or discrete toroidal field sensors, (ii) the direct measurement of halo currents into specially instrument tiles, and (iii) small Rogowski coils placed on the mechanical supports of in-vessel components. For the segmented Rogowski coils and discrete toroidal field detectors, it is shown that the toroidal peaking factor inferred from the data is significantly less than the peaking factor of the underlying halo current distribution, and a simple model is developed to relate the two. For the array of discrete toroidal field detectors and small Rogowski sensors, the compensation steps that are used to isolate the halo current signal are described. The electrical and mechanical design of compact under-tile resistive shunts and mini-Rogowski coils is described. Example data from the various systems is shown.

Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Fredrickson, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Guttadora, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kugel, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Menard, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Takahashi, H. [Princeton Fusion Research LLC, Princeton, NJ (United States)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

54

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan i Record;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan ii Table of Contents 1 ..............................................................................................................................1 1.2.1 DOE-approved project documents

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

55

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan i Record 10/12/2012 Update to WBS Level 2 Threshold (top of page 20), Change DOE Federal Project Director and Deputy Federal Project Director. Various OBS changes. #12;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

56

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan i Record/schedule baseline updates #12;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan ii ..............................................................................................................................1 1.2.1 DOE-approved project documents

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

57

An Overview of Recent Results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hopkins U Los Alamos NL Lawrence Livermore NL Lodestar MIT Nova Photonics, Inc. New York U Old Dominion U U Hiroshima U Hyogo U Kyoto U Kyushu U Kyushu Tokai U NIFS Niigata U U Tokyo JAEA Hebrew U Ioffe, Garching ASCR, Czech Rep U Quebec Supported by #12;Bell / NIFS seminar / 080916 2 "Spherical Torus" Extends

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

58

Fast ion absorption of the high harmonic fast wave in the National Spherical Torus Experiment a...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the high harmonic fast wave #HHFW# and energetic particles in a spherical torus #ST# #Ref. 1# is a new, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 R. W. Harvey CompX, Del Mar, California 92014 T. K. Mau University of California, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 J. Egedal Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts

Egedal, Jan

59

Snowflake divertor configuration studies for NSTX-Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX provide basis for PMI development toward NSTX-Upgrade. Snowflake configuration formation was followed by radiative detachment. Significant reduction of steady-state divertor heat flux observed in snowflake divertor. Impulsive heat loads due to Type I ELMs are partially mitigated in snowflake divertor. Magnetic control of snowflake divertor configuration is being developed. Plasma material interface development is critical for NSTX-U success. Four divertor coils should enable flexibility in boundary shaping and control in NSTX-U. Snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX provide good basis for PMI development in NSTX-Upgrade. FY 2009-2010 snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX: (1) Helped understand control of magnetic properties; (2) Core H-mode confinement unchanged; (3) Core and edge carbon concentration reduced; and (4) Divertor heat flux significantly reduced - (a) Steady-state reduction due to geometry and radiative detachment, (b) Encouraging results for transient heat flux handling, (c) Combined with impurity-seeded radiative divertor. Outlook for snowflake divertor in NSTX-Upgrade: (1) 2D fluid modeling of snowflake divertor properties scaling - (a) Edge and divertor transport, radiation, detachment threshold, (b) Compatibility with cryo-pump and lithium conditioning; (2) Magnetic control development; and (3) PFC development - PFC alignment and PFC material choice.

Soukhanovskii, V A

2011-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

60

Large Area Divertor Temperature Measurements Using A High-speed Camera With Near-infrared FiIters in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast cameras already installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have be equipped with near-infrared (NIR) filters in order to measure the surface temperature in the lower divertor region. Such a system provides a unique combination of high speed (> 50 kHz) and wide fi eld-of-view (> 50% of the divertor). Benchtop calibrations demonstrated the system's ability to measure thermal emission down to 330 oC. There is also, however, signi cant plasma light background in NSTX. Without improvements in background reduction, the current system is incapable of measuring signals below the background equivalent temperature (600 - 700 oC). Thermal signatures have been detected in cases of extreme divertor heating. It is observed that the divertor can reach temperatures around 800 oC when high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating is used. These temperature profiles were fi t using a simple heat diffusion code, providing a measurement of the heat flux to the divertor. Comparisons to other infrared thermography systems on NSTX are made.

Lyons, B C; Zweben, S J; Gray, T K; Hosea, J; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; Maqueda, R J; McLean, A G; Roquemore, A L; Soukhanovskii, V A

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Mass changes in NSTX Surface Layers with Li Conditioning as Measured by Quartz Microbalances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic retention, lithium deposition, and the stability of thick deposited layers were measured by three quartz crystal microbalances (QMB) deployed in plasma shadowed areas at the upper and lower divertor and outboard midplane in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Deposition of 185 {micro}/g/cm{sup 2} over 3 months in 2007 was measured by a QMB at the lower divertor while a QMB on the upper divertor, that was shadowed from the evaporator, received an order of magnitude less deposition. During helium glow discharge conditioning both neutral gas collisions and the ionization and subsequent drift of Li{sup +} interrupted the lithium deposition on the lower divertor. We present calculations of the relevant mean free paths. Occasionally strong variations in the QMB frequency were observed of thick lithium films suggesting relaxation of mechanical stress and/or flaking or peeling of the deposited layers.

C.H. Skinner, H.W. Kugel, A. L. Roquemore, PS. Krstic and A. Beste

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

NSTX LTXPEGASUS Compact CTF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

isotope retention. ST-CTF Compact ST-CTF at ~ 10 MA range provide a compact nuclear component test to NSTX. Large vacuum vessel, no stabilizing plates, excellent set of profile and boundary diagnostics

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

63

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Board (designated by Run Coordinator) MINOR MODIFICATIONS (Approved by Experimental Research in NSTX and DIII-D. Because the physics of ELM mitigation by non- axisymmetric fields is not established, this experiment is somewhat exploratory in nature. For instance, plasma targets with various edge q

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

64

NSTX-U Advances in Real-time C++11 on Linux  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Programming languages like C and Ada combined with proprietary embedded operating systems have dominated the real-time application space for decades. The new C++11standard includes native, language-level support for concurrency, a required feature for any nontrivial event-oriented real-time software. Threads, Locks, and Atomics now exist to provide the necessary tools to build the structures that make up the foundation of a complex real-time system. The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is breaking new ground with the language as applied to the needs of fusion devices. A new Digital Coil Protection System (DCPS) will serve as the main protection mechanism for the magnetic coils, and it is written entirely in C++11 running on Concurrent Computer Corporation's real-time operating system, RedHawk Linux. It runs over 600 algorithms in a 5 kHz control loop that determine whether or not to shut down operations before physical damage occurs. To accomplish this, NSTX-U engineers developed software tools that do not currently exist elsewhere, including real-time atomic synchronization, real-time containers, and a real-time logging framework. Together with a recent (and carefully configured) version of the GCC compiler, these tools enable data acquisition, processing, and output using a conventional operating system to meet a hard real-time deadline (that is, missing one periodic is a failure) of 200 microseconds.

Erickson, Keith G

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Design of interferometer system for Keda Torus eXperiment using terahertz solid-state diode sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solid-state source based terahertz (THz) interferometer diagnostic system has been designed and characterized for the Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX). The THz interferometer utilizes the planar diodes based frequency multiplier (X48) to provide the probing beam at fixed frequency 0.650 THz, and local oscillator is provided by an independent solid-state diode source with tunable frequency (0.650 THz +/? 10 MHz). Both solid-state sources have approximately 1 mW power. The planar-diode mixers optimized for high sensitivity, ?750 mV/mW, are used in the heterodyne detection system, which permits multichannel interferometer on KTX with a low phase noise. A sensitivity of {sub min} = 4.5 10{sup 16} m{sup ?2} and a temporal resolution of 0.2 ?s have been achieved during the initial bench test.

Xie, Jinlin, E-mail: jlxie@ustc.edu.cn; Wang, Haibo; Li, Hong; Lan, Tao; Liu, Adi; Liu, Wandong; Yu, Changxuan [School of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ding, Weixing [School of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); University of California-Los Angeles, P. O. Box 957099, Los Angeles, California 90095-7099 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

NSTX Computing and Controls Paul Sichta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Operations: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly #12;ITER NSTX #12;Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Motor : 6 12 MW BTF : 1 2 Tesla * Project is in the design stages #12;NSTX Control Room NSTX Computer

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

67

NSTX-U Control System Upgrades  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) is undergoing a wealth of upgrades (NSTX-U). These upgrades, especially including an elongated pulse length, require broad changes to the control system that has served NSTX well. A new fiber serial Front Panel Data Port input and output (I/O) stream will supersede the aging copper parallel version. Driver support for the new I/O and cyber security concerns require updating the operating system from Redhat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) v4 to RedHawk (based on RHEL) v6. While the basic control system continues to use the General Atomics Plasma Control System (GA PCS), the effort to forward port the entire software package to run under 64-bit Linux instead of 32-bit Linux included PCS modifications subsequently shared with GA and other PCS users. Software updates focused on three key areas: (1) code modernization through coding standards (C99/C11), (2) code portability and maintainability through use of the GA PCS code generator, and (3) support of 64-bit platforms. Central to the control system upgrade is the use of a complete real time (RT) Linux platform provided by Concurrent Computer Corporation, consisting of a computer (iHawk), an operating system and drivers (RedHawk), and RT tools (NightStar). Strong vendor support coupled with an extensive RT toolset influenced this decision. The new real-time Linux platform, I/O, and software engineering will foster enhanced capability and performance for NSTX-U plasma control.

Erickson, K G; Gates, D A; Gerhardt, S P; Lawson, J E; Mozulay, R; Sichta, P; Tchilinguirian, G J

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

NSTX Weekly Report (Mar. 19, 2010) FY 2010 NSTX plasma operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments in NSTX that provided support for this plasma-material interface (PMI) concept (http" divertor configuration may be a viable PMI solution for future conventional and spherical tokamaks. Initial was completed, and preparations started for its leak checking. Plasma Materials Interaction (PMI) Probe - J. P

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

69

Novel Use of Water Soluble "Aquapour" As A Temporary Spacer During Coil Winding For The NSTX-U Centerstack  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major facility upgrade to the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX-U) is currently underway at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). A key component of NSTX-U is the fabrication of a new, higher field centerstack (CS). In order to simultaneously provide robust joints between the inner and outer legs of the Toroidal Field Coils (TF) and minimize radial build, the NSTX-U CS design requires that the Ohmic Heating solenoid (OH) be wound directly on the inner TF bundle. To protect the OH against thermal expansion stress during scenarios where the inner TF bundle is hot but the OH is relatively cool, the completed CS will have a 0.100 inch annular gap between the outer diameter of the TF bundle and the inner diameter of the OH solenoid. "Aquapour", a proprietary material produced by the Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Company will be used during manufacture to produce this gap. After the TF bundle is vacuum pressure impregnated and cured, a cylindrical "clam shell" mold will be assembled around it, and a slurry of powdered Aquapour and water will be pumped into the annular space between the mold and TF bundle. Subsequent baking will turn the Aquapour solid, and a protective layer of wet lay-up fiberglass and resin will be added. The OH solenoid will be wound directly on this wet lay-up shell. After vacuum pressure impregnation of the OH, the water soluble Aquapour will be washed away, leaving the required radial clearance between the TF and OH. This paper will describe prototyping and testing of this process, and plans for use on the actual CS fabrication.

Mardenfeld, Michael

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan Appendix 1 - WBS Dictionary 25 Appendix 1 - NSTX Upgrade Project Work Breakdown Structure This Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) organizes and defines the scope of the NSTX Upgrade using the WBS as established by the original NSTX project and modified

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

71

Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in microtearing-dominated National Spherical Torus eXperiment plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A representative H-mode discharge from the National Spherical Torus eXperiment is studied in detail to utilize it as a basis for a time-evolving prediction of the electron temperature profile using an appropriate reduced transport model. The time evolution of characteristic plasma variables such as ?{sub e},??{sub e}{sup ?}, the MHD ? parameter, and the gradient scale lengths of T{sub e}, T{sub i}, and n{sub e} were examined as a prelude to performing linear gyrokinetic calculations to determine the fastest growing micro instability at various times and locations throughout the discharge. The inferences from the parameter evolutions and the linear stability calculations were consistent. Early in the discharge, when ?{sub e} and ?{sub e}{sup ?} were relatively low, ballooning parity modes were dominant. As time progressed and both ?{sub e} and ?{sub e}{sup ?} increased, microtearing became the dominant low-k{sub ?} mode, especially in the outer half of the plasma. There are instances in time and radius, however, where other modes, at higher-k{sub ?}, may, in addition to microtearing, be important for driving electron transport. Given these results, the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins (RLW) electron thermal diffusivity model, which is based on microtearing-induced transport, was used to predict the time-evolving electron temperature across most of the profile. The results indicate that RLW does a good job of predicting T{sub e} for times and locations where microtearing was determined to be important, but not as well when microtearing was predicted to be stable or subdominant.

Kaye, S. M., E-mail: skaye@pppl.gov; Guttenfelder, W.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

NSTX Failure Modes & Effects Analysis / NSTX-FMEA-71-10 / p. 1 of 115 FAILURE MODES AND EFFECTS ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Failure Modes & Effects Analysis / NSTX-FMEA-71-10 / p. 1 of 115 NSTX FAILURE MODES AND EFFECTS ANALYSIS (FMEA) Revision 10 Dated: November 2014 Prepared By: Name/WBS Signature Name: ________________________________________________ Ron Strykowsky, NSTX Upgrade Project Manager #12;NSTX Failure Modes & Effects Analysis / NSTX-FMEA-71

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

73

Final Scientific/Technical Report, USDOE Award DE-FG-02ER54684, Recipient: CompX, Project Title: Fokker-Planck/Ray Tracing for Electron Bernstein and Fast Wave Modeling in Support of NSTX.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE grant supported fusion energy research, a potential long-term solution to the world's energy needs. Magnetic fusion, exemplified by confinement of very hot ionized gases, i.e., plasmas, in donut-shaped tokamak vessels is a leading approach for this energy source. Thus far, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes has produced 10's of megawatts of fusion power for seconds in a tokamak reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey. The research grant under consideration, ER54684, uses computer models to aid in understanding and projecting efficacy of heating and current drive sources in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, a tokamak variant, at PPPL. The NSTX experiment explores the physics of very tight aspect ratio, almost spherical tokamaks, aiming at producing steady-state fusion plasmas. The current drive is an integral part of the steady-state concept, maintaining the magnetic geometry in the steady-state tokamak. CompX further developed and applied models for radiofrequency (rf) heating and current drive for applications to NSTX. These models build on a 30 year development of rf ray tracing (the all-frequencies GENRAY code) and higher dimensional Fokker-Planck rf-collisional modeling (the 3D collisional-quasilinear CQL3D code) at CompX. Two mainline current-drive rf modes are proposed for injection into NSTX: (1) electron Bernstein wave (EBW), and (2) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) modes. Both these current drive systems provide a means for the rf to access the especially high density plasma--termed high beta plasma--compared to the strength of the required magnetic fields. The CompX studies entailed detailed modeling of the EBW to calculate the efficiency of the current drive system, and to determine its range of flexibility for driving current at spatial locations in the plasma cross-section. The ray tracing showed penetration into NSTX bulk plasma, relatively efficient current drive, but a limited ability to produce current over the whole radial plasma cross-section. The actual EBW experiment will cost several million dollars, and remains in the proposal stage. The HHFW current drive system has been experimentally implemented on NSTX, and successfully drives substantial current. The understanding of the experiment is to be accomplished in terms of general concepts of rf current drive, and also detailed modeling of the experiment which can discern the various competing processes which necessarily occur simultaneously in the experiment. An early discovery of the CompX codes, GENRAY and CQL3D, was that there could be significant interference between the neutral beam injection fast ions in the machine (injected for plasma heating) and the HHFW energy. Under many NSTX experimental conditions, power which could go to the fast ions would then be unavailable for current drive by the desired HHFW interaction with electrons. This result has been born out by experiments; the modeling helps in understanding difficulties with HHFW current drive, and has enabled adjustment of the experiment to avoid interaction with neutral beam injected fast ions thereby achieving stronger HHFW current drive. The detailed physics modeling of the various competing processes is almost always required in fusion energy plasma physics, to ensure a reasonably accurate and certain interpretation of the experiment, enabling the confident design of future, more advanced experiments and ultimately a commercial fusion reactor. More recent work entails detailed investigation of the interaction of the HHFW radiation for fast ions, accounting for the particularly large radius orbits in NSTX, and correlations between multiple HHFW-ion interactions. The spherical aspect of the NSTX experiment emphasized particular physics such as the large orbits which are present to some degree in all tokamaks, but gives clearer clues on the resulting physics phenomena since competing physics effects are reduced.

R.W. Harvey, CompX, Del Mar, CA 92014

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

74

HHFW absorption in Neutral-Beam heated NSTX plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HHFW absorption in Neutral-Beam heated NSTX plasmas B. LeBlanc, M. Podestà, W. Heidbrink XP -1012 ions Need to characterize RF absorption as a function of RF phasing, L vs. H-mode plasmas, outer gap, optimized for FIDA measurements · Similar to 2008 FIDA experiment on RF absorption by fast ions · NB sources

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

75

Progress In Understanding The Enhanced Petestal H-mode In NSTX  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from the plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.

Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory; Canik, J. M. [ORNL; Maingi, R. [PPPL; Battaglia, D. [PPPL; Bell, R. E. [PPPL; Guttenfelder, W. [PPPL; LeBlanc, B. P. [PPPL; Smith, D. R. [U. Wisconsin-Madison; Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics; Sabbagh, S. [Columbia Univ

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

76

Progress In Understanding The Enhanced Petestal H-mode In NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ThIS paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from the plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.

none,

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

Progress in understanding the enhanced pedestal H-mode in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from the plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.

Gerhardt, S.P.; Canik, J.M; Maingi, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, R.E.; Guttenfelder, W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Smith, D.R.; Yuh, H.; Sabbagh, S.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Torus instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expansion instability of a toroidal current ring in low-beta magnetized plasma is investigated. Qualitative agreement is obtained with experiments on spheromak expansion and with essential properties of solar coronal mass ejections, unifying the two apparently disparate classes of fast and slow coronal mass ejections.

B. Kliem; T. Toeroek

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

79

NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

80

Lithium Wall Conditioning And Surface Dust Detection On NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium evaporation onto NSTX plasma facing components (PFC) has resulted in improved energy confinement, and reductions in the number and amplitude of edge-localized modes (ELMs) up to the point of complete ELM suppression. The associated PFC surface chemistry has been investigated with a novel plasma material interface probe connected to an in-vacuo surface analysis station. Analysis has demonstrated that binding of D atoms to the polycrystalline graphite material of the PFCs is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular deuterium atoms become weakly bonded near lithium atoms themselves bound to either oxygen or the carbon from the underlying material. Surface dust inside NSTX has been detected in real-time using a highly sensitive electrostatic dust detector. In a separate experiment, electrostatic removal of dust via three concentric spiral-shaped electrodes covered by a dielectric and driven by a high voltage 3-phase waveform was evaluated for potential application to fusion reactors

Skinner, C H; Bell, M G; Friesen, F.Q.L.; Heim, B; Jaworski, M A; Kugel, H; Maingi, R; Rais, B

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lithium Surface Coatings for Improved Plasma Performance in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NSTX high-power divertor plasma experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and frequent benefits from lithium coatings applied to plasma facing components. Lithium pellet injection on NSTX introduced lithium pellets with masses 1 to 5 mg via He discharges. Lithium coatings have also been applied with an oven that directed a collimated stream of lithium vapor toward the graphite tiles of the lower center stack and divertor. Lithium depositions from a few mg to 1 g have been applied between discharges. Benefits from the lithium coating were sometimes, but not always seen. These improvements sometimes included decreases plasma density, inductive flux consumption, and ELM frequency, and increases in electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement and periods of MHD quiescence. In addition, reductions in lower divertor D, C, and O luminosity were measured.

Kugel, H W; Ahn, J -W; Allain, J P; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaye, S; Kaita, R; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Timberlake, J; Wampler, W R

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

82

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan 6 PPPL Laboratory Director S.Prager Deputy Director.Gentile Centerstack Dsgn & Fab J. Chrzanowski NSTX Upgrade Project Manager R. Strykowsky Deputy and Construction Manager E. Perry Project Controls S. Langish NSTXCenterstack Manager L. Dudek NSTXNeutral Beam Manager T

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

83

Work Authorization Document NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Work Authorization Document NSTX Upgrade Project Control Account #: 1302 Title: WBS 1.1.11 Title Functional Manager P. Heitzenroeder Approvals Signature Date NSTX-U Project Manager R. Strykowsky 4- WBS and includes design modifications and upgrade of the coil assembly stand; procedures for assembling the Center

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

84

Work Authorization Document NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Work Authorization Document NSTX Upgrade Project Control Account #: 7900 Title: WBS 1.7.3 Title Functional Manager L. Dudek Approvals Signature Date NSTX-U Project Manager R. Strykowsky 4- WBS Dictionary procedures and documents to support the integrated tests, and to support performance of the pre

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

85

Experimental studies on fast-ion transport by Alfven wave avalanches on the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-linearities may compromise a direct comparison between experiment and theory. PACS numbers: I. INTRODUCTION a linear magneto-hydrodynamics stability code. The comparison with experimental data suggests that non or neutral beams (NB), may open new avenues to control the behavior of a fusion reactor. Paper GI1 1, Bull

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

86

Simulation of Diffusive Lithium Evaporation Onto the NSTX Vessel Walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for simulating the diffusive evaporation of lithium into a helium filled NSTX vacuum vessel is described and validated against an initial set of deposition experiments. The DEGAS 2 based model consists of a three-dimensional representation of the vacuum vessel, the elastic scattering process, and a kinetic description of the evaporated atoms. Additional assumptions are required to account for deuterium out-gassing during the validation experiments. The model agrees with the data over a range of pressures to within the estimated uncertainties. Suggestions are made for more discriminating experiments that will lead to an improved model.

Stotler, D. P.; Skinner, C. H.; Blanchard, W. R.; Krstic, P. S.; Kugel, H. W.; Schneider, H.; Zakharov, L. E.

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

88

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and that this may effect the energy confinement time as well as provide current drive. Of course, other effects mayPrinceton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal Title: CHI into an ohmic discharge

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

89

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mode reflectometry. The electron density scale length (Ln) at the B-X mode conversion layer is an important parameter at the B-X conversion layer. The antenna includes a port for a gas injection valve. #12;NSTX Experimental the Conversion of EBWs to X-Mode on NSTX OP-XP-404 Revision: 0 Effective Date: December 10, 2003 (Ref. OP-AD-97

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

90

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mode reflectometry. The electron density scale length (Ln) at the B-X mode conversion layer is an important parameter at the B-X conversion layer. The antenna includes a port for a gas injection valve. #12;NSTX Experimental the Conversion of EBWs to X-Mode on NSTX OP-XP- 308 Revision: 3 Effective Date: February 10, 2003 (Ref. OP-AD-97

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

91

Page 1 of 17 NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFORMATION Project Title: NSTX Upgrade Project at PPPL Total Project Cost (TPC) Range: $74.7M to $92.9M CD-0 Range 2.1 Total Project Cost Range The preliminary total project cost (TPC) range is $74.7M - $92.9M. 2Page 1 of 17 NSTX Upgrade Project Acquisition Strategy April 5, 2010 #12;Page 2 of 17 Change Log

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

92

NSTX Weekly Report (August 27, 2010) FY 2010 NSTX plasma operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were prepared for the 19th International Conference on Plasma Surface Interactions that was held in San Diego, CA on May 24-28, 2010: "Deuterium Retention in NSTX with Lithium Conditioning" by C.H. Skinner-attachment in discharges with lithium coatings in NSTX " by F. Scotti , and "Turbulent Transport and the Scrape

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

93

NSTX Weekly Report (Jan. 15, 2009) FY 2010 NSTX plasma operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

preparations to close and pump-down the NSTX vacuum vessel. Some rework and testing of the Beam Emission duct is scheduled for next week, and will be followed by vessel pump-down. Access to the NSTX test cell published in Nuclear Fusion. The paper describes high beta stability sustainment to resistive wall modes

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

94

NSTX Weekly Report (November 24, 2010) FY 2011 NSTX plasma operations started on October 4, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in NSTX" by V. A. Soukhanovskii (LLNL) et al. has been accepted for publication in Nuclear Fusion Operations (A. von Halle, C. Neumeyer) The NSTX outage continued this past week with in-vessel diagnostic removed and brought to the Vacuum Prep Lab for transmission testing. A water leak was discovered

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

95

NSTX PLASMA START-UP USING TRANSIENT COAXIAL HELICITY INJECTION D. Mueller1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experimental measurements made on NSTX include fast time-scale visible imaging of the entire process. I generation of ST experiments, and essential for an ST reactor, that the central solenoid be replaced by other schematically in Fig. 2. When gas is introduced into the volume below the lower divertor gap and a voltage (1

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

96

Recent Progress in the NSTX/NSTX-U Lithium Program and Prospects for Reactor-Relevant Liquid-Lithium Based Divertor Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing a reactor compatible divertor has been identified as a particularly challenging technology problem for magnetic confinement fusion. While tungsten has been identified as the most attractive solid divertor material, the NSTX/NSTX-U lithium (Li) program is investigating the viability of liquid lithium (LL) as a potential reactor compatible divertor plasma facing component (PFC) . In the near term, operation in NSTX-U is projected to provide reactor-like divertor heat loads < 40 MW/m^2 for 5 s. During the most recent NSTX campaign, ~ 0.85 kg of Li was evaporated onto the NSTX PFCs where a ~50% reduction in heat load on the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) was observed, attributable to enhanced divertor bolometric radiation. This reduced divertor heat flux through radiation observed in the NSTX LLD experiment is consistent with the results from other lithium experiments and calculations. These results motivate an LL-based closed radiative divertor concept proposed here for NSTX-U and fusion reactors. With an LL coating, the Li is evaporated from the divertor strike point surface due to the intense heat. The evaporated Li is readily ionized by the plasma due to its low ionization energies, and the ionized Li ions can radiate strongly, resulting in a significant reduction in the divertor heat flux. Due to the rapid plasma transport in divertor plasma, the radiation values can be significantly enhanced up to ~ 11 MJ/cc of LL. This radiative process has the desired function of spreading the focused divertor heat load to the entire divertor chamber facilitating the divertor heat removal. The LL divertor surface can also provide a "sacrificial" surface to protect the substrate solid material from transient high heat flux such as the ones caused by the ELMs. The closed radiative LLD concept has the advantages of providing some degree of partition in terms of plasma disruption forces on the LL, Li particle divertor retention, and strong divertor pumping action from the Li-coated divertor chamber wall. By operating at a lower temperature than the first wall, the LLD can serve to purify the entire reactor chamber, as impurities generally migrate toward lower temperature Li-condensed surfaces. To maintain the LL purity, a closed LL loop system with a modest capacity (e.g., ~ 1 Liter/sec for ~ 1% level "impurities") is envisioned for a steady-state 1 GW-electric class fusion power plant.

M. Ono, et al.

2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

97

NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) Design Status and Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) Design Status and Plans Office of Science H. W. Kugel, PPPL Design Status and Plans (Kugel) 2July 28, 2008 Motivation for NSTX Lithium Research · NSTX research with solid lithium is aimed initially towards using liquid lithium to control density, edge collisionality

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

98

Data Analysis Tools for NSTX-U Physics Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Analysis Tools for NSTX-U Bill Davis Stan Kaye Physics Meeting B-318 Aug. 26, 2013 NSTX LLC #12;NSTX-U Monday Physics Meeting Data Analysis Tools, Bill Davis (8/26/2013) 2 Overview Web Tools in depth Overlaying in different ways Browsing Fast Camera data EFITmovies and EFITviewer

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

99

NSTX Program Governance, Research Support and Facility Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of DPP, 3 PU faculty) · Graduate students & post-doc (from PU) · Engineering expertise: designNSTX Program Governance, Research Support and Facility Operation Office of Science M.G. Bell, PPPL for the NSTX Research Team NSTX 5 Year Plan Review for 2009-13 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory July 28

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

100

Diagnostic options for radiative divertor feedback control on NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiative divertor technique is used in present tokamak experiments and planned for ITER to mitigate high heat loads on divertor plasma-facing components (PFCs) to prevent excessive material erosion and thermal damage. In NSTX, a large spherical tokamak with lithium-coated graphite PFCs and high divertor heat flux (q{sub peak} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 15 MW/m{sup 2}), radiative divertor experiments have demonstrated a significant reduction of divertor peak heat flux simultaneously with good core H-mode confinement using pre-programmed D{sub 2} or CD{sub 4} gas injections. In this work diagnostic options for a new real-time feedback control system for active radiative divertor detachment control in NSTX-U, where steady-state peak divertor heat fluxes are projected to reach 20-30 MW/m{sup 2}, are discussed. Based on the NSTX divertor detachment measurements and analysis, the control diagnostic signals available for NSTX-U include divertor radiated power, neutral pressure, spectroscopic deuterium recombination signatures, infrared thermography of PFC surfaces, and thermoelectric scrape-off layer current. In addition, spectroscopic 'security' monitoring of possible confinement or pedestal degradation is recommended. These signals would be implemented in a digital plasma control system to manage the divertor detachment process via an actuator (impurity gas seeding rate).

Soukhanovskii, V. A.; McLean, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94550 (United States); Gerhardt, S. P.; Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Raman, R. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

NSTX-U Office of Science Review (10/ 2 & 3 /2013) L. Dudek, N. Atnafu, R. Hatcher, R. Kaita,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U Wisconsin X Science LLC Ancillary Systems 1 #12;NSTX-U NSTX Upgrade Project ­ Office of Science by Hatcher / Erickson 2 #12;NSTX-U NSTX Upgrade Project ­ Office of Science Review ­ October 2-3,, 2013 Weldments OTF Outer Ring / Links #12;NSTX-U NSTX Upgrade Project ­ Office of Science Review ­ October 2

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

103

Overview of Innovative PMI Research on NSTX-U and Associated PMI Facilities at PPPL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTXU, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. With ~ 15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2 . To support the PMI research, a comprehensive set of PMI diagnostic tools are being implemented. The snow-flake configuration can produce exceptionally high divertor flux expansion of up to ~ 50. Combined with the radiative divertor concept, the snow-flake configuration has reduced the divertor heat flux by an order of magnitude in NSTX. Another area of active PMI investigation is the effect of divertor lithium coating (both in solid and liquid phases). The overall NSTX lithium PFC coating results suggest exciting opportunities for future magnetic confinement research including significant electron energy confinement improvements, Hmode power threshold reduction, the control of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), and high heat flux handling. To support the NSTX-U/PPPL PMI research, there are also a number of associated PMI facilities implemented at PPPL/Princeton University including the Liquid Lithium R&D facility, Lithium Tokamak Experiment, and Laboratories for Materials Characterization and Surface Chemistry.

M. Ono, M. Jaworski, R. Kaita, C. N. Skinner, J.P. Allain, R. Maingi, F. Scotti, V.A. Soukhanovskii, and the NSTX-U Team

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

104

Reduction of plasma density in the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance experiment by using a helicon pre-ionization source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A helicon based pre-ionization source has been developed and installed on the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance (HIT-SI) spheromak. The source initiates plasma breakdown by injecting impurity-free, unmagnetized plasma into the HIT-SI confinement volume. Typical helium spheromaks have electron density reduced from (23) 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3} to 1 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}. Deuterium spheromak formation is possible with density as low as 2 10{sup 18} m{sup ?3}. The source also enables HIT-SI to be operated with only one helicity injector at injector frequencies above 14.5 kHz. A theory explaining the physical mechanism driving the reduction of breakdown density is presented.

Hossack, Aaron C.; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Victor, Brian S. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Firman, Taylor; Prager, James R.; Ziemba, Timothy [Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc., 119 W. Denny Way, Suite 210, Seattle, Washington 98119 (United States)] [Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc., 119 W. Denny Way, Suite 210, Seattle, Washington 98119 (United States); Wrobel, Jonathan S. [979B West Moorhead Circle, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)] [979B West Moorhead Circle, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Machine Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-XMP-62 2 / 5 REVIEWERS (designated by RLM) Organization/Position Name Signature ATI Test Director designated by RLM NSTX Work Permit T-MOD (OP-AD-03) Independent Review ES&H Review MINOR MODIFICATIONS #12;OP Independent Reviewer NB RF Diagnostics TRAINING (designated by RLM) Training required: No Yes Instructor

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

106

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Machine Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-XMP-58 2 / 5 REVIEWERS (designated by RLM) Organization/Position Name Signature ATI Test Director designated by RLM NSTX Work Permit T-MOD (OP-AD-03) Independent Review ES&H Review MINOR MODIFICATIONS #12;OP Independent Reviewer NB RF Diagnostics TRAINING (designated by RLM) Training required: No Yes Instructor

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

107

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Machine Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINOR MODIFICATIONS #12;OP-XMP-60 2 / 6 REVIEWERS (designated by RLM) Organization/Position Name Procedure Requirements designated by RLM NSTX Work Permit T-MOD (OP-AD-03) Independent Review ES&H Review Signature ATI D. Mueller Test Director D. Gates Independent Reviewer NB M. Cropper RF Diagnostics TRAINING

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

108

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal Title: Dependence of ELM size Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) have yielded a pedestal energy loss fraction between 5% and 20 with resonant magnetic perturbations2 or by access to small ELM regimes. Fig. 1 from reference1 , where

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

109

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal Title: Dependence of ELM size Projections1 of the energy loss from Type I ELMs for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor perturbations2 or by access to small ELM regimes. Fig. 1 from reference1 , where extrapolation to ITER is done

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

110

Driving EHOs in NSTX Rob Goldston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driving EHOs in NSTX Rob Goldston September 8, 2010 #12;Houston, We have a Problem Lithium rises. This is not good, but it is not because the lithium is not pumping deuterium. In the absence in most respects to RWM interactions - but in rotating frame. Being examined by J-K Park and A. Boozer

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

111

Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFC's) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, T-11M, and FT-U. Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

Kaita, R

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFCOs) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, [1] T-11M, [2] and FT-U. [3] Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. [4] The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

Kaita, R; Ahn, J -W; Allain, J P; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Stotler, D; Timberlake, J; Wampler, W R; Wilgen, J B

2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

113

NSTX Real-Time Control GUI User's Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the use of the Power Supply Real-Time Control (PSRTC) Graphical User Interface (GUI), shown below. AsideNSTX Real-Time Control GUI User's Guide March 28, 2008 #12;This document is meant to describe from the PCS, the NSTX control system is made up of several executables/applications that each function

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

114

Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from the simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [S. M. Kaye, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.

Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Russell, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); D'Ippolito, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Ahn, J- W [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maqueda, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Lundberg, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Stotler, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Boedo, J. [Univ. of California at San Diego, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

Comparison of Small ELM Characteristics and Regimes in Alcator C-Mod, MAST, and NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the status of a set of ITPA-coordinated experiments between the Alcator C-Mod, MAST and NSTX devices to compare the characteristics and access conditions of discharges with small edge-localized modes (ELMs). The small ELMs in C-Mod, MAST and one of the two small ELM types in NSTX exist when {beta}{sub ped}{sup pol} approached 10-15%, although the lower/upper limits of the operational windows differ. These small ELM regimes appear in diverted configurations very close to balanced double-null in each device. We classify these small ELMs as type II, based on the published characteristics from a number of previous studies. In addition, these type II ELMs in each device had multiple filaments with propagation in the co-I{sub p} or ion diamagnetic drift direction. Moreover, we conclude that these type II ELMs are distinct from the type V ELMs routinely observed in NSTX, which have one or two filaments and propagate in the electron diamagnetic drift direction.

Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Hubbard, A.E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Meyer, H. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Hughes, J.W. [UKAEA Fusion, Culham UK; Kirk, A. [UKAEA Fusion, Culham UK; Maqueda, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Terry, J. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

NSTX Weekly Report (May 28, 2010) FY 2010 NSTX plasma operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Twelve papers have been submitted for publication in Journal of Nuclear Materials. The poster given Lithium Evaporation onto the NSTX Vessel Walls" by D. Stotler, "Macroscopic Motion of Liquid Metal Plasma operations resumed this past week after completion of combined field power testing, leading to the successful

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

117

Efficient Subtorus Processor Allocation in a Multi-Dimensional Torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Processor allocation in a mesh or torus connected multicomputer system with up to three dimensions is a hard problem that has received some research attention in the past decade. With the recent deployment of multicomputer systems with a torus topology of dimensions higher than three, which are used to solve complex problems arising in scientific computing, it becomes imminent to study the problem of allocating processors of the configuration of a torus in a multi-dimensional torus connected system. In this paper, we first define the concept of a semitorus. We present two partition schemes, the Equal Partition (EP) and the Non-Equal Partition (NEP), that partition a multi-dimensional semitorus into a set of sub-semitori. We then propose two processor allocation algorithms based on these partition schemes. We evaluate our algorithms by incorporating them in commonly used FCFS and backfilling scheduling policies and conducting simulation using workload traces from the Parallel Workloads Archive. Specifically, our simulation experiments compare four algorithm combinations, FCFS/EP, FCFS/NEP, backfilling/EP, and backfilling/NEP, for two existing multi-dimensional torus connected systems. The simulation results show that our algorithms (especially the backfilling/NEP combination) are capable of producing schedules with system utilization and mean job bounded slowdowns comparable to those in a fully connected multicomputer.

Weizhen Mao; Jie Chen; William Watson

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

Cao, A.; Zweben, S. J.; Stotler, D. P.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Procedure Title: Access to NSTX Experimental Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX D-Site Caretaking Vacuum Computer Tritium Quality Assurance/Quality Control AC Power Maintenance of this procedure is to delineate the rules and requirements for access to the NSTX experimental areas

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

120

The torus instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expansion instability of a toroidal current ring in low-beta magnetized plasma is investigated. Qualitative agreement is obtained with experiments on spheromak expansion and with essential properties of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs), unifying the two apparently disparate classes of fast and slow CMEs.

Kliem, B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Plasma Performance Improvement with Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium as a plasma-facing material has many attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Recent NSTX experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium coatings on plasma-facing components (PFC's) to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. They included decreases in the plasma density and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate. Extended periods of MHD quiescence were also achieved, and measurements of the visible emission from the lower divertor showed a reduction in the deuterium, carbon, and oxygen line emission. Other salient results with lithium evaporation included a broadening of the electron temperature profile, and changes in edge density gradients that benefited electron Bernstein wave coupling. There was also a reduction in ELM frequency and amplitude, followed by a period of complete ELM suppression. In general, it was observed that both the best and the average confinement occurred after lithium deposition and that the increase in WMHD occurs mostly through an increase in We. In addition, a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) is being installed on NSTX this year. As the first fully-toroidal liquid metal divertor target, experiments with the LLD can provide insight into the behavior of metallic ITER PFC's should they liquefy during high-power divertor tokamak operations. The NSTX lithium coating and LLD experiments are important near-term steps in demonstrating the potential of liquid lithium as a solution to the first-wall problem for both magnetic and inertial fusion reactors.

Kaita, R; Kugel, H; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Ellis, R; Gates, D; Gerhardt, S; Gray, T; Kallman, J; Kaye, S; LeBlanc, B; Majeski, R; Maingi, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, S H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Stotler, D; Timberlake, J; Zakharov, L; Ahn, J; Allain, J P; Wampler, W R

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Plasma Performance Improvement with Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium as a plasma-facing material has many attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Recent NSTX experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium coatings on plasma-facing components (PFC's) to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. They included decreases in the plasma density and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate. Extended periods of MHD quiescence were also achieved, and measurements of the visible emission from the lower divertor showed a reduction in the deuterium, carbon, and oxygen line emission. Other salient results with lithium evaporation included a broadening of the electron temperature profile, and changes in edge density gradients that benefited electron Bernstein wave coupling. There was also a reduction in ELM frequency and amplitude, followed by a period of complete ELM suppression. In general, it was observed that both the best and the average confinement occurred after lithium deposition and that the increase in WMHD occurs mostly through an increase in We. In addition, a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) is being installed on NSTX this year. As the first fully-toroidal liquid metal divertor target, experiments with the LLD can provide insight into the behavior of metallic ITER PFC's should they liquefy during high-power divertor tokamak operations. The NSTX lithium coating and LLD experiments are important near-term steps in demonstrating the potential of liquid lithium as a solution to the first-wall problem for both magnetic and inertial fusion reactors.

Kaita, R., et. al.

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

123

Turbo Pump Magnetic Shielding Analysis NSTX-CALC-24-04-00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Turbo Pump Magnetic Shielding Analysis NSTX-CALC-24-04-00 March 16, 2011 Prepared By turbo pump to reduce the fringe field from NSTX coils at the pump location to below 50 gauss to be at least 12 inches longer than the pump (6 inches above the top and below the bottom of the turbo pump

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

124

BPM, 3/12-13/02 NSTX Research Plan Supported by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BPM, 3/12-13/02 NSTX Research Plan Supported by Martin Peng Oak Ridge National Laboratory, UT to accelerate research in FY03-04 to meet the FESAC 5-year Objective on ST #12;BPM, 3/12-13/02 NSTX Research programs #12;BPM, 3/12-13/02 NSTX Research Plan U.S. Collaborative Team members make crucial contributions

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

125

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for plasma boundary control [D. A. Gates, etal., submitted to Nuclear Fusion (2005)]. More recently Physics Laboratory Status of the Control System on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) D://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm #12;Status of the Control System on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) D. A. Gatesa , J. R

126

Deuterium Retention in NSTX with Lithium Conditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High (? 90%) deuterium retention was observed in NSTX gas balance measurements both withand without lithiumization of the carbon plasma facing components. The gas retained in ohmic discharges was measured by comparing the vessel pressure rise after a discharge to that of a gasonly pulse with the pumping valves closed. For neutral beam heated discharges the gas input and gas pumped by the NB cryopanels were tracked. The discharges were followed by outgassing of deuterium that reduced the retention. The relationship between retention and surface chemistry was explored with a new plasma-material interface probe connected to an in-vacuo surface science station that exposed four material samples to the plasma. XPS and TDS analysis showed that the binding of D atoms is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular atoms are weakly bonded in regions near lithium atoms bound to either oxygen or the carbon matrix.

C.H. Skinner, J.P. Allain, W. Blanchard, H.W. Kugel, R. Maingi, L. Roquemore, V. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

127

Supported by National Spherical Torus Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Materials Interactions, Advanced Physics, Nuclear Component Testing Burning Plasma Physics ST offers compact geometry / ITER Operations Passive plates Blanket modules Port Control Coils Control Coils ITER vessel ITER plasma

128

Simulations of NSTX with a Liquid Lithium Divertor Module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UEDGE edge plasma transport code is used to model the effect of the reduced recycling provided by the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) module that will be installed in NSTX. UEDGE's transport coefficients are calibrated against an existing NSTX shot using midplane and divertor diagnostic data. The LLD is then incorporated into the simulations as a reduction in the recycling coefficient over the outer divertor. Heat transfer calculations performed using the resulting heat flux profiles indicate that lithium evaporation will be negligible for pulse lengths < 2 s at low (? 2 MW) input power. At high input power (? 7 MW), the pulse length may have to be restricted.

D. P. Stotler, R. Maingi, H.W. Kugel, A. Yu. Pigarov, T.D. Rognlien, V.A. Soukhanovskii

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaporated Lithium Surface Coatings in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two lithium evaporators were used to evaporate more than 100 g of lithium on to the NSTX lower divertor region. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators were withdrawn behind shutters, where they also remained during the subsequent HeGDC applied for periods up to 9.5 min. After the HeGDC, the shutters were opened and the LITERs were reinserted to deposit lithium on the lower divertor target for 10 min, at rates of 10-70 mg/min, prior to the next discharge. The major improvements in plasma performance from these lithium depositions include: 1) plasma density reduction as a result of lithium deposition; 2) suppression of ELMs; 3) improvement of energy confinement in a low-triangularity shape; 4) improvement in plasma performance for standard, high-triangularity discharges; 5) reduction of the required HeGDC time between discharges; 6) increased pedestal electron and ion temperature; 7) reduced SOL plasma density; and 8) reduced edge neutral density.

Kugel, H. W.; Mansfield, D.; Maingi, R.; Bel, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Allain, J. P.; Gates, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.

2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

130

Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

S.P. Gerhardt

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

Health and Safety Plan for NSTX Upgrade Project Tasks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

describes the structure and implementation of the Health and Safety Plan for the NSTX Upgrade Project work Safety Management Objective of this project is: 1. To integrate safety into all work management and work to Work Being Performed Operations Authorization This Integrated Safety Management Plan describes

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

132

Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

3D TORUS V1.0  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002440MLTPL00 3D Torus Routing Engine Module for OFA OpenSM v. 1.0 http://www.openfabrics.org/git?p=sashak/management.git;a=sum

134

The role of parallel heat transport in the relation between upstream scrape-off layer widths and target heat flux width in H-mode plasmas of NSTX.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physics of parallel heat transport was tested in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000) and S. M. Kaye, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S168 (2005)] tokamak by comparing the upstream electron temperature (T{sub e}) and density (n{sub e}) profiles measured by the mid-plane reciprocating probe to the heat flux (q{sub {perpendicular}}) profile at the divertor plate measured by an infrared (IR) camera. It is found that electron conduction explains the near SOL width data reasonably well while the far SOL, which is in the sheath limited regime, requires an ion heat flux profile broader than the electron one to be consistent with the experimental data. The measured plasma parameters indicate that the SOL energy transport should be in the conduction-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} (radial distance from the separatrix location) < 2-3 cm. The SOL energy transport should transition to the sheath-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm. The T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and q{sub {perpendicular}} profiles are better described by an offset exponential function instead of a simple exponential. The conventional relation between mid plane electron temperature decay length ({lambda}{sub Te}) and target heat flux decay length ({lambda}{sub q}) is {lambda}{sub Te} = 7/2{lambda}{sub q}, whereas the newly-derived relation, assuming offset exponential functional forms, implies {lambda}{sub Te} = (2-2.5){lambda}{sub q}. The measured values of {lambda}{sub Te}/{lambda}{sub q} differ from the new prediction by 25-30%. The measured {lambda}{sub q} values in the far SOL (R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm) are 9-10cm, while the expected values are 2.7 < {lambda}{sub q} < 4.9 cm (for sheath-limited regime). We propose that the ion heat flux profile is substantially broader than the electron heat flux profile as an explanation for this discrepancy in the far SOL.

Ahn, J W; Boedo, J A; Maingi, R; Soukhanovskii, V A

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

135

Low-noise, high-speed detector development for optical turbulence fluctuation measurements for NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic is under development. Photon-noise limited measurements of neutral beam emissions are achieved using photoconductive photodiodes with a novel frequency-compensated broadband preamplifier. The new BES system includes a next-generation preamplifier and upgraded optical coupling system. Notable features of the design are surface-mount components, minimized stray capacitance, a wide angular acceptance photodiode, a differential output line driver, reduced input capacitance, doubling of the frequency range, net reduced electronic noise, and elimination of the need for a cryogenic cooling system. The irreducible photon noise dominates the noise up to 800 kHz for a typical input power of 60 nW. This new assembly is being integrated into an upgraded multichannel optical detector assembly for a new BES system on the NSTX experiment.

Schoenbeck, N. L.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Smith, D.; Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Winz, G. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Ellington, S. D. [Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Jaehnig, K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Raman spectroscopy of carbon dust samples from NSTX Y. Raitses a,*, C.H. Skinner a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the diagnosis of the microscopic structure of different forms of carbon. The intensity of D-mode at 1350 cm?1Raman spectroscopy of carbon dust samples from NSTX Y. Raitses a,*, C.H. Skinner a , F. Jiang b , T. The Raman measurements indicate that the production of carbon dust particles in NSTX involves modifications

Duffy, Thomas S.

137

Easy Web Interfaces to IDL Code for NSTX Data Analysis W. M. Davisa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Easy Web Interfaces to IDL Code for NSTX Data Analysis W. M. Davisa * a Princeton Plasma Physics and debugging time. A variety of "Web Tools" for the analysis and display of raw and analyzed physics data are in use on NSTX [1], and new ones can be produced quickly from existing IDL [2] code. A Web Tool with only

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

138

Upward-facing Lithium Flash Evaporator for NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NSTX plasma performance has been significantly enhanced by lithium conditioning [1]. To date, the lower divertor and passive plates have been conditioned by downward facing lithium evaporators (LITER) as appropriate for lower null plasmas. The higher power operation expected from NSTX-U requires double null plasma operation in order to distribute the heat flux between the upper and lower divertors making it desirable to coat the upper divertor region with Li as well. An upward aiming LITER (U-LITER) is presently under development and will be inserted into NSTX-U using a horizontal probe drive located in a 6" upper midplane port. In the retracted position the evaporator will be loaded with up to 300 mg of Li granules utilizing one of the calibrated NSTX Li powder droppers[2]. The evaporator will then be inserted into the vessel in a location within the shadow of the RF limiters and will remain in the vessel during the discharge. About 10 seconds before a discharge, it will be rapidly heated and the lithium completely evaporated onto the upper divertor, thus avoiding the complication of a shutter that prevents evaporation during the shot when the diagnostic shutters are open. The minimal time interval between the evaporation and the start of the discharge will avoid the passivation of the lithium by residual gases and enable the study of the conditioning effects of un-passivated Li surfaces [3]. Two methods are being investigated to accomplish the rapid (few second) heating of the lithium. A resistive method relies on passing a large current through a Li filled crucible. A second method requires using a 3 kW e-beam gun to heat the Li. In this paper the evaporator systems will be described and the pros and cons of each heating method will be discussed.

Roquemore, A. L.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

139

Imaging of high-speed dust particle trajectories on NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imaging of high-speed incandescent dust particle trajectories in a tokamak plasma has been accomplished on NSTX using up to three high-speed cameras each viewing the same plasma volume from different locations and operating at speeds up to 68 000 frames/s with exposure times varying from 2 to 300 {mu}s. The dynamics of the dust trajectories can be quite complex exhibiting a large variation in both speed (10-200 m/s) and direction. Simulations of these trajectories will be utilized to ascertain the role dust may play in future machines such as ITER where significant dust production from wall erosion is expected. NSTX has numerous view ports including both tangential as well as radial views in both the midplane and lower divertors. Several vertical ports are also available so that a few specific regions in NSTX may be viewed simultaneously from several different camera positions. The cameras can be operated in the full visible spectrum but near-infrared filters can be utilized to enhance the observation of incandescent particles against a bright background. A description of the cameras and required optics is presented.

Roquemore, A. L.; Davis, W.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Maqueda, R.; Nishino, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

A note on geodesic foliations on the torus Pierre Mounoud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A note on geodesic foliations on the torus Pierre Mounoud R´esum´e : Nous ´etudions les propri´et´es de leur feuilletages orthogonaux. Abstract: We look at geodesic foliations on the Lorentzian torus with leaves of different kind. We prove that they do not exist if the torus is geodesically

Mounoud, Pierre

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Plasma Facing Surface Composition During NSTX Li Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices. However, the nature of the plasma-lithium surface interaction has been obscured by the difficulty of in-tokamak surface analysis. We report laboratory studies of the chemical composition of lithium surfaces exposed to typical residual gases found in tokamaks. Solid lithium and a molybdenum alloy (TZM) coated with lithium has been examined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, and Auger electron spectroscopy both in ultrahigh vacuum conditions and after exposure to trace gases. Lithium surfaces near room temperature were oxidized after exposure to 1-2 Langmuirs of oxygen or water vapor. The oxidation rate by carbon monoxide was four times less. Lithiated PFC surfaces in tokamaks will be oxidized in about 100 s depending on the tokamak vacuum conditions.

C.H. Skinner, R. Sullenberger, B.E. Koel, M.A. Jaworski and H.W. Kugel

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

142

Performance characterization of the Caltech corn act torus injector P. K. Loewenhardt,a) M. R. Browqb) J. Yee, and P. M. Bellan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A compact torus (CT), or spheromak, is a toroidal mag- netofluid configuration in which plasma is cot tokamak by the Caltech Spheromak Ijec- tion experiment to study helicity injection and refueling,3

Brown, Michael R.

143

Lithium Coatings on NSTX Plasma Facing Components and Its Effects On Boundary Control, Core Plasma Performance, and Operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NSTX high-power divertor plasma experiments have used in succession lithium pellet injection (LPI), evaporated lithium, and injected lithium powder to apply lithium coatings to graphite plasma facing components. In 2005, following wall conditioning and LPI, discharges exhibited edge density reduction and performance improvements. Since 2006, first one, and now two lithium evaporators have been used routinely to evaporate lithium onto the lower divertor region at total rates of 10-70 mg/min for periods 5-10 min between discharges. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators are withdrawn behind shutters. Significant improvements in the performance of NBI heated divertor discharges resulting from these lithium depositions were observed. These evaporators are now used for more than 80% of NSTX discharges. Initial work with injecting fine lithium powder into the edge of NBI heated deuterium discharges yielded comparable changes in performance. Several operational issues encountered with lithium wall conditions, and the special procedures needed for vessel entry are discussed. The next step in this work is installation of a Liquid Lithium Divertor surface on the outer part of the lower divertor.

H.W.Kugel, M.G.Bell, H.Schneider, J.P.Allain, R.E.Bell, R Kaita, J.Kallman, S. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, D. Mansfield, R.E. Nygen, R. Maingi, J. Menard, D. Mueller, M. Ono, S. Paul, S.Gerhardt, R.Raman, S.Sabbagh, C.H.Skinner, V.Soukhanovskii, J.Timberlake, L.E.Zakharov, and the NSTX Research Team

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

Conceptual design of a divertor Thomson scattering diagnostic for NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual design for a divertor Thomson scattering (DTS) diagnostic has been developed for the NSTX-U device to operate in parallel with the existing multipoint Thomson scattering system. Higher projected peak heat flux in NSTX-U will necessitate application of advanced magnetics geometries and divertor detachment. Interpretation and modeling of these divertor scenarios will depend heavily on local measurement of electron temperature, T{sub e}, and density, n{sub e}, which DTS provides in a passive manner. The DTS design for NSTX-U adopts major elements from the successful DIII-D DTS system including 7-channel polychromators measuring T{sub e} to 0.5 eV. If implemented on NSTX-U, the divertor TS system would provide an invaluable diagnostic for the boundary program to characterize the edge plasma.

McLean, A. G., E-mail: mclean@fusion.gat.com; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Allen, S. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Carlstrom, T. N. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); LeBlanc, B. P.; Ono, M.; Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a "fixed wall" device is key for management of plasma-wall (i.e., divertor) interactions. In particular-H transition. The early times after this transition being generally blob-less. The proposed experiment intends

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

146

Raman Spectroscopy of Carbon Dust Samples from NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Raman spectrum of dust particles exposed to the NSTX plasma is different from the spectrum of unexposed particles scraped from an unused graphite tile. For the unexposed particles, the high energy G-mode peak (Raman shift ~1580 cm-1) is much stronger than the defect-induced D-mode peak (Raman shift ~ 1350 cm-1), a pattern that is consistent with Raman spectrum for commercial graphite materials. For dust particles exposed to the plasma, the ratio of G-mode to D-mode peaks is lower and becomes even less than 1. The Raman measurements indicate that the production of carbon dust particles in NSTX involves modifications of the physical and chemical structure of the original graphite material. These modifications are shown to be similar to those measured for carbon deposits from atmospheric pressure helium arc discharge with an ablating anode electrode made from a graphite tile material. We also demonstrate experimentally that heating to 2000-2700 K alone can not explain the observed structural modifications indicating that they must be due to higher temperatures needed for graphite vaporization, which is followed either by condensation or some plasma-induced processes leading to the formation of more disordered forms of carbon material than the original graphite.

Y. Raitses, C.H. Skinner, F. Jiang and T.S. Duffy

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

147

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Constant q OP-XP-617 1. Overview of planned experiment Goal: Measure RF power loss properties as a function of magnetic field constant q to elucidate: RF power loss scaling with B under similar stability conditions of shots around 112699) [J. Hosea et al., 2005 RF Conference]. Thus the RF power loss is significantly

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

148

Plasma-Material Interface Development for Future Spherical Tokamak-based Devices in NSTX.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The divertor plasma-material interface (PMI) must be able to withstand steady-state heat fluxes up to 10 MW/m{sup 2} (a limit imposed by the present day divertor material and engineering constraints) with minimal material erosion, as well as to provide impurity control and ion density pumping capabilities. In spherical tokamaks (STs), the compact divertor geometry and the requirement of low core electron collisionality n*{sub e} at n{sub e} < 0.5-0.7 n{sub G} (where n{sub G} is the Greenwald density) for increased neutral beam current drive efficiency impose much greater demands on divertor and first-wall particle and heat flux mitigation solutions. In NSTX, divertor heat flux mitigation and impurity control with an innovative 'snowflake' divertor configuration and ion density pumping by evaporated lithium wall and divertor coatings are studied. Lithium coatings have enabled ion density reduction up to 50% in NSTX through the reduction of wall and divertor recycling rates. The 'snowflake' divertor configuration was obtained in NSTX in 0.8-1 MA 4-6 MW NBI-heated H-mode lithium-assisted discharges using three divertor coils. The snowflake divertor formation was always accompanied by a partial detachment of the outer strike point with an up to 50% increase in divertor radiation from intrinsic carbon, the peak divertor heat flux reduction from 3-6 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-1 MW/m{sup 2}, and a significant increase in divertor volume recombination. High core confinement was maintained with the snowflake divertor, evidenced by the t{sub E}, W{sub MHD} and the H98(y,2) factors similar to those of the standard divertor discharges. Core carbon concentration and radiated power were reduced by 30-70%, apparently as a result of reduced divertor physical and chemical sputtering in the snowflake divertor and ELMs. In the SFD discharges, the MHD stability of the H-mode pedestal region was altered leading to the re-appearance of medium size (DW/W = 5-10%), Type I, ELMs otherwise suppressed due to lithium conditioning. Fast divertor measurements showed that impulsive particle and heat fluxes due to the ELMs were significantly dissipated in the high magnetic flux expansion region of the snowflake divertor. The snowflake divertor configuration is being combined in experiments with extrinsic deuterium or impurity gas puffing for increased dissipative divertor power losses, additional upper divertor nulls for increased power sharing between the upper and the lower divertors, and lithium coated plasma facing components for large area ion pumping. These efforts are aimed at the development of an integrated PMI for future ST-based devices for fusion development applications.

et. al, V

2011-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Minimal Liouville Gravity on the Torus via Matrix Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we use recent results on resonance relations between the matrix models and the minimal Liouville gravity to compute the torus correlation numbers in (3,p) minimal Liouville gravity. Namely, we calculate the torus generating partition function of the (3,p) matrix models and use it to obtain the one- and two-point correlation numbers in the minimal Liouville gravity.

Lev Spodyneiko

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Observation of EHO in NSTX and Theoretical Study of its Active Control Using HHFW Antenna  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two important topics in the tokamak ELM control, using the non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic perturbations, are studied in NSTX and combined envisioning ELM control in the future NSTX-U operation: Experimental observations of the edge harmonic oscillation in NSTX (not necessarily the same as EHOs in DIII-D), and theoretical study of its external drive using the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) antenna as a 3D field coil. Edge harmonic oscillations were observed particularly well in NSTX ELM-free operation with low n core modes, with various diagnostics confirming n = 4 ~#24; 6 edge-localized and coherent oscillations in 2 ~#24; 8kHz frequency range. These oscillations seem to have a favored operational window in rotational shear, similarly to EHOs in DIII-D QH modes . However, in NSTX, they are not observed to provide particle or impurity control, possibly due to their weak amplitudes, of a few mm displacements, as measured by reflectometry. The external drive of these modes has been proposed in NSTX, by utilizing audio-frequency currents in the HHFW antenna straps. Analysis shows that the HHFW straps can be optimized to maximize n = 4 ~#24; 6 while minimizing n = 1 ~#24; 3. Also, IPEC calculations show that the optimized configuration with only 1kAt current can produce comparable or larger displacements than the observed internal modes. If this optimized external drive can be constructively combined, or further resonated with the internal modes, the edge harmonic oscillations in NSTX may be able to produce sufficient particle control to modify ELMs.

J.-K. Park, et. al.

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

151

Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium coatings on the graphite plasma facing components (PFCs) in NSTX are being investigated as a tool for density profile control and reducing the recycling of hydrogen isotopes. Repeated lithium pellet injection into Center Stack Limited and Lower Single Null Ohmic Helium Discharges were used to coat graphite surfaces that had been pre-conditioned with Ohmic Helium Discharges of the same shape to reduce their contribution to hydrogen isotope recycling. The following deuterium NBI reference discharges exhibited a reduction in density by a factor of about 3 for limited and 2 for diverted plasmas respectively, and peaked density profiles. Recently, a lithium evaporator has been used to apply thin coatings on conditioned and unconditioned PFCs. Effects on the plasma density and the impurities were obtained by pre-conditioning the PFCs with ohmic helium discharges, and performing the first deuterium NBI discharge as soon as possible after applying the lithium coating.

Kugel, H W; Bell, M G; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaita, R; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Mueller, D; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Sabbagh, S; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Zakharov, L

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

152

Arithmetic functions in torus and tree networks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems for performing arithmetic functions. In accordance with a first aspect of the invention, methods and apparatus are provided, working in conjunction of software algorithms and hardware implementation of class network routing, to achieve a very significant reduction in the time required for global arithmetic operation on the torus. Therefore, it leads to greater scalability of applications running on large parallel machines. The invention involves three steps in improving the efficiency and accuracy of global operations: (1) Ensuring, when necessary, that all the nodes do the global operation on the data in the same order and so obtain a unique answer, independent of roundoff error; (2) Using the topology of the torus to minimize the number of hops and the bidirectional capabilities of the network to reduce the number of time steps in the data transfer operation to an absolute minimum; and (3) Using class function routing to reduce latency in the data transfer. With the method of this invention, every single element is injected into the network only once and it will be stored and forwarded without any further software overhead. In accordance with a second aspect of the invention, methods and systems are provided to efficiently implement global arithmetic operations on a network that supports the global combining operations. The latency of doing such global operations are greatly reduced by using these methods.

Bhanot, Gyan (Princeton, NJ); Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton On Hudson, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost.

Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N.M.; Engelhardt, A.G.; Seed, T.J.; Zubrin, R.M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Response of NSTX Liquid Lithium divertor to High Heat Loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) with and without an evaporative Li coating were directly exposed to a neutral beam ex-situ at a power of ~1.5 MW/m2 for 1-3 seconds. Measurements of front face and bulk sample temperature were obtained. Predictions of temperature evolution were derived from a 1D heat flux model. No macroscopic damage occurred when the "bare" sample was exposed to the beam but microscopic changes to the surface were observed. The Li-coated sample developed a lithium hydroxide (LiOH) coating, which did not change even when the front face temperature exceeded the pure Li melting point. These results are consistent with the lack of damage to the LLD surface and imply that heating alone may not expose pure liquid Li if the melting point of surface impurities is not exceeded. This suggests that flow and heat are needed for future PFCs requiring a liquid Li surface. __________________________________________________

Abrams, Tyler; Kallman, J; Kaitaa, R; Foley, E L; Grayd, T K; Kugel, H; Levinton, F; McLean, A G

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

NSTX Weekly Report (December 17, 2010) FY 2011 NSTX plasma operations started on October 4, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This symposium will include sessions for: 1. Lithium effects on edge and core plasma properties in magnetic confinement devices; 2. Laboratory experiments on plasma-lithium interactions; 3. Technologies for handling and 839 plasma shots The 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

156

Interaction between Faraday rotation and Cotton-Mouton effects in polarimetry modeling for NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of electromagnetic wave polarization is modeled for propagation in the major radial direction in the National Spherical Torus Experiment with retroreflection from the center stack of the vacuum vessel. This modeling illustrates that the Cotton-Mouton effect-elliptization due to the magnetic field perpendicular to the propagation direction-is shown to be strongly weighted to the high-field region of the plasma. An interaction between the Faraday rotation and Cotton-Mouton effects is also clearly identified. Elliptization occurs when the wave polarization direction is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the local transverse magnetic field. Since Faraday rotation modifies the polarization direction during propagation, it must also affect the resultant elliptization. The Cotton-Mouton effect also intrinsically results in rotation of the polarization direction, but this effect is less significant in the plasma conditions modeled. The interaction increases at longer wavelength and complicates interpretation of polarimetry measurements.

Zhang, J.; Crocker, N. A.; Carter, T. A.; Kubota, S.; Peebles, W. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

LM-MHD free-surface flow experiments in MTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LM-MHD free-surface flow experiments in MTOR Neil Morley for the APEX Participants VLT Conference concentrators · Free jet · Recirculating cell · Soaker Hose (not discussed here) Slide 5 #12;LM In LM Out #12;LM Jet test for NSTX module simulation · Jet flow is introduced into the high field region between

California at Los Angeles, University of

158

Magnetic Diagnostics For Equilibrium Reconstruction And Realtime Plasma Control In NSTX-Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes aspects of magnetic diagnostics for realtime control in NSTX-U. The sensor arrangement on the upgraded center column is described. New analog and digital circuitry for processing the plasma current rogowski data are presented. An improved algorithm for estimating the plasma vertical velocity for feedback control is presented.

Gerhardt, Stefan P. [PPPL; Erickson, Keith [PPPL; Kaita, Robert [PPPL; Lawson, John [PPPL; Mozulay, Robert [PPPL; Mueller, Dennis [PPPL; Que, Weiguo [PPPL; Rahman, Nabidur [PPPL; Schneider, Hans [PPPL; Smalley, Gustav [PPPL; Tresemer, Kelsey [PPPL

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Initial Results from the Lost Alpha Diagnostics on Joint European Torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors, and (ii) a well collimated scintillator which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results, including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 200506 JET restart campaign, will be presented.

Darrow, Doug; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

First Observation Of ELM Pacing With Vertical Jogs In A Spherical Torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies. __________________________________________________

Gerhardt, S P; Canik, J M; Maingi, R; Bell, R; Gates, d; Goldston, R; Hawryluk, R; Le Blanc, B P; Menard, J; Sontag, A C; Sabbagh, S

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Simulations of LH coupling in the Madison Symmetric Torus Reversed Field Pinch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations using several codes are being performed in support of the LH experiment in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Due to the special requirements of the MST RFP configuration (tight-fitting conducting shell in which only minimal portholes can be tolerated), a novel interdigital line slow-wave launch structure is used, mounted below the mid plane on the inboard side. The unusual configuration made it necessary to modify the main RF coupling code, RANT3D/AORSA1D-H, which was primarily developed for tokamak simulations. Preliminary results will be presented.

Carlsson, J.; Smithe, D. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder USA (United States); Cartert, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Burke, D.; Kaufman, M.; Goetz, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced studies torus Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mention of future work in Section 6. 2 Torus Network Model In this study, the simulation model... focused the strong scaling study on a 16-million-node torus and then the 1-...

163

ccsd-00003224,version1-4Nov2004 Clifton-Pohl torus and geodesic completeness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd-00003224,version1-4Nov2004 Clifton-Pohl torus and geodesic completeness by a 'complex' point generalization of the idea of completeness guarantee geodesic completeness of Clifton- Pohl torus; we explicitely compute all of its geodesics. Keywords: Clifton-Pohl torus, geodesic completeness, holomorphic metric

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

164

Torus-Margo Pits Help Conifers Compete with Angiosperms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The reduction in resistivity achieved by the torus-margo pit membrane is equivalent to a 7.7-fold increase the number of times water must flow through high-resistance pits that link conduits end-to-end. Accordingly, the tracheid-based wood of conifers should have much higher flow resistance per length (resistivity) than

Hacke, Uwe

165

Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Dust Particle Trajectories in the NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly mobile incandescent dust particles are routinely observed on NSTX using two fast cameras operating in the visible region. An analysis method to reconstruct dust particle trajectories in space using two fast cameras is presented in this paper. Position accuracies of a few millimeters depending on the particle's location have been achieved and particle velocities between 10 and 200 m/s have been observed. 2008 American Institute of Physics. __________________________________________________

W.U. Boeglin, A.L. Roquemore, and R. Maqueda

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

166

Three-dimensional reconstruction of dust particle trajectories in the NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly mobile incandescent dust particles are routinely observed on NSTX using two fast cameras operating in the visible region. An analysis method to reconstruct dust particle trajectories in space using two fast cameras is presented in this paper. Position accuracies of a few millimeters depending on the particle's location have been achieved and particle velocities between 10 and 200 m/s have been observed.

Boeglin, W. U. [Physics Department, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, James Forrestal Campus, Rt. 1 N at Sayre Dr., Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Maqueda, R. [NOVA Photonics, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Chimera states on a flat torus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discovered numerically by Kuramoto and Battogtokh in 2002, chimera states are spatiotemporal patterns in which regions of coherence and incoherence coexist. These mathematical oddities were recently reproduced in a laboratory setting sparking a flurry of interest in their properties. Here we use asymptotic methods to derive the conditions under which two-dimensional chimeras, similar to those observed in the experiments, can appear in a periodic space. We also use numerical integration to explore the dynamics of these chimeras and determine which are dynamically stable.

Mark J. Panaggio; Daniel M. Abrams

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

Recent Fast Wave Coupling and Heating Studies on NSTX, with Possible Implications for ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) research on NSTX is to maximize the coupling of RF power to the core of the plasma by minimizing the coupling of RF power to edge loss processes. HHFW core plasma heating efficiency in helium and deuterium L-mode discharges is found to improve markedly on NSTX when the density 2 cm in front of the antenna is reduced below that for the onset of perpendicular wave propagation (nonset ? B*k|| 2/?). In NSTX, the observed RF power losses in the plasma edge are driven in the vicinity of the antenna as opposed to resulting from multi-pass edge damping. PDI surface losses through ion-electron collisions are estimated to be significant. Recent spectroscopic measurements suggest that additional PDI losses could be caused by the loss of energetic edge ions on direct loss orbits and perhaps result in the observed clamping of the edge rotation. Initial deuterium H-mode heating studies reveal that core heating is degraded at lower k? (- 8 m-1 relative to 13 m-1) as for the Lmode case at elevated edge density. Fast visible camera images clearly indicate that a major edge loss process is occurring from the plasma scrape off layer (SOL) in the vicinity of the antenna and along the magnetic field lines to the lower outer divertor plate. Large type I ELMs, which are observed at both k? values, appear after antenna arcs caused by precursor blobs, low level ELMs, or dust. For large ELMs without arcs, the source reflection coefficients rise on a 0.1 ms time scale, which indicates that the time derivative of the reflection coefficient can be used to discriminate between arcs and ELMs.

J.C. Hosea, R.E. Bell, E. Feibush, R.W. Harvey, E.F. Jaeger, B.P LeBlanc, R. Maingi, C.K. Phillips, L. Roquemore, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, K. Tritz, E.J. Valeo, J. Wilgen, J.R. Wilson, and the NSTX Team

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

169

NSTX-U Advances in Real-time C++11 on Linux | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test andFieldSubscribeJefferson Lab SecurityNSTX-U

170

Dynamic evolution of plasma facing surfaces in NSTX: Impact of impurities and substrate composition on fuel recycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interactions in NSTX with liquid lithium on thin porous molyb- denum substrate for the divertor, additional PFC material dynamic properties. High rate of oxygen adsorption from residual gases during lithium deposition, mixing, and overall fuel recycling. Simulation results showed that formed lithium compounds, filling

Harilal, S. S.

171

Beta-induced Alfven-Acoustic Eigenmodes in NSTX and DIII-D Driven by Beam Ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beta-induced Alfv´en-Acoustic Eigenmodes in NSTX and DIII-D Driven by Beam Ions N. N. Gorelenkov´en Cascades) · BAAEmodes (Beta-induced Alfv´en- acoustic Eigenmodes) New BAAE modes (Gorelenkov- bilities: · TAE/RSAEs and (toroidicity-induced/ reversed shear AEs - Alfv´en Cascades) · BAAEmodes (Beta

172

Dependence of recycling and edge profiles on lithium evaporation in high triangularity, high performance NSTX H-mode discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Dependence of recycling and edge profiles on lithium evaporation in high triangularity, high between discharges in NSTX, partly to reduce recycling. Reduced D emissions from the lower and upper of the recycling light, improvements in global confinement16-19 , along with the appearance of ELM-free regimes20

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

173

Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance.

R. Kaita; R. Majeski; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; D. Hoffman; H. Kugel; J. Menard; T. Munsat; A. Post-Zwicker; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; M. Maiorano; S. Smith

2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

174

High-resolution Tangential AXUV Arrays for Radiated Power Density Measurements on NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precise measurements of the local radiated power density and total radiated power are a matter of the uttermost importance for understanding the onset of impurity-induced instabilities and the study of particle and heat transport. Accounting of power balance is also needed for the understanding the physics of various divertor con#12;gurations for present and future high-power fusion devices. Poloidal asymmetries in the impurity density can result from high Mach numbers and can impact the assessment of their flux-surface-average and hence vary the estimates of P[sub]rad (r, t) and (Z[sub]eff); the latter is used in the calculation of the neoclassical conductivity and the interpretation of non-inductive and inductive current fractions. To this end, the bolometric diagnostic in NSTX-U will be upgraded, enhancing the midplane coverage and radial resolution with two tangential views, and adding a new set of poloidally-viewing arrays to measure the 2D radiation distribution. These systems are designed to contribute to the near- and long-term highest priority research goals for NSTX-U which will integrate non-inductive operation at reduced collisionality, with high-pressure, long energy-confinement-times and a divertor solution with metal walls.

Delgado-Aparicio, L [PPPL; Bell, R E [PPPL; Faust, I [MIT; Tritz, K [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21209, USA; Diallo, A [PPPL; Gerhardt, S P [PPPL; Kozub, T A [PPPL; LeBlanc, B P [PPPL; Stratton, B C [PPPL

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-Area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-Area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U R. KAITA of this concept, key liquid lithium-plasma interaction questions are being addressed in the CDX-U device[2 (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution

California at Los Angeles, University of

176

NSTX RESEARCH FORUM FOR EXPERIMENTS IN FY2011-12 PPPL -March 15-18, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Click on Submit 3. Click on Participant 4. If you don't already have WebEX on your system you shield under the tool bar and installing ActiveX. 5. Once the WebEx client is installed you will entered

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

177

Experiences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial Thin Film XRDEvanExecutiveSRD-13Experiences with

178

Towards identifying the mechanisms underlying field-aligned edge-loss of HHFW power on NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast-wave heating will be a major heating scheme on ITER, as it can heat ions directly and is relatively unaffected by the large machine size unlike neutral beams. However, fast-wave interactions with the plasma edge can lead to deleterious effects such as, in the case of the high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) system on NSTX, large losses of fast-wave power in the scrape off layer (SOL) under certain conditions. In such scenarios, a large fraction of the lost HHFW power is deposited on the upper and lower divertors in bright spiral shapes. The responsible mechanism(s) has not yet been identified but may include fast-wave propagation in the scrape off layer, parametric decay instability, and RF currents driven by the antenna reactive fields. Understanding and mitigating these losses is important not only for improving the heating and current-drive on NSTX-Upgrade but also for understanding fast-wave propagation across the SOL in any fast-wave system. This talk summarizes experimental results demonstrating that the flow of lost HHFW power to the divertor regions largely follows the open SOL magnetic field lines. This lost power flux is relatively large close to both the antenna and the last closed flux surface with a reduced level in between, so the loss mechanism cannot be localized to the antenna. At the same time, significant losses also occur along field lines connected to the inboard edge of the bottom antenna plate. The power lost within the spirals is roughly estimated, showing that these field-aligned losses to the divertor are significant but may not account for the total HHFW loss. To elucidate the role of the onset layer for perpendicular fast-wave propagation with regards to fast-wave propagation in the SOL, a cylindrical cold-plasma model is being developed. This model, in addition to advanced RF codes such as TORIC and AORSA, is aimed at identifying the underlying mechanism(s) behind these SOL losses, to minimize their effects in NSTX-U, and to predict their importance in ITER.

Perkins, R. J.; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, N.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Kramer, G. J.; Maingi, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Podest, M.; Roquemore, L.; Scotti, F.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Ahn, J-W.; Gray, T. K.; Green, D. L.; McLean, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); and others

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Observation of Non-Maxwellian Electron Distributions in th e NSTX Divertor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scrape-off layer plasma at the tokamak region is characterized by open field lines and often contains large variations in plasma properties along these field-lines. Proper characterization of local plasma conditions is critical to assessing plasma-material interaction processes occuring at the target. Langmuir probes are frequently employed in tokamak divertors but are challenging to interpretation. A kinetic interpretation for Langmuir probes in NSTX has yielded non-Maxwellian electron distributions in the divertor characterized by cool bulk populations and energetic tail populations with temperatures of 2-4 times the bulk. Spectroscopic analysis and modeling confirms the bulk plasma temperature and density which can only be obtained with the kinetic interpretation

M.A. Jaworski, et. al.

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

180

Effect of Deuterium Gas Puff On The Edge Plasma In NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a detailed examination of the effects of a relatively small pulsed deuterium gas puff on the edge plasma and edge turbulence in NSTX. This gas puff caused little or no change in the line-averaged plasma density or total stored energy, or in the edge density and electron temperature up to the time of the peak of the gas puff. The radial profile of the D? light emission and the edge turbulence within this gas puff did not vary significantly over its rise and fall, implying that these gas puffs did not significantly perturb the local edge plasma or edge turbulence. These measurements are compared with modeling by DEGAS 2, UEDGE, and with simplified estimates for the expected effects of this gas puff.

Zweben, S. J.

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Stent Prototype to Induce Closure of Post-Traumatic Blast-Induced Pseudo-Aneurysms; Modification 1) and its Effect on High Performance Plasmas in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)." Allebach, Jan P." Applegate, Todd J; animal sciences, from Purac, $43,632, "Effect of Form and Dos- age of Lactylate

Ginzel, Matthew

182

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Calendar Year 2001. The home page for PPPL Reports and Publications is: http://www.pppl.gov/pub_report/ DOE, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA Abstract Neutral beam (NB) heating in the National Spherical Torus auxiliary heating. NB heating experiments in NSTX began in September 2000 using up to 5 MW of 80 keV D beams

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced bumpy torus Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 21 GENERICITY OF GEODESIC FLOWS WITH POSITIVE TOPOLOGICAL ENTROPY ON S2 Summary: ) and the two-torus (Klein...

184

Ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium in a non-symmetric topological torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alternative representation of an ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is developed. The representation is a variation of one given by A. Salat, Phys. Plasmas 2, 1652 (1995). The system of equations is used to study the possibility of non-symmetric equilibria in a topological torus, here an approximate rectangular parallelopiped, with periodicity in two of the three rectangular coordinates. An expansion is carried out in the deviation of pressure surfaces from planes. Resonances are manifest in the process. Nonetheless, provided the magnetic shear is small, it is shown that it is possible to select the magnetic fields and flux surfaces in such a manner that no singularities appear on resonant surfaces. One boundary surface of the parallelopiped is not arbitrary but is dependent on the equilibrium in question. A comparison of the solution sets of axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric equilibria suggests that the latter have a wider class of possible boundary shapes but more restrictive rotational transform profiles. No proof of convergence of the series is given.

Weitzner, Harold [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)] [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

NSTX presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test andFieldSubscribeJefferson Lab Security

186

Transition to ELM-free improved H-mode by lithium deposition on NSTX graphite divertor surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium evaporated onto plasma facing components in the NSTX lower divertor has made dramatic improvements in discharge performance. As lithium accumulated, plasmas previously exhibiting robust Type 1 ELMs gradually transformed into discharges with intermittent ELMs and finally into continuously evolving ELM-free discharges. During this sequence, other discharge parameters changed in a complicated manner. As the ELMs disappeared, energy confinement improved and remarkable changes in edge and scrape-off layer plasma properties were observed. These results demonstrate that active modification of plasma surface interactions can preempt large ELMs.

Mansfield, D K; Kugel, H W; Maingi, R; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kaye, S; LeBlanc, B; Mueller, D; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V A; Timberlake, J; Wilgen, J; Zakharov, L

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

Comparison of Measurement And Modeling Of Current Profile Changes Due To Neutral Bean Ion Redistribution During TAE Avalanches in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brief "avalanches" of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) are observed in NSTX plasmas with several different n numbers simultaneously present. These affect the neutral beam ion distribution as evidenced by a concurrent drop in the neutron rate and, sometimes, beam ion loss. Guiding center orbit modeling has shown that the modes can transiently render portions of the beam ion phase space stochastic. The resulting redistribution of beam ions can also create a broader beam-driven current profile and produce other changes in the beam ion distribution function

Darrow, Douglas

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

188

High-resolution tangential absolute extreme ultraviolet arrays for radiated power density measurements on NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiated-power-density diagnostic on the equatorial midplane for the NSTX-U tokamak will be upgraded to measure the radial structure of the photon emissivity profile with an improved radial resolution. This diagnostic will enhance the characterization and studies of power balance, impurity transport, and MHD. The layout and response expected of the new system is shown for different plasma conditions and impurity concentrations. The effect of toroidal rotation driving poloidal asymmetries in the core radiation from high-Z impurities is also addressed.

Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kozub, T. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Faust, I. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Tritz, K. [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21209 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Design and Construction of the NSTX Bakeout, Cooling and Vacuum Systems L. E. Dudek, W. Blanchard, M. Kalish, R. Gernhardt and R. F. Parsells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 50 °C. The system uses a low viscosity heat transfer oil which is capable of high temperature low and a Roots blower pump. A PLC is used as the control system to provide remote monitoring, control of the design requirements for the NSTX auxiliary systems was to use as much of the existing equipment

190

White Paper for Massive Gas Injection studies in NSTX-U in support of ITER research University of Washington (19 July 2012)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White Paper for Massive Gas Injection studies in NSTX-U in support of ITER research University of Washington (19 July 2012) 1/2 White Paper@aa.washington.edu , Jarboe@aa.washington.edu , dstotler@pppl.gov, tabrams@pppl.gov This white paper describes

191

Understanding ion cyclotron harmonic fast wave heating losses in the scrape off layer of tokamak plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast waves at harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency, which have been used successfully on National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), will also play an important role in ITER and are a promising candidate for the Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) designs based on spherical torus (ST). Experimental studies of high harmonic fast waves (HHFW) heating on the NSTX have demonstrated that substantial HHFW power loss occurs along the open field lines in the scrape-off layer (SOL), but the mechanism behind the loss is not yet understood. The full wave RF code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain, is applied to specific NSTX discharges in order to predict the effects and possible causes of this power loss. In the studies discussed here, a collisional damping parameter has been implemented in AORSA as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. A prediction for the NSTX Upgrade (NSTX-U) experiment, that will begin operation next year, is also presented, indicating a favorable condition for the experiment due to a wider evanescent region in edge density.*Research supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 with Princeton University.

Bertelli, N [PPPL; Jaeger, E F; Hosea, J C; Phillips, C K; Berry, L; Bonoli, P T; Gerhardt, S P [PPPL; Green, D; LeBlanc, B [PPPL; Perkins, R J; Ryan, P M; Taylor, G; Valeo, E J; Wilso, J R; Wright, J C

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Calculation of Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity with a Particle Simulation in the Tokamak Magnetic Breaking Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate calculation of perturbed distribution function #14;?f and perturbed magnetic fi eld #14;?B is essential to achieve prediction of non-ambipolar transport and neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) in perturbed tokamaks. This paper reports a study of the NTV with a #14;?f particle code (POCA) and improved understanding of magnetic braking in tokamak experiments. POCA calculates the NTV by computing #14;f with guiding-center orbit motion and using #14;B from the ideal perturbed equilibrium code (IPEC). POCA simulations are compared with experimental estimations for NTV, which are measured from angular momentum balance (DIII-D) and toroidal rotational damping rate (NSTX). The calculation shows good agreement in total NTV torque for the DIII-D discharge, where an analytic neoclassical theory also gives a consistent result thanks to relatively large aspect-ratio and slow toroidal rotations. In NSTX discharges, where the aspect-ratio is small and the rotation is fast, the theory only gives a qualitative guide for predicting NTV. However, the POCA simulation largely improves the quantitative NTV prediction for NSTX. It is discussed that a self- consistent calculation of ?#14;B using general perturbed equilibria is eventually necessary since a non-ideal plasma response can change the perturbed eld and thereby the NTV torque.

Kimin Kim, et al

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

Local well-posedness for the Zakharov system on multidimensional torus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The initial value problem of the Zakharov system on two dimensional torus with general period is shown to be locally well-posed in the Sobolev spaces of optimal regularity, including the energy space. Proof relies on a standard iteration argument using the Bourgain norms. The same strategy is also applicable to three and higher dimensional cases.

Kishimoto, Nobu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

THE CLASSIFICATION OF DEHN FILLINGS ON THE OUTER TORUS OF A 1-BRIDGE BRAID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLID TORI Ying-Qing Wu1 Abstract. Let K = K(w, b, t) be a 1-bridge braid in a solid torus V , and let #DMS 0203394 1 #12;2 YING-QING WU Figure 1.1 Let be a (p, q) curve on T with respect to the standard

Wu, Ying-Qing

195

DEPLETED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES AS PROBES OF THE IO TORUS PLASMA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA ABSTRACT On the initial pass by Io the Galileo that they were depleted in their energy content. These tubes have not been seen on every return to the Io torus balance with neighboring flux tubes in steady state. Figure 1 shows such pressure balance. The magnitude

Russell, Christopher T.

196

Initial Data for General Relativity Containing a Marginally Outer Trapped Torus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotically flat, time-symmetric, axially symmetric and conformally flat initial data for vacuum general relativity are studied numerically on $R^3$ with the interior of a standard torus cut out. By the choice of boundary condition the torus is marginally outer trapped, and thus a surface of minimal area. Apart from pure scaling the standard tori are parameterized by a radius $a\\in [0,1]$, where $a=0$ corresponds to the limit where the boundary torus degenerates to a circle and $a=1$ to a torus that touches the axis of symmetry. Noting that these tori are the orbits of a $U(1)\\times U(1)$ conformal isometry allows for a simple scheme to solve the constraint, involving numerical solution of only ordinary differential equations.The tori are unstable minimal surfaces (i.e. only saddle points of the area functional) and thus can not be apparent horizons, but are always surrounded by an apparent horizon of spherical topology, which is analyzed in the context of the hoop conjecture and isoperimetric inequality for black holes.

Sascha Husa

1996-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

An Inexpensive Ohmic Transformer Firing Circuit for the CDXU Spherical Torus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 An Inexpensive Ohmic Transformer Firing Circuit for the CDX­U Spherical Torus T. Munsat, R designed and modeled a simple, efficient circuit for delivering power to the CDX­U ohmic transformer, spherical tori) have traditionally driven plasma current by using the transformer action of a centrally

198

An Inexpensive Ohmic Transformer Firing Circuit for the CDX-U Spherical Torus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 An Inexpensive Ohmic Transformer Firing Circuit for the CDX-U Spherical Torus T. Munsat, R designed and modeled a simple, efficient circuit for delivering power to the CDX-U ohmic transformer, spherical tori) have traditionally driven plasma current by using the transformer action of a centrally

199

PUBLISHED VERSION Fusion alpha-particle diagnostics for DT experiments on the Joint European Torus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Association Euratom -MEdC, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Romania f Max

200

Advances in High-harmonic Fast Wave Physics in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improved core high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating at longer wavelengths and during start-up and plasma current ramp-up, has now been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall. Lithium conditioning allowed significant HHFW core electron heating of deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) fuelled H-mode plasmas to be observed for the first time. Large edge localized modes were observed immediately after the termination of rf power. Visible and infrared camera images show that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable rf energy on the outboard divertor. HHFW-generated parametric decay instabilities were observed to heat ions in the plasma edge and may be the cause for a measured drag on edge toroidal rotation during HHFW heating. A significant enhancement in neutron rate and fast-ion profile were measured in NBI-fuelled plasmas when HHFW heating was applied. __________________________________________________

Taylor, G; Hosea, J C; LeBlanc, B P; Phillips, C K; Podesta, M; Valeo, E J; Wilson, J R; Ahn, J -W; Chen, G; Green, D L; Jaeger, E F; Maingi, R; Ryan, P M; Wilgen, J B; Heidbrink, W W; Liu, D; Bonoli, P T; Brecht, T; Choi, M

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

FORMATION OF A COMPACT TORUS USING A TOROIDAL PLASMA GUN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING A TOROIDAL PLASMA GUN Morton A. Levine and Philip A.bounce back toward the gun. If this experiment is successfulUSING A TOROIDAL PLASMA GUN Morton A. Levine and Philip A.

Levine, Morton A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Star on Earth  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Star on Earth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

204

Please cite this article in press as: J.N. Brooks, et al., Modeling of plasma/lithium-surface interactions in NSTX: Status and key issues. Fusion Eng. Des. (2011), doi:10.1016/j.fusengdes.2011.08.002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.elsevier.com/locate/fusengdes Modeling of plasma/lithium-surface interactions in NSTX: Status and key issues J.N. Brooks , A. Hassanein history: Available online xxx Keywords: Lithium NSTX Plasma material interactions Erosion a b s t r a c nuclear science facility or DEMO. Accordingly, we have been analyzing lithium plasma surface interactions

Harilal, S. S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

NSTX ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS S. Ramakrishnan, C. Neumeyer, E. Baker, R. Hatcher, A. Ilic, R. Marsala, D. O'Neill, A. von Halle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the transmission line and feed power to two 13.8 kV 60 Hz switchgears, located in D- Site. One fed at 138 kV by Public Service Gas & Electric Co. (PSE&G). Two 138 kV/ 13.8 kV transformers are fed MG units each rated at 475 MVA, 60 to 90 Hz., 13.8 kV, is used to supply the NSTX coil system via two

206

Existence of exotic torus configuration in high-spin excited states of $^{40}$Ca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the possibility of the existence of the exotic torus configuration in the high-spin excited states of $^{40}$Ca. We here consider the spin alignments about the symmetry axis. To this end, we use a three-dimensional cranked Skyrme Hartree-Fock method and search for stable single-particle configurations. We find one stable state with the torus configuration at the total angular momentum $J=$ 60 $\\hbar$ and an excitation energy of about 170 MeV in all calculations using various Skyrme interactions. The total angular momentum J=60 $\\hbar$ consists of aligned 12 nucleons with the orbital angular momenta $\\Lambda=+4$, +5, and +6 for spin up-down neutrons and protons. The obtained results strongly suggest that a macroscopic amount of circulating current breaking the time-reversal symmetry emerges in the high-spin excited state of $^{40}$Ca.

T. Ichikawa; J. A. Maruhn; N. Itagaki; K. Matsuyanagi; P. -G. Reinhard; S. Ohkubo

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

207

Traces of holomorphic families of operators on the noncommutative torus and on Hilbert modules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit traces of holomorphic families of pseudodifferential operators on a closed manifold in view of geometric applications. We then transpose the corresponding analytic constructions to two different geometric frameworks; the noncommutative torus and Hilbert modules. These traces are meromorphic functions whose residues at the poles as well as the constant term of the Laurent expansion at zero (the latter when the family at zero is a differential operator) can be expressed in terms of Wodzicki residues and extended Wodzicki residues involving logarithmic operators. They are therefore local and contain geometric information. For holomorphic families leading to zeta regularised traces, they relate to the heat-kernel asymptotic coefficients via an inverse Mellin mapping theorem. We revisit Atiyah's L^2-index theorem by means of the (extended) Wodzicki residue and interpret the scalar curvature on the noncommutative two torus as an (extended) Wodzicki residue.

Sara Azzali; Cyril Lvy; Carolina Neira Jimnez; Sylvie Paycha

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

208

The Torus Universe in the Polygon Approach to 2+1-Dimensional Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we describe the matter-free toroidal spacetime in 't Hooft's polygon approach to 2+1-dimensional gravity (i.e. we consider the case without any particles present). Contrary to earlier results in the literature we find that it is not possible to describe the torus by just one polygon but we need at least two polygons. We also show that the constraint algebra of the polygons closes.

M. Welling

1996-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Tomographic analysis of neutron and gamma pulse shape distributions from liquid scintillation detectors at Joint European Torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D)/Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. Neutrons produced in these plasmas are measured using various types of neutron detectors and spectrometers. Two of these instruments on JET make use of organic liquid scintillator detectors. The neutron emission profile monitor implements 19 liquid scintillation counters to detect the 2.45 MeV neutron emission from D plasmas. A new compact neutron spectrometer is operational at JET since 2010 to measure the neutron energy spectra from both D and DT plasmas. Liquid scintillation detectors are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation but give light responses of different decay time such that pulse shape discrimination techniques can be applied to identify the neutron contribution of interest from the data. The most common technique consists of integrating the radiation pulse shapes within different ranges of their rising and/or trailing edges. In this article, a step forward in this type of analysis is presented. The method applies a tomographic analysis of the 3-dimensional neutron and gamma pulse shape and pulse height distribution data obtained from liquid scintillation detectors such that n/? discrimination can be improved to lower energies and additional information can be gained on neutron contributions to the gamma events and vice versa.

Giacomelli, L. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom) [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Universit degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Conroy, S. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom) [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Gorini, G. [Department of Physics, Universit degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Physics, Universit degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Horton, L.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Derivation of nuclear parameters for delayed neutron detector measurements for D-D and D-T plasma operation at the Joint European Torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first attempt to calculate the parameters for [sup 238]U and [sup 232]Th used in the analysis of delayed neutron counter measurements of the total neutron yield from deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas is described. The nuclear theory of systematics is employed, together with nuclear data from the literature. As a check on the methods used, the delayed neutron parameters were also calculated for deuterium-deuterium plasma conditions; the resulting neutron yields agreed within [+-]7% with the results obtained using the experimentally calibrated delayed neutron counter assemblies. After the calculations were completed, the first D-T plasma experiment was performed at the Joint European Torus (JET). Delayed neutron measurements were made using [sup 232]Th samples. The calculated delayed neutron parameters gave neutron yields that agreed within [+-]8% with those obtained with conventional activation methods, using iron and silicon samples. 30 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

Angelone, M. (JET Joint Undertaking Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Topological Invariants and Ground-State Wave Functions of Topological Insulators on a Torus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We define topological invariants in terms of the ground states wave functions on a torus. This approach leads to precisely defined formulas for the Hall conductance in four dimensions and the topological magneto-electric $\\theta$ term in three dimensions, and their generalizations in higher dimensions. They are valid in the presence of arbitrary many-body interaction and disorder. These topological invariants systematically generalize the two-dimensional Niu-Thouless-Wu formula, and will be useful in numerical calculations of disordered topological insulators and strongly correlated topological insulators, especially fractional topological insulators.

Zhong Wang; Shou-Cheng Zhang

2014-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

212

Simulations of lower-hybrid coupling in the Madison Symmetric Torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations of Lower Hybrid (LH) coupling in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) will be presented. Due to the special requirements of the RFP configuration (tight-fitting conducting shell in which only minimal portholes are acceptable), an unusual interdigital line slow-wave antenna is used, mounted below the mid plane on the inboard side. A number of codes are used, including VORPAL, RANT3D/AORSA1D-H and MWS, each solving different equations and using different algorithms. Output from the different codes will be presented and compared to verify the simulation results.

Carlsson, Johan; Smithe, David [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Carter, Mark [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Kaufman, Mike [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

TORUS: Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes - Year 1 Continuation and Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TORUS collaboration derives its name from the research it focuses on, namely the Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes. It is a Topical Collaboration in Nuclear Theory, and funded by the Nuclear Theory Division of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. The funding started on June 1, 2010, it will have been running for nine months by the date of submission of this Annual Continuation and Progress Report on March 1, 2011. The extent of funding was reduced from the original application, and now supports one postdoctoral researcher for the years 1 through 3. The collaboration brings together as Principal Investigators a large fraction of the nuclear reaction theorists currently active within the USA. The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration is to develop new methods that will advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct-reaction calculations, and, by using a new partial-fusion theory, to integrate descriptions of direct and compound-nucleus reactions. This multi-institution collaborative effort is directly relevant to three areas of interest: the properties of nuclei far from stability; microscopic studies of nuclear input parameters for astrophysics, and microscopic nuclear reaction theory.

Arbanas, G; Elster, C; Escher, J; Mukhamedzhanov, A; Nunes, F; Thompson, I J

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Conformal perturbation theory and higher spin entanglement entropy on the torus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the free fermion theory in 1+1 dimensions deformed by chemical potentials for holomorphic, conserved currents at finite temperature and on a spatial circle. For a spin-three chemical potential \\mu, the deformation is related at high temperatures to a higher spin black hole in hs[0] theory on AdS_3 spacetime. We calculate the order \\mu^2 corrections to the single interval Renyi and entanglement entropies on the torus using the bosonized formulation. A consistent result, satisfying all checks, emerges upon carefully accounting for both perturbative and winding mode contributions in the bosonized language. The order \\mu^2 corrections involve integrals that are finite but potentially sensitive to contact term singularities. We propose and apply a prescription for defining such integrals which matches the Hamiltonian picture and passes several non-trivial checks for both thermal corrections and the Renyi entropies at this order. The thermal corrections are given by a weight six quasi-modular form, whilst the Renyi entropies are controlled by quasi-elliptic functions of the interval length with modular weight six. We also point out the well known connection between the perturbative expansion of the partition function in powers of the spin-three chemical potential and the Gross-Taylor genus expansion of large-N Yang-Mills theory on the torus. We note the absence of winding mode contributions in this connection, which suggests qualitatively different entanglement entropies for the two systems.

Shouvik Datta; Justin R. David; S. Prem Kumar

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

215

Solenoid-free Plasma Start-up in NSTX using Transient CHI R. Raman 1), T.R. Jarboe 1), B.A. Nelson 1), D. Mueller 2), M.G. Bell 2), R. Bell 1),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Solenoid-free Plasma Start-up in NSTX using Transient CHI R. Raman 1), T.R. Jarboe 1), B sustainment and ramp-up of the toroidal plasma current. In these discharges, the central Ohmic transformer by CHI. The coupled discharges have ramped up to >700 kA and transitioned into an H-mode demonstrating

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

216

Hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields: Phase space topology and torus quantization via periodic orbits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields: Phase space topology and torus quantization for the periodic orbits in a strongly coupled multidimen- sional Hamiltonian system, namely the hydrogen atom.15.Gy, 05.45.-a, 45.20.Jj I. INTRODUCTION The hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields

217

Fast-wave Power Flow Along SOL Field Lines In NSTX nd The Associated Power Deposition Profile Across The SOL In Front Of The Antenna  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast-wave heating and current drive efficiencies can be reduced by a number of processes in the vicinity of the antenna and in the scrape off layer (SOL). On NSTX from around 25% to more than 60% of the high-harmonic fast-wave power can be lost to the SOL regions, and a large part of this lost power flows along SOL magnetic field lines and is deposited in bright spirals on the divertor floor and ceiling. We show that field-line mapping matches the location of heat deposition on the lower divertor, albeit with a portion of the heat outside of the predictions. The field-line mapping can then be used to partially reconstruct the profile of lost fast-wave power at the midplane in front of the antenna, and the losses peak close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS) as well as the antenna. This profile suggests a radial standing-wave pattern formed by fast-wave propagation in the SOL, and this hypothesis will be tested on NSTX-U. Advanced RF codes must reproduce these results so that such codes can be used to understand this edge loss and to minimize RF heat deposition and erosion in the divertor region on ITER.

Perkins, Roy

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

218

6/15/00 1 Diagnostics for Liquid Lithium Experiments in CDXU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in fusion reactors. To investigate the interaction of a spherical torus plasma with liquid lithium limitersUpgrade (CDXU) where the plasmawall interactions are dominated by liquid lithium surfaces. Among the unique6/15/00 1 Diagnostics for Liquid Lithium Experiments in CDXU R. Kaita, a P. Efthimion, a D

219

Electron cyclotron emission radiometer upgrade on the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capabilities of the Joint European Torus (JET) electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics have recently been extended with an upgrading of the heterodyne radiometer. The number of channels has been doubled to 96 channels, with a frequency separation corresponding to <1 cm for JET magnetic field gradient, and with a frequency response of 1 MHz. This enhancement has increased the radial coverage of the ECE electron temperature measurements in JET to approximately the full plasma column (limited at R>2.6 m for the X-mode due to harmonic overlap) at almost all magnetic field values used at JET (1.7 T

Luna, E. de la; Sanchez, J.; Tribaldos, V.; Conway, G.; Suttrop, W.; Fessey, J.; Prentice, R.; Gowers, C.; Chareau, J. M. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT para Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); IPP-EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Associations, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Statistical analysis of variations in impurity ion heating at reconnection events in the Madison Symmetric Torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The connection between impurity ion heating and other physical processes in the plasma is evaluated by studying variations in the amount of ion heating at reconnection events in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). Correlation of the change in ion temperature with individual tearing mode amplitudes indicates that the edge-resonant modes are better predictors for the amount of global ion heating than the core-resonant modes. There is also a strong correlation between ion heating and current profile relaxation. Simultaneous measurements of the ion temperature at different toroidal locations reveal, for the first time, a toroidal asymmetry to the ion heating in MST. These results present challenges for existing heating theories and suggest a stronger connection between edge-resonant tearing modes, current profile relaxation, and ion heating than has been previously thought.

Cartolano, M. S.; Craig, D., E-mail: darren.craig@wheaton.edu [Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 60187 (United States); Den Hartog, D. J.; Kumar, S. T. A.; Nornberg, M. D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Group-Theoretical Quantization of 2+1 Geavity in the Metric-Torus Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A symmetry based quantization method of reparametrization invariant systems is described; it will work for all systems that possess complete sets of perennials whose Lie algebras close and which generate a sufficiently large symmetry groups. The construction leads to a quantum theory including a Hilbert space, a complete system of operator observables and a unitary time evolution. The method is applied to the 2+1 gravity. The paper is restricted to the metric-torus sector, zero cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ and it makes strong use of the so-called homogeneous gauge; the chosen algebra of perennials is that due to Martin. Two frequent problems are tackled. First, the Lie algebra of perennials does not generate a group of symmetries. The notion of group completion of a reparametrization invariant system is introduced so that the group does act; the group completion of the physical phase space of our model is shown to add only some limit points to it so that the ranges of observables are not unduly changed. Second, a relatively large number of relations between observables exists; they are transferred to the quantum theory by the well-known methods due to Kostant and Kirillov. In this way, a uniqueness of the physical representation of some extension of Martin's algebra is shown. The Hamiltonian is defined by a systematic procedure due to Dirac; for the torus sector, the result coincides with that by Moncrief. The construction may be extensible to higher genera and non-zero $\\Lambda$ of the 2+1 gravity, because some complete sets of perennials are well-known and there are no obstructions to the closure of the algebra.

P. Hajicek

1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Description of the Full Particle Orbit Following SPIRAL Code for Simulating Fast-ion Experiments in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The numerical methods used in the full particle-orbit following SPIRAL code are described and a number of physics studies performed with the code are presented to illustrate its capabilities. The SPIRAL code is a test-particle code and is a powerful numerical tool to interpret and plan fast-ion experiments in Tokamaks. Gyro-orbit effects are important for fast ions in low-field machines such as NSTX and to a lesser extent in DIII-D. A number of physics studies are interlaced between the description of the code to illustrate its capabilities. Results on heat loads generated by a localized error-field on the DIII-D wall are compared to measurements. The enhanced Triton losses caused by the same localized error-field are calculated and compared to measured neutron signals. MHD activity such as tearing modes and Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes (TAEs) have a profound effect on the fast-ion content of Tokamak plasmas and SPIRAL can calculate the effects of MHD activity on the confined and lost fast-ion population as illustrated for a burst of TAE activity in NSTX. The interaction between Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating and fast ions depends solely on the gyro-motion of the fast ions and is captured exactly in the SPIRAL code. A calculation of ICRF absorption on beam ions in ITER is presented. The effects of high harmonic fast wave heating on the beam-ion slowing-down distribution in NSTX is also studied.

Kramer, G.J.; Budny, R.V.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields: Phase space topology and torus quantization via periodic orbits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A hierarchical ordering is demonstrated for the periodic orbits in a strongly coupled multidimensional Hamiltonian system, namely the hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields. It mirrors the hierarchy of broken resonant tori and thereby allows one to characterize the periodic orbits by a set of winding numbers. With this knowledge, we construct the action variables as functions of the frequency ratios and carry out a semiclassical torus quantization. The semiclassical energy levels thus obtained agree well with exact quantum calculations.

Stephan Gekle; Jrg Main; Thomas Bartsch; T. Uzer

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

Continuous Improvement of H-Mode Discharge Performance with Progressively Increasing Lithium Coatings in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-wall interactions. Recently, there is growing use of lithium coatings, in particular, to control edge recyclingContinuous Improvement of H-Mode Discharge Performance with Progressively Increasing Lithium September 2011) Lithium wall coatings have been shown to reduce recycling, improve energy confinement

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

225

PPPL-3300, Preprint: May 1998, UC-420,423 Tritium Experience in Large Tokamaks: Application to ITER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experience with the use of tritium fuel in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, together with progress in developing the technical design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor has expanded the technical knowledge base for tritium issues in fusion. This paper reports

226

PPPL3300, Preprint: May 1998, UC420,423 Tritium Experience in Large Tokamaks: Application to ITER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experience with the use of tritium fuel in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, together with progress in developing the technical design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor has expanded the technical knowledge base for tritium issues in fusion. This paper reports

227

An axisymmetric hydrodynamical model for the torus wind in AGN. II: X-ray excited funnel flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have calculated a series of models of outflows from the obscuring torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling assumes that the inner face of a rotationally supported torus is illuminated and heated by the intense X-rays from the inner accretion disk and black hole. As a result of such heating a strong biconical outflow is observed in our simulations. We calculate 3-dimensional hydrodynamical models, assuming axial symmetry, and including the effects of X-ray heating, ionization, and radiation pressure. We discuss the behavior of a large family of these models, their velocity fields, mass fluxes and temperature, as functions of the torus properties and X-ray flux. Synthetic warm absorber spectra are calculated, assuming pure absorption, for sample models at various inclination angles and observing times. We show that these models have mass fluxes and flow speeds which are comparable to those which have been inferred from observations of Seyfert 1 warm absorbers, and that they can produce rich absorption line spectra.

A. Dorodnitsyn; T. Kallman; D. Proga

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

228

An axisymmetric hydrodynamical model for the torus wind in AGN. II: X-ray excited funnel flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have calculated a series of models of outflows from the obscuring torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling assumes that the inner face of a rotationally supported torus is illuminated and heated by the intense X-rays from the inner accretion disk and black hole. As a result of such heating a strong biconical outflow is observed in our simulations. We calculate 3-dimensional hydrodynamical models, assuming axial symmetry, and including the effects of X-ray heating, ionization, and radiation pressure. We discuss the behavior of a large family of these models, their velocity fields, mass fluxes and temperature, as functions of the torus properties and X-ray flux. Synthetic warm absorber spectra are calculated, assuming pure absorption, for sample models at various inclination angles and observing times. We show that these models have mass fluxes and flow speeds which are comparable to those which have been inferred from observations of Seyfert 1 warm absorbers, and that they can produce rich absorp...

Dorodnitsyn, A; Proga, D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

ACCRETION AND OUTFLOW FROM A MAGNETIZED, NEUTRINO COOLED TORUS AROUND THE GAMMA-RAY BURST CENTRAL ENGINE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We calculate the structure and short-term evolution of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) central engine in the form of a turbulent torus accreting onto a stellar mass black hole. Our models apply to the short GRB events, in which a remnant torus forms after the neutron star-black hole or a double neutron star merger and is subsequently accreted. We study the two-dimensional, relativistic models and concentrate on the effects of the black hole and flow parameters as well as the neutrino cooling. We compare the resulting structure and neutrino emission to the results of our previous one-dimensional simulations. We find that the neutrino cooled torus launches a powerful mass outflow, which contributes to the total neutrino luminosity and mass loss from the system. The neutrino luminosity may exceed the Blandford-Znajek luminosity of the polar jets and the subsequent annihilation of neutrino-antineutrino pairs will provide an additional source of power to the GRB emission.

Janiuk, Agnieszka; Mioduszewski, Patryk [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Moscibrodzka, Monika, E-mail: agnes@cft.edu.pl [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 South Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

Calibration of an advanced neutral particle analyzer for the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new E Parallel-To B neutral particle analyzer, which has recently been installed on Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch (RFP), has now been calibrated, allowing the measurement of the fast ion density and energy distribution. This diagnostic, dubbed the advanced neutral particle analyzer (ANPA), can simultaneously produce time resolved measurements of the efflux of both hydrogen and deuterium ions from the plasma over a 35 keV energy range with an energy resolution of 2-4 keV and a time resolution of 10 {mu}s. These capabilities are needed to measure both majority ion heating that occurs during magnetic reconnection events in MST and the behavior of the fast ions from the 1 MW hydrogen neutral beam injector on MST. Calibration of the ANPA was performed using a custom ion source that resides in the flight tube between the MST and the ANPA. In this work, the ANPA will be described, the calibration procedure and results will be discussed, and initial measurements of the time evolution of 25 keV neutral beam injection-born fast ions will be presented.

Reusch, J. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Eilerman, S. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Belykh, V.; Polosatkin, S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Liu, D. [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Fiksel, G. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Plasma behaviour at high beta and high density in the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pellet fuelling of improved confinement Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) plasmas has resulted in high density and high plasma beta. The density in improved confinement discharges has been increased fourfold, and a record plasma beta (beta(tot) = 26%) for the improved confinement reversed-field pinch (RFP) has been achieved. At higher beta, a new regime for instabilities is accessed in which local interchange and global tearing instabilities are calculated to be linearly unstable, but experimentally, no severe effect, e. g., a disruption, is observed. The tearing instability, normally driven by the current gradient, is driven by the pressure gradient in this case, and there are indications of increased energy transport ( as compared with low-density improved confinement). Pellet fuelling is also compared with enhanced edge fuelling of standard confinement RFP discharges for the purpose of searching for a density limit in MST. In standard-confinement discharges, pellet fuelling peaks the density profile where edge fuelling cannot, but transport appears unchanged. For a limited range of plasma current, MST discharges with edge fuelling are constrained to a maximum density corresponding to the Greenwald limit. This limit is surpassed in pellet-fuelled improved confinement discharges.

Wyman, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Chapman, B. E. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ahn, J. W. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Almagri, A. F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Anderson, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Bonomo, F. [Consorzio RFX, Italy; Bower, D L [University of California, Los Angeles; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Craig, D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Foust, Charles R [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Interplay between MacDonald and Hall-Littlewood expansions of extended torus superpolynomials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In arXiv:1106.4305 extended superpolynomials were introduced for the torus links T[m,mk+r], which are functions on the entire space of time variables and, at expense of reducing the topological invariance, possess additional algebraic properties, resembling those of the matrix model partition functions and the KP/Toda tau-functions. Not surprisingly, being a suitable extension it actually allows one to calculate the superpolynomials. These functions are defined as expansions into MacDonald polynomials, and their dependence on k is entirely captured by the action of the cut-and-join operator, like in the HOMFLY case. We suggest a simple description of the coefficients in these character expansions, by expanding the initial (at k=0) conditions for the k-evolution into the new auxiliary basis, this time provided by the Hall-Littlewood polynomials, which, hence, play a role in the description of the dual m-evolution. For illustration we list manifest expressions for a few first series, mk\\pm 1, mk\\pm 2, mk\\pm 3, mk\\pm 4. Actually all formulas were explicitly tested up to m=17 strands in the braid.

A. Mironov; A. Morozov; Sh. Shakirov; A. Sleptsov

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

233

Smoother than a circle, or How non commutative geometry provides the torus with an egocentred metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give an overview on the metric aspect of noncommutative geometry, especially the metric interpretation of gauge fields via the process of "fluctuation of the metric". Connes' distance formula associates to a gauge field on a bundle P equipped with a connection H a metric. When the holonomy is trivial, this distance coincides with the horizontal distance defined by the connection. When the holonomy is non trivial, the noncommutative distance has rather surprising properties. Specifically we exhibit an elementary example on a 2-torus in which the noncommutative metric d is somehow more interesting than the horizontal one since d preserves the S^1-structure of the fiber and also guarantees the smoothness of the length function at the cut-locus. In this sense the fiber appears as an object "smoother than a circle". As a consequence, from a intrinsic metric point of view developed here, any observer whatever his position on the fiber can equally pretend to be "the center of the world".

Pierre Martinetti

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

234

Liquid Lithium Experiments in CDX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial results of experiments involving the use of liquid lithium as a plasma facing component in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) are reported. Studies of the interaction of a steady-state plasma with liquid lithium in the Plasma Interaction with Surface and Components Experimental Simulator (PISCES-B) are also summarized. In CDX-U a solid or liquid lithium covered rail limiter was introduced as the primary limiting surface for spherical torus discharges. Deuterium recycling was observed to be reduced, but so far not eliminated, for glow discharge-cleaned lithium surfaces. Some lithium influx was observed during tokamak operation. The PISCES-B results indicate that the rates of plasma erosion of lithium can exceed predictions by an order of magnitude at elevated temperatures. Plans to extend the CDX-U experiments to large area liquid lithium toroidal belt limiters are also described.

R. Majeski; R. Doerner; R. Kaita; G. Antar; J. Timberlake; et al

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Embedding global barrier and collective in torus network with each node combining input from receivers according to class map for output to senders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments of the invention provide a method, system and computer program product for embedding a global barrier and global interrupt network in a parallel computer system organized as a torus network. The computer system includes a multitude of nodes. In one embodiment, the method comprises taking inputs from a set of receivers of the nodes, dividing the inputs from the receivers into a plurality of classes, combining the inputs of each of the classes to obtain a result, and sending said result to a set of senders of the nodes. Embodiments of the invention provide a method, system and computer program product for embedding a collective network in a parallel computer system organized as a torus network. In one embodiment, the method comprises adding to a torus network a central collective logic to route messages among at least a group of nodes in a tree structure.

Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W; Eisley, Noel A; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Senger, Robert M; Salapura, Valentina; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Sugawara, Yutaka; Takken, Todd E

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

Migration of NSTX MDSPlus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slide revised 07OCT2008 #12;VMS2Linux - CAMAC Hardware · Linux drivers for PCI board (SCSI i/o) and Jorway CAMAC Serial Highway Driver complete. Software · ~20 CAMAC module drivers written in (VMS) C have

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

237

Description NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

30AUG11A 30AUG11A 100 0.00 B 1038 Award Friction Stir Weld Contract 0 30AUG11A 30AUG11A 100 0.00 B FY

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

238

Nanoparticle shape reconstruction by solving the direct and inverse small-angle scattering problems for a unit potential localized inside a torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simplest doubly connected surface of revolution (torus) is used as an example to demonstrate the possibility of stable reconstruction a three-dimensional homogeneous body defined by a unit potential U(r) using a spherically averaged small-angle scattering (SAS) curve I(s). Annealing Monte Carlo simulations are performed without using prior information about nanoparticle shape and size. Exact and approximate expressions are obtained for the form factor of a torus. It is shown graphically that the exact and approximate SAS form-factor curves agree for an experimentally accessible scattering region. Examples are given.

Amarantov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)], E-mail: amarantov_s@mail.ru

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Accurate evolutions of unequal-mass neutron-star binaries: properties of the torus and short GRB engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new results from accurate and fully general-relativistic simulations of the coalescence of unmagnetized binary neutron stars with various mass ratios. The evolution of the stars is followed through the inspiral phase, the merger and prompt collapse to a black hole, up until the appearance of a thick accretion disk, which is studied as it enters and remains in a regime of quasi-steady accretion. Although a simple ideal-fluid equation of state with \\Gamma=2 is used, this work presents a systematic study within a fully general relativistic framework of the properties of the resulting black-hole--torus system produced by the merger of unequal-mass binaries. More specifically, we show that: (1) The mass of the torus increases considerably with the mass asymmetry and equal-mass binaries do not produce significant tori if they have a total baryonic mass M_tot >~ 3.7 M_sun; (2) Tori with masses M_tor ~ 0.2 M_sun are measured for binaries with M_tot ~ 3.4 M_sun and mass ratios q ~ 0.75-0.85; (3) The mass of the torus can be estimated by the simple expression M_tor(q, M_tot) = [c_1 (1-q) + c_2](M_max-M_tot), involving the maximum mass for the binaries and coefficients constrained from the simulations, and suggesting that the tori can have masses as large as M_tor ~ 0.35 M_sun for M_tot ~ 2.8 M_sun and q ~ 0.75-0.85; (4) Using a novel technique to analyze the evolution of the tori we find no evidence for the onset of non-axisymmetric instabilities and that very little, if any, of their mass is unbound; (5) Finally, for all the binaries considered we compute the complete gravitational waveforms and the recoils imparted to the black holes, discussing the prospects of detection of these sources for a number of present and future detectors.

Luciano Rezzolla; Luca Baiotti; Bruno Giacomazzo; David Link; Jose A. Font

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

240

Global oscillations of a fluid torus as a modulation mechanism for black-hole high-frequency QPOs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study strong-gravity effects on modulation of radiation emerging from accreting compact objects as a possible mechanism for flux modulation in QPOs. We construct a toy model of an oscillating torus in the slender approximation assuming thermal bremsstrahlung for the intrinsic emissivity of the medium and we compute observed (predicted) radiation signal including contribution of indirect (higher-order) images and caustics in the Schwarzschild spacetime. We show that the simplest oscillation mode in an accretion flow, axisymmetric up-and-down motion at the meridional epicyclic frequency, may be directly observable when it occurs in the inner parts of accretion flow around black holes. Together with the second oscillation mode, an in-and-out motion at the radial epicyclic frequency, it may then be responsible for the high-frequency modulations of the X-ray flux observed at two distinct frequencies (twin HF-QPOs) in micro-quasars.

Michal Bursa

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Anomalous Electron Transport Due to Multiple High Frequency Beam Ion Driven Alfven Eigenmode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the simulations of recently observed correlations of the core electron transport with the sub-thermal ion cyclotron frequency instabilities in low aspect ratio plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to model the electron transport of the guiding center code ORBIT is employed. A spectrum of test functions of multiple core localized Global shear Alfven Eigenmode (GAE) instabilities based on a previously developed theory and experimental observations is used to examine the electron transport properties. The simulations exhibit thermal electron transport induced by electron drift orbit stochasticity in the presence of multiple core localized GAE.

N.N. Gorelenkov, D. Stutman, K. Tritz, A. Boozer, L. Delgardo-Aparicio, E. Fredrickson, S. Kaye, and R. White

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

242

Effects of Large Area Liquid Lithium Limiters on Spherical Torus Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of a large-area liquid lithium surface as a first wall has significantly improved the plasma performance in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Previous CDX-U experiments with a partially-covered toroidal lithium limiter tray have shown a decrease in impurities and the recycling of hydrogenic species. Improvements in loading techniques have permitted nearly full coverage of the tray surface with liquid lithium. Under these conditions, there was a large drop in the loop voltage needed to sustain the plasma current. The data are consistent with simulations that indicate more stable plasmas having broader current profiles, higher temperatures, and lowered impurities with liquid lithium walls. As further evidence for reduced recycling with a liquid lithium limiter, the gas puffing had to be increased by up to a factor of eight for the same plasma density achieved with an empty toroidal tray limiter.

R. Kaita; R. Majeski; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; G. Gettelfinger; T. Gray; D. Hoffman; S. Jardin; H. Kugel; P. Marfuta; T. Munsat; C. Neumeyer; S. Raftopoulos; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; L. Delgado-Aparicio; R.P. Seraydarian; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; M. Baldwin; R.W. Conn; R. Maingi; M. Menon; R. Causey; D. Buchenauer; M. Ulrickson; B. Jones; D. Rodgers

2004-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Overview of the ALPS Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Advanced Limiter-divertor Plasma-facing Systems (ALPS) program is developing the science of liquid metal surface divertors for near and long term tokamaks. These systems may help solve the demanding heat removal, particle removal, and erosion issues of fusion plasma/surface interactions. ALPS combines tokamak experiments, lab experiments, and modeling. We are designing both static and flowing liquid lithium divertors for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton. We are also studying tin, gallium, and tin-lithium systems. Results to date are extensive and generally encouraging, e.g., showing: 1) good tokamak performance with a liquid Li limiter, 2) high D pumping in Li and non-zero He/Li pumping, 3) well-characterized temperature-dependent liquid metal surface composition and sputter yield data, 4) predicted stable low-recycle improved-plasma NSTX-Li performance, 5) high temperature capability Sn or Ga potential with reduced ELM and disruption response concerns. In the MHD area, analysis predicts good NSTX static Li performance, with dynamic systems being evaluated.

Brooks, J.N. [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Allain, J.P. [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Bastasz, R. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Doerner, R. [University of California San Diego (United States); Evans, T. [General Atomics (United States); Hassanein, A. [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (United States); Luckhardt, S. [University of California San Diego (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (United States); Morley, N.B. [University of California Los Angeles (United States); Narula, M. [University of California Los Angeles (United States); Rognlien, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Ruzic, D. [University of Illinois Urbana Champaign (United States); Stubbers, R. [University of Illinois Urbana Champaign (United States); Ulrickson, M. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Wong, C.P.C. [General Atomics (United States); Whyte, D. [University of California San Diego (United States); Ying, A. [University of California Los Angeles (United States)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions - Iterated Finite-Orbit Monte Carlo Simulations with Full-Wave Fields for Modeling Tokamak ICRF Wave Heating Experiments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report describes the work performed under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-08ER54954 for the period April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2013. The goal of this project was to perform iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wall fields for modeling tokamak ICRF wave heating experiments. In year 1, the finite-orbit Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF and its iteration algorithms with the full-wave code AORSA were improved to enable systematical study of the factors responsible for the discrepancy in the simulated and the measured fast-ion FIDA signals in the DIII-D and NSTX ICRF fast-wave (FW) experiments. In year 2, ORBIT-RF was coupled to the TORIC full-wave code for a comparative study of ORBIT-RF/TORIC and ORBIT-RF/AORSA results in FW experiments.

Choi, Myunghee [Retired] [Retired; Chan, Vincent S. [General Atomics] [General Atomics

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Influence of plasma diagnostics and constraints on the quality of equilibrium reconstructions on Joint European Torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main approaches to thermonuclear fusion relies on confining high temperature plasmas with properly shaped magnetic fields. The determination of the magnetic topology is, therefore, essential for controlling the experiments and for achieving the required performance. In Tokamaks, the reconstruction of the fields is typically formulated as a free boundary equilibrium problem, described by the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal geometry and axisymmetric configurations. Unfortunately, this results in mathematically very ill posed problems and, therefore, the quality of the equilibrium reconstructions depends sensitively on the measurements used as inputs and on the imposed constraints. In this paper, it is shown how the different diagnostics (Magnetics Measurements, Polarimetry and Motional Stark Effect), together with the edge current density and plasma pressure constraints, can have a significant impact on the quality of the equilibrium on JET. Results show that both the Polarimetry and Motional Stark Effect internal diagnostics are crucial in order to obtain reasonable safety factor profiles. The impact of the edge current density constraint is significant when the plasma is in the H-mode of confinement. In this plasma scenario the strike point positions and the plasma last closed flux surface can change even by centimetres, depending on the edge constraints, with a significant impact on the remapping of the equilibrium-dependent diagnostics and of pedestal physics studies. On the other hand and quite counter intuitively, the pressure constraint can severely affect the quality of the magnetic reconstructions in the core. These trends have been verified with several JET discharges and consistent results have been found. An interpretation of these results, as interplay between degrees of freedom and available measurements, is provided. The systematic analysis described in the paper emphasizes the importance of having sufficient diagnostic inputs and of properly validating the results of the codes with independent measurements.

Gelfusa, M.; Gaudio, P.; Peluso, E. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy)] [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Murari, A.; Baruzzo, M. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, I-35127 Padova (Italy)] [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Lupelli, I.; Hawkes, N.; Brix, M.; Drozdov, V.; Meigs, A.; Romanelli, M. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Craciunescu, T. [EURATOM-MEdC Association, NILPRP, Bucharest (Romania)] [EURATOM-MEdC Association, NILPRP, Bucharest (Romania); Schmuck, S.; Sieglin, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Teilinstitut Greifswald, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstr.1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Teilinstitut Greifswald, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstr.1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. Sputtering and erosion tests are currently underway in the PISCES device at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). To complement this effort, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry will be addressed by a proposed new groundbreaking experiment in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The CDX-U plasma is intensely heated and well diagnosed, and an extensive liquid lithium plasma-facing surface will be used for the first time with a toroidal plasma. Since CDX-U is a small ST, only approximately1 liter or less of lithium is required to produce a toroidal liquid lithium limiter target, leading to a quick and cost-effective experiment.

R. Doerner; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; S. Luckhardt; et al

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS & FACILITIES AT BNL: BLIP & NSLS II Peter Wanderer Superconducting Magnet). Current user: LBNE ­ materials for Project X. · Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment ­ Abandoned gold mine

McDonald, Kirk

248

Advances in neutral-beam-based diagnostics on the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS), motional Stark effect (MSE), and Rutherford scattering diagnostics are now in operation on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch (RFP). The CHERS diagnostic measures impurity ion flow and temperature, localized to 2 cm with high time resolution ({approx}100 kHz). A spectral MSE diagnostic has been in use for five years, measuring |B| down to 0.2 T with high precision ({approx}2%) and good time resolution (10 kHz). The Rutherford scattering diagnostic has demonstrated the robustness of this technique for reliable measurement of majority (D) ion temperature, also with high time resolution. MST is a large RFP (R=1.5 m, a=0.52 m) operated at moderate current (I{sub p}{<=}600 kA), with n{sub e} typically (1-2)x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} and T{sub e}, T{sub i}{<=}2 keV. Two compact and reliable diagnostic neutral beams are installed on MST. These beams are short pulse, intense, monoenergetic, and low divergence. The first, a neutral H beam, is used in combination with ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy to make the CHERS and MSE measurements. For CHERS, the C VI line at 343.4 nm is collected by a custom high-throughput double grating spectrometer which simultaneously records both charge-exchange and background emissions. The spectrum is analyzed using a sophisticated model derived from the Atomic Database and Analysis Structure (ADAS) package. The MSE system records the entire H{alpha} Stark spectrum; |B| is derived from the measured splitting of the {pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup -} manifolds. Measurement of |B| is critical to accurate equilibrium reconstruction in the RFP. The second diagnostic beam is a 20 keV neutral He beam and is used for the Rutherford scattering measurements. A pair of neutral particle analyzers is used to record the energy spectrum of the small-angle Rutherford scattered He atoms.

Den Hartog, D. J.; Craig, D.; Ennis, D. A.; Fiksel, G.; Gangadhara, S.; Holly, D. J.; Reardon, J. C.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Lizunov, A. A.; O'Mullane, M. G.; Summers, H. P. [Department of Physics, and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XQ Scotland (United Kingdom)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

TORUS: Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes Annual Continuation and Progress Report Year-2: March 1, 2011 - February 29, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TORUS collaboration derives its name from the research it focuses on, namely the Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes. It is a Topical Collaboration in Nuclear Theory, and funded by the Nuclear Theory Division of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. The funding supports one postdoctoral researcher for the years 1 through 3. The collaboration brings together as Principal Investigators a large fraction of the nuclear reaction theorists currently active within the USA. The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration is to develop new methods that will advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct-reaction calculations, and, by using a new partial-fusion theory, to integrate descriptions of direct and compound-nucleus reactions. This multi-institution collaborative effort is directly relevant to three areas of interest: the properties of nuclei far from stability; microscopic studies of nuclear input parameters for astrophysics, and microscopic nuclear reaction theory.

Arbanas, G; Elster, C; Escher, J; Mukhamedzanov, A; Nunes, F; Thompson, I J

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

TRIO experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

FACT SHEET NSTX-U  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced OilExtracting theExtremeM ^Education

252

Probes for measuring fluctuation-induced Maxwell and Reynolds stresses in the edge of the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several probes have been constructed to measure fluctuation-induced Maxwell and Reynolds stresses in the edge of the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch (RFP). The magnetic probe is composed of six magnetic pickup coil triplets. The triplets are separated spatially, which allows for local measurements of the Maxwell stress. To measure the plasma flow components for evaluation of the Reynolds stress, we employ a combination of an optical probe [Kuritsyn et al., Rev. Sci. Indrum. 77, 10F112 (2006)] and a Mach probe. The optical probe measures the radial ion flow locally using Doppler spectroscopy. The Mach probe consists of four current collectors biased negatively with respect to a reference tip and allows for measurements of the poloidal and toroidal components of the bulk plasma flow. The stresses are observed to play an important role in the momentum balance in the RFP edge during internal reconnection events.

Kuritsyn, A.; Fiksel, G.; Miller, M. C.; Almagri, A. F.; Reyfman, M.; Sarff, J. S. [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas and Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Chaos in plasma simulation and experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the possibility that chaos and simple determinism are governing the dynamics of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas using data from both numerical simulations and experiment. A large repertoire of nonlinear analysis techniques is used to identify low dimensional chaos. These tools include phase portraits and Poincard sections, correlation dimension, the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents and short term predictability. In addition, nonlinear noise reduction techniques are applied to the experimental data in an attempt to extract any underlying deterministic dynamics. Two model systems are used to simulate the plasma dynamics. These are -the DEBS code, which models global RFP dynamics, and the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM) model, which models drift wave turbulence. Data from both simulations show strong indications of low,dimensional chaos and simple determinism. Experimental data were obtained from the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP and consist of a wide array of both global and local diagnostic signals. None of the signals shows any indication of low dimensional chaos or other simple determinism. Moreover, most of the analysis tools indicate the experimental system is very high dimensional with properties similar to noise. Nonlinear noise reduction is unsuccessful at extracting an underlying deterministic system.

Watts, C. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Fusion Research Center; Newman, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sprott, J.C. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Plasma Physics Research

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

experiment, collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Departamento Energias Renovables, Plataforma Solar de Almeria, E-04080 Almeria, Spain Departamento de Lenguajes y ca. factor 10 less complex then imaging solar Cerenkov exp.:smaller cost, fewer systematic errors #12; 5 Rainer Plaga The GRAAL experiment, ECRS Lodz July 2000 Location of GRAAL " Plataforma Solar de

255

SUZAKU VIEW OF THE SWIFT/BAT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. V. TORUS STRUCTURE OF TWO LUMINOUS RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI (3C 206 AND PKS 0707-35)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results from broadband X-ray spectral analysis of 3C 206 and PKS 0707-35 with Suzaku and Swift/BAT, two of the most luminous unobscured and obscured radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with hard X-ray luminosities of 10{sup 45.5} erg s{sup -1} and 10{sup 44.9} erg s{sup -1} (14-195 keV), respectively. Based on the radio core luminosity, we estimate that the X-ray spectrum of 3C 206 contains a significant ({approx}60% in the 14-195 keV band) contribution from the jet, while it is negligible in PKS 0707-35. We can successfully model the spectra with the jet component (for 3C 206), the transmitted emission, and two reflection components from the torus and the accretion disk. The reflection strengths from the torus are found to be R{sub torus}({identical_to} {Omega}/2{pi}) = 0.29 {+-} 0.18 and 0.41 {+-} 0.18 for 3C 206 and PKS 0707-35, respectively, which are smaller than those in typical Seyfert galaxies. Utilizing the torus model by Ikeda et al., we quantify the relation between the half-opening angle of a torus ({theta}{sub oa}) and the equivalent width of an iron-K line. The observed equivalent width of 3C 206, < 71 eV, constrains the column density in the equatorial plane to N{sub H}{sup eq} <10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}, or the half-opening angle to {theta}{sub oa} > 80 Degree-Sign if N{sub H}{sup eq} =10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} is assumed. That of PKS 0707-35, 72 {+-} 36 eV, is consistent with N{sub H}{sup eq} {approx}10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. Our results suggest that the tori in luminous radio-loud AGNs are only poorly developed. The trend is similar to that seen in radio-quiet AGNs, implying that the torus structure is not different between AGNs with jets and without jets.

Tazaki, Fumie; Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Terashima, Yuichi [Department of Physics, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Mushotzky, Richard F.; Tombesi, Francesco [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Experimental studies on fast-ion transport by Alfvn wave avalanches on the National Spherical Torus Experimenta...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disagreement suggests that nonlinearities may compromise a direct comparison between experiment and linear for reactors such as ITER, where alpha particles originate from fusion reac- tions with an energy of 3.5 Me the behavior of a fusion reactor. Waves in the Alfvén frequency range are well known for their potential

Heidbrink, William W.

257

Liquid Lithium Limiter Experiments in CDX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experiments in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade provide a first-ever test of large area liquid lithium surfaces as a tokamak first wall, to gain engineering experience with a liquid metal first wall, and to investigate whether very low recycling plasma regimes can be accessed with lithium walls. The CDX-U is a compact (R = 34 cm, a = 22 cm, B{sub toroidal} = 2 kG, I{sub P} = 100 kA, T{sub e}(0) = 100 eV, n{sub e}(0) {approx} 5 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) spherical torus at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A toroidal liquid lithium tray limiter with an area of 2000 cm{sup 2} (half the total plasma limiting surface) has been installed in CDX-U. Tokamak discharges which used the liquid lithium limiter required a fourfold lower loop voltage to sustain the plasma current, and a factor of 5-8 increase in gas fueling to achieve a comparable density, indicating that recycling is strongly reduced. Modeling of the discharges demonstrated that the lithium-limited discharges are consistent with Z{sub effective} < 1.2 (compared to 2.4 for the pre-lithium discharges), a broadened current channel, and a 25% increase in the core electron temperature. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that edge oxygen and carbon radiation are strongly reduced.

R. Majeski; S. Jardin; R. Kaita; T. Gray; P. Marfuta; J. Spaleta; J. Timberlake; L. Zakharov; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Seraydarian; V. Soukhanovskii; R. Maingi; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; D. Rodgers

2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

First X-ray-Based Statistical Tests for Clumpy-Torus Models: Eclipse Events from 230 Years of Monitoring of Seyfert AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of multi-timescale variability in line-of-sight X-ray absorbing gas as a function of optical classification in a large sample of Seyfert AGN to derive the first X-ray statistical constraints for clumpy-torus models. We systematically search for discrete absorption events in the vast archive of RXTE monitoring of dozens of nearby type I and Compton-thin type II AGN. We are sensitive to discrete absorption events due to clouds of full-covering, neutral or mildly ionized gas with columns <~ 10^(22-25) cm^-2 transiting the line of sight. We detect 12 eclipse events in 8 objects, roughly tripling the number previously published from this archive. Peak column densities span ~ 4-26 x 10^22 cm^-2. Event durations span hours to months. The column density profile for an eclipsing cloud in NGC 3783 is doubly spiked, possibly indicating a cloud that is being tidally sheared. We infer the clouds' distances from the black hole to span ~0.3 -140 x 10^4 R_g. In seven objects, the clouds' distances a...

Markowitz, Alex; Nikutta, Robert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

On the LINER nuclear obscuration, Compton-thickness and the existence of the dusty torus; Clues from Spitzer/IRS spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most of the optically classified low ionisation narrow emission-line regions (LINERs) nuclei host an active galactic nuclei (AGN). However, how they fit into the unified model (UM) of AGN is still an open question. The aims of this work are to study at mid-infrared (mid-IR) (1) the Compton-thick nature of LINERs; and (2) the disappearance of the dusty torus in LINERs predicted from theoretical arguments. We have compiled all the available low spectral resolution mid-IR spectra of LINERs from the IRS/Spitzer (40 LINERs). We have complemented this sample with Spitzer/IRS spectra of PGQSOs, S1s, S2s, and SBs nuclei. We have studied the AGN versus the starburst content in our sample using different indicators: the EW(PAH 6.2um), the strength of the silicate feature at 9.7um, and the steepness of the mid-IR spectra. In 25 out of the 40 LINERs (i.e., 62.5%) the mid-IR spectra are not SB-dominated, similar to the comparison S2 sample (67.7%). The average spectra of both SB-dominated LINERs and S2s are very similar t...

Gonzalez-Martin, O; Marquez, I; Rodrguez-Espinosa, J M; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Ramos-Almeida, C; Dultzin, D; Hernandez-Garcia, L; Ruschel-Dutra, D; Alonso-Herrero, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Simulation of the shape of chaperonins using the small-angle x-ray scattering curves and torus form factor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inverse scattering problem has been solved for protein complexes whose surfaces can be described by a set of the simplest doubly connected surfaces in the uniform approximation (a scattering potential inside the molecule is a constant). Solutions of two proteins-well-known GroEL bacterial chaperonin and poor-studied bacteriophage chaperonin, which is a product of 146 gene (gp146)-were taken for the experiment. The shapes of protein complexes have been efficiently reconstructed from the experimental scattering curves. The shell method, the method of the rotation of amino acid sequences with the use of the form factor of an amino acid, and the method of seeking the model parameters of a protein complex with the preliminarily obtained form factor of the model have been used to reconstruct the shape of these particles.

Amarantov, S. V., E-mail: amarantov_s@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Naletova, I. N. [Moscow State University, Belozerskii Institute of Molecular Biology and Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kurochkina, L. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 47 (2007) 14491457 doi:10.1088/0029-5515/47/11/006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-D; and electron heat diffusivities in non-tokamak experiments (NSTX/ST, MST/RFP, SSPX/spheromak). The radial

Callen, James D.

262

On The Anomalous Fast Ion Energy Diffusion in Toroidal Plasmas Due to Cavity Modes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An enormous wave-particle diffusion coefficient along paths suitable for alpha channeling had been deduced in mode converted ion Bernstein wave experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) the only plausible explanation advanced for such a large diffusion coefficient was the excitation of internal cavity modes which induce particle diffusion along identical diffusion paths, but at much higher rates. Although such a mode was conjectured, it was never observed. However, recent detailed observations of high frequency compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAEs) on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) indirectly support the existence of the related conjectured modes on TFTR. The eigenmodes responsible for the high frequency magnetic activity can be identified as CAEs through the polarization of the observed magnetic field oscillations in NSTX and through a comparison with the theoretically derived freuency dispersion relation. Here, we show how these recent observations of high frequency CAEs lend support to this explanation of the long-standing puzzle of anomalous fast ion energy diffusion on TFTR. The support of the conjecure that these internal modes could have caused the remarkable ion energy diffusion on TFTR carries significant and favorable implications for the possibilities in achieving the alpha channeling effect with small injected power in a tokamak reactor.

N.N. Gorelenkov, N.J. Fisch and E. Fredrickson

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

263

Recent Liquid Lithium Limiter Experiments in CDX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experiments in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) provide a first-ever test of large area liquid lithium surfaces as a tokamak first wall, to gain engineering experience with a liquid metal first wall, and to investigate whether very low recycling plasma regimes can be accessed with lithium walls. The CDX-U is a compact (R=34 cm, a=22 cm, B{sub toroidal} = 2 kG, I{sub P} =100 kA, T{sub e}(0) {approx} 100 eV, n{sub e}(0) {approx} 5 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) spherical torus at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A toroidal liquid lithium pool limiter with an area of 2000 cm{sup 2} (half the total plasma limiting surface) has been installed in CDX-U. Tokamak discharges which used the liquid lithium pool limiter required a fourfold lower loop voltage to sustain the plasma current, and a factor of 5-8 increase in gas fueling to achieve a comparable density, indicating that recycling is strongly reduced. Modeling of the discharges demonstrated that the lithium limited discharges are consistent with Z{sub effective} < 1.2 (compared to 2.4 for the pre-lithium discharges), a broadened current channel, and a 25% increase in the core electron temperature. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that edge oxygen and carbon radiation are strongly reduced.

R. Majeski; S. Jardin; R. Kaita; T. Gray; P. Marfuta; J. Spaleta; J. Timberlake; L. Zakharov; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Seraydarian; V. Soukhanovskii; R. Maingi; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; D. Rodgers; S. Angelini

2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

264

He Puff System For Dust Detector Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Local detection of surface dust is needed for the safe operation of next-step magnetic fusion devices such as ITER. An electrostatic dust detector, based on a 5 cm x 5 cm grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 50 V, has been developed to detect dust on remote surfaces and was successfully tested for the first time on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). We report on a helium puff system that clears residual dust from this detector and any incident debris or fibers that might cause a permanent short circuit. The entire surface of the detector was cleared of carbon particles by two consecutive helium puffs delivered by three nozzles of 0.45 mm inside diameter. The optimal configuration was found to be with the nozzles at an angle of 30o with respect to the surface of the detector and a helium backing pressure of 6 bar. __________________________________________________

B. Rais, C.H. Skinner A.L. Roquemore

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Spontaneous three-dimensional magnetic reconnection in merging toroidal plasma experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated a new phenomenon of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection in TS-4 torus plasma merging experiments by directly measuring the 3D structures of the current sheet. Removal of all toroidal asymmetry of the device reveals that a strong external drive of reconnection inflow increases the toroidal asymmetry of the current sheet only during the reconnection. This spontaneous 3D deformation of the current sheet increases the reconnection outflow as well as the reconnection electric field, probably because local compression of the current sheet to a thickness less than the ion gyroradius triggers its strong dissipation of the current sheet, responsible for the onset of 3D reconnection. These mechanisms indicate that the 3D reconnection is a newly observed spontaneous process of fast reconnection.

Ii, Toru [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ono, Yasushi [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Diagnostics for liquid lithium experiments in CDX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A flowing liquid lithium first wall or diverter target could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls in fusion reactors. To investigate the interaction of a spherical torus plasma with liquid lithium limiters, large area diverter targets, and walls, discharges will be established in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) where the plasma-wall interactions are dominated by liquid lithium surfaces. Among the unique CDX-U lithium diagnostics is a multi-layer mirror (MLM) array, which will monitor the 135 {angstrom} LiIII line for core lithium concentrations. Additional spectroscopic diagnostics include a grazing incidence XUV spectrometer (STRS) and a filterscope system to monitor D{sub {alpha}} and various impurity lines local to the lithium limiter. Profile data will be obtained with a multichannel tangential bolometer and a multipoint Thomson scattering system configured to give enhanced edge resolution. Coupons on th e inner wall of the CDX-U vacuum vessel will be used for surface analysis. A 10,000 frame per second fast visible camera and an IR camera will also be available.

R. Kaita; P. Efthimion; D. Hoffman; B. Jones; H. Kugel; R. Majeski; T. Munsat; S. Raftopoulos; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; V. Soukhanovskii; D. Stutman; M. Iovea; M. Finkenthal; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; R. Causey

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

267

Diagnostics for liquid lithium experiments in CDX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A flowing liquid lithium first wall or divertor target could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls in fusion reactors. To investigate the interaction of a spherical torus plasma with liquid lithium limiters, large area divertor targets, and walls, discharges will be established in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) where the plasma--wall interactions are dominated by liquid lithium surfaces. Among the unique CDX-U lithium diagnostics is a multilayer mirror (MLM) array, which will monitor the 13.5 nm LiIII line for core lithium concentrations. Additional spectroscopic diagnostics include a grazing incidence extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectrometer (STRS) and a filterscope system to monitor D{sub {alpha}} and various impurity lines local to the lithium limiter. Profile data will be obtained with a multichannel tangential bolometer and a multipoint Thomson scattering system configured to give enhanced edge resolution. Coupons on the inner wall of the CDX-U vacuum vessel will be used for surface analysis. A 10000 frame per second fast visible camera and an IR camera will also be available.

Kaita, R.; Efthimion, P.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Kugel, H.; Majeski, R.; Munsat, T.; Raftopoulos, S.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J. (and others) [and others

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present status of double beta decay experiments are reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments, NEMO-3 and CUORICINO, are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments are considered. In these experiments sensitivity for the effective neutrino mass will be on the level of (0.1-0.01) eV.

A. S. Barabash

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast Wave Heating Experiments on NSTX by J.R. Wilson, R. Bell, M. Bitter, P. Bonoli, M. Carter, D in Calendar Year 2000. The home page for PPPL Reports and Publications is: http://www.pppl.gov/pub_report/ DOE: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm #12;High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Experiments on NSTX J. R. Wilson 1

270

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Experiments on NSTX by J.C. Hosea, R.E. Bell, M. Bitter, P. Bonoli, M. Carter, D in Calendar Year 2001. The home page for PPPL Reports and Publications is: http://www.pppl.gov/pub_report/ DOE: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm #12;Results of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Experiments on NSTX* J

271

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DEAC0276CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast Wave Heating Experiments NSTX Wilson, Bell, Bitter, Bonoli, Carter, Gates, J.C. Hosea, Le. The home PPPL Reports and Publications http://www.pppl.gov/pub_report/ DOE DOE Contractors obtain copies; High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Experiments NSTX Wilson Bell Bitter Bonoli Carter Gates Hosea Le

272

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DEAC0276CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Experiments NSTX J.C. Hosea, R.E. Bell, Bitter, Bonoli, Carter, Gates, B.P. Le Year 2001. The home PPPL Reports and Publications http://www.pppl.gov/pub_report/ DOE DOE Contractors://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm #12; Results of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Experiments NSTX Hosea, 1 Bitter, 1 Bonoli, 2 Carter

273

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the 2000 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2000. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality -- an alternative energy source. The year 2000 marked the second year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion power plants. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. In 2000, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on-site and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations with limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are precipitation, surface, ground, a nd waste water monitoring. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of nonradiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents). Monitoring revealed the presence of low levels of volatile organic compounds in an area adjacent to PPPL. Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the D-site stack; the data are presented in this report.

Virginia L. Finley

2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

274

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the 1999 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1999. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality--an alternative energy source. 1999 marked the first year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. The 1999 performance of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was rated ''outstanding'' by the U.S. Department of Energy in the Laboratory Appraisal report issued early in 2000. The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements, its successful management practices, and included high marks in a host of other areas including environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of non-radiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents). Monitoring revealed the presence of low levels of volatile organic compounds in an area adjacent to PPPL. Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the TFTR stack; the data are presented in this report.

Virginia Finley

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operations Chit Review Board (designated by Run Coordinator) MINOR MODIFICATIONS (Approved by Experimental and detailed nature of the inertial effects and dissipation mechanisms have yet to be determined. The strength, and neoclassical effects. Active braking of the plasma rotation by externally applied fields will be used to alter

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

276

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chit Review Board (designated by Run Coordinator) MINOR MODIFICATIONS (Approved by Experimental helical field, resonant electromagnetic coupling of rational surfaces to error fields or the conducting global nature of toroidal rotation damping at N / Nno-wall > 1 2) The observed dependence of rotation

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

277

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Responsible Division: Experimental Research Operations Chit Review Board (designated by Run Coordinator) MINOR redistribution and loss of fast ions resulting from the bursts. In addition, eternal braking fields eigenfunctions. Comparison with calculated BAAE eigenfunctions will improve understanding of the exact nature

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

278

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Machine Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designated by RLM MINOR MODIFICATIONS #12;OP-XMP-59 2 / 6 REVIEWERS (designated by RLM) Organization/Position Name Signature ATI D. Mueller Test Director M. Podestà Independent Reviewer NB M. Cropper RF Diagnostics TRAINING (designated by RLM) Training required: No Yes Instructor

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

279

NSTX Upgrade Armor Plate Backing Plate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

available during this time period. Assumptions 1.) 2-D Opera Results uniformly expanded into 3-D as provided the calculation was not repeated. #12;Cognizant Engineer's printed name, signature, and date __________

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

280

Work Authorization Document NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUG14 01AUG14 0 41 1,094,172.40 0.00 0.00 Design 24200020 PDR Prep PPL 26 17MAY10A 17MAY10A 22JUN10A.00 0.00 24200059 Peer Review 0 31MAR11 14APR11A -10 0.00 0.00 0.00 24200060 FDR Prep PPL 24* 17MAY11 16

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Overview of the Initial NSTX Experimental Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Japan O. Mitarai, Kyushu Tokai Univ., Kumamoto, Japan M. Nagata, Himeji Inst. Technology, Okayama, Japan. Takase, ,H. Hayashiya, S. Shiraiwa, Univ. Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan N. Nishino, Hiroshima Univ., Hiroshima-sustaining by pressure driven current. Combination of highCombination of high TT, high, high , and high q(a) leads

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

282

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to apply small oscillations in the plasma vertical position, in order to trigger ELMs. The vertical oscillations will be generated in one of two ways i) by requesting rapid variations in the plasma vertical position, or ii) explicitly adding a "kick" voltage to the PF-3 coil, and then allowing the vertical

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

283

Martin Peng*, Charles Neumeyer NSTX National Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

30 Injector Voltage Toroidal Current Injector current SN 106488 kAkVmWbkAkA n = 1 oscillations n=1 oscillations related to reconnection mechanisms (U Wash, PPPL) (JHU) #12;Plasmas with Beam Heating Can Surpass Moderate plasma current High p ~ 1 H-mode with Edge-Localized Modes Induction voltage reduced to

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

284

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mode plasmas, using Neon injection and the (diode based) USXR poloidal arrays. While thermal ion transport in H H- modes by using deuterated-methane and neon gas puffs as well as vitreous carbon pellet injection. We will first attempt injection into ELM-free H-modes by applying brief (50-200 ms) gas puffs

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

285

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division: Experimental Research Operations Chit Review Board (designated by Run Coordinator) MINOR others, that affects the divertor detachment threshold. Deuterium will be injected from the outer wall divertor is cold (Te

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

286

P a g e | 1 NSTX Upgrade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 MPa in the inner leg corners near the friction stir welded flags. Pending acceptable results from the friction stir welded flags. The global model load files are base

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

287

Work Authorization Document NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2,600,540.35 781,209.80 800,604.60 Inner TF Bundl;e Design 1304-0050 Perform Add'l Friction Stir Weld Trials-Phase II 75 01SEP10A 01SEP10A 01OCT10A 01OCT10A 0 0.00 100 0.00 0.00 1304-0060 Fabricate

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

288

NSTX-U | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn F. Geisz,AerialStaff

289

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - NSTX-U  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16 FOR Primary Author Last Nameenergyiterlithiumnstx-u

290

Work Authorization Document NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

01JUN10A 0 0.00 100 0.00 0.00 1000-0008 Fault, FMEA evaluation and analyses 21 03MAY10A 03MAY10A 0110A 25FEB11 18MAY11 -58 147 18,651.56 75 13,823.15 18,430.86 1000-0017 Fault, FMEA analyses (LOE) 220

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

291

Work Authorization Document NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-NBI-Control & Instm 5 08JUN10A 08JUN10A 14JUN10A 14JUN10A 0 0.00 100 0.00 0.00 2475-0004 FMEA Analysis

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

292

Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

A. S. Barabash

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

Science and Technology of the 10-MA Spherical Tori  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spherical Torus (ST) configuration has recently emerged as an example of confinement concept innovation that enables attractive steps in the development of fusion energy. The scientific potential for the ST has been indicated by recent encouraging results from START,2 CDX-U, and HIT. The scientific principles for the D-fueled ST will soon be tested by NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment3) in the U.S. and MAST (Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak4) in the U.K. at the level of l-2 MA in plasma current. More recently, interest has grown in the U.S. in the possibility of near-term ST fusion burn devices at the level of 10 MA in plasma current. The missions for these devices would be to test burning plasma performance in a small, pulsed D-T-fueled ST (i.e., DTST) and to develop fusion energy technologies in a small steady state ST-based Volume Neutron Source (VNS). This paper reports the results of analysis of the key science and technology issues for these devices.

Peng, Y-K.M.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

295

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiment (NSTX) by means of thermocouples, an infrared (IR) camera, and a Faraday cup probe. The losses temperatures and high beta, auxiliary heating is needed, the simplest form being neutral beam (NB) heating. NB heating has been applied to NSTX, commencing in September 2000, and has resulted in toroidal beta values

296

Irish Potato Fertilizer Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO 101 January, 1908. ish Potato Fertilizer Experiments - Postoffice, COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS OFFICERS. GOVERNING BOARD. (Board of Directors... was sc Be Irish Potato Fl nents W. S. Hotchkiss and E. J. Kyle. e fertilizer work with the Irish potato at Troupe was first planned fall of 1902. The results which were gotten upon harvesting the the spring of 1903 were so opposed, especially...

Hotchkiss, W.S.; Kyle, E. J. (Edwin Jackson)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Double Beta Decay Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present, neutrinoless double beta decay is perhaps the only experiment that can tell us whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. Given the significance of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}, there is a widespread interest for these rare event studies employing a variety of novel techniques. This paper describes the current status of DBD experiments. The Indian effort for an underground NDBD experiment at the upcoming INO laboratory is also presented.

Nanal, Vandana [Dept. of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Conference: Synergy Between Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kaxiras (Harvard) Synopsis ­ Society's ceaseless demand for clean, renewable energy resources on rapidly developing areas of nanoscale computation, will hold a conference on energy research, experimentAn NNIN/C Conference: Synergy Between Experiment and Computation in Energy ­ Looking to 2030. Yu

Heller, Eric

299

Undergraduate reactor control experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise.

Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Study of Thermonuclear Alfven Instabilities in Next Step Burning Plasma Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study is presented for the stability of alpha-particle driven shear Alfven Eigenmodes (AE) for the normal parameters of the three major burning plasma proposals, ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), FIRE (Fusion Ignition Research Experiment), and IGNITOR (Ignited Torus). A study of the JET (Joint European Torus) plasma, where fusion alphas were generated in tritium experiments, is also included to attempt experimental validation of the numerical predictions. An analytic assessment of Toroidal AE (TAE) stability is first presented, where the alpha particle beta due to the fusion reaction rate and electron drag is simply and accurately estimated in 7-20 keV plasma temperature regime. In this assessment the hot particle drive is balanced against ion-Landau damping of the background deuterons and electron collision effects and stability boundaries are determined. Then two numerical studies of AE instability are presented. In one the High-n stability code HINST is used . This code is capable of predicting instabilities of low and moderately high frequency Alfven modes. HINST computes the non-perturbative solution of the Alfven eigenmodes including effects of ion finite Larmor radius, orbit width, trapped electrons etc. The stability calculations are repeated using the global code NOVAK. We show that for these tokamaks the spectrum of the least stable AE modes are TAE that appear at medium-/high-n numbers. In HINST TAEs are locally unstable due to the alphas pressure gradient in all the devices under the consideration except IGNITOR. However, NOVAK calculations show that the global mode structure enhances the damping mechanisms and produces stability in all configurations considered here. A serious question remains whether the perturbation theory used in NOVAK overestimates the stability predictions, so that it is premature to conclude that the nominal operation of all three proposals are stable to AEs. In addition NBI ions produce a strong stabilizing effect for JET. However, in ITER the beam energies needed to penetrate to the core must be high so that a diamagnetic drift frequency comparable to that of the alpha particles is produced by the beam ions which induces a destabilizing effect.

N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; R. Budny; C.Z. Cheng; G.-Y. Fu; W.W. Heidbrink; G. Kramer; D. Meade; and R. Nazikian

2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Neutron EDM Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutron EDM experiment has played an important part over many decades in shaping and constraining numerous models of CP violation. This review article discusses some of the techniques used to calculate EDMs under various theoretical scenarios, and highlights some of the implications of EDM limits upon such models. A pedagogical introduction is given to the experimental techniques employed in the recently completed ILL experiment, including a brief discussion of the dominant systematic uncertainties. A new and much more sensitive version of the experiment, which is currently under development, is also outlined.

P. G. Harris

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

303

Simulated pion photoproduction experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction: In this paper, I will be assessing the capabilities of the Neutral Meson Spectrometer (NMS) detector in a planned experiment at the High Intensity Gamma Source at Duke University. I will review the relevant ...

Howe, Ethan (Ethan Gabriel Grief)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

General relativity and experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

T. Damour

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

305

Corporate Operating Experience Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program helps to prevent the recurrence of significant adverse events/trends by sharing performance information, lessons learned and good practices across the DOE complex.

306

The MAJORANA Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MAJORANA collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment, an R&D effort that will field approximately 40kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR.

The MAJORANA Collaboration

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Majorana Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Keillor, M. E.; Kephart, J. D.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F. T. III [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Back, H. O. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bergevin, M.; Chan, Y.-D.; Detwiler, J. A.; Loach, J. C. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); and others

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

The MAJORANA Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, John; Wolfe, B. A.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Dulye Leadership Experience The Ultimate Professional Development Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experience Do YOU have what it takes to join the team? Find out more at dle.dulye.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DulyeLeadershipExperience Twitter: DLE4SU #12;Dulye Leadership Experience Program Overview Dulye Leadership Experience The Dulye Leadership Experience (DLE) is a full scholarship, professional development program for Syracuse University

Crowston, Kevin

310

NSTX Upgrade Project Final Design Review June 22 -24, 2011 1 NSTX Supported by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Bakeout ­ Gas Injection ­ Cooling Water · Requirements · Description of the Design · Previous Chits, 2011 Cooling Water Requirements · Upgrade 8 OH Flow Paths ­ Existing · Eight (8) OH flow paths @ 1 GPM to equalize temperature of coil conductors · Add local pressure monitoring gage · Add remote pressure

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

311

NSTX Weekly Report (Jan. 22, 2009) FY 2010 NSTX plasma operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Tokamaks," and Vsevolod Soukhanovskii of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on "Advanced High Heat Flux research team attended the 2nd NIFS-CRF International Symposium on Plasma-Surface Interactions on Jan. 18 - 20, 2010 at NIFS, Gifu, Japan and the presented following three invited and two contributed oral

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

312

NSTX Weekly Report (June 11, 2010) FY 2010 NSTX plasma operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modes. Radio frequency heating (wave-particle and edge interactions, and fast wave antenna loading heating, as well as dual probe lithium evaporation. The lithium (LITER) probe in the Bay F #12;position (H. Kugel) Liquid Lithium Diver

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

313

NSTX Weekly Report (Mar. 5, 2010) FY 2010 NSTX plasma operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning. Lithium conditioning allowed of rf power. Visible and infrared camera images show that fast wave interactions can deposit Physics Operations (H. Kugel) Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) Diagnostics - Filters for the Divertor Fast

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

314

NSTX Weekly Report (November 19, 2010) FY 2011 NSTX plasma operations started on October 4, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the neutral beam helium refrigerator compressors were removed for refurbishment, and electricians are making (next to CHI gap) was successful pending resolution of chits · Lithium Particle Centrifugal Injection

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

315

NSTX Weekly Report (August 6, 2010) FY 2010 NSTX plasma operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and features that are required for divertor and PMI testing and also discussed PFC/PMI testing strategy in FNSF

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

316

http://NSTX.pppl.gov/nstx/Software/IDL/ idl_intro.html#GOTCHAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graphics get erased? When a window gets covered, then uncovered, someone has to keep a copy of the obscured be stopped using control-C. (Hold down the control key and hit the letter c). IDL can be aborted immediately using control-\\. (All variables are lost and the state of open files will be uncertain). Programs

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

317

NSTX Weekly Report (Mar. 12, 2010) FY 2010 NSTX plasma operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the successful completion of the vacuum vessel bake, and the ongoing preparations for field coil power testing vacuum vessel. Also this week, new fiber-optic cabling was installed in the test cell for network for publication in Nuclear Fusion. The paper reviews recent 2009 results on L-H transition dependences

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

318

NSTX Weekly Report (May 7, 2010) FY 2010 NSTX plasma operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at that bay. Also this week, tests of a prototype hot air-based heating system for one of the four Liquid-air heating of an LLD plate. · LLD Diagnostics - The fabrication of the fiber holder for the divertor week. The last of the remote mirror control mechanisms for the High-k turbulence diagnostic has been

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

319

AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

Depken, J.C.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A demonstration mobility experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corporation, Albuquerque& New Nhxico& for his assl. stance and advice in the preparation of the crystslsl snd my wife, Ellen, who corrected gram&asr& typed, proofread& and offered sncouragesmnt throughout the comple- tion of this thesis, I I I 8 I w... Shockley Haynes mobil. ty experiment. Tp Fig, 2. Sketch of oscilloscope trace from asr1y version of tha Shoo'klay Hagrnes momlity experiment, drift toward the eollsotor point with e velocity~? whereMLO the h ~ ability of a boles Ths Current tlsw...

Martin, Howard Lawrence

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The MAJORANA Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

Guiseppe, V.E. [Univ S Dakota; Keller, C. [Univ S Dakota; Mei, D-M [Univ S Dakota; Perevozchikov, O. [Univ S Dakota; Perumpilly, G. [Univ S Dakota; Thomas, K. [Univ S Dakota; Xiang, W. [Univ S Dakota; Zhang, C. [Univ S Dakota; Aalseth, C.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Aguayo, E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Ely, J. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Fast, J.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hoppe, E.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hossbach, T.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Keillor, M. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kephart, J.D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kouzes, R. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Miley, H.S. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Mizouni, L. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Myers, A.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Reid, D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Amman, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Bergevin, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Chan, Y-D [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Detwiler, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Loach, J.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Martin, R.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Poon, A.W.P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Prior, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Yaver, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Avignone, F.T. III [University of South Carolina; Creswick, R. [University of South Carolina; Farach, H. [University of South Carolina; Mizouni, L. [University of South Carolina; Avignone, Frank Titus [ORNL; Bertrand Jr, Fred E [ORNL; Capps, Gregory L [ORNL; Cooper, Reynold J [ORNL; Radford, David C [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Wilkerson, John F [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Yu, Chang-Hong [ORNL; Back, H.O. [University of North Carolina; Leviner, L. [North Carolina State University; Young, A.R. [North Carolina State University; Back (et al.), H.O. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC; Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Hong, H. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Howard, S. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Medlin, D. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Sobolev, V. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Barabash, A.S. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Konovalov, S.I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Vanyushin, I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Yumatov, V. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Barbeau, P.S. [University of Chicago; Collar, J.I. [University of Chicago; Fields, N. [University of Chicago; Boswell (et al.), M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brudanin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Egorov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Gusey, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Kochetov, O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Shirchenko, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Timkin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Yakushev, E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bugg, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Efremenko, M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Dept Phys, Seattle, WA; Busch, M. [Duke University; Esterline, J. [Duke University; Swift, G. [Duke University; Tornow, W. [Duke University/TUNL; Ejiri, H. [Osaka University; Hazama, R. [Osaka University; Nomachi, M. [Osaka University; Shima, T. [Osaka University; Finnerty (et al.), P. [University of North Carolina; et al.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The OLYMPUS Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01~GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately $25^\\circ$--$75^\\circ$. Symmetric M{\\o}ller/Bhabha calorimeters at $1.29^\\circ$ and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at $12^\\circ$ served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5~fb$^{-1}$ was collected over two running periods in 2012. This paper provides details on the accelerator, target, detectors, and operation of the experiment.

R. Milner; D. K. Hasell; M. Kohl; U. Schneekloth; N. Akopov; R. Alarcon; V. A. Andreev; O. Ates; A. Avetisyan; D. Bayadilov; R. Beck; S. Belostotski; J. C. Bernauer; J. Bessuille; F. Brinker; B. Buck; J. R. Calarco; V. Carassiti; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; N. D'Ascenzo; R. De Leo; J. Diefenbach; T. W. Donnelly; K. Dow; G. Elbakian; D. Eversheim; S. Frullani; Ch. Funke; G. Gavrilov; B. Glser; N. Grrissen; J. Hauschildt; B. S. Henderson; Ph. Hoffmeister; Y. Holler; L. D. Ice; A. Izotov; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; J. Kelsey; D. Khaneft; P. Klassen; A. Kiselev; A. Krivshich; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; D. Lenz; S. Lumsden; Y. Ma; F. Maas; H. Marukyan; O. Miklukho; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; Y. Naryshkin; C. O'Connor; R. Perez Benito; R. Perrino; R. P. Redwine; D. Rodrguez Pieiro; G. Rosner; R. L. Russell; A. Schmidt; B. Seitz; M. Statera; A. Thiel; H. Vardanyan; D. Veretennikov; C. Vidal; A. Winnebeck; V. Yeganov

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The Majorana Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in Ge-76. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

V. E. Guiseppe; for the Majorana Collaboration

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

ATA beam director experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes beam director elements for an experiment at the Advanced Test Accelerator. The elements described include a vernier magnet for beam aiming, an achromat magnet, and an isolation system for the beam interface. These components are built at small scale for concept testing. (JDH)

Lee, E.P.; Younger, F.C.; Cruz, G.E.; Nolting, E.

1986-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Majorana Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

Aalseth, Craig E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Bai, Xinhua; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hong, H.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Medlin, D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perevozchikov, O.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Reid, Douglas J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Ronquest, M. C.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, V.; Zhang, C.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

POLARIZED TARGET EXPERIMENT AT FERMILAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Experiment 61 at Fermilab, which is a large collaborationBernie Sandler, From From Fermilab. Alan Jonckheere andTARGET EXPERIMENT AT FERMILAB Owen Chamberlain January 1977

Chamberlain, O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Gross decontamination experiment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Electronics for Satellite Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tracking detector for the LAT science instrument on the GLAST mission is an example of a large-scale particle detection system built primarily by particle physicists for space flight within the context of a NASA program. The design and fabrication model in most ways reflected practice and experience from particle physics, but the quality assurance aspects were guided by NASA. Similarly, most of the electronics in the LAT as a whole were designed and built by staff at a particle physics lab. This paper reports on many of the challenges and lessons learned in the experience of designing and building the tracking detector and general LAT electronics for use in the NASA GLAST mission.

Johnson, Robert P.; /UC, Santa Cruz

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

331

The OLYMPUS Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01~GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately $25^\\circ$--$75^\\circ$. Symmetric M{\\o}ller/Bhabha calorimeters at $1.29^\\circ$ and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at $12^\\circ$ served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5~fb$^{-1}$ was collect...

Milner, R; Kohl, M; Schneekloth, U; Akopov, N; Alarcon, R; Andreev, V A; Ates, O; Avetisyan, A; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Belostotski, S; Bernauer, J C; Bessuille, J; Brinker, F; Buck, B; Calarco, J R; Carassiti, V; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; D'Ascenzo, N; De Leo, R; Diefenbach, J; Donnelly, T W; Dow, K; Elbakian, G; Eversheim, D; Frullani, S; Funke, Ch; Gavrilov, G; Glser, B; Grrissen, N; Hauschildt, J; Henderson, B S; Hoffmeister, Ph; Holler, Y; Ice, L D; Izotov, A; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Kelsey, J; Khaneft, D; Klassen, P; Kiselev, A; Krivshich, A; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lenz, D; Lumsden, S; Ma, Y; Maas, F; Marukyan, H; Miklukho, O; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Naryshkin, Y; O'Connor, C; Benito, R Perez; Perrino, R; Redwine, R P; Pieiro, D Rodrguez; Rosner, G; Russell, R L; Schmidt, A; Seitz, B; Statera, M; Thiel, A; Vardanyan, H; Veretennikov, D; Vidal, C; Winnebeck, A; Yeganov, V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

Depken, J.C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ``as run``; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

Depken, J.C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

2169 steel waveform experiments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe - phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mm-thick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

APT radionuclide production experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium ({sup 3}H, a heavy isotope of hydrogen) is produced by low energy neutron-induced reactions on various elements. One such reaction is n+{sup 3}He {yields}>{sup 3}H+{sup 1}H in which {sup 3}He is transmuted to tritium. Another reaction, which has been used in reactor production of tritium, is the n+{sup 6}Li {yields}> {sup 3}H+{sup 4}He reaction. Accelerator Production of Tritium relies on a high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy protons reacting with a heavy nucleus produce a shower of low-energy neutrons and a lower-mass residual nucleus. It is important to quantify the residual radionuclides produced in the spallation target for two reasons. From an engineering point of view, one must understand short-lived isotopes that may contribute to decay heat. From a safety viewpoint, one must understand what nuclei and decay gammas are produced in order to design adequate shielding, to estimate ultimate waste disposal problems, and to predict possible effects due to accidental dispersion during operation. The authors have performed an experiment to measure the production of radioisotopes in stopping-length W and Pb targets irradiated by a 800 MeV proton beam, and are comparing the results to values obtained from calculations using LAHET and MCNP. The experiment was designed to pay particular attention to the short half-life radionuclides, which have not been previously measured. In the following, they present details of the experiment, explain how they analyzed the data and obtain the results, how they perform the calculations, and finally, how the experimental data agree with the calculations.

Ullmann, J.L.; Gavron, A.; King, J.D. [and others

1994-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

336

Fundamental experiments in velocimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One can understand what velocimetry does and does not measure by understanding a few fundamental experiments. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is an interferometer that will produce fringe shifts when the length of one of the legs changes, so we might expect the fringes to change whenever the distance from the probe to the target changes. However, by making PDV measurements of tilted moving surfaces, we have shown that fringe shifts from diffuse surfaces are actually measured only from the changes caused by the component of velocity along the beam. This is an important simplification in the interpretation of PDV results, arising because surface roughness randomizes the scattered phases.

Briggs, Matthew Ellsworth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hull, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shinas, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Water Vapor Experiment Concludes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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338

BNL | Active ATF Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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339

BNL | Completed ATF Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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340

Sharing Smart Grid Experiences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The majorana experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MAJORANA Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, MAJORANA aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype DEMONSTRATOR module are presented. Our proposed method uses the well-established technique of searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay in high purity Ge-diode radiation detectors that play both roles of source and detector. The use of P-PC Ge detectors present advances in background rejection and a Significantly lower energy threshold than conventional Ge detector technologies. The lower energy threshold opens up a broader and exciting physics program including searches for dark matter and axions concurrent with the double-beta decay search. The DEMONSTRATOR should establish that the backgrounds are low enough to justify scaling to tonne-scale experiment, probe the neutrino effective mass region above 100 meV, and search the low energy region with a sensitivity to dark matter. The DEMONSTRATOR will be sited at the 4850-ft level (4200 m.w.e) of the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake and preparations for construction are currently underway.

Rielage, Keith R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boswell, Melissa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gehman, Victor M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kidd, Mary F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Roque, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ronquest, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Harry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steele, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Tokamak Physics Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) [Nevins {ital et} {ital al}., {ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion}, Wuerzburg (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1992), Vol. 3, p. 279] is to develop the scientific basis for an economically competitive and continuously operating tokamak fusion power source. This complements the primary mission of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [ITER Document Ser. No. 18 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991)], the demonstration of ignition and long-pulse burn, and the integration of nuclear technologies. The TPX program is focused on making the demonstration power plant that follows ITER as compact and attractive as possible, and on permitting ITER to achieve its ultimate goal of steady-state operation. This mission of TPX requires the development of steady-state regimes with high beta, good confinement, and a high fraction of a self-driven bootstrap current. These regimes must be compatible with plasma stability, strong heat-flux dispersion in the divertor region, and effective particle control.

Davidson, R.C.; Goldston, R.J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Neilson, G.H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Thomassen, K.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Ultrafast gas switching experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Zone routing in a torus network  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for routing data in a network comprising a network logic device at a sending node for determining a path between the sending node and a receiving node, wherein the network logic device sets one or more selection bits and one or more hint bits within the data packet, a control register for storing one or more masks, wherein the network logic device uses the one or more selection bits to select a mask from the control register and the network logic device applies the selected mask to the hint bits to restrict routing of the data packet to one or more routing directions for the data packet within the network and selects one of the restricted routing directions from the one or more routing directions and sends the data packet along a link in the selected routing direction toward the receiving node.

Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

345

Electron Bernstein waves in spherical torus plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Propagation and absorption of the electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) in spherical tokamaks (STs) have been intensively discussed in recent years because the EBWs coupled with an externally launched electromagnetic beam seem to be the only opportunity for microwave plasma heating and current drive in the electron cyclotron (EC) frequency range in the STs. The whole problem of the electron Bernstein heating and current drive (EBWHCD) in spherical plasmas is naturally divided into three major parts: coupling of incident electromagnetic waves (EMWs) to the EBWs near the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) surface, propagation and absorption of the EBWs in the plasma interior and generation of noninductive current driven by the EBWs. The present paper is a brief survey of the most important theoretical and numerical results on the issue of EBWs.

Saveliev, A. N. [A.F.Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Coupled-channel scattering on a torus  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Based on the Hamiltonian formalism approach, a generalized Luscher's formula for two particle scattering in both the elastic and coupled-channel cases in moving frames is derived from a relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equation. Some strategies for extracting scattering amplitudes for a coupled-channel system from the discrete finite-volume spectrum are discussed and illustrated with a toy model of two-channel resonant scattering. This formalism will, in the near future, be used to extract information about hadron scattering from lattice QCD computations.

Guo, Peng [JLAB; Dudek, Jozef Jon [Old Dominion U., JLAB; Edwards, Robert G. [JLAB; Szczepaniak, Adam Pawel [Indiana U.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evaluation of the DHCE Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE) experiment was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during cycle 12, which was completed in 1992. The purpose of the experiment was to enhance helium generation in vanadium alloys to simulate fusion reactor helium-to-dpa ratios with a target goal of 4-5 appm He/dpa. The Fusion Materials Science Program is considering mounting another experiment in hopes of gathering additional data on the effect of helium on the mechanical and physical properties of vanadium structural materials. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was assigned the task of evaluating the feasibility of conducting another DHCE experiment by carefully evaluating the results obtained of the first DHCE experiment. This report summarizes the results of our evaluation and presents recommendations for consideration by the Materials Science Coordinators Organization.

Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Baldwin, David L.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Future Cosmic Microwave Background Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarise some aspects of experiments currently being built or planned, and indulge in wild speculation about possibilities on the more distant horizon.

Mark Halpern; Douglas Scott

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

349

Experiments in Physics Physics 1291  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Conservation of Energy 97 1-9 Standing Waves 105 1-10 Specific Heat and Mechanical Equivalent of Heat 115 #12;#12;Introduction 1-0 General Instructions 1 Purpose of the Laboratory The laboratory experiments described in this manual are an important part of your physics course. Most of the experiments are designed to illustrate

Columbia University

350

Work Experience Guidance for Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Work Experience Guidance for Managers When approached with a request for work experience, managers. Any queries regarding CRB checks should be directed to your designated HR Manager. When a work any work, paid or unpaid: Before 7am or after 7pm For more than two hours on a school day or Sunday

351

DHS Research Experience Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I learned a great deal during my summer internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). I plan to continue a career in research, and I feel that my experience at LLNL has been formative. I was exposed to a new area of research, as part of the Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) group, and I had the opportunity to work on projects that I would not have been able to work on anywhere else. The projects both involved the use of a novel mass spectrometer that was developed at LLNL, so I would not have been able to do this research at any other facility. The first project that Zachary and I worked on involved using SPAMS to detect pesticides. The ability to rapidly detect pesticides in a variety of matrices is applicable to many fields including public health, homeland security, and environmental protection. Real-time, or near real-time, detection of potentially harmful or toxic chemical agents can offer significant advantages in the protection of public health from accidental or intentional releases of harmful pesticides, and can help to monitor the environmental effects of controlled releases of pesticides for pest control purposes. The use of organophosphate neurotoxins by terrorists is a possibility that has been described; this is a legitimate threat, considering the ease of access, toxicity, and relatively low cost of these substances. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) has successfully been used to identify a wide array of chemical compounds, including drugs, high explosives, biological materials, and chemical warfare agent simulants. Much of this groundbreaking work was carried out by our group at LLNL. In our work, we had the chance to show that SPAMS fulfills a demonstrated need for a method of carrying out real-time pesticide detection with minimal sample preparation. We did this by using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer to obtain spectra of five different pesticides. Pesticide samples were chosen to represent four common classes of pesticides that are currently used in the US. Permethrin (a pyrethrin insecticide), dichlorvos and malathion (organophosphates), imidacloprid (a chloronicotinyl pesticide), and carbaryl (a carbamate) were selected for analysis. Samples were aerosolized either in water (using a plastic nebulizer) or in ethanol (using a glass nebulizer), and the particles entered the SPAMS instrument through a focusing lens stack. The particles then passed through a stage with three tracking lasers that were used to determine each particle's velocity. This velocity was used to calculate when to fire a desorption/ionization (D/I) laser in order to fragment the particle for analysis in a dual polarity time of flight mass spectrometer. Signals were digitized, and then analyzed using LLNL-developed software. We obtained chemical mass spectral signatures for each pesticide, and assigned peaks to the mass spectra based on our knowledge of the pesticides chemical structures. We then proved the robustness of our detection method by identifying the presence of pesticides in two real-world matrices: Raid{trademark} Ant Spray and a flea collar. To sample these, we simply needed to direct aerosolized particles into the SPAMS instrument. The minimal sample preparation required makes SPAMS very attractive as a detector. Essentially, we were able to show that SPAMS is a reliable and effective method for detecting pesticides at extremely low concentrations in a variety of matrices and physical states. The other project that I had the opportunity to be a part of did not involve data collection in the lab; it consisted of analyzing a large amount of data that had already been collected. We got to look at data collected over the course of about two months, when the SPAMS instrument was deployed to a public place. The machine sampled the air and collected spectra for over two months, storing all the spectra and associated data; we then looked at an approximately two-month subset of this data to search for patterns in the types of particles being detected. Essentially, we we

Venkatachalam, V

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

352

Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience: Applying Results, Reaching Beyond Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience: Applying Results,...

353

New Safety and Technical Challenges and Operational Experience on the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Safety and Technical Challenges and Operational Experience on the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment

354

Modeling Warm Dense Matter Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Center (NERSC) at LBNL and has been shown to scale well to thousands of CPUs. New surface tension models that are being implemented and applied to WDM experiments. Some of...

355

Essays in macroeconomics and experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation consists of four chapters on empirical and experimental macroeconomics and other experimental topics. Chapter 1 uses a laboratory experiment to test the predictions of a dynamic global game designed to ...

Shurchkov, Olga

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Maintenance FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insulation Enclosure Remote Maintenance Module FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT SYSTEM describes the status of the configuration development and the integration of the major subsystem components vessel structural stiffness, this configuration makes use of the cooling jacket as nuclear shielding

357

DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order institutes a DOE wide program for the management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and facilitate the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Cancels DOE O 210.2.

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

358

GCFR thermal-hydraulic experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal-hydraulic experimental studies performed and planned for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) core assemblies are described. The experiments consist of basic studies performed to obtain correlations, and bundle experiments which provide input for code validation and design verification. These studies have been performed and are planned at European laboratories, US national laboratories, Universities in the US, and at General Atomic Company

Schlueter, G.; Baxi, C.B.; Dalle Donne, M.; Gat, U.; Fenech, H.; Hanson, D.; Hudina, M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Results from D-T Experiments on TFTR and Implications for Achieving an Ignited Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint-like temperatures and densities and, through the use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel on the Joint European Torus defined, even power producing reactors, for control reasons, will most likely be operating "near

360

Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Retail Choice Experiments: Comparing Early-AdopterExperience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the experience with retail choice of non-residential electricity customers during the period from early 1998 through the first few months of 2000. Key findings include: (1) customers in California received a significantly smaller discount from utility tariffs than customers in other competitive markets; (2) this sample of large commercial/industrial customers believed they were benefiting significantly more from commodity savings from contracts with retail electricity service providers (RESP) than from value-added services; and,(3) market rules appear to be critical to customer experiences with retail competition, yet the relationship between market rules and market development is inadequately understood.

Golove, William

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Next generation Stage IV dark energy experiments under design during this grant, and now under construction, will enable the determination of the properties of dark energy and dark matter to unprecedented precision using multiple complementary probes. The most pressing challenge in these experiments is the characterization and understanding of the systematic errors present within any given experimental configuration and the resulting impact on the accuracy of our constraints on dark energy physics. The DETF and the P5 panel in their reports recommended Expanded support for ancillary measurements required for the long-term program and for projects that will improve our understanding and reduction of the dominant systematic measurement errors. Looking forward to the next generation Stage IV experiments we have developed a program to address the most important potential systematic errors within these experiments. Using data from current facilities it has been feasible and timely to undertake a detailed investigation of the systematic errors. In this DOE grant we studied of the source and impact of the dominant systematic effects in dark energy measurements, and developed new analysis tools and techniques to minimize their impact. Progress under this grant is briefly reviewed in this technical report. This work was a necessary precursor to the coming generations of wide-deep probes of the nature of dark energy and dark matter. The research has already had an impact on improving the efficiencies of all Stage III and IV dark energy experiments.

Tyson, J. Anthony [University of California, Davis

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

363

Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinoless double beta decay is the only process known so far able to test the neutrino intrinsic nature: its experimental observation would imply that the lepton number is violated by two units and prove that neutrinos have a Majorana mass components, being their own anti-particle. While several experiments searching for such a rare decay have been performed in the past, a new generation of experiments using different isotopes and techniques have recently released their results or are taking data and will provide new limits, should no signal be observed, in the next few years to come. The present contribution reviews the latest public results on double beta decay searches and gives an overview on the expected sensitivities of the experiments in construction which will be able to set stronger limits in the near future.

Alberto Garfagnini

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

364

Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinoless double beta decay is the only process known so far able to test the neutrino intrinsic nature: its experimental observation would imply that the lepton number is violated by two units and prove that neutrinos have a Majorana mass components, being their own anti-particle. While several experiments searching for such a rare decay have been performed in the past, a new generation of experiments using different isotopes and techniques have recently released their results or are taking data and will provide new limits, should no signal be observed, in the next few years to come. The present contribution reviews the latest public results on double beta decay searches and gives an overview on the expected sensitivities of the experiments in construction which will be able to set stronger limits in the near future.

Garfagnini, Alberto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Health and Safety Plan for NSTX Upgrade Project Tasks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Policies, PPPL ES&H Respiratory Protection Directive, the Work Control Center Procedure and the DOE Hoisting and Rigging Manual. Herein is our site specific Health and Safety Plan for the work The Integrated Safety Management Objectives of this project are: 1. To integrate safety into all work management

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

366

NSTX-U PRINCETON PLASMA D-NSTXU-??-??-???  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management Division Water Neutral Beam (Heating Systems Branch of Electrical Engineering) Radiofrequency (Heating Systems Branch of Electrical Engineering) Diagnostics: Brent Stratton Environmental, Safety conditions, diagnostics, and heating systems required for an Experimental Proposal. Experimental proposals

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

367

NSTX Upgrade: ST research to accelerate fusion development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameter regimes to advance predictive capability - for ITER and beyond Develop ST as fusion energy-Z + Li Theme 4. Harnessing Fusion Power Leader in physics basis and design of low-A fusion systems Theme non-inductive ramp-up from ~0.4 1MA HI-start-up Te, ne too low for fast-wave, NBI coupling need

368

NSTX Run Statistics and Update Friday November 16, 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

->MDSplus direct Electron Bernstein Wave EB X ECH Electron Cyclotron Heating EC X NPA Neutral Particle FIReTIP Far Infrared Tang Interferom. FT X PC & PLC for control Filtered Visible (Filter scopes) FV X (old) PC broke Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) HI X X EPICS Interim CHERS IC X PC FTP Infrared Cameras

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

369

Edge Physics Studies on the NSTX Spherical Tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this funding period, activities were focused on processing data for publication, writing code to facilitate processing of data in the future as programmatic needs arise, and closing down grant activities.

Boedo, J.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

370

NSTX-U Control System Upgrades | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test andFieldSubscribeJefferson Lab

371

Objective Criteria for Assessing Safe NSTX-U Startup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) reviews. SAD/FMEA Author and Activity Certification Committee-U facility and systems adequately described in the SAD? 1. Review SAD Chapter 3 and associated FMEAs FMEAs, and review SAD Chapter 4. Consider follow up interviews with cognizant systems engineers, SAD

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

372

The Lead Radius Experiment PREX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed PREX experiment at Jefferson Lab will measure the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons at an energy of 850 MeV and a scattering angle of 6 degrees. Since the Z0 boson couples mainly to neutrons, this asymmetry provides a clean measurement of R{sub n} with a projected experimental precision of 1 %. In addition to being a fundamental test of nuclear theory, a precise measurement of R{sub n} pins down the density dependence of the symmetry energy of neutron rich nuclear matter which has impacts on neutron star structure, heavy ion collisions, and atomic parity violation experiments.

Robert Michaels

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

Reactor accelerator coupling experiments: a feasability study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) are a set of neutron source driven subcritical experiments under temperature feedback conditions. These experiments will involve coupling an accelerator driven neutron source to a TRIGA reactor...

Woddi Venkat Krishna, Taraknath

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

374

David Bohms EPR Gedanken Experiment Frank Rioux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

David Bohms EPR Gedanken Experiment Frank Rioux In 1951 David Bohm proposed a gedanken experiment, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) in 1935. In this thought experiment a spin1/2 pair is prepared in a singlet state

Rioux, Frank

375

Hydrogen Piping Experience in Chevron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Piping Experience in Chevron Refining Ned Niccolls Materials Engineer Chevron Energy Technology Company Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 #12;Outline 2 Overall perspectives from long term use of hydrogen piping in refining. Piping specifications and practices. The (few

376

BUILDING MOBILE EXPERIENCES Frank Bentley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING MOBILE EXPERIENCES Frank Bentley Principal Staff Research Scientist Motorola Mobility of teaching mobile apps class at MIT ! Strong believer in user-inspired innovation ! Have brought several new? ! Investigating the interaction between people and mobile computing devices ! Creating compelling mobile

Glinz, Martin

377

Current Direct Neutrino Mass Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this contribution we review the status and perspectives of direct neutrino mass experiments. These experiments investigate the kinematics of $\\beta$-decays of specific isotopes ($^3$H, $^{187}$Re, $^{163}$Ho) to derive model-independent information on the averaged electron (anti-) neutrino mass, which is formed by the incoherent sum of the neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. We first review the kinematics of $\\beta$-decay and the determination of the neutrino mass, before giving a brief overview of past neutrino mass measurements (SN1987a-ToF studies, Mainz and Troitsk experiments for $^3$H, cryo-bolometers for $^{187}$Re). We then describe the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment which is currently under construction at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The large-scale setup will use the MAC-E-Filter principle pioneered earlier to push the sensitivity down to a value of 200 meV(90% C.L.). KATRIN faces many technological challenges that have to be resolved with regar...

Drexlin, G; Mertens, S; Weinheimer, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

ID-69 Sodium drain experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes experiments to determine the sodium retention and drainage from the two key areas of an ID-69. This information is then used as the initiation point for guidelines of how to proceed with washing an ID-69 in the IEM Cell Sodium Removal System.

Johnston, D.C.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

379

apply skills & experience build skills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

senior apply skills & experience junior build skills sophomore research & execute freshman explore options1 2 3 4 s u p p o r t4-year career action plan parent about the center for career development Remind your student that it is never too soon or too late to seek an internship or summer job. build

Alvarez, Pedro J.

380

Neutrino Oscillations Experiments at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino oscillations provide an unique opportunity to probe physics beyond the Standard Model. Fermilab is constructing two new neutrino beams to provide a decicive test of two of the recent positive indications for neutrino oscillations: MiniBOONE experiment will settle the LSND controversy, MINOS will provide detailed studies of the region indicated by the SuperK results.

Adam Para

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Experiments in Physics Physics 1291  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Laboratory The laboratory experiments described in this manual are an important part of your physics course-3 Velocity, Acceleration, and g 35 1-4 Projectile Motion and Conservation of Energy 45 1-5 Conservation. Whenever possible, the material will have been discussed in lecture before you come to the laboratory

Columbia University

382

Experiments in Physics Physics 1291  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The laboratory experiments described in this manual are an important part of your physics course. Most-8 Projectile Motion and Conservation of Energy 97 1-9 Standing Waves 105 1-10 Specific Heat and Mechanical Equivalent of Heat 115 #12;#12;Introduction 1-0 General Instructions 1 Purpose of the Laboratory

Columbia University

383

DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes a DOE wide program for management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and to expand the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Canceled by DOE O 210.2A. Does not cancel other directives.

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Collaboration Key to Enabling On-The-Fly HPC...

385

Hydrogen Embrittlement Fundamentals, Modeling, and Experiment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Hydrogen Embrittlement Fundamentals, Modeling, and Experiment Hydrogen Embrittlement Fundamentals, Modeling, and Experiment Embrittlement, under static load could be a result of...

386

Documentation Requirements for Pressurized Experiment Equipment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Documentation Requirements for Pressurized Experiment Apparatus PSSC NOTE01 15-Jan-2013 When bringing a piece of apparatus to the APS for an experiment that will involve pressure,...

387

Operational experience of the OC-OTEC experiments at NELH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Research Institute, under funding and program direction from the US Department of Energy, has been operating a small-scale test apparatus to investigate key components of open- cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The apparatus started operations in October 1987 and continues to provide valuable information on heat-and mass-transfer processes in evaporators and condensers, gas sorption processes as seawater is depressurized and repressurized, and control and instrumentation characteristics of open-cycle systems. Although other test facilities have been used to study some of these interactions, this is the largest apparatus of its kind to use seawater since Georges Claude`s efforts in 1926. The information obtained from experiments conducted in this apparatus is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which a positive net power production is expected to be demonstrated for the first time with OC-OTEC. This paper describes the apparatus, the major tests conducted during its first 18 months of operation, and the experience gained in OC-OTEC system operation. 13 refs., 8 figs.

Link, H.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Meson Photoproduction Experiments with CLAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to light baryon spectroscopy. Meson photoprodcution experiments are essential part of this program. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and availability of circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beams and frozen spin polarized targets provide unique conditions for this type of experiments. This combination of experimental tools gives a remarkable opportunity to measure double polarization observables for different pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction processes. For the first time, a complete or nearly complete measurement became possible and will facilitate model independent extraction of the reaction amplitude. An overview of the experimental program and its current status together with recent results on double polarization measurements in ?{sup +} photoproduction are presented.

Eugene Pasyuk

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The Compass Experiment at CERN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has a broad physics program focused on the study of the spin structure of the nucleon and on hadron spectroscopy. Key measurements for the spin program are the gluon contribution to the spin of the nucleon, flavor dependent quark spin distribution, and the measurement of the transverse spin structure function. The apparatus consists of a two-stage spectrometer designed for high data rates and equipped with high-resolution tracking, particle identification, electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry. Data taking has started in 2002. Following the CERN SPS shut down in 2005, the experiment will resume data taking in 2006 and is planned to continue (at least) until 2010. Few hundreds of Terabytes of data are put on tape each year. Out of this large amount of data first important physics results have been obtained.

Magnon, A. [DAPNIA/SPhN, CEA-Saclay, F91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier et al., Physics of Plasmas, 13 (2006) 056111]. High- beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability made LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment operating in the U.S. fusion program. A significant measure of progress in the LDX research program was the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole and the resulting observations of confinement improvement. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements were made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma was created by multi frequency electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2.45 GHz, 6.4 GHz, 10.5 GHz and 28 GHz allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole was levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature was estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities to approach 1e18 m?3. We have found that levitation causes a strong inwards density pinch [Boxer et al., Nature Physics, 6 (2010) 207] and we have observed the central plasma density increase dramatically indicating a significant improvement in the confinement of a thermal plasma species.

Kesner, Jay [Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Mauel, Michael [Columbia University

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

Practical experience with Title V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Having prepared numerous Title V permit applications and applications for synthetic minor status, the do`s and don`ts of this experience are evaluated. The philosophy for what goes into the application is reviewed, with special regard to the EPA {open_quotes}White Paper{close_quotes} on streamlining the process. The pros and cons of accepting and applying for synthetic minor status are evaluated.

Hoffnagle, G.F. [TRC Environmental, Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; /UCLA; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Thermal blooming experiments. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this program were to design an experiment for determining the effect of stimulated thermal Brillouin scattering (STBS) on single pulse laser propagation and to establish the ability of both a wave optics code and of linearized theory to predict the results of the experiment accurately. The second goal is particularly important because no experimental verification of analytical tools currently in use for single pulse high power laser propagation is available. When a high power laser propagates through the atmosphere, a small fraction of the laser energy is absorbed, creating acoustic waves that may move a significant distance transverse to the propagation direction during the pulse. Such waves lead to the well-known t{sup 3}-blooming refractive-index variations. When such blooming is sufficiently strong, the induced refractive-index alters the intensity profile of the beam farther along the propagation path. This altered intensity profile induces a somewhat different refractive-index profile that may reinforce the path-integrated t{sup 3} blooming. This self-enhancement may be called near-forward stimulated thermal Brillouin scattering (STBS). The design effort described here was carried out much like the proposed experimental program, which calls for the interaction of experimental work with analytical theory and with a wave optics code, A linearized theory of STBS was developed. Results from this theory were compared to output from a wave optics propagation code for several well defined sets of operating conditions. Once good agreement between theory and code simulation was obtained for these test conditions, the theory was used to define and operating regime for a laboratory scale thermal blooming experiment that would provide information relevant to high power laser propagation. A conceptual design for this experiment was then generated and, finally, and experimental set-up, including diagnostics, was proposed.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

AGS experiments: 1990, 1991, 1992. Ninth edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a description of the following: AGS Experimental Area - High Energy Physics FY 1993 and Heavy Ion Physics FY 1993; Table of Beam Parameters and Fluxes; Experiment Schedule ``as run``; Proposed 1993 Schedule; A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Publications of AGS Experiments; and List of AGS Experimenters.

Depken, J.C.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Suli Experience | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Suli Experience Students and mentors talk about the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program...

396

Physics with the ALICE experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALICE experiment at LHC collects data in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV and in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV. Highlights of the detector performance and an overview of experimental results measured with ALICE in pp and AA collisions are presented in this paper. Physics with proton-proton collisions is focused on hadron spectroscopy at low and moderate $p_T$. Measurements with lead-lead collisions are shown in comparison with those in pp collisions, and the properties of hot quark matter are discussed.

Yuri Kharlov; for the ALICE collaboration

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

397

Physics with the ALICE experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ALICE experiment at LHC collects data in pp collisions at 1497-1 = 0.9, 2.76, and 7 TeV and in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV. Highlights of the detector performance and an overview of experimental results measured with ALICE in pp and AA collisions are presented in this paper. Physics with protonproton collisions is focused on hadron spectroscopy at low and moderate p{sub t}. Measurements with lead-lead collisions are shown in comparison with those in pp collisions, and the properties of hot quark matter are discussed.

Kharlov, Yu. V. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Attosecond Double-Slit Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new scheme for a double-slit experiment in the time domain is presented. Phase-stabilized few-cycle laser pulses open one to two windows (slits) of attosecond duration for photoionization. Fringes in the angle-resolved energy spectrum of varying visibility depending on the degree of which-way information are measured. A situation in which one and the same electron encounters a single and a double slit at the same time is observed. The investigation of the fringes makes possible interferometry on the attosecond time scale. From the number of visible fringes, for example, one derives that the slits are extended over about 500 as.

Lindner, F.; Schaetzel, M.G.; Baltuska, A.; Goulielmakis, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Walther, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Krausz, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Institut fuer Photonik, Technische Universitaet Wien, Gusshausstr. 27, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Milosevic, D.B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Bauer, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Becker, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Paulus, G.G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States)

2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

399

Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of neutrinoless double beta decay is of outmost importance for neutrino physics. It is considered to be the gold plated channel to probe the fundamental character of neutrinos and to determine the neutrino mass. From the experimental point about nine different isotopes are explored for the search. After a general introduction follows a short discussion on nuclear matrix element calculations and supportive measurements. The current experimental status of double beta searches is presented followed by a short discussion of the ideas and proposals for large scale experiments.

K. Zuber

2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

400

Experiment Report Instructions General Instructions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial Thin Film XRDEvanExecutiveSRD-13ExperiencesReport

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative all modes failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Small Break Air Ingress Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The small break air-ingress experiment, described in this report, is designed to investigate air-ingress phenomena postulated to occur in pipes in a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTRs). During this experiment, air-ingress rates were measured for various flow and break conditions through small holes drilled into a pipe of the experimental apparatus. The holes were drilled at right angles to the pipe wall such that a direction vector drawn from the pipe centerline to the center of each hole was at right angles with respect to the pipe centerline. Thus the orientation of each hole was obtained by measuring the included angle between the direction vector of each hole with respect to a reference line anchored on the pipe centerline and pointing in the direction of the gravitational force. Using this reference system, the influence of several important parameters on the air ingress flow rate were measured including break orientation, break size, and flow velocity . The approach used to study the influence of these parameters on air ingress is based on measuring the changes in oxygen concentrations at various locations in the helium flow circulation system as a function of time using oxygen sensors (or detectors) to estimate the air-ingress rates through the holes. The test-section is constructed of a stainless steel pipe which had small holes drilled at the desired locations.

Chang Oh; Eung Soo Kim

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The polarized SRF gun experiment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RF electron guns are capable of producing electron bunches with high brightness, which outperform DC electron guns and may even be able to provide electron beams for the ILC without the need for a damping ring. However, all successful existing guns for polarized electrons are DC guns because the environment inside an RF gun is hostile to the GaAs cathode material necessary for polarization. While the typical vacuum pressure in a DC gun is better than 10{sup -11} torr the vacuum in an RF gun is in the order of 10{sup -9} torr. Experiments at BINP Novosibirsk show that this leads to strong ion back-bombardment and generation of dark currents, which destroy the GaAs cathode in a short time. The situation might be much more favorable in a (super-conducting) SRF gun. The cryogenic pumping of the gun cavity walls may make it possible to maintain a vacuum close to 10{sup -12} torr, solving the problem of ion bombardment and dark currents. Of concern would be contamination of the gun cavity by evaporating cathode material. This report describes an experiment that Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in collaboration with Advanced Energy Systems (AES) is conducting to answer these questions.

Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Grover, R.; Todd, R.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Schultheiss, T.

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

404

Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier, Phys. Plasmas, v13, p. 056111, 2006]. High-beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability makes LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment now operating in the U.S. fusion program. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements are made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma is created by multifrequency electron cyclotron resonance heating allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole is levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature is estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities reach 1.0E18 (1/m3). Several significant discoveries resulted from the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole. For the first time, toroidal plasma with pressure approaching the pressure of the confining magnetic field was well-confined in steady-state without a toroidal magnetic field. Magnetic levitation proved to be reliable and is now routine. The dipole's cryostat allows up to three hours of "float time" between re-cooling with liquid helium and providing scientists unprecedented access to the physics of magnetizd plasma. Levitation eliminates field-aligned particle sources and sinks and results in a toroidal, magnetically-confined plasma where profiles are determined by cross-field transport. We find levitation causes the central plasma density to increase dramatically and to significantly improve the confinement of thermal plasma [Boxer, Nature-Physics, v8, p. 949, 2010]. Several diagnostic systems have been used to measure plasma fluctuations, and these appear to represent low-frequency convection that may lead to adiabatic heating and strongly peaked pressure profiles. These experiments are remarkable, and the motivate wide-ranging studies of plasma found in space and confined for fusion energy. In the following report, we describe: (i) observations of the centrally-peaked density profile that appears naturally as a consequence of a strong turbulent pinch, (ii) observations of overall density and pressure increases that suggest large improvements to the thermal electron confinement time result occur during levitation, and (iii) the remarkable properties of low-frequency plasma fluctuations that cause magnetized plasma to "self-organize" into well-confined, centrally-peaked profiles that are relative to fusion and to space.

Kesner, Jay; Mauel, Michael

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

HERS experiment cause for confidence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At last April's Affordable Comfort conference, I conducted a small HERS (home energy ratings) experiment to examine the relative variability of ratings in new and older homes. The experiment grew out of discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Senior Researcher Mark Ternes and EPA Energy Specialist Mia South about how good the HERS tools currently employed in the new homes market are at identifying cost-effective conservation measures in existing homes. Older homes present challenges for raters that may not generally exist in new construction. These include the absence of blueprints, the inability to interview the builder, the difficulty of identifying the operating efficiency of installed equipment, and different envelope characteristics within the home caused by partial remodels over the years. For precisely these reasons, the need for accurate ratings of older homes is acute. The efficacy of ratings in existing homes hinges on two questions: How accurate are the ratings in existing homes? and, How much does accuracy matter to the selection of conservation measures? A small experiment was organized to test the variability of ratings. Two homes were chosen to represent the very broad spectra that raters can find in the new-construction and existing-home housing stock. The new home in Park Ridge, Illinois, is typical in size and layout of the homes being built in the suburbs around Chicago. This four-bedroom, two-story house with finished basement measures slightly more than 4,000 ft{sup 2}, including the basement. The older home is located in Elgin, Illinois, and was built before 1940, probably sometime in the '20s or '30s. This two-bedroom house has a basement in which the furnace, water heater, clothes washer, and dryer are located. The raters disagreed as to whether the basement should be considered part of the conditioned space. Excluding the basement area, the house measurement approximately 1,000 ft{sup 2}. The rating process included a site visit to measure the homes features, inspection of the blueprints for the new home (none existed for the Elgin home), and a blower door test. After the raters completed their analysis, I examined the effect that the variability of ratings for the Elgin home had on choices for energy conservation measures. Although the sample was small, the results of this experiment are valuable. They may be summarized as follows: First, the ratings that different analysts estimated varied more widely for the older home than they did for the new home. Second, for the older home, the identification of cost-effective energy conservation measures was insensitive to the variation in ratings. Clearly, these findings need to be verified in further experiments. But it is noteworthy that the separate ratings of the new home were in such good agreement, and that cost-effective efficiency recommendations can be arrived at even when divergences exist in the absolute rating value. These findings also suggest that it is appropriate to have confidence in ratings as a tool for identifying cost-effective energy measures in older housing stock.

Cavallo, J. D.; Energy Systems

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

Misti A Lillo

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Overview of Fusion Nuclear Technology in the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fusion Nuclear Technology (FNT) research in the United States encompasses many activities and requires expertise and capabilities in many different disciplines. The US Enabling Technology program is divided into several task areas, with aspects of fusion nuclear technology being addressed mainly in the Plasma Chamber, Neutronics, Safety, Materials, Tritium and Plasma Facing Component Programs. These various programs work together to address key FNT topics, including support for the ITER basic machine and the ITER Test Blanket Module, support for domestic plasma experiments, and development of DEMO relevant material and technological systems for blankets, shields, and plasma facing components. While it is difficult to describe all these activities in adequate detail, this paper gives an overview of critical FNT activities. With the recent return of the US to the ITER collaboration, several activities in support of the ITER machine have been initiated, including development of the first wall shielding blanket baffle module (module 18), testing of plasma facing components, ITER tokamak exhaust tritium processing system development, and 3-D neutronics and activation code advances. The ITER test blanket module development activity has also been restarted in the US, and critical R&D is proceeding on ceramic breeder thermomechanical systems and lead-lithium breeder systems utilizing SiC composite flow channel inserts for thermal and MHD electrical insulation. Novel research on free surface liquid metal divertors is also continuing, with the goal of fielding a lithium free surface divertor in the National Spherical Torus eXperimental device (NSTX) and aiding the development of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at Princeton. Materials research in the long term is focused on coupled computational materials science and carefully designed experiments to determine the underlying mechanisms that control the mechanical and physical behavior of advanced body-centered cubic metals and ceramic composites in the harsh fusion environment. In addition, two inertial fusion energy (IFE) research programs conducting FNT-related research for IFE are also described.

Morley, Neil B.; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Anderson, Mark; Calderoni, P.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Nygren, R N.; Raffray, R; Sawan, M.; Sharpe, Peter J.; Smolentsev, S.; Willms, Scott; Ying, A Y.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The COMPASS Experiment at CERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The COMPASS experiment makes use of the CERN SPS high-intensitymuon and hadron beams for the investigation of the nucleon spin structure and the spectroscopy of hadrons. One or more outgoing particles are detected in coincidence with the incoming muon or hadron. A large polarized target inside a superconducting solenoid is used for the measurements with the muon beam. Outgoing particles are detected by a two-stage, large angle and large momentum range spectrometer. The setup is built using several types of tracking detectors, according to the expected incident rate, required space resolution and the solid angle to be covered. Particle identification is achieved using a RICH counter and both hadron and electromagnetic calorimeters. The setup has been successfully operated from 2002 onwards using a muon beam. Data with a hadron beam were also collected in 2004. This article describes the main features and performances of the spectrometer in 2004; a short summary of the 2006 upgrade is also given.

Abbon, P.; Alexakhin, V.Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alekseev, M.G.; Amoroso, A.; Angerer, H.; Anosov, V.A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Becker, M.; Bedfer, Y.; Berglund, P.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bosteels, M.; Bradamante, F.; Braem, A.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Bytchkov, V.N.; Chalifour, M.; Chapiro, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; Cristaudo, P.; Dafni, T.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; d'Ambrosio, C.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Delagnes, E.; De Masi, R.; Deck, P.; Dedek, N.; Demchenko, D.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Dolgopolov, A.V.; Donati, A.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Durand, D.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Falaleev, V.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Franz, J.; Fratnik, F.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchs, U.; Garfagnini, R.; Gatignon, L.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Gheller, J.M.; Giganon, A.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Gougnaud, F.; Grabmuller, S.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Grunemaier, A.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hagemann, R.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Heckmann, J.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Horn, I.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanchin, I.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kalinnikov, V.; Kang, D.; Karstens, F.; Kastaun, W.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kiefer, J.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, Kay; Konoplyannikov, A.K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Kramer, D.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kubart, J.; Kuhn, R.; Kukhtin, V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kuzmin, N.A.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leberig, M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levinski, V.; Levorato, S.; Lyashenko, V.I; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Mann, A.; Manuilov, I.V.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Masek, L.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Matthia, D.; Maximov, A.N.; Menon, G.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Molinie, F.; Mota, F.; Mutter, A.; Nagel, T.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Niebuhr, M.; Niinikoski, T.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Parsamyan, B.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pawlukiewicz, B.; Pereira, H.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piedigrossi, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Platzer, K.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Popov, A.A.; Pretz, J.; Procureur, S.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.-F.; Ramos, S.; Razaq, I.; Rebourgeard, P.; Reggiani, D.; Reicherz, G.; Richter, A.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Rousse, J.Y.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Ryabchikov, D.; Samartsev, A.G.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Merce, M.Sans; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sauli, F.; Savin, Igor A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitt, H.; Schmitt, L.; Schonmeier, P.; Schroeder, W.; Seeharsch, D.; Seimetz, M.; Setter, D.; Shaligin, A.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Shishkin, A.A.; Siebert, H.-W.; Silva, L.; Simon, F.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sora, D.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Tarte, G.; Takabayashi, N.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Thers, D.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Toeda, T.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Trippel, S.; Urban, J.; Valbuena, R.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Wiedner, U.; Wiesmann, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wirth, S.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Ziembicki, M.; Zlobin, Y.L.; Zvyagin, A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Rationalization of EPR Coincidence Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coincidence experiments on EPR pairs show strong violations of Bell's Inequalities at certain filter settings which is widely believed to mean that local hidden variable models cannot explain these results. In this paper it is shown that the 'non-separable' singlet density matrix can be represented as a sum of separable density matrices which are products of individual non-hermitian spin operator states. This decomposition is consistent with the intuitive notion that after separation from the singlet the two physical systems should be described by a product state. In spite of the non-hermiticity, the values of the relevant spin observables are real. A new local hidden variable model inspired by this decomposition is discussed.

B. C. Sanctuary

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

410

Summarizing my DHS Internship Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the author addresses four main topics: (1) A description of the topic of his internship at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; (2) A description of his contributions to the project; (3) A discussion of research directions beneficial to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS); and (4) A discussion of the impact the internship experience had on his career aspirations. He feels the first three points can best be addressed using the contents of a paper his mentor, Dr. Tina Eliassi-Rad, and he have published based on their work this summer [Roberts and Eliassi-Rad, 2006]. Sections 2 - 5 are intended for this purpose and have been excerpted from that paper. He concludes this paper in Section 6 with a discussion of the fourth point.

Roberts, D L

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

411

Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Interactive portraiture : designing intimate interactive experiences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis I present a set of interactive portrait experiences that strive to create an intimate connection between the viewer and the portrayed subject; an emotional experience, one of personal reflection. My interactive ...

Zuckerman, Orit

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Suspended sediment erosion in laboratory flume experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory flume experiments are used to examine the role of suspended sediment abrasion in bedrock channel erosion. A range of topographies was used, from a planar bed to a sinuous and scalloped inner channel. Experiments ...

Cornell, Katrina Muir

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING EDUCATION #12;This project is a collaboration with the authors and NAE. #12;Infusing Real World Experiences into Engineering Education 2012 #12;2 Preface The aim

Napier, Terrence

415

Building Knowledge through Families of Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Knowledge through Families of Experiments Victor R. Basili, Fellow, IEEE, Forrest Shull, and build models that represent the common observations about the discipline. This paper discusses building knowledge in an incremental manner through the replication of experiments within families

Basili, Victor R.

416

Proposal for PLASMA LENS EXPERIMENT AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for PLASMA LENS EXPERIMENT AT THE FINAL FOCUS TEST BEAM April 1, 1997 THE PLASMA LENS.....................................................................................3 1.1 Plasma Focusing ......................................................................3 1.2 Previous Plasma Lens Experiments.................................................4 1.3 Plasma Lens

417

Status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment is currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, USA. An overview and status of the experiment are given.

Martin, R. D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA and Department of Physics, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States); Abgrall, N.; Chan, Y-D.; Hegai, A.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A. W. P.; Vetter, K. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R.; Soin, A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone III, F. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Yumatov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bertrand, F. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); and others

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

The INEL beryllium multiplication experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experiment to measure the multiplication of 14-MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium has been completed. The experiment consists of determining the ratio of {sup 56}Mn activities induced in a large manganese bath by a central 14-MeV neutron source, with and without a beryllium sample surrounding the source. In the manganese bath method a neutron source is placed at the center of a totally-absorbing aqueous solution of MnSo{sub 4}. The capture of neutrons by Mn produces a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the emission rate of the source. As applied to the measurement of the multiplication of 14- MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium, the neutron source is a tritium target placed at the end of the drift tube of a small deuteron accelerator. Surrounding the source is a sample chamber. When the sample chamber is empty, the neutrons go directly to the surrounding MnSO{sub 4} solution, and produce a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate. When the chamber contains a beryllium sample, the neutrons first enter the beryllium and multiply through the (n,2n) process. Neutrons escaping from the beryllium enter the bath and produce a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate multiplied by the effective value of the multiplication in bulk beryllium. The ratio of the activities with and without the sample present is proportional to the multiplication value. Detailed calculations of the multiplication and all the systematic effects were made with the Monte Carlo program MCNP, utilizing both the Young and Stewart and the ENDF/B-VI evaluations for beryllium. Both data sets produce multiplication values that are in excellent agreement with the measurements for both raw and corrected values of the multiplication. We conclude that there is not real discrepancy between experimental and calculated values for the multiplication of neutrons in bulk beryllium. 12 figs., 11 tabs., 18 refs.

Smith, J.R.; King, J.J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

SOURCE PHENOMENOLOGY EXPERIMENTS IN ARIZONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments (SPE) have resulted in an important dataset for the nuclear monitoring community. The 19 dedicated single-fired explosions and multiple delay-fired mining explosions were recorded by one of the most densely instrumented accelerometer and seismometer arrays ever fielded, and the data have already proven useful in quantifying confinement and excitation effects for the sources. It is very interesting to note that we have observed differences in the phenomenology of these two series of explosions resulting from the differences between the relatively slow (limestone) and fast (granodiorite) media. We observed differences at the two SPE sites in the way the rock failed during the explosions, how the S-waves were generated, and the amplitude behavior as a function of confinement. Our consortium's goal is to use the synergy of the multiple datasets collected during this experiment to unravel the phenomenological differences between the two emplacement media. The data suggest that the main difference between single-fired chemical and delay-fired mining explosion seismograms at regional distances is the increased surface wave energy for the latter source type. The effect of the delay-firing is to decrease the high-frequency P-wave amplitudes while increasing the surface wave energy because of the longer source duration and spall components. The results suggest that the single-fired explosions are surrogates for nuclear explosions in higher frequency bands (e.g., 6-8 Hz Pg/Lg discriminants). We have shown that the SPE shots, together with the mining explosions, are efficient sources of S-wave energy, and our next research stage is to postulate the possible sources contributing to the shear-wave energy.

Jessie L. Bonner; Brian Stump; Mark Leidig; Heather Hooper; Xiaoning (David) Yang; Rongmao Zhou; Tae Sung Kim; William R. Walter; Aaron Velasco; Chris Hayward; Diane Baker; C. L. Edwards; Steven Harder; Travis Glenn; Cleat Zeiler; James Britton; James F. Lewkowicz

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

Galic, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, F.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); von Przewoski, B. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)] [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Lorentz Symmetry, the SME, and Gravitational Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This proceedings contribution summarizes the implications of recent SME-based investigations of Lorentz violation for gravitational experiments.

Jay D. Tasson

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Lorentz Symmetry, the SME, and Gravitational Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This proceedings contribution summarizes the implications of recent SME-based investigations of Lorentz violation for gravitational experiments.

Tasson, Jay D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

NOvA Experiment - The Local Community  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Local proprietors Steve and Deb Wieber discuss the impact of the NOvA experiment on their community.

Deb Wieber

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

NOvA Experiment - The Local Community  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Local proprietors Steve and Deb Wieber discuss the impact of the NOvA experiment on their community.

Deb Wieber

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

425

Experiments with Branching using General Disjunctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 Acknowledgement. The computational experiments were undertaken on a cluster provided by High Performance Com- puting at Lehigh University. CPLEX

2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

426

Experiments with MASS A. Tokovinin, V. Kornilov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Turbina program, and these data were analyzed subsequently in great detail. After finishing the experiment

Tokovinin, Andrei A.

427

Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

428

Today and Future Neutrino Experiments at Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of undergoing experiments and new experiment propositions at Krasnoyarsk underground nuclear reactor are presented

Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov; L. A. Popeko; A. V. Cherny; G. A. Shishkina

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

AGS experiments -- 1991, 1992, 1993. Tenth edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains: (1) FY 1993 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1994--95 AGS schedule; (3) AGS experiments {ge} FY 1993 (as of 30 March 1994); (4) AGS beams 1993; (5) AGS experimental area FY 1991 physics program; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1992 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1993 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program (planned); (9) a listing of experiments by number; (10) two-page summaries of each experiment; (11) listing of publications of AGS experiments; and (12) listing of AGS experiments.

Depken, J.C.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

PXIE: Project X Injector Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-MW proton facility, Project X, has been proposed and is currently under development at Fermilab. We are planning a program of research and development aimed at integrated systems testing of critical components comprising the front end of the Project X. This program is being undertaken as a key component of the larger Project X R&D program. The successful completion of this program will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing a primary technical risk element within Project X. Integrated systems testing, known as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), will be accomplished with a new test facility under construction at Fermilab and will be completed over the period FY12-16. PXIE will include an H{sup -} ion source, a CW 2.1-MeV RFQ and two superconductive RF (SRF) cryomodules providing up to 25 MeV energy gain at an average beam current of 1 mA (upgradable to 2 mA). Successful systems testing will also demonstrate the viability of novel front end technologies that are expected find applications beyond Project X.

Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne; Holmes, S.D.; Kephart, R.D.; Kerby, J.S.; Lebedev, V.A.; Mishra, C.S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Solyak, N.; Stanek, R.P.; /Fermilab; Li, D.; /LBL, Berkeley

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Shock recovery experiments: An assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systematic shock recovery experiments, in which microstructural and mechanical property effects are characterized quantitatively, constitute an important means of increasing our understanding of shock processes. Through studies of the effects of variations in metallurgical and shock loading parameters on structure/property relationships, the micromechanisms of shock deformation, and how they differ from conventional strain rate processes, are beginning to emerge. This paper will highlight the state-of-the-art in shock recovery of metallic and ceramic materials. Techniques will be described which are utilized to ''soft'' recover shock-loaded metallic samples possessing low residual strain; crucial to accurate ''post-mortem'' metallurgical investigations of the influence of shock loading on material behavior. Illustrations of the influence of shock assembly design on the structure/property relationships in shock-recovered copper samples including such issues as residual strain and contact stresses, and their consequences are discussed. Shock recovery techniques used on brittle materials will be reviewed and discussed in light of recent experimental results. Finally, shock recovery structure/property results and VISAR data on the /alpha/--/omega/ shock-induced phase transition in titanium will be used to illustrate the beneficial link between shock recovery and ''real-time'' shock data. 26 refs., 3 figs.

Gray, G.T. III

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth's climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27[degree]C, but never 31[degree]C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Deuterium accelerator experiments for APT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories in California initiated an experimental program to determine whether tritium retention in the tube walls and permeation through the tubes into the surrounding coolant water would be a problem for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), and to find ways to mitigate the problem, if it existed. Significant holdup in the tube walls would limit the ability of APT to meet its production goals, and high levels of permeation would require a costly cleanup system for the cooling water. To simulate tritium implantation, a 200 keV accelerator was used to implant deuterium into Al 6061-T and SS3 16L samples at temperatures and particle fluxes appropriate for APT, for times varying between one week and five months. The implanted samples were characterized to determine the deuterium retention and Permeation. During the implantation, the D(d,p)T nuclear reaction was used to monitor the build-up of deuterium in the implant region of the samples. These experiments increased in sophistication, from mono-energetic deuteron implants to multi-energetic deuteron and proton implants, to more accurately reproduce the conditions expected in APT. Micron-thick copper, nickel, and anodized aluminum coatings were applied to the front surface of the samples (inside of the APT walls) in an attempt to lower retention and permeation. The reduction in both retention and permeation produced by the nickel coatings, and the ability to apply them to the inside of the APT tubes, indicate that both nickel-coated Al 6061-T6 and nickel-coated SS3 16L tubes would be effective for use in APT. The results of this work were submitted to the Accelerator Production of Tritium project in document number TPO-E29-Z-TNS-X-00050, APT-MP-01-17.

Causey, Rion A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hertz, Kristin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Cowgill, Donald F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Romanian experience on packaging testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With more than twenty years ago, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), through its Reliability and Testing Laboratory, was licensed by the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body- CNCAN and to carry out qualification tests [1] for packages intended to be used for the transport and storage of radioactive materials. Radioactive materials, generated by Romanian nuclear facilities [2] are packaged in accordance with national [3] and the IAEA's Regulations [1,6] for a safe transport to the disposal center. Subjecting these packages to the normal and simulating test conditions accomplish the evaluation and certification in order to prove the package technical performances. The paper describes the qualification tests for type A and B packages used for transport and storage of radioactive materials, during a period of 20 years of experience. Testing is used to substantiate assumption in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural response. The Romanian test facilities [1,3,6] are used to simulate the required qualification tests and have been developed at INR Pitesti, the main supplier of type A packages used for transport and storage of low radioactive wastes in Romania. The testing programme will continue to be a strong option to support future package development, to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on radioactive material packages or component sections, such as packages used for transport of radioactive sources to be used for industrial or medical purposes [2,8]. The paper describes and contain illustrations showing some of the various tests packages which have been performed during certain periods and how they relate to normal conditions and minor mishaps during transport. Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design there are also presented and commented. (authors)

Vieru, G. [IAEA Technical Expert, Head, Reliability and Testing Lab., Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cygnus Performance in Subcritical Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources with the following specifications: 4-rad dose at 1 m, 1-mm spot size, 50-ns pulse length, 2.25-MeV endpoint energy. The facility is located in an underground tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site. Here SubCritical Experiments (SCEs) are performed to study the dynamic properties of plutonium. The Cygnus sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for these tests. Since SCEs are single-shot, high-value events - reliability and reproducibility are key issues. Enhanced reliability involves minimization of failure modes through design, inspection, and testing. Many unique hardware and operational features were incorporated into Cygnus to insure reliability. Enhanced reproducibility involves normalization of shot-to-shot output also through design, inspection, and testing. The first SCE to utilize Cygnus, Armando, was executed on May 25, 2004. A year later, April - May 2005, calibrations using a plutonium step wedge were performed. The results from this series were used for more precise interpretation of the Armando data. In the period February - May 2007 Cygnus was fielded on Thermos, which is a series of small-sample plutonium shots using a one-dimensional geometry. Pulsed power research generally dictates frequent change in hardware configuration. Conversely, SCE applications have typically required constant machine settings. Therefore, while operating during the past four years we have accumulated a large database for evaluation of machine performance under highly consistent operating conditions. Through analysis of this database Cygnus reliability and reproducibility on Armando, Step Wedge, and Thermos is presented.

G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, S. Lutz, C. Mitton, et al.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Current Experiments in Particle Physics (September 1996)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. This report contains full summaries of 180 approved current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. The focus of the report is on selected experiments which directly contribute to our better understanding of elementary particles and their properties such as masses, widths or lifetimes, and branching fractions.

Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Bilak, S.V.; Illarionova, N.S.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Strokovsky, E.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Kettle, P.-R.; Olin, A.; Armstrong, F.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

E-Print Network 3.0 - advance project formal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spherical Torus Experiment Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 74 DA Associate Program -AeS Proposal Ongoing development Summary: results make the formal development a standard...

438

The BigBoss Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (k{sub max} = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (k{sub max} = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.

Schelgel, D.; Abdalla, F.; Abraham, T.; Ahn, C.; Allende Prieto, C.; Annis, J.; Aubourg, E.; Azzaro, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Baugh, C.; Bebek, C.; Becerril, S.; Blanton, M.; Bolton, A.; Bromley, B.; Cahn, R.; Carton, P.-H.; Cervanted-Cota, J.L.; Chu, Y.; Cortes, M.; /APC, Paris /Brookhaven /IRFU, Saclay /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, CPT /Durham U. / /IEU, Seoul /Fermilab /IAA, Granada /IAC, La Laguna / /IAC, Mexico / / /Madrid, IFT /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. / / /New York U. /Valencia U.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Current experiments in elementary particle physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E., Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Current experiments in elementary particle physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Oyanagi, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)); Dodder, D.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov (USSR). Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Frosch, R. (Swiss Inst. for Nuclear Research, Villigen (Switzerla

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Dodder, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Serpukhov (Russian Federation); Illarionova, N.S. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lehar, F. [CEN Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Oyanagi, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Sciences; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frosch, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Operating Experience Summary, 2013-03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Investigation: Contamination at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Due to Deficiencies in Conduct of Operations ...5 Page 1 Page 5 Page 1 of 12 Operating Experience Summary...

443

International Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Experiment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

interaction to evaluate sealing and clay barrier performance; 2) EBS Experiment -thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) behavior of the EBS under heating conditions and...

444

Review of double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The brief review of current experiments on search and studying of double beta decay processes is done. Best present limits on $\\langle m_{\

A. S. Barabash

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

445

Review of double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The brief review of current experiments on search and studying of double beta decay processes is done. Best present limits on $\\langle m_{\

Barabash, A S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Playing games with EPR-type experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An approach towards quantum games is proposed that uses the unusual probabilities involved in EPR-type experiments directly in two-player games.

Azhar Iqbal

2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

Recent Results From The Daya Bay Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has observed the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors at $\\sim$kilometer baselines. The relative measurement of the $\\bar\

Chao Zhang; for the Daya Bay Collaboration

2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

Recent Results From The Daya Bay Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has observed the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors at $\\sim$kilometer baselines. The relative measurement of the $\\bar\

Zhang, Chao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Cavendish Experiment in General Relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions of Einstein's equations are discussed in which the ``gravitational force" is balanced by an electrical force, and which can serve as models for the Cavendish experiment.

Dieter R. Brill

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

450

State Experience in Hydrogen Infrastructure in California  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Experience in Hydrogen Infrastructure in California Gerhard H Achtelik Jr. February 17, 2011 Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop California Environmental Protection...

451

INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT, MONTICELLO, SOUTH CAROLINA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letters INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,12091 INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,transient data from a hydraulic fracturing experiment have

Narasimhan, T.N.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Informational experiments with microparticles and atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepting information as a physical category and ascribing to inanimate matter some spirit (consciousness, intelligence) allows to explain quantum-mechanical phenomena, including delayed-choice and EPR-Bohm-Bell experiments, as well as irreversibility of time, remaining on the basis of local realism, and suggest essentially new experiments with microparticles and atoms in which information plays the principal role.

Raoul Nakhmanson

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fusion Ignition Research Experiment Engineering Status Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the world. The FIRE web site has been chosen as a selection for the Scout Report for Science and EngineeringFusion Ignition Research Experiment -FIRE- Engineering Status Report For Fiscal Year 2000 Issued on the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE), a tokamak designed for burning plasma research. Engineering

454

Robotics Science & Technology for Burning Plasma Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotics Science & Technology for Burning Plasma Experiments J. N. Herndon, T. W. Burgess, M. M, General Atomics, San Diego, California. #12;Robotics Challenges in Burning Plasma Experiments · Control x x x x x x earthmoving equipment electric robots Conventional Machines DMHP Machines x x x x

455

EXPLORATORY EXPERIMENTS IN GUIDING SALMON FINGERLINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Federal, State or cooperating agencies and in processed form for economy and to avoid delay in publicationEXPLORATORY EXPERIMENTS IN GUIDING SALMON FINGERLINGS BY A NARROW D.C. ELECTRIC FIELD Marine L. Farley, Director EXPLORATORY EXPERIMENTS IN GUIDING SALMON FINGERLINGS BY A NARROW D. C, ELECTRIC

456

The Immigration Experience in Saskatchewan's Labour Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Immigration Experience in Saskatchewan's Labour Market Douglas Durst Faculty of Social Work.durst@uregina.ca The Immigration Experience in Saskatchewan's Labour Market EDITORIAL AND DISTRIBUTION OFFICE Social Policy Research Unit (SPR) Faculty of Social Work University of Regina Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4S 0A2 Phone

Argerami, Martin

457

Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2004. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2004 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE neutrino experiment, and SY 120 activities.

Bromberg, C.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Holmes, S.; Louis, W.; Meyer, A.; Moore, Craig D.; Raja, R.; Ramberg, E.; Roser, R.; /Fermilab

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Proposed New Antiproton Experiments at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermilab operates the world's most intense source of antiprotons. Recently various experiments have been proposed that can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Tevatron Collider running or after the Tevatron Collider finishes in about 2010. We discuss the physics goals and prospects of the proposed experiments.

Daniel M. Kaplan

2008-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

460

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience There are myriad ways to build experience Sciences at Columbia University offers on-campus research opportunities for the summer term Dec. 13 - March careereducation.columbia.edu Join LionSHARE ­ CCE's internship/job board Double Discovery Center Volunteer

Shepard, Kenneth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience There are so many ways to build experience The Columbia University Office of Government and Community Affairs provides assistance to undergraduates.edu/academics/research/science Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship The Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University

Hone, James

462

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience There are so many ways to build experience Program The Columbia University Office of Government and Community Affairs provides assistance.edu/academics/research/science Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship The Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University

Hone, James

463

Status of the AlCap experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The AlCap experiment is a joint project between the COMET and Mu2e collaborations. Both experiments intend to look for the lepton-flavour violating conversion $\\mu + A \\rightarrow e + A$, using tertiary muons from high-power pulsed proton beams. In these experiments the products of ordinary muon capture in the muon stopping target are an important concern, both in terms of hit rates in tracking detectors and radiation damage to equipment. The goal of the AlCap experiment is to provide precision measurements of the products of nuclear capture on Aluminium, which is the favoured target material for both COMET and Mu2e. The results will be used for optimising the design of both conversion experiments, and as input to their simulations. Data was taken in December 2013 and is currently being analysed.

Litchfield, R Phillip

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Status of the AlCap experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The AlCap experiment is a joint project between the COMET and Mu2e collaborations. Both experiments intend to look for the lepton-flavour violating conversion $\\mu + A \\rightarrow e + A$, using tertiary muons from high-power pulsed proton beams. In these experiments the products of ordinary muon capture in the muon stopping target are an important concern, both in terms of hit rates in tracking detectors and radiation damage to equipment. The goal of the AlCap experiment is to provide precision measurements of the products of nuclear capture on Aluminium, which is the favoured target material for both COMET and Mu2e. The results will be used for optimising the design of both conversion experiments, and as input to their simulations. Data was taken in December 2013 and is currently being analysed.

R. Phillip Litchfield

2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

465

Theory, experiment and computer simulation of the electrostatic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theory, experiment and computer simulation of the electrostatic potential at crystalelectrolyte interfaces . Theory, experiment and computer simulation of the electrostatic...

466

Voices of Experience | Insights into Advanced Distribution Management...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Voices of Experience | Insights into Advanced Distribution Management Systems (February 2015) Voices of Experience | Insights into Advanced Distribution Management Systems...

467

Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive SpectrumKinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wang, Z. R.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Manickam, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Solar axion search with the CAST experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CAST (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside the magnet pipe of an LHC dipole. The analysis of the data recorded during the first phase of the experiment with vacuum in the magnet pipes has resulted in the most restrictive experimental limit on the coupling constant of axions to photons. In the second phase, CAST is operating with a buffer gas inside the magnet pipes in order to extent the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axion masses. We will present the first results on the $^{4}{\\rm He}$ data taking as well as the system upgrades that have been operated in the last year in order to adapt the experiment for the $^{3}{\\rm He}$ data taking. Expected sensitivities on the coupling constant of axions to photons will be given for the recent $^{3}{\\rm He}$ run just started in March 2008.

CAST Collaboration; E. Arik; S. Aune; D. Autiero; K. Barth; A. Belov; B. Beltrn; S. Borghi; F. S. Boydag; H. Bruninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; L. Di Lella; O. B. Dogan; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; H. Fischer; J. Franz; J. Galn; E. Gazis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gmez; M. Hasinoff; F. H. Heinsius; I. Hikmet; D. H. H. Hoffmann; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; D. Kang; T. Karageorgopoulou; M. Karuza; K. Knigsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; K. Kousouris; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; C. Lasseur; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; V. Lozza; G. Lutz; G. Luzn; D. Miller; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; A. Ortiz; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; A. Placci; G. Raiteri; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. Rodrguez; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; Y. Semertzidis; P. Serpico; S. K. Solanki; R. Soufli; L. Stewart; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; J5D. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

469

ORISE: Recent Graduate Research Experiences - Lindsay Gabbert  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, accepts scientists at all levels and provides them with laboratory experience and...

470

FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE PLASTIC BALL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE PLASTIC BALL H.H. Gutbrod, A.scheme for one module Plastic Soil Response (based on protonS Ropidity Fig. 3. Plastic Ball acceptance in the plane

Gutbrod, H.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

User experience design of complex systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over recent years, the global marketplace and its consumers have developed a mutual recognition for the rising prominence of design that delivers high quality user experience. For the provider of products and services, ...

Reily, Todd R. (Todd Richard)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring.

Martin, P.S.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Experiments on decision making and auctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory (Gilboa and Schmeidler, 1995). The basic premise behind Case-Based Decision Theory (henceforth CBDT) is that a DM uses her past experience to help evaluate current choices, rather than constructing beliefs about certain states of the world...

Watson, Elizabeth Ann

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

474

West Virginia University 1 First Year Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia University 1 First Year Experience FAQs · What is a First-Year Seminar? · Who must the knowledge and skills necessary for academic success. What are the goals and objectives of FYS? 1. Set

Mohaghegh, Shahab

475

Multi-frequency cable vibration experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of Multi-Frequency cable vibration experiments at Reynolds number 7600 were carried out at the MIT Tow Tank using the Virtual Cable Towing Apparatus (VCTA). Motions observed in a Direct Numerical Simulation of a ...

Wiggins, Andrew (Andrew Dale)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A phenomenology of Galileo's experiments with pendulums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenology of Galileo's experiments with pendulums PAOLO PALMIERI* Abstract. The paper reports in the context of Galileo's writings. The methodology is based on a phenomenological approach to Galileo

Machery, Edouard

477

UEME : the underground electronic music experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The global electronic music scene has remained underground for its entire lifespan, momentarily materializing during an event, a place defined by the music performed and the people who desire the experience. As festivals ...

Ciraulo, Christopher Samuel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Laser experiments explore the hidden sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, the laser experiments BMV and GammeV, searching for light shining through walls, have published data and calculated new limits on the allowed masses and couplings for axion-like particles. In this note we point out that these experiments can serve to constrain a much wider variety of hidden-sector particles such as, e.g., minicharged particles and hidden-sector photons. The new experiments improve the existing bounds from the older BFRT experiment by a factor of two. Moreover, we use the new PVLAS constraints on a possible rotation and ellipticity of light after it has passed through a strong magnetic field to constrain pure minicharged particle models. For masses <~0.05 eV, the charge is now restricted to be less than (3-4)x10^(-7) times the electron electric charge. This is the best laboratory bound and comparable to bounds inferred from the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

M. Ahlers; H. Gies; J. Jaeckel; J. Redondo; A. Ringwald

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

Experiments with interacting Bose and Fermi gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past few years, the study of trapped fermionic atoms evolved from the first cooling experiments which produced quantum degenerate samples to becoming one of the most exciting branches of current atomic physics ...

Stan, Claudiu Andrei

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

ORISE: Recent Graduate Research Experiences - Heather Lavalleur  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at NETL, she set up an experiment using pressure vessels"similar to little rice cookers, according to Lavalleur- to simulate the pressure and temperatures of the deep-well...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "torus experiment nstx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Fracture of Thermosetting Polymers: Experiments and Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by BRAD EVIN BURGESS FRACTURE OF THERMOSETTING POLYMERS: EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING Approved by: Research Advisor: Amine Benzerga Associate Dean for Undergraduate... Scholars Thesis by BRAD EVIN BURGESS iii ABSTRACT Fracture of Thermosetting Polymers: Experiments and Modeling. (April 2009) Brad Evin Burgess Department of Aerospace Engineering Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Amine Benzerga...

Benzerga, Amine; Burgess, Brad

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

482

Plasma flow switch experiment on Procyon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results obtained from a series of plasma flow switch experiments done on the Procyon explosive pulse power generator. These experiments involved switching into a fixed inductance dummy load and also into a dynamic implosion load. The results indicated that the switch did fairly well at switching current into the load, but the results for the implosion are more ambiguous. The results are compared to calculations and the implications for future plasma flow switch work are discussed.

Benage, J.F. Jr.; Bowers, R.; Peterson, D. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Why Eppley and Hannah's thought experiment fails  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that Eppley and Hannah's thought experiment establishing that gravity must be quantized is fatally flawed. The device they propose, even if built, cannot establish their claims, nor is it plausible that it can be built with any materials compatible with the values of c ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), G. Finally the de