National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for torus experiment nstx

  1. National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is an innovative magnetic fusion device that was constructed by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in collaboration with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Columbia University, and the University of Washington at Seattle. First plasma was obtained on NSTX on Friday, February 12, 1999 at 6:06 p.m. NSTX is being used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized

  2. Overview of Results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, D; Ahn, J; Allain, J; Andre, R; Bastasz, R; Bell, M; Bell, R; Belova, E; Berkery, J; Betti, R; Bialek, J; Biewer, T; Bigelow, T; Bitter, M; Boedo, J; Bonoli, P; Bozzer, A; Brennan, D; Breslau, J; Brower, D; Bush, C; Canik, J; Caravelli, G; Carter, M; Caughman, J; Chang, C; Choe, W; Crocker, N; Darrow, D; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Diem, S; D'Ippolito, D; Domier, C; Dorland, W; Efthimion, P; Ejiri, A; Ershov, N; Evans, T; Feibush, E; Fenstermacher, M; Ferron, J; Finkenthal, M; Foley, J; Frazin, R; Fredrickson, E; Fu, G; Funaba, H; Gerhardt, S; Glasser, A; Gorelenkov, N; Grisham, L; Hahm, T; Harvey, R; Hassanein, A; Heidbrink, W; Hill, K; Hillesheim, J; Hillis, D; Hirooka, Y; Hosea, J; Hu, B; Humphreys, D; Idehara, T; Indireshkumar, K; Ishida, A; Jaeger, F; Jarboe, T; Jardin, S; Jaworski, M; Ji, H; Jung, H; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Katsuro-Hopkins, O; Kawahata, K; Kawamori, E; Kaye, S; Kessel, C; Kim, J; Kimura, H; Kolemen, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Krstic, P; Ku, S; Kubota, S; Kugel, H; La Haye, R; Lao, L; LeBlanc, B; Lee, W; Lee, K; Leuer, J; Levinton, F; Liang, Y; Liu, D; Luhmann, N; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Manickam, J; Mansfield, D; Maqueda, R; Mazzucato, E; McCune, D; McGeehan, B; McKee, G; Medley, S; Menard, J; Menon, M; Meyer, H; Mikkelsen, D; Miloshevsky, G; Mitarai, O; Mueller, D; Mueller, S; Munsat, T; Myra, J; Nagayama, Y; Nelson, B; Nguyen, X; Nishino, N; Nishiura, M; Nygren, R; Ono, M; Osborne, T; Pacella, D; Park, H; Park, J; Paul, S; Peebles, W; Penaflor, B; Peng, M; Phillips, C; Pigarov, A; Podesta, M; Preinhaelter, J; Ram, A; Raman, R; Rasmussen, D; Redd, A; Reimerdes, H; Rewoldt, G; Ross, P; Rowley, C; Ruskov, E; Russell, D; Ruzic, D; Ryan, P; Sabbagh, S; Schaffer, M; Schuster, E; Scott, S; Shaing, K; Sharpe, P; Shevchenko, V; Shinohara, K; Sizyuk, V; Skinner, C; Smirnov, A; Smith, D; Smith, S; Snyder, P; Soloman, W; Sontag, A; Soukhanovskii, V; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T; Stotler, D; Strait, T; Stratton, B; Stutman, D; Takahashi, R; Takase, Y; Tamura, N; Tang, X; Taylor, G; Taylor, C; Ticos, C; Tritz, K; Tsarouhas, D; Turrnbull, A; Tynan, G; Ulrickson, M; Umansky, M; Urban, J; Utergberg, E; Walker, M; Wampler, W; Wang, J; Wang, W; Weland, A

    2009-01-05

    The mission of NSTX is the demonstration of the physics basis required to extrapolate to the next steps for the spherical torus (ST), such as a plasma facing component test facility (NHTX) or an ST based component test facility (ST-CTF), and to support ITER. Key issues for the ST are transport, and steady state high {beta} operation. To better understand electron transport, a new high-k scattering diagnostic was used extensively to investigate electron gyro-scale fluctuations with varying electron temperature gradient scale-length. Results from n = 3 braking studies confirm the flow shear dependence of ion transport. New results from electron Bernstein wave emission measurements from plasmas with lithium wall coating applied indicate transmission efficiencies near 70% in H-mode as a result of reduced collisionality. Improved coupling of High Harmonic Fast-Waves has been achieved by reducing the edge density relative to the critical density for surface wave coupling. In order to achieve high bootstrap fraction, future ST designs envision running at very high elongation. Plasmas have been maintained on NSTX at very low internal inductance l{sub i} {approx} 0.4 with strong shaping ({kappa} {approx} 2.7, {delta} {approx} 0.8) with {beta}{sub N} approaching the with-wall beta limit for several energy confinement times. By operating at lower collisionality in this regime, NSTX has achieved record non-inductive current drive fraction f{sub NI} {approx} 71%. Instabilities driven by super-Alfvenic ions are an important issue for all burning plasmas, including ITER. Fast ions from NBI on NSTX are super-Alfvenic. Linear TAE thresholds and appreciable fast-ion loss during multi-mode bursts are measured and these results are compared to theory. RWM/RFA feedback combined with n = 3 error field control was used on NSTX to maintain plasma rotation with {beta} above the no-wall limit. The impact of n > 1 error fields on stability is a important result for ITER. Other highlights are: results of lithium coating experiments, momentum confinement studies, scrape-off layer width scaling, demonstration of divertor heat load mitigation in strongly shaped plasmas, and coupling of CHI plasmas to OH ramp-up. These results advance the ST towards next step fusion energy devices such as NHTX and ST-CTF.

  3. Overview of Results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, D. A.; Ahn, J.; Allain, J.; Andre, R.; Bastasz, R.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Belova, E.; Berkery, J.; Betti, R.; Bialek, J.; Biewer, T.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Choe, W.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diem, S.; DIppolito, D.; Domier, C.; Dorland, W.; Efthimion, P.; Ejiri, A.; Ershov, N.; Evans, T.; Feibush, E.; Fenstermacher, M.; Ferron, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Frazin, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.; Funaba, H.; Gerhardt, S.; Glasser, A.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grisham, L.; Hahm, T.; Harvey, R.; Hassanein, A.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.; Hillesheim, J.; Hillis, D.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, B.; Humphreys, D.; Idehara, T.; Indireshkumar, K.; Ishida, A.; Jaeger, F.; Jarboe, T.; Jardin, S.; Jaworski, M.; Ji, H.; Jung, H.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Katsuro-Hopkins, O.; Kawahata, K.; Kawamori, E.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J.; Kimura, H.; Kolemen, E.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Krstic, P.; Ku, S.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R.; Lao, L.; LeBlanc, B.; Lee, W.; Lee, K.; Leuer, J.; Levinton, F.; Liang, Y.; Liu, D.; Luhmann, Jr., N.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D.; Maqueda, R.; Mazzucato, E.; McCune, D.; McGeehan, B.; McKee, G.; Medley, S.; Menard, J.; Menon, M.; Meyer, H.; Mikkelsen, D.; Miloshevsky, G.; Mitarai, O.; Mueller, D.; Mueller, S.; Munsat, T.; Myra, J.; Nagayama, Y.; Nelson, B.; Nguyen, X.; Nishino, N.; Nishiura, M.; Nygren, R.; Ono, M.; Osborne, T.; Pacella, D.; Park, H.; Park, J.; Paul, S.; Peebles, W.; Penaflor, B.; Peng, M.; Phillips, C.; Pigarov, A.; Podesta, M.; Preinhaelter, J.; Ram, A.; Raman, R.; Rasmussen, D.; Redd, A.; Reimerdes, H.; Rewo, G.; Ross, P.; Rowley, C.; Ruskov, E.; Russell, D.; Ruzic, D.; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S.; Schaffer, M.; Schuster, E.; Scott, S.; Shaing, K.; Sharpe, P.; Shevchenko, V.; Shinohara, K.; Sizyuk, V.; Skinner, C.; Smirnov, A.; Smith, D.; Smith, S.; Snyder, P.; Solomon, W.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Stotler, D.; Strait, T.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Takahashi, R.; Takase, Y.; Tamura, N.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, C.; Ticos, C.; Tritz, K.; Tsarouhas, D.; Turrnbull, A.; Tynan, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Umansky, M.; Urban, J.; Utergberg, E.; Walker, M.; Wampler, W.; Wang, J.; Wang, W.; Welander, A.; Whaley, J.; White, R.; Wilgen, J.; Wilson, R.; Wong, K.; Wright, J.; Xia, Z.; Xu, X.; Youchison, D.; Yu, G.; Yuh, H.; Zakharov, L.; Zemlyanov, D.; Zweben, S.

    2009-03-24

    The mission of NSTX is the demonstration of the physics basis required to extrapolate to the next steps for the spherical torus (ST), such as a plasma facing component test facility (NHTX) or an ST based component test facility (ST-CTF), and to support ITER. Key issues for the ST are transport, and steady state high ? operation. To better understand electron transport, a new high-k scattering diagnostic was used extensively to investigate electron gyro-scale fluctuations with varying electron temperature gradient scale-length. Results from n = 3 braking studies are consistent with the flow shear dependence of ion transport. New results from electron Bernstein wave emission measurements from plasmas with lithium wall coating applied indicate transmission efficiencies near 70% in H-mode as a result of reduced collisionality. Improved coupling of High Harmonic Fast-Waves has been achieved by reducing the edge density relative to the critical density for surface wave coupling. In order to achieve high bootstrap current fraction, future ST designs envision running at very high elongation. Plasmas have been maintained on NSTX at very low internal inductance li ~0.4 with strong shaping (? ~ 2.7, ? ~ 0.8) with ?N approaching the with-wall beta limit for several energy confinement times. By operating at lower collisionality in this regime, NSTX has achieved record non-inductive current drive fraction fNI ~71%. Instabilities driven by super-Alfvenic ions will be an important issue for all burning plasmas, including ITER. Fast ions from NBI on NSTX are super-Alfvenic. Linear TAE thresholds and appreciable fast-ion loss during multi-mode bursts are measured and these results are compared to theory. The impact of n > 1 error fields on stability is a important result for ITER. RWM/RFA feedback combined with n=3 error field control was used on NSTX to maintain plasma rotation with ? above the no-wall limit. Other highlights are: results of lithium coating experiments, momentum confinement studies, scrape-off layer width scaling, demonstration of divertor heat load mitigation in strongly shaped plasmas, and coupling of CHI plasmas to OH ramp-up. These results advance the ST towards next step fusion energy devices such as NHTX and ST-CTF

  4. National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities User Facilities DIII-D National Fusion Facility (DIII-D) National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Alcator C-Mod ITER External link Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  5. MHD-induced Energetic Ion Loss during H-mode Discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.S. Medley; N.N. Gorelenkov; R. Andre; R.E. Bell; D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; A.L. Roquemore; and the NSTX Team

    2004-03-15

    MHD-induced energetic ion loss in neutral-beam-heated H-mode [high-confinement mode] discharges in NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] is discussed. A rich variety of energetic ion behavior resulting from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity is observed in the NSTX using a horizontally scanning Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) whose sightline views across the three co-injected neutral beams. For example, onset of an n = 2 mode leads to relatively slow decay of the energetic ion population (E {approx} 10-100 keV) and consequently the neutron yield. The effect of reconnection events, sawteeth, and bounce fishbones differs from that observed for low-n, low-frequency, tearing-type MHD modes. In this case, prompt loss of the energetic ion population occurs on a time scale of less than or equal to 1 ms and a precipitous drop in the neutron yield occurs. This paper focuses on MHD-induced ion loss during H-mode operation in NSTX. After H-mode onset, the NPA charge-exchange spectrum usually exhibits a significant loss of energetic ions only for E > E(sub)b/2 where E(sub)b is the beam injection energy. The magnitude of the energetic ion loss was observed to decrease with increasing tangency radius, R(sub)tan, of the NPA sightline, increasing toroidal field, B(sub)T, and increasing neutral-beam injection energy, E(sub)b. TRANSP modeling suggests that MHD-induced ion loss is enhanced during H-mode operation due to an evolution of the q and beam deposition profiles that feeds both passing and trapped ions into the region of low-n MHD activity. ORBIT code analysis of particle interaction with a model magnetic perturbation supported the energy selectivity of the MHD-induced loss observed in the NPA measurements. Transport analysis with the TRANSP code using a fast-ion diffusion tool to emulate the observed MHD-induced energetic ion loss showed significant modifications of the neutral- beam heating as well as the power balance, thermal diffusivities, energy confinement times, and toroidal beta. A proper accounting of energetic ion loss is therefore important for accurate analysis of power balance and transport in plasmas exhibiting MHD-induced energetic ion loss.

  6. Detection of Disruptions in the High-β Spherical Torus NSTX (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Detection of Disruptions in the High-β Spherical Torus NSTX Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection of Disruptions in the High-β Spherical Torus NSTX This paper describes the prediction of disruptions based on diagnostic data in the high-β spherical torus NSTX [M. Ono, et al., Nuclear Fusion 40 , 557 (2000)]. The disruptive threshold values on many signals are examined. In some cases, raw diagnostic data can be used as a signal for disruption

  7. NSTX-U Press Kit | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSTX-U Press Kit Upgraded NSTX center stack. (photo by Elle Starkman/ PPPL Office of Communications The NSTX-U Press Kit (this webpage) offers downloadable fact sheets, images, videos, and more! Journalists can access all these features and resources below. National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) runs the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), which has undergone a $94 million upgrade which was completed

  8. Characteristics of Energy Transport of Li-conditioned and non-Li-conditioned Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, S.; Kaye, S. M.; Bell, R. E.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Paul, S.; Wan, B.

    2009-10-21

    The transport properties of NSTX plasmas obtained during the 2008 experimental cam- paign have been studied and are reported here. Transport trends and dependences have been isolated, and it is found that both electron and ion energy transport coefficients have strong dependences on local values of n?T, which in turn is strongly dependent on local current density profile. Without identifying this dependence, it is difficult to identify others, such as the dependence of transport coefficients on Bp (or q), Ip and Pheat. In addition, a comparison between discharges with and without Lithium wall conditioning has been made. While the trends in the two sets of data are similar, the thermal transport loss, especially in the electron channel, is found to strongly depend on the amount of Lithium deposited, decreasing by up to 50% of its no-Lithium value.

  9. CONSTRUCTING THE NATIONAL Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade took

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONSTRUCTING THE NATIONAL Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade took years of detailed planning and oversight. The team in charge brought decades of experience to the task, working together to make the $94 million upgrade a reality. Ron Strykowsky: Massive coordination of details for a massive project Ron Strykowsky compares his role as overall manager of the NSTX-U project to that of an orchestra leader conducting a team of expert musicians. Strykowsky coordinated all the engineers and techni-

  10. Completed NSTX-U. After

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    panel (15 tons) being inserted into the new neutral beam box. New neutral beam box (40 tons) being moved into the NSTX-U test cell. Center stack encased within the vacuum boundary and lowered into the NSTX-U. Completed center stack installed in the NSTX-U. Completed NSTX-U. After Original NSTX prior to the upgrade. Before Building the first quadrant of the center stack magnet. Winding the ohmic heating coil around the center stack. National Spherical Torus Experiment - Upgrade NSTX was a

  11. Disruptions, Disruptivity, and Safer Operating Windows in the High-? Spherical Torus NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhardt, S P; Diallo, A; Gates, D; LeBlanc, B P; Menard, J E; Mueller, D; Sabbagh, S A; Soukhanovskii, V; Tritz, K

    2012-09-27

    This paper discusses disruption rates, disruption causes, and disruptivity statistics in the high- ?N National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While the overall disruption rate is rather high, configurations with high ?N , moderate q*, strong boundary shaping, sufficient rotation, and broad pressure and current profiles are found to have the lowest disruptivity; active n=1 control further reduces the disruptivity. The disruptivity increases rapidly for q*<2.7, which is substantially above the ideal MHD current limit. In quiescent conditions, qmin >1.25 is generally acceptable for avoiding the onset of core rotating n=1 kink/tearing modes; when EPM and ELM disturbances are present, the required qmin for avoiding those modes is raised to ~1.5. The current ramp and early flat-top phase of the discharges are prone to n=1 core rotating modes locking to the wall, leading to a disruption. Small changes to the discharge fueling during this phase can often mitigate the rotation damping associated with these modes and eliminate the disruption. The largest stored energy disruptions are those that occur at high current when a plasma current rampdown is initiated incorrectly.

  12. Electron Bernstein Wave Research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Taylor; A. Bers; T.S. Bigelow; M.D. Carter; J.B. Caughman; J. Decker; S. Diem; P.C. Efthimion; N.M. Ershov; E. Fredd; R.W. Harvey; J. Hosea; F. Jaeger; J. Preinhaelter; A.K. Ram; D.A. Rasmussen; A.P. Smirnov; J.B. Wilgen; J.R. Wilson

    2005-04-21

    Off-axis electron Bernstein wave current drive (EBWCD) may be critical for sustaining noninductive high-beta National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas. Numerical modeling results predict that the {approx}100 kA of off-axis current needed to stabilize a solenoid-free high-beta NSTX plasma could be generated via Ohkawa current drive with 3 MW of 28 GHz EBW power. In addition, synergy between EBWCD and bootstrap current may result in a 10% enhancement in current-drive efficiency with 4 MW of EBW power. Recent dual-polarization EBW radiometry measurements on NSTX confirm that efficient coupling to EBWs can be readily accomplished by launching elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves oblique to the confining magnetic field, in agreement with numerical modeling. Plans are being developed for implementing a 1 MW, 28 GHz proof-of-principle EBWCD system on NSTX to test the EBW coupling, heating and current-drive physics at high radio-frequency power densities.

  13. Simulation of microtearing turbulence in national spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Bell, R. E.; Hammett, G. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Ren, Y.; Candy, J.; Nevins, W. M.; Wang, E.; Zhang, J.; Crocker, N. A.; Yuh, H.

    2012-05-15

    Thermal energy confinement times in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) dimensionless parameter scans increase with decreasing collisionality. While ion thermal transport is neoclassical, the source of anomalous electron thermal transport in these discharges remains unclear, leading to considerable uncertainty when extrapolating to future spherical tokamak (ST) devices at much lower collisionality. Linear gyrokinetic simulations find microtearing modes to be unstable in high collisionality discharges. First non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing turbulence in NSTX show they can yield experimental levels of transport. Magnetic flutter is responsible for almost all the transport ({approx}98%), perturbed field line trajectories are globally stochastic, and a test particle stochastic transport model agrees to within 25% of the simulated transport. Most significantly, microtearing transport is predicted to increase with electron collisionality, consistent with the observed NSTX confinement scaling. While this suggests microtearing modes may be the source of electron thermal transport, the predictions are also very sensitive to electron temperature gradient, indicating the scaling of the instability threshold is important. In addition, microtearing turbulence is susceptible to suppression via sheared E Multiplication-Sign B flows as experimental values of E Multiplication-Sign B shear (comparable to the linear growth rates) dramatically reduce the transport below experimental values. Refinements in numerical resolution and physics model assumptions are expected to minimize the apparent discrepancy. In cases where the predicted transport is strong, calculations suggest that a proposed polarimetry diagnostic may be sensitive to the magnetic perturbations associated with the unique structure of microtearing turbulence.

  14. Modification Of The Electron Energy Distribution Function During Lithium Experiments On The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaworski, M A; Gray, T K; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B; McLean, A; Sabbagh, S A; Soukanovskii, V; Stotler, D P

    2011-06-03

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has recently studied the use of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD). Divertor Langmuir probes have also been installed for making measurements of the local plasma conditions. A non-local probe interpretation method is used to supplement the classical probe interpretation and obtain measurements of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) which show the occurrence of a hot-electron component. Analysis is made of two discharges within a sequence that exhibited changes in plasma fueling efficiency. It is found that the local electron temperature increases and that this increase is most strongly correlated with the energy contained within the hot-electron population. Preliminary interpretative modeling indicates that kinetic effects are likely in the NSTX.

  15. New Capabilities and Results for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, D.A. Gates, S.M. Kaye, H. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, F.M. Levinton, R. Maingi, J.E. Menard, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, D. Stutman and the NSTX Research Team

    2008-02-29

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) produces plasmas with toroidal aspect ratio as low as 1.25, which can be heated by up to 6 MW High-Harmonic Fast Waves and up to 7 MW of deuterium Neutral Beam Injection. Using new poloidal fields coils, plasmas with cross-section elongation up to 2.7, triangularity 0.8, plasma currents Ip up to 1.5 MA and normalized currents Ip/a?BT up to 7.5 MA/m?T have been achieved. A significant extension of the plasma pulse length, to 1.5 s at a plasma current of 0.7 MA, has been achieved by exploiting the bootstrap and NBI-driven currents to reduce the dissipation of poloidal flux. Inductive plasma startup has been supplemented by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) and the production of persistent current on closed flux surfaces by CHI has now been demonstrated in NSTX. The plasma response to magnetic field perturbations with toroidal mode numbers n = 1 or 3 and the effects on the plasma rotation have been investigated using three pairs of coils outside the vacuum vessel. Recent studies of both MHD stability and of transport benefitted from improved diagnostics, including measurements of the internal poloidal field using the motional Stark effect (MSE). In plasmas with a region of reversed magnetic shear in the core, now confirmed by the MSE data, improved electron confinement has been observed.

  16. Hardwired Control Changes For NSTX DC Power Feeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramakrishnan, S.

    2013-06-28

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been designed and installed in the existing facilities at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Most of the hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, and power systems originally used for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used with suitable modifications to reflect NSTX needs. The original TFTR Hardwired Control System (HCS) with electromechanical relays was used for NSTX DC Power loop control and protection during NSTX operations. As part of the NSTX Upgrade, the HCS is being changed to a PLC-based system with the same control logic. This paper gives a description of the changeover to the new PLC-based system __________________________________________________

  17. NSTX-U Digital Coil Protection System Software Detailed Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-06-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) currently uses a collection of analog signal processing solutions for coil protection. Part of the NSTX Upgrade (NSTX-U) entails replacing these analog systems with a software solution running on a conventional computing platform. The new Digital Coil Protection System (DCPS) will replace the old systems entirely, while also providing an extensible framework that allows adding new functionality as desired.

  18. Progress in Understanding Error-field Physics in NSTX Spherical Torus Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Menard, R.E. Bell, D.A. Gates, S.P. Gerhardt, J.-K. Park, S.A. Sabbagh, J.W. Berkery, A. Egan, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B. LeBlanc, Y.Q. Liu, A. Sontag, D. Swanson, H. Yuh, W. Zhu and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-05-19

    The low aspect ratio, low magnetic field, and wide range of plasma beta of NSTX plasmas provide new insight into the origins and effects of magnetic field errors. An extensive array of magnetic sensors has been used to analyze error fields, to measure error field amplification, and to detect resistive wall modes in real time. The measured normalized error-field threshold for the onset of locked modes shows a linear scaling with plasma density, a weak to inverse dependence on toroidal field, and a positive scaling with magnetic shear. These results extrapolate to a favorable error field threshold for ITER. For these low-beta locked-mode plasmas, perturbed equilibrium calculations find that the plasma response must be included to explain the empirically determined optimal correction of NSTX error fields. In high-beta NSTX plasmas exceeding the n=1 no-wall stability limit where the RWM is stabilized by plasma rotation, active suppression of n=1 amplified error fields and the correction of recently discovered intrinsic n=3 error fields have led to sustained high rotation and record durations free of low-frequency core MHD activity. For sustained rotational stabilization of the n=1 RWM, both the rotation threshold and magnitude of the amplification are important. At fixed normalized dissipation, kinetic damping models predict rotation thresholds for RWM stabilization to scale nearly linearly with particle orbit frequency. Studies for NSTX find that orbit frequencies computed in general geometry can deviate significantly from those computed in the high aspect ratio and circular plasma cross-section limit, and these differences can strongly influence the predicted RWM stability. The measured and predicted RWM stability is found to be very sensitive to the E B rotation profile near the plasma edge, and the measured critical rotation for the RWM is approximately a factor of two higher than predicted by the MARS-F code using the semi-kinetic damping model.

  19. Imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Roquemore, A.L.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Kahn, S.M.; Elliott, S.R.; Fraenkel, B.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of high-resolution x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers is described for implementation on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on the ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion-charge state distributions, and impurity transport. These data are derived from observations of the satellite spectra of heliumlike argon, ArthinspXVII, which is the dominant charge state for electron temperatures in the range from 0.4 to 3.0 keV and which is accessible to NSTX. Experiments at the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR) demonstrate that a throughput of 2{times}10{sup 5}thinspphotons/s (corresponding to the count-rate limit of the present detectors) can easily be obtained with small, nonperturbing argon gas puffs of less than 1{times}10{sup {minus}3}thinspTorrthinspscr(l)/s, so that it is possible to record spectra with a small statistical error and a good time resolution (typically 50 and 1 ms in some cases). Employing a novel design, which is based on the imaging properties of spherically bent crystals, the spectrometers will provide spectrally and spatially resolved images of the plasma for all experimental conditions, which include ohmically heated discharges as well as plasmas with rf and neutral-beam heating. The conceptual design, experimental results on the focusing properties, and relevant spectral data from TEXTOR are presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. The Impact Of Lithium Wall Coatings On NSTX Discharges And The Engineering Of The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Majeski, H. Kugel and R. Kaita

    2010-03-18

    Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown the benefits of solid lithium coatings on carbon PFC's to diverted plasma performance, in both Land H- mode confinement regimes. Better particle control, with decreased inductive flux consumption, and increased electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate were observed. Successive increases in lithium coverage resulted in the complete suppression of ELM activity in H-mode discharges. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD), which will employ the porous molybdenum surface developed for the LTX shell, is being installed on NSTX for the 2010 run period, and will provide comparisons between liquid walls in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) and liquid divertor targets in NSTX. LTX, which recently began operations at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, is the world's first confinement experiment with full liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs). All materials and construction techniques in LTX are compatible with liquid lithium. LTX employs an inner, heated, stainless steel-faced liner or shell, which will be lithium-coated. In order to ensure that lithium adheres to the shell, it is designed to operate at up to 500 - 600 oC to promote wetting of the stainless by the lithium, providing the first hot wall in a tokamak to operate at reactor-relevant temperatures. The engineering of LTX will be discussed.

  1. Control System for the NSTX Lithium Pellet Injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Sichta; J. Dong; R. Gernhardt; G. Gettelfinger; H. Kugel

    2003-10-27

    The Lithium Pellet Injector (LPI) is being developed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The LPI will inject ''pellets'' of various composition into the plasma in order to study wall conditioning, edge impurity transport, liquid limiter simulations, and other areas of research. The control system for the NSTX LPI has incorporated widely used advanced technologies, such as LabVIEW and PCI bus I/O boards, to create a low-cost control system which is fully integrated into the NSTX computing environment. This paper will present the hardware and software design of the computer control system for the LPI.

  2. Electron Bernstein Wave Research on NSTX and CDX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Taylor; P.C. Efthimion; B. Jones; G.L. Bell; A. Bers; T.S. Bigelow; M.D. Carter; R.W. Harvey; A.K. Ram; D.A. Rasmussen; A.P. Smirnov; J.B. Wilgen; J.R. Wilson

    2003-06-10

    Studies of thermally emitted electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) on CDX-U and NSTX, via mode conversion (MC) to electromagnetic radiation, support the use of EBWs to measure the Te profile and provide local electron heating and current drive (CD) in overdense spherical torus plasmas. An X-mode antenna with radially adjustable limiters successfully controlled EBW MC on CDX-U and enhanced MC efficiency to {approx} 100%. So far the X-mode MC efficiency on NSTX has been increased by a similar technique to 40-50% and future experiments are focused on achieving * 80% MC. MC efficiencies on both machines agree well with theoretical predictions. Ray tracing and Fokker-Planck modeling for NSTX equilibria are being conducted to support the design of a 3 MW, 15 GHz EBW heating and CD system for NSTX to assist non-inductive plasma startup, current ramp up, and to provide local electron heating and CD in high beta NSTX plasmas.

  3. NSTX-U: Builders and Users | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSTX-U: Builders and Users Constructing the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade took years of detailed planning and oversight. The team in charge brought decades of experience to the task, working together to make the $94 million upgrade a reality. Publication File: PDF icon Builders and Users Publication Type: Fact Sheets

  4. Using LGI experiments to achieve better understanding of pedestal-edge coupling in NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhehui

    2015-02-23

    PowerPoint presentation. Latest advances in granule or dust injection technologies, fast and high-resolution imaging, together with micro-/nano-structured material fabrication, provide new opportunities to examine plasma-material interaction (PMI) in magnetic fusion environment. Some of our previous work in these areas is summarized. The upcoming LGI experiments in NSTX-U will shed new light on granular matter transport in the pedestal-edge region. In addition to particle control, these results can also be used for code validation and achieving better understanding of pedestal-edge coupling in fusion plasmas in both NSTX-U and others.

  5. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation Gas-Pu -Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge Dα light emission from a neutral Dα gas puff near the outer mid- plane of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and

  6. Direct X-B mode conversion for high-? national spherical torus experiment in nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali Asgarian, M. E-mail: maa@msu.edu; Parvazian, A.; Abbasi, M.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2014-09-15

    Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can be effective for heating and driving currents in spherical tokamak plasmas. Power can be coupled to EBW via mode conversion of the extraordinary (X) mode wave. The most common and successful approach to study the conditions for optimized mode conversion to EBW was evaluated analytically and numerically using a cold plasma model and an approximate kinetic model. The major drawback in using radio frequency waves was the lack of continuous wave sources at very high frequencies (above the electron plasma frequency), which has been addressed. A future milestone is to approach high power regime, where the nonlinear effects become significant, exceeding the limits of validity for present linear theory. Therefore, one appropriate tool would be particle in cell (PIC) simulation. The PIC method retains most of the nonlinear physics without approximations. In this work, we study the direct X-B mode conversion process stages using PIC method for incident wave frequency f{sub 0}?=?15?GHz, and maximum amplitude E{sub 0}?=?10{sup 5?}V/m in the national spherical torus experiment (NSTX). The modelling shows a considerable reduction in X-B mode conversion efficiency, C{sub modelling}?=?0.43, due to the presence of nonlinearities. Comparison of system properties to the linear state reveals predominant nonlinear effects; EBW wavelength and group velocity in comparison with linear regime exhibit an increment around ?36% and 17%, respectively.

  7. Analysis Efforts Supporting NSTX Upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.Zhang, P. Titus, P. Rogoff, A.Zolfaghari, D. Mangra, M. Smith

    2010-11-29

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio, spherical torus (ST) configuration device which is located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) This device is presently being updated to enhance its physics by doubling the TF field to 1 Tesla and increasing the plasma current to 2 Mega-amperes. The upgrades include a replacement of the centerstack and addition of a second neutral beam. The upgrade analyses have two missions. The first is to support design of new components, principally the centerstack, the second is to qualify existing NSTX components for higher loads, which will increase by a factor of four. Cost efficiency was a design goal for new equipment qualification, and reanalysis of the existing components. Showing that older components can sustain the increased loads has been a challenging effort in which designs had to be developed that would limit loading on weaker components, and would minimize the extent of modifications needed. Two areas representing this effort have been chosen to describe in more details: analysis of the current distribution in the new TF inner legs, and, second, analysis of the out-of-plane support of the existing TF outer legs.

  8. Visible imaging of edge turbulence in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Zweben; R. Maqueda; K. Hill; D. Johnson; et al

    2000-06-13

    Edge plasma turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators is believed to cause the radical heat and particle flux across the separatrix and into the scrape-off-layers of these devices. This paper describes initial measurements of 2-D space-time structure of the edge density turbulence made using a visible imaging diagnostic in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The structure of the edge turbulence is most clearly visible using a method of gas puff imaging to locally illuminate the edge density turbulence.

  9. Power Supply Changes for NSTX Resistive Wall Mode Coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramakrishnan, S S.

    2013-06-28

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been designed and installed in the existing facilities at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Most of the hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, and power systems originally used for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used with suitable modifications to reflect NSTX needs. Prior to 2004, the NSTX power system was feeding twelve (12) circuits in the machine. In 2004 the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) Coils were installed on the machine to correct error fields. There are six of these coils installed around the machine in the mid-plane. Since these coils need fast and accurate controls, a Switching Power Amplifier (SPA) with three sub-units was procured, installed and commissioned along with other power loop components. Two RWM Coils were connected in series and fed from one SPA sub-unit. After the initial RWM campaign, operational requirements evolved such that each of the RWM coils now requires separate power and control. Hence a second SPA with three sub-units has been procured and installed. The second unit is of improved design and has the controls and power components completely isolated. The existing thyristor rectifier is used as DC Link to both of the Switching Power Amplifiers. The controls for the RWM are integrated into the overall computer control of the DC Power systems for NSTX. This paper describes the design changes in the RWM Power system for NSTX.

  10. Analyses of Divertor Regimes in NSTX (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in NSTX Identification of divertor operating regimes is of particular importance for heat and particle control optimization in high performance plasmas of a spherical torus,...

  11. NSTX Diagnostics for Fusion Plasma Science Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Kaita; D. Johnson; L. Roquemore; M. Bitter; F. Levinton; F. Paoletti; D. Stutman; and the NSTX Team

    2001-07-05

    This paper will discuss how plasma science issues are addressed by the diagnostics for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), the newest large-scale machine in the magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) program. The development of new schemes for plasma confinement involves the interplay of experimental results and theoretical interpretations. A fundamental requirement, for example, is a determination of the equilibria for these configurations. For MCF, this is well established in the solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation. While it is simple to state its basis in the balance between the kinetic and magnetic pressures, what they are as functions of space and time are often not easy to obtain. Quantities like the plasma pressure and current density are not directly measurable. They are derived from data that are themselves complex products of more basic parameters. The same difficulties apply to the understanding of plasma instabilities. Not only are the needs for spatial and temporal resolution more stringent, but the wave parameters which characterize the instabilities are difficult to resolve. We will show how solutions to the problems of diagnostic design on NSTX, and the physics insight the data analysis provides, benefits both NSTX and the broader scientific community.

  12. Measured improvement of global magnetohydrodynamic mode stability at high-beta, and in reduced collisionality spherical torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Balbaky, A.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Manickam, J.; Menard, J. E.; Podest, M.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Global mode stability is studied in high-? National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas to avoid disruptions. Dedicated experiments in NSTX using low frequency active magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy of applied rotating n?=?1 magnetic fields revealed key dependencies of stability on plasma parameters. Observations from previous NSTX resistive wall mode (RWM) active control experiments and the wider NSTX disruption database indicated that the highest ?{sub N} plasmas were not the least stable. Significantly, here, stability was measured to increase at ?{sub N}?l{sub i} higher than the point where disruptions were found. This favorable behavior is shown to correlate with kinetic stability rotational resonances, and an experimentally determined range of measured E??B frequency with improved stability is identified. Stable plasmas appear to benefit further from reduced collisionality, in agreement with expectation from kinetic RWM stabilization theory, but low collisionality plasmas are also susceptible to sudden instability when kinetic profiles change.

  13. Lithium Pellet Injector Development for NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Gettelfinger; J. Dong; R. Gernhardt; H. Kugel; P. Sichta; J. Timberlake

    2003-12-04

    A pellet injector suitable for the injection of lithium and other low-Z pellets of varying mass into plasmas at precise velocities from 5 to 500 m/s is being developed for use on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment). The ability to inject low-Z impurities will significantly expand NSTX experimental capability for a broad range of diagnostic and operational applications. The architecture employs a pellet-carrying cartridge propelled through a guide tube by deuterium gas. Abrupt deceleration of the cartridge at the end of the guide tube results in the pellet continuing along its intended path, thereby giving controlled reproducible velocities for a variety of pellets materials and a reduced gas load to the torus. The planned injector assembly has four hundred guide tubes contained in a rotating magazine with eight tubes provided for injection into plasmas. A PC-based control system is being developed as well and will be described elsewhere in these Proceedings. The development path and mechanical performance of the injector will be described.

  14. Progress Towards High Performance, Steady-state Spherical Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; W. Blanchard; J. Boedo; C. Bourdelle; C. Bush; W. Choe; J. Chrzanowski; D.S. Darrow; S.J. Diem; R. Doerner; P.C. Efthimion; J.R. Ferron; R.J. Fonck; E.D. Fredrickson; G.D. Garstka; D.A. Gates; T. Gray; L.R. Grisham; W. Heidbrink; K.W. Hill; D. Hoffman; T.R. Jarboe; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; S.M. Kaye; C. Kessel; J.H. Kim; M.W. Kissick; S. Kubota; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; K. Lee; S.G. Lee; B.T. Lewicki; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; R. Majeski; J. Manickam; R. Maqueda; T.K. Mau; E. Mazzucato; S.S. Medley; J. Menard; D. Mueller; B.A. Nelson; C. Neumeyer; N. Nishino; C.N. Ostrander; D. Pacella; F. Paoletti; H.K. Park; W. Park; S.F. Paul; Y.-K. M. Peng; C.K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; P.H. Probert; S. Ramakrishnan; R. Raman; M. Redi; A.L. Roquemore; A. Rosenberg; P.M. Ryan; S.A. Sabbagh; M. Schaffer; R.J. Schooff; R. Seraydarian; C.H. Skinner; A.C. Sontag; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; T. Stevenson; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; E. Synakowski; Y. Takase; X. Tang; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; K.L. Tritz; E.A. Unterberg; A. Von Halle; J. Wilgen; M. Williams; J.R. Wilson; X. Xu; S.J. Zweben; R. Akers; R.E. Barry; P. Beiersdorfer; J.M. Bialek; B. Blagojevic; P.T. Bonoli; M.D. Carter; W. Davis; B. Deng; L. Dudek; J. Egedal; R. Ellis; M. Finkenthal; J. Foley; E. Fredd; A. Glasser; T. Gibney; M. Gilmore; R.J. Goldston; R.E. Hatcher; R.J. Hawryluk; W. Houlberg; R. Harvey; S.C. Jardin; J.C. Hosea; H. Ji; M. Kalish; J. Lowrance; L.L. Lao; F.M. Levinton; N.C. Luhmann; R. Marsala; D. Mastravito; M.M. Menon; O. Mitarai; M. Nagata; G. Oliaro; R. Parsells; T. Peebles; B. Peneflor; D. Piglowski; G.D. Porter; A.K. Ram; M. Rensink; G. Rewoldt; P. Roney; K. Shaing; S. Shiraiwa; P. Sichta; D. Stotler; B.C. Stratton; R. Vero; W.R. Wampler; G.A. Wurden

    2003-10-02

    Research on the Spherical Torus (or Spherical Tokamak) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect-ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The Spherical Tours (ST) experiments are being conducted in various U.S. research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium-size ST research facilities: Pegasus at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the U.S., an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high-performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (B), noninductive sustainment, ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values bT of up to 35% with the near unity central betaT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where bT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for noninductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta-poloidal regime, where discharges with a high noninductive fraction ({approx}60% bootstrap current + neutral-beam-injected current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency-based heating and current drive utilizing HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) and EBW (Electron Bernstein Wave) is also pursued on NSTX, Pegasus, and CDX-U. For noninductive start-up, the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted on NSTX to test the method up to Ip {approx} 500 kA. In parallel, start-up using radio-frequency current drive and only external poloidal field coils are being developed on NSTX. The area of power and particle handling is expected to be challenging because of the higher power density expected in the ST relative to that in conventional aspect-ratio tokamaks. Due to its promise for power and particle handling, liquid lithium is being studied in CDX-U as a potential plasma-facing surface for a fusion reactor.

  15. Liquid Lithium Divertor and Scrape-Off-Layer Interactions on the National Spherical Torus Experiment: 2010 ? 2013 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-08-27

    The implementation of the liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in NSTX presented a unique opportunity in plasma-material interactions studies. A high density Langmuir Probe (HDLP) array utilizing a dense pack of triple Langmuir probes was built at PPPL and the electronics designed and built by UIUC. It was shown that the HDLP array could be used to characterize the modification of the EEDF during lithium experiments on NSTX as well as characterize the transient particle loads during lithium experiments as a means to study ELMs. With NSTX being upgraded and a new divertor being installed, the HDLP array will not be used in NSTX-U. However UIUC is currently helping to develop two new systems for depositing lithium into NSTX-U, a Liquid Lithium Pellet Dripper (LLPD) for use with the granular injector for ELM mitigation and control studies as well as an Upward-Facing Lithium Evaporator (U-LITER) based on a flash evaporation system using an electron beam. Currently UIUC has Daniel Andruczyk Stationed at PPPL and is developing these systems as well as being involved in preparing the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP) for use in LTX and NSTX-U. To date the MAPP preparations have been completed. New sample holders were designed by UIUC?s Research Engineer at PPPL and manufactured at PPPL and installed. MAPP is currently being used on LTX to do calibration and initial studies. The LLPD has demonstrated that it can produce pellets. There is still some adjustments needed to control the frequency and particle size. Equipment for the U-LITER has arrived and initial test are being made of the electron beam and design of the U-LITER in progress. It is expected to have these ready for the first run campaign of NSTX-U.

  16. Addressing the challenges of plasma-surface interactions in NSTX-U*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaita, Robert; Abrams, Tyler; Jaworski, Michael; Lucia, Matthew; Nichols, Jacob H.; Skinner, Charles H.; Stotler, Daren; Allain, Jean Paul; Bedoya, Felipe

    2015-04-01

    The importance of conditioning plasma-facing components (PFCs) has long been recognized as a critical element in obtaining high-performance plasmas in magnetic confinement devices. Lithium coatings, for example, have been used for decades for conditioning PFCs. Since the initial studies on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, experiments on devices with different aspect ratios and magnetic geometries like the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) continue to show the relationship between lithium PFCs and good confinement and stability. While such results are promising, their empirical nature do not reflect the detailed relationship between PFCs and the dynamic conditions that occur in the tokamak environment. A first step developing an understanding such complexity will be taken in the upgrade to NSTX (NSTX-U) that is nearing completion. New measurement capabilities include the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) for in situ surface analysis of samples exposed to tokamak plasmas. The OEDGE suite of codes, for example, will provide a new way to model the underlying mechanisms for such material migration in NSTX-U. This will lead to a better understanding of how plasma-facing surfaces evolve during a shot, and how the composition of the plasma facing surface influences the discharge performance we observe. This paper will provide an overview of these capabilities, and highlight their importance for NSTX-U plans to transition from carbon to high-Z PFCs.

  17. Addressing the challenges of plasma-surface interactions in NSTX-U*

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaita, Robert; Abrams, Tyler; Jaworski, Michael; Lucia, Matthew; Nichols, Jacob H.; Skinner, Charles H.; Stotler, Daren; Allain, Jean Paul; Bedoya, Felipe

    2015-04-01

    The importance of conditioning plasma-facing components (PFCs) has long been recognized as a critical element in obtaining high-performance plasmas in magnetic confinement devices. Lithium coatings, for example, have been used for decades for conditioning PFCs. Since the initial studies on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, experiments on devices with different aspect ratios and magnetic geometries like the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) continue to show the relationship between lithium PFCs and good confinement and stability. While such results are promising, their empirical nature do not reflect the detailed relationship between PFCs and the dynamic conditions that occur in the tokamakmore » environment. A first step developing an understanding such complexity will be taken in the upgrade to NSTX (NSTX-U) that is nearing completion. New measurement capabilities include the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) for in situ surface analysis of samples exposed to tokamak plasmas. The OEDGE suite of codes, for example, will provide a new way to model the underlying mechanisms for such material migration in NSTX-U. This will lead to a better understanding of how plasma-facing surfaces evolve during a shot, and how the composition of the plasma facing surface influences the discharge performance we observe. This paper will provide an overview of these capabilities, and highlight their importance for NSTX-U plans to transition from carbon to high-Z PFCs.« less

  18. Electron Bernstein Wave Research on CDX-U and NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Jones, B.; Hosea, J.C.; Kaita, R.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Majeski, R.; Munsat, T.; Phillips, C.K.; Spaleta, J.; Wilson, J.R.; Rasmussen, D.; Bell, G.; Bigelow, T.S.; Carter, M.D.; Swain, D.W.; Wilgen, J.B.; Ram, A.K.; Bers, A.; Harvey, R.W.; and Forest, C.B.

    2001-05-18

    Mode-converted electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) potentially allow the measurement of local electron temperature (Te) and the implementation of local heating and current drive in spherical torus (ST) devices, which are not directly accessible to low harmonic electron cyclotron waves. This paper reports on the measurement of X-mode radiation mode-converted from EBWs observed normal to the magnetic field on the midplane of the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) spherical torus plasmas. The radiation temperature of the EBW emission was compared to Te measured by Thomson scattering and Langmuir probes. EBW mode-conversion efficiencies of over 20% were measured on both CDX-U and NSTX. Sudden increases of mode-conversion efficiency, of over a factor of three, were observed at high-confinement-mode transitions on NSTX, when the measured edge density profile steepened. The EBW mode-conversion efficiency was found to depend on the density gradient at the mode-conversion layer in the plasma scrape-off, consistent with theoretical predictions. The EBW emission source was determined by a perturbation technique to be localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer and was successfully used for radial transport studies. Recently, a new in-vessel antenna and Langmuir probe array were installed on CDX-U to better characterize and enhance the EBW mode-conversion process. The probe incorporates a local adjustable limiter to control and maximize the mode-conversion efficiency in front of the antenna by modifying the density profile in the plasma scrape-off where fundamental EBW mode conversion occurs. Initial results show that the mode-conversion efficiency can be increased to {approximately}100% when the local limiter is inserted near the mode-conversion layer. Plans for future EBW research, including EBW heating and current-drive studies, are discussed.

  19. Dependence of Recycling and Edge Profiles on Lithium Evaporation in High Triangularity, High Performance NSTX H-mode Discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maingi, R; Osborne, T H; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boyle, D P; Canik, J M; Dialla, A; Kaita, R; Kaye, S M; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Sabbagh, S A; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the effects of a pre-discharge lithium evaporation scan on highly shaped discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are documented. Lithium wall conditioning ('dose') was routinely applied onto graphite plasma facing components between discharges in NSTX, partly to reduce recycling. Reduced D[sub]? emission from the lower and upper divertor and center stack was observed, as well as reduced midplane neutral pressure; the magnitude of reduction increased with the pre-discharge lithium dose. Improved energy confinement, both raw ?[sub]E and H-factor normalized to scalings, with increasing lithium dose was also observed. At the highest doses, we also observed elimination of edge-localized modes. The midplane edge plasma profiles were dramatically altered, comparable to lithium dose scans at lower shaping, where the strike point was farther from the lithium deposition centroid. This indicates that the benefits of lithium conditioning should apply to the highly shaped plasmas planned in NSTX-U.

  20. The Role of Lithium Conditioning in Achieving High Performance, Long Pulse H-mode Discharges in the NSTX and EAST Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maingi, Rajesh; Mansfield, D. K.; Gong, X. Z.; Sun, Z.; Bell, M. G.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the role of lithium wall conditioning on the achievement of high performance, long pulse discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is documented. Common observations include recycling reduction and elimination of ELMs. In NSTX, lithium conditioning typically resulted in ELM-free operation with impurity accumulation, which was ameliorated e.g. with pulsed 3D fields to trigger controlled ELMs. Active lithium conditioning in EAST discharges has overcome this problem, producing an ELM-free Hmode with controlled density and impurities.

  1. NSTX: Facility/Research Highlights and Near Term Facility Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ono

    2008-11-19

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a collaborative mega-ampere-class spherical torus research facility with high power heating and current drive systems and the state-of-the-art comprehensive diagnostics. For the 2008 experimental campaign, the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating efficiency in deuterium improved significantly with lithium evaporation and produced a record central Te of 5 keV. The HHFW heating of NBI-heated discharges was also demonstrated for the first time with lithium application. The EBW emission in H-mode was also improved dramatically with lithium which was shown to be attributable to reduced edge collisional absorption. Newly installed FIDA energetic particle diagnostic measured significant transport of energetic ions associated with TAE avalanche as well as n=1 kink activities. A full 75 channel poloidal CHERS system is now operational yielding tantalizing initial results. In the near term, major upgrade activities include a liquid-lithium divertor target to achieve lower collisionality regime, the HHFW antenna upgrades to double its power handling capability in H-mode, and a beam-emission spectroscopy diagnostic to extend the localized turbulence measurements toward the ion gyro-radius scale from the present concentration on the electron gyro-radius scale. For the longer term, a new center stack to significantly expand the plasma operating parameters is planned along with a second NBI system to double the NBI heating and CD power and provide current profile control. These upgrades will enable NSTX to explore fully non-inductive operations over a much expanded plasma parameter space in terms of higher plasma temperature and lower collisionality, thereby significantly reducing the physics parameter gap between the present NSTX and the projected next-step ST experiments.

  2. Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J.M. Bialek; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; plus 148 additional authors

    2005-07-27

    An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high beta Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high beta and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions.

  3. Advanced ST Plasma Scenario Simulations for NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Kessel; E.J. Synakowski; D.A. Gates; R.W. Harvey; S.M. Kaye; T.K. Mau; J. Menard; C.K. Phillips; G. Taylor; R. Wilson; the NSTX Research Team

    2004-10-28

    Integrated scenario simulations are done for NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] that address four primary milestones for developing advanced ST configurations: high {beta} and high {beta}{sub N} inductive discharges to study all aspects of ST physics in the high-beta regime; non-inductively sustained discharges for flattop times greater than the skin time to study the various current-drive techniques; non-inductively sustained discharges at high {beta} for flattop times much greater than a skin time which provides the integrated advanced ST target for NSTX; and non-solenoidal start-up and plasma current ramp-up. The simulations done here use the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) and are based on a discharge 109070. TRANSP analysis of the discharge provided the thermal diffusivities for electrons and ions, the neutral-beam (NB) deposition profile, and other characteristics. CURRAY is used to calculate the High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating depositions and current drive. GENRAY/CQL3D is used to establish the heating and CD [current drive] deposition profiles for electron Bernstein waves (EBW). Analysis of the ideal-MHD stability is done with JSOLVER, BALMSC, and PEST2. The simulations indicate that the integrated advanced ST plasma is reachable, obtaining stable plasmas with {beta} {approx} 40% at {beta}{sub N}'s of 7.7-9, I{sub P} = 1.0 MA, and B{sub T} = 0.35 T. The plasma is 100% non-inductive and has a flattop of 4 skin times. The resulting global energy confinement corresponds to a multiplier of H{sub 98(y,2)} = 1.5. The simulations have demonstrated the importance of HHFW heating and CD, EBW off-axis CD, strong plasma shaping, density control, and early heating/H-mode transition for producing and optimizing these plasma configurations.

  4. Flow and shear behavior in the edge and scrape-off layer of L-mode plasmas in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; Maqueda, R. J.; Myra, J. R.; Russell, D.; Zweben, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations in the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) of L-mode plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) as observed by the gas puff imaging (GPI) diagnostic are studied. Calculation of local, time resolved velocity maps using the Hybrid Optical Flow and Pattern Matching Velocimetry (HOP-V) code enables analysis of turbulent flow and shear behavior. Periodic reversals in the direction of the poloidal flow near the separatrix are observed. Also, poloidal velocities and their radial shearing rate are found to be well correlated with the fraction of Dα light contained in the SOL, which acts as a measure of turbulentmore »bursts. The spectra of GPI intensity and poloidal velocity both have a strong feature near 3 kHz, which appears to correspond with turbulent bursts. This mode exhibits a poloidal structure with poloidal wavenumber of 7.7 m-1 for GPI intensity and 3.4 m-1 for poloidal velocity, and the poloidal velocity fluctuations near 3 kHz remain coherent over length scales in excess of the turbulent scales. Furthermore, recent SOL Turbulence (SOLT) simulations find a parameter regime that exhibits periodic bursty transport and shares many qualitative similarities with the experimental data. Strong correlations between the shearing rate and the turbulent bursts are observed for time periods of ~ 2 ms, but the relationship is complicated by several factors. Finally, measurements of the radial profiles of the Reynolds shear stresses are reported. These radial profiles exhibit many similarities for several shots, and a region with positive radial gradient is seen to be coincident with local flow shear.« less

  5. Analysis of NSTX Upgrade OH Magnet and Center Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Zolfaghari, P. Titus, J. Chrzanowski, A. Salehzadeh, F. Dahlgren

    2010-11-30

    The new ohmic heating (OH) coil and center stack for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) upgrade are required to meet cooling and structural requirements for operation at the enhanced 1 Tesla toroidal field and 2 MA plasma current. The OH coil is designed to be cooled in the time between discharges by water flowing in the center of the coil conductor. We performed resistive heating and thermal hydraulic analyses to optimize coolant channel size to keep the coil temperature below 100 C and meet the required 20 minute cooling time. Coupled electromagnetic, thermal and structural FEA analyses were performed to determine if the OH coil meets the requirements of the structural design criteria. Structural response of the OH coil to its self-field and the field from other coils was analyzed. A model was developed to analyze the thermal and electromagnetic interaction of centerstack components such as the OH coil, TF inner legs and the Bellville washer preload mechanism. Torsional loads from the TF interaction with the OH and poloidal fields are transferred through the TF flag extensions via a torque transfer coupling to the rest of the tokamak structure. A 3D FEA analysis was performed to qualify this design. The results of these analyses, which will be presented in this paper, have led to the design of OH coil and centerstack components that meet the requirements of the NSTX-upgrade structural design criteria.

  6. Solenoid-free Plasma Startup in NSTX using Coaxial Helicity Injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roger Raman; Thomas R. Jarboe; Michael G. Bell; Dennis Mueller; Brian A. Nelson; Benoit LeBlanc; Charles Bush; Masayoshi Nagata; Ted Biewer

    2005-01-03

    The favorable properties of the Spherical Torus (ST) arise from its very small aspect ratio. However, small aspect ratio devices have very restricted space for a substantial central solenoid. Thus methods for initiating the plasma current without relying on induction from a central solenoid are essential for the viability of the ST concept. Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) is a promising candidate for solenoid-free plasma startup in a ST. Recent experiments on the HIT-II ST at the University of Washington, have demonstrated the capability of a new method, referred to as transient CHI, to produce a high quality, closed-flux equilibrium that has then been coupled to induction, with a reduced requirement for transformer flux [R. Raman, T.R. Jarboe, B.A. Nelson, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (February 2003) 075005-1]. An initial test of this method on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has produced about 140 kA of toroidal current. Modifications are now underway to improve capability for transient CHI in NSTX.

  7. Recent Progress on Spherical Torus Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Masayuki; Kaita, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R0/a) reduced to A ~ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ≥ 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta β (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as β ~ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation κ, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two megaampere class ST facilities in 2000, National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) in the US and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than sixteen ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all of fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

  8. Techniques for the measurement of disruption halo currents in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Fredrickson, E.; Guttadora, L.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Takahashi, H.

    2011-10-06

    This paper describes techniques for measuring halo currents, and their associated toroidal peaking, in the National Spherical Torus Experiments. The measurements are based on three techniques: (i) measurement of the toroidal field created by the poloidal halo current, either with segmented Rogowski coils or discrete toroidal field sensors, (ii) the direct measurement of halo currents into specially instrument tiles, and (iii) small Rogowski coils placed on the mechanical supports of in-vessel components. For the segmented Rogowski coils and discrete toroidal field detectors, it is shown that the toroidal peaking factor inferred from the data is significantly less than the peakingmore » factor of the underlying halo current distribution, and a simple model is developed to relate the two. For the array of discrete toroidal field detectors and small Rogowski sensors, the compensation steps that are used to isolate the halo current signal are described. The electrical and mechanical design of compact under-tile resistive shunts and mini-Rogowski coils is described. Example data from the various systems is shown.« less

  9. Characterization of the plasma current quench during disruptions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhardt, S.P., Menard, J.E., and the NSTX Research Team

    2008-12-17

    A detailed analysis of the plasma current quench in the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M.Ono, et al Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] is presented. The fastest current quenches are fit better by a linear waveform than an exponential one. Area-normalized current quench times down to .4 msec/m2 have been observed, compared to the minimum of 1.7 msec/m2 recommendation based on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks; as noted in previous ITPA studies, the difference can be explained by the reduced self-inductance at low aspect ratio and high-elongation. The maximum instantaneous dIp/dt is often many times larger than the mean quench rate, and the plasma current before the disruption is often substantially less than the flat-top value. The poloidal field time-derivative during the disruption, which is directly responsible for driving eddy currents, has been recorded at various locations around the vessel. The Ip quench rate, plasma motion, and magnetic geometry all play important roles in determining the rate of poloidal field change.

  10. Snowflake divertor configuration studies for NSTX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soukhanovskii, V A

    2011-11-12

    Snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX provide basis for PMI development toward NSTX-Upgrade. Snowflake configuration formation was followed by radiative detachment. Significant reduction of steady-state divertor heat flux observed in snowflake divertor. Impulsive heat loads due to Type I ELMs are partially mitigated in snowflake divertor. Magnetic control of snowflake divertor configuration is being developed. Plasma material interface development is critical for NSTX-U success. Four divertor coils should enable flexibility in boundary shaping and control in NSTX-U. Snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX provide good basis for PMI development in NSTX-Upgrade. FY 2009-2010 snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX: (1) Helped understand control of magnetic properties; (2) Core H-mode confinement unchanged; (3) Core and edge carbon concentration reduced; and (4) Divertor heat flux significantly reduced - (a) Steady-state reduction due to geometry and radiative detachment, (b) Encouraging results for transient heat flux handling, (c) Combined with impurity-seeded radiative divertor. Outlook for snowflake divertor in NSTX-Upgrade: (1) 2D fluid modeling of snowflake divertor properties scaling - (a) Edge and divertor transport, radiation, detachment threshold, (b) Compatibility with cryo-pump and lithium conditioning; (2) Magnetic control development; and (3) PFC development - PFC alignment and PFC material choice.

  11. NSTX-U Control System Upgrades (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NSTX-U Control System Upgrades Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NSTX-U Control System Upgrades The National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) is undergoing a wealth of upgrades (NSTX-U). These upgrades, especially including an elongated pulse length, require broad changes to the control system that has served NSTX well. A new fiber serial Front Panel Data Port input and output (I/O) stream will supersede the aging copper parallel version. Driver support for the new I/O and cyber

  12. Ion heating during magnetic relaxation in the helicity injected torus-II experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neill, R.G.; Redd, A.J.; Hamp, W.T.; Smith, R.J.; Jarboe, T.R.

    2005-12-15

    Ion doppler spectroscopy (IDS) is applied to the helicity injected torus (HIT-II) spherical torus to measure impurity ion temperature and flows. [A. J. Redd et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2006 (2002)] The IDS instrument employs a 16-channel photomultiplier and can track temperature and velocity continuously through a discharge. Data for the coaxial helicity injection (CHI), transformer, and combined current drive configurations are presented. Ion temperatures for transformer-driven discharges are typically equal to or somewhat lower than electron temperatures measured by Thomson scattering. Internal reconnection events in transformer-driven discharges cause rapid ion heating. The CHI discharges exhibit anomalously high ion temperatures >250 eV, which are an order of magnitude higher than Thomson measurements, indicating ion heating through magnetic relaxation. The CHI discharges that exhibit current and poloidal flux buildup after bubble burst show sustained ion heating during current drive.

  13. NSTX-U Advances in Real-Time C++11 on Linux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Keith G.

    2015-08-14

    Programming languages like C and Ada combined with proprietary embedded operating systems have dominated the real-time application space for decades. The new C++11standard includes native, language-level support for concurrency, a required feature for any nontrivial event-oriented real-time software. Threads, Locks, and Atomics now exist to provide the necessary tools to build the structures that make up the foundation of a complex real-time system. The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is breaking new ground with the language as applied to the needs of fusion devices. A new Digital Coil Protection System (DCPS) will serve as the main protection mechanism for the magnetic coils, and it is written entirely in C++11 running on Concurrent Computer Corporation's real-time operating system, RedHawk Linux. It runs over 600 algorithms in a 5 kHz control loop that determine whether or not to shut down operations before physical damage occurs. To accomplish this, NSTX-U engineers developed software tools that do not currently exist elsewhere, including real-time atomic synchronization, real-time containers, and a real-time logging framework. Together with a recent (and carefully configured) version of the GCC compiler, these tools enable data acquisition, processing, and output using a conventional operating system to meet a hard real-time deadline (that is, missing one periodic is a failure) of 200 microseconds.

  14. NSTX-U Advances in Real-Time C++11 on Linux

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erickson, Keith G.

    2015-08-14

    Programming languages like C and Ada combined with proprietary embedded operating systems have dominated the real-time application space for decades. The new C++11standard includes native, language-level support for concurrency, a required feature for any nontrivial event-oriented real-time software. Threads, Locks, and Atomics now exist to provide the necessary tools to build the structures that make up the foundation of a complex real-time system. The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is breaking new ground with the language as applied to the needs of fusion devices. A new Digital Coil Protection System (DCPS) willmore »serve as the main protection mechanism for the magnetic coils, and it is written entirely in C++11 running on Concurrent Computer Corporation's real-time operating system, RedHawk Linux. It runs over 600 algorithms in a 5 kHz control loop that determine whether or not to shut down operations before physical damage occurs. To accomplish this, NSTX-U engineers developed software tools that do not currently exist elsewhere, including real-time atomic synchronization, real-time containers, and a real-time logging framework. Together with a recent (and carefully configured) version of the GCC compiler, these tools enable data acquisition, processing, and output using a conventional operating system to meet a hard real-time deadline (that is, missing one periodic is a failure) of 200 microseconds.« less

  15. NSTX-U Advances in Real-Time C++11 on Linux

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erickson, Keith G.

    2015-08-14

    Programming languages like C and Ada combined with proprietary embedded operating systems have dominated the real-time application space for decades. The new C++11standard includes native, language-level support for concurrency, a required feature for any nontrivial event-oriented real-time software. Threads, Locks, and Atomics now exist to provide the necessary tools to build the structures that make up the foundation of a complex real-time system. The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is breaking new ground with the language as applied to the needs of fusion devices. A new Digital Coil Protection System (DCPS) willmore » serve as the main protection mechanism for the magnetic coils, and it is written entirely in C++11 running on Concurrent Computer Corporation's real-time operating system, RedHawk Linux. It runs over 600 algorithms in a 5 kHz control loop that determine whether or not to shut down operations before physical damage occurs. To accomplish this, NSTX-U engineers developed software tools that do not currently exist elsewhere, including real-time atomic synchronization, real-time containers, and a real-time logging framework. Together with a recent (and carefully configured) version of the GCC compiler, these tools enable data acquisition, processing, and output using a conventional operating system to meet a hard real-time deadline (that is, missing one periodic is a failure) of 200 microseconds.« less

  16. Novel Use of Water Soluble "Aquapour" As A Temporary Spacer During Coil Winding For The NSTX-U Centerstack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mardenfeld, Michael

    2013-07-01

    A major facility upgrade to the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX-U) is currently underway at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). A key component of NSTX-U is the fabrication of a new, higher field centerstack (CS). In order to simultaneously provide robust joints between the inner and outer legs of the Toroidal Field Coils (TF) and minimize radial build, the NSTX-U CS design requires that the Ohmic Heating solenoid (OH) be wound directly on the inner TF bundle. To protect the OH against thermal expansion stress during scenarios where the inner TF bundle is hot but the OH is relatively cool, the completed CS will have a 0.100 inch annular gap between the outer diameter of the TF bundle and the inner diameter of the OH solenoid. "Aquapour", a proprietary material produced by the Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Company will be used during manufacture to produce this gap. After the TF bundle is vacuum pressure impregnated and cured, a cylindrical "clam shell" mold will be assembled around it, and a slurry of powdered Aquapour and water will be pumped into the annular space between the mold and TF bundle. Subsequent baking will turn the Aquapour solid, and a protective layer of wet lay-up fiberglass and resin will be added. The OH solenoid will be wound directly on this wet lay-up shell. After vacuum pressure impregnation of the OH, the water soluble Aquapour will be washed away, leaving the required radial clearance between the TF and OH. This paper will describe prototyping and testing of this process, and plans for use on the actual CS fabrication.

  17. NSTX-U Control System Upgrades

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erickson, K. G.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Lawson, J. E.; Mozulay, R.; Sichta, P.; Tchilinguirian, G. J.

    2014-06-01

    The National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) is undergoing a wealth of upgrades (NSTX-U). These upgrades, especially including an elongated pulse length, require broad changes to the control system that has served NSTX well. A new fiber serial Front Panel Data Port input and output (I/O) stream will supersede the aging copper parallel version. Driver support for the new I/O and cyber security concerns require updating the operating system from Redhat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) v4 to RedHawk (based on RHEL) v6. While the basic control system continues to use the General Atomics Plasma Control System (GA PCS), the effort to forwardmore » port the entire software package to run under 64-bit Linux instead of 32-bit Linux included PCS modifications subsequently shared with GA and other PCS users. Software updates focused on three key areas: (1) code modernization through coding standards (C99/C11), (2) code portability and maintainability through use of the GA PCS code generator, and (3) support of 64-bit platforms. Central to the control system upgrade is the use of a complete real time (RT) Linux platform provided by Concurrent Computer Corporation, consisting of a computer (iHawk), an operating system and drivers (RedHawk), and RT tools (NightStar). Strong vendor support coupled with an extensive RT toolset influenced this decision. The new real-time Linux platform, I/O, and software engineering will foster enhanced capability and performance for NSTX-U plasma control.« less

  18. Edge transport studies in the edge and scrape-off layer of the National Spherical Torus Experiment with Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boedo, J. A. Rudakov, D. L.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Zweben, S.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R. J.; Bell, R.; Kugel, H.; Leblanc, B.; Roquemore, L. A.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Ahn, J. W.; Canik, J.; Crocker, N.

    2014-04-15

    Transport and turbulence profiles were directly evaluated using probes for the first time in the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] in low (L) and high (H) confinement, low power (P{sub in}? 1.3?MW), beam-heated, lower single-null discharges. Radial turbulent particle fluxes peak near the last closed flux surface (LCFS) at ?410{sup 21}?s{sup ?1} in L-mode and are suppressed to ?0.210{sup 21}?s{sup ?1} in H mode (80%90% lower) mostly due to a reduction in density fluctuation amplitude and of the phase between density and radial velocity fluctuations. The radial particle fluxes are consistent with particle inventory based on SOLPS fluid modeling. A strong intermittent component is identified. Hot, dense plasma filaments 410?cm in diameter, appear first ?2?cm inside the LCFS at a rate of ?110{sup 21}?s{sup ?1} and leave that region with radial speeds of ?35?km/s, decaying as they travel through the SOL, while voids travel inward toward the core. Profiles of normalized fluctuations feature levels of 10% inside LCFS to ?150% at the LCFS and SOL. Once properly normalized, the intermittency in NSTX falls in similar electrostatic instability regimes as seen in other devices. The L-H transition causes a drop in the intermittent filaments velocity, amplitude and number in the SOL, resulting in reduced outward transport away from the edge and a less dense SOL.

  19. Progress In Understanding The Enhanced Petestal H-mode In NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Canik, J. M.; Maingi, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, R. E.; Guttenfelder, W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.; Sabbagh, S.

    2014-06-26

    ThIS paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from the plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.

  20. Progress in understanding the enhanced pedestal H-mode in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Canik, J. M.; Maingi, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, R. E.; Guttenfelder, W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.; Sabbagh, S.

    2014-08-01

    The paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from the plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.

  1. Progress in understanding the enhanced pedestal H-mode in NSTX

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Canik, J. M.; Maingi, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, R. E.; Guttenfelder, W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.; Sabbagh, S.

    2014-08-01

    The paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from themore » plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.« less

  2. Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX Lithium...

  3. Development of a radio frequency ion source with multi-helicon plasma injectors for neutral beam injection system of Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choe, Kyumin; Jung, Bongki; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.; Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744

    2014-02-15

    Despite of high plasma density, helicon plasma has not yet been applied to a large area ion source such as a driver for neutral beam injection (NBI) system due to intrinsically poor plasma uniformity in the discharge region. In this study, a radio-frequency (RF) ion source with multi-helicon plasma injectors for high plasma density with good uniformity has been designed and constructed for the NBI system of Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus at Seoul National University. The ion source consists of a rectangular plasma expansion chamber (120 120 120 mm{sup 3}), four helicon plasma injectors with annular permanent magnets and RF power system. Main feature of the source is downstream plasma confinement in the cusp magnetic field configuration which is generated by arranging polarities of permanent magnets in the helicon plasma injectors. In this paper, detailed design of the multi-helicon plasma injector and plasma characteristics of the ion source are presented.

  4. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Torus Experiment-Upgrade. Technicians inspect the new center stack that forms the heart of the NSTX-U. The new neutral beam box arrives in the NSTX-U test cell. The NSTX-U...

  5. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  6. Lithium Wall Conditioning And Surface Dust Detection On NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, C H; Bell, M G; Friesen, F.Q.L.; Heim, B; Jaworski, M A; Kugel, H; Maingi, R; Rais, B

    2011-05-23

    Lithium evaporation onto NSTX plasma facing components (PFC) has resulted in improved energy confinement, and reductions in the number and amplitude of edge-localized modes (ELMs) up to the point of complete ELM suppression. The associated PFC surface chemistry has been investigated with a novel plasma material interface probe connected to an in-vacuo surface analysis station. Analysis has demonstrated that binding of D atoms to the polycrystalline graphite material of the PFCs is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular deuterium atoms become weakly bonded near lithium atoms themselves bound to either oxygen or the carbon from the underlying material. Surface dust inside NSTX has been detected in real-time using a highly sensitive electrostatic dust detector. In a separate experiment, electrostatic removal of dust via three concentric spiral-shaped electrodes covered by a dielectric and driven by a high voltage 3-phase waveform was evaluated for potential application to fusion reactors

  7. Lithium Surface Coatings for Improved Plasma Performance in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugel, H W; Ahn, J -W; Allain, J P; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaye, S; Kaita, R; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Timberlake, J; Wampler, W R

    2008-02-19

    NSTX high-power divertor plasma experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and frequent benefits from lithium coatings applied to plasma facing components. Lithium pellet injection on NSTX introduced lithium pellets with masses 1 to 5 mg via He discharges. Lithium coatings have also been applied with an oven that directed a collimated stream of lithium vapor toward the graphite tiles of the lower center stack and divertor. Lithium depositions from a few mg to 1 g have been applied between discharges. Benefits from the lithium coating were sometimes, but not always seen. These improvements sometimes included decreases plasma density, inductive flux consumption, and ELM frequency, and increases in electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement and periods of MHD quiescence. In addition, reductions in lower divertor D, C, and O luminosity were measured.

  8. Design and Construction of the NSTX Bakeout, Cooling and Vacuum Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Dudek; M. Kalish; R. Gernhardt; R.F. Parsells; W. Blanchard

    1999-11-01

    This paper will describe the design, construction and initial operation of the NSTX bakeout, water cooling and vacuum systems. The bakeout system is designed for two modes of operation. The first mode allows heating of the first wall components to 350 degrees C while the external vessel is cooled to 150 degrees C. The second mode cools the first wall to 150 degrees C and the external vessel to 50 degrees C. The system uses a low viscosity heat transfer oil which is capable of high temperature low pressure operation. The NSTX Torus Vacuum Pumping System (TVPS) is designed to achieve a base pressure of approximately 1x10 (superscript -8) Torr and to evacuate the plasma fuel gas loads in less than 5 minutes between discharges. The vacuum pumping system is capable of a pumping speed of approximately 3400 l/s for deuterium. The hardware consists of two turbo molecular pumps (TMPs) and a mechanical pump set consisting of a mechanical and a Roots blower pump. A PLC is used as the control system to provide remote monitoring, control and software interlock capability. The NSTX cooling water provides chilled, de ionized water for heat removal in the TF, OH and PF, power supplies, bus bar systems, and various diagnostics. The system provides flow monitoring via a PLC to prevent damage due to loss of flow.

  9. Simulation of Diffusive Lithium Evaporation Onto the NSTX Vessel Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotler, D. P.; Skinner, C. H.; Blanchard, W. R.; Krstic, P. S.; Kugel, H. W.; Schneider, H.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2010-12-09

    A model for simulating the diffusive evaporation of lithium into a helium filled NSTX vacuum vessel is described and validated against an initial set of deposition experiments. The DEGAS 2 based model consists of a three-dimensional representation of the vacuum vessel, the elastic scattering process, and a kinetic description of the evaporated atoms. Additional assumptions are required to account for deuterium out-gassing during the validation experiments. The model agrees with the data over a range of pressures to within the estimated uncertainties. Suggestions are made for more discriminating experiments that will lead to an improved model.

  10. MPI Multicore Torus Communication Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-02-05

    The MPI Multicore Torus Communications Benchmark (TorusTest) measues the aggegate bandwidth across all six links from/to any multicore node in a logical torus. It can run in wo modi: using a static or a random mapping of tasks to torus locations. The former can be used to achieve optimal mappings and aggregate bandwidths that can be achieved with varying node mappings.

  11. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  12. Components of the NSTX-U | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Components of the NSTX-U Current in center stack: 2 million amps, enough to light 2 million 100 watt light bulbs. Publication File: PDF icon NSTX-U_presskit_print_Components

  13. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, B.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Leblanc, B.

    2012-10-27

    Gas-Puff-Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D2 gas puff nears the outer mid-plane of NSTX. DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and atomic physics in tokamak plasmas. In this paper we compare measurements of the D? light emission obtained by GPI on NSTX with DEGAS 2 simulations of D? light emission for specific experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and absolute intensity of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between ELMs in H-mode.

  14. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, B.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Leblanc, B.

    2012-11-08

    Gas-Puff-Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D2 gas puff nears the outer mid-plane of NSTX. DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and atomic physics in tokamak plasmas. In this paper we compare measurements of the D? light emission obtained by GPI on NSTX with DEGAS 2 simulations of D? light emission for specific experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and absolute intensity of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between ELMs in H-mode. __________________________________________________

  15. Implementation of BN Control in the National Spherical Torus...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the normalized B in the National Spherical Torus Experiment M. Ono, et al., Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000). A PID operator is applied to the difference between the present value...

  16. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-01-01

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  17. Overview of Innovative PMI Research on NSTX-U and Associated PMI Facilities at PPPL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ono, M. Jaworski, R. Kaita, C. N. Skinner, J.P. Allain, R. Maingi, F. Scotti, V.A. Soukhanovskii, and the NSTX-U Team

    2012-09-19

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTXU, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. With ~ 15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2 . To support the PMI research, a comprehensive set of PMI diagnostic tools are being implemented. The snow-flake configuration can produce exceptionally high divertor flux expansion of up to ~ 50. Combined with the radiative divertor concept, the snow-flake configuration has reduced the divertor heat flux by an order of magnitude in NSTX. Another area of active PMI investigation is the effect of divertor lithium coating (both in solid and liquid phases). The overall NSTX lithium PFC coating results suggest exciting opportunities for future magnetic confinement research including significant electron energy confinement improvements, Hmode power threshold reduction, the control of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), and high heat flux handling. To support the NSTX-U/PPPL PMI research, there are also a number of associated PMI facilities implemented at PPPL/Princeton University including the Liquid Lithium R&D facility, Lithium Tokamak Experiment, and Laboratories for Materials Characterization and Surface Chemistry.

  18. NSTX Report on FES Joint Facilities Research Milestone 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maingi, R.; Ahn, J- W.; Gray, T. K.; McLean, A. G.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2011-03-24

    Annual Target: Conduct experiments on major fusion facilities to improve understanding of the heat transport in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma, strengthening the basis for projecting divertor conditions in ITER. The divertor heat flux profiles and plasma characteristics in the tokamak scrape-off layer will be measured in multiple devices to investigate the underlying thermal transport processes. The unique characteristics of C-Mod, DIII-D, and NSTX will enable collection of data over a broad range of SOL and divertor parameters (e.g., collisionality ?*, beta ?, parallel heat flux q||, and divertor geometry). Coordinated experiments using common analysis methods will generate a data set that will be compared with theory and simulation.

  19. Detection of Disruptions in the High-β Spherical Torus NSTX

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States ... See Sections 4a)-4d). * While the algorithm does a good job of predicting the current ...

  20. Kelsey Tresemer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tresemer has been the primary design engineer and cost account manager for plasma-facing components for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), and currently serves as...

  1. Solenoid-free Plasma Start-up in NSTX using Transient CHI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, R; Jarboe, T; Nelson, B; Mueller, D; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-01-05

    Experiments in NSTX have now demonstrated the coupling of toroidal plasmas produced by the technique of Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) to inductive sustainment and ramp-up of the toroidal plasma current. In these discharges, the central Ohmic transformer was used to apply an inductive loop voltage to discharges with a toroidal current of about 100 kA created by CHI. The coupled discharges have ramped up to >700 kA and transitioned into an H-mode demonstrating compatibility of this startup method with conventional operation. The electron temperature in the coupled discharges reached over 800 eV and the resulting plasma had low inductance, which is preferred for long-pulse high performance discharges. These results from NSTX in combination with the previously obtained record 160 kA non-inductively-generated startup currents in an ST or tokamak in NSTX demonstrate that CHI is a viable solenoid-free plasma startup method for future STs and tokamaks.

  2. Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, A.; Zweben, S. J.; Stotler, D. P.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2012-08-10

    Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

  3. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R. J.; Lundberg, D. P.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Boedo, J.; et al

    2011-01-01

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from themore »simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.« less

  4. NSTX-U IS ONE OF AN ELITE GROUP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSTX-U IS ONE OF AN ELITE GROUP of magnetic fusion facilities scattered across the globe. These powerful and complex machines are advancing mankind's quest to harness fusion as a...

  5. Unusual emission lines of carbon in the 170-190 A region on NSTX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Unusual emission lines of carbon in the 170-190 A region on NSTX Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Unusual emission lines of carbon in the 170-190 A region on NSTX You...

  6. Divertor Heat Flux Amelioration in Highly-Shaped Plasma in NSTX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Divertor Heat Flux Amelioration in Highly-Shaped Plasma in NSTX Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Divertor Heat Flux Amelioration in Highly-Shaped Plasma in NSTX You...

  7. Divertor Heat Flux Amelioration in Highly-Shaped Plasma in NSTX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Divertor Heat Flux Amelioration in Highly-Shaped Plasma in NSTX Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Divertor Heat Flux Amelioration in Highly-Shaped Plasma in NSTX...

  8. Central safety factor and β N control on NSTX-U via beam power...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Central safety factor and N control on NSTX-U via beam power and plasma boundary shape ... Title: Central safety factor and N control on NSTX-U via beam power and plasma boundary ...

  9. Developing the digital safeguard that protects the National Spherical Torus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment-Upgrade at PPPL | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Developing the digital safeguard that protects the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade at PPPL By John Greenwald February 22, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Members of the team that developed the DCPS, from left: Gretchen Zimmer, Kevin Lamb, Greg Tchillingarian, Paul Sichta, John Lawson, Tim Stevenson, Stefan Gerhardt and Roman Rozenblat. Not shown: Vince Mastrocola, John Dong, Gary Gibilisco. (Photo by

  10. Developing the digital safeguard that protects the National Spherical Torus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment-Upgrade at PPPL | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Developing the digital safeguard that protects the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade at PPPL By John Greenwald February 22, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Members of the team that developed the DCPS, from left: Gretchen Zimmer, Kevin Lamb, Greg Tchillingarian, Paul Sichta, John Lawson, Tim Stevenson, Stefan Gerhardt and Roman Rozenblat. Not shown: Vince Mastrocola, John Dong, Gary Gibilisco. (Photo by

  11. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  12. Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-01-14

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  13. 3D TORUS V1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002440MLTPL00 3D Torus Routing Engine Module for OFA OpenSM v. 1.0 http://www.openfabrics.org/git?p=sashak/management.git;a=sum

  14. Jonathan E Menard | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jonathan E Menard Principal Research Physicst, Program Director for NSTX Jonathan Menard is program director for the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) and is responsible for guiding the scientific research program of NSTX-U working with an international research team. His research interests include the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and stability properties of spherical torus (ST) and tokamak plasmas, advanced operating scenarios in the ST, and the development of next-

  15. Local Effects of Biased Electrodes in the Divertor of NSTX (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    divertor plates of NSTX. When the electrodes were located near the outer divertor strike point and biased positively, there was an increase in the nearby probe currents and...

  16. HEATING AND CURRENT DRIVE IN NSTX WITH ELECTRON BERNSTEIN WAVES AND HIGH HARMONIC FAST WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, Abhay K

    2010-06-14

    A suitable theoretical and computational framework for studying heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment has been developed. This framework can also be used to study heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in spherical tori and other magnetic confinement devices. It is also useful in studying the propagation and damping of electron cyclotron waves in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  17. Masayuki Ono | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Masayuki Ono Principal Research Physicist, Head, NSTX Department Masa Ono is project director of the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U). Ono has led a number of PPPL research teams including those involved in the Advanced Concept Torus (ACT-1), the Current Drive Experiment (CDX), the Current Drive Experiment Upgrade (CDX-U) and the NSTX. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the author of more than 250 scientific papers. Interests Fusion energy NSTX-U Contact

  18. Diagnostics for the biased electrode experiment on NSTX (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the other two to 10 A each. The effect of local biasing was measured with a set of Langmuir probes placed between the electrodes and another set extending radially outward from...

  19. Local Effects of Biased Electrodes in the Divertor of NSTX

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    60 PPPL- 4760 Local Effects of Biased Electrodes in the Divertor of NSTX May, 2012 S. Zweben, M.D. Campanell, B.C. Lyons, R.J. Maqueda, Y. Raitses, A.L. Roquemore and F. Scotti Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Report Disclaimers Full Legal Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors or their

  20. Results from the NSTX X-ray Crystal Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Bitter; K. Hill; L. Roquemore; P. Beiersdorfer; D. Thorn; Ming Feng Gu

    2003-01-14

    A high-resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer has recently been installed at the National Spherical Torus Experiment to record the satellite spectra of helium-like argon, ArXVII, in the wavelength range from 3.94 to 4.00 {angstrom} for measurements of ion and electron temperatures, and measurements of the ionization equilibrium of argon, which is of interest for studies of ion transport. The instrument presently consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal and a conventional one-dimensional position-sensitive multi-wire proportional counter, but it will soon be upgraded to a new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer by the installation of a large size (10 cm x 30 cm) two-dimensional position-sensitive detector that will allow us to obtain temporally and spatially resolved spectra from an 80 cm high cross-section of the plasma. In its present configuration, the spectrometer has been optimized for high throughput so that it is possible to record spectra with small statistical errors with a time resolution of 10 ms by adding only small, nonperturbing amounts of argon to the plasma. The spectrometer is most valuable for measurements of the ion temperature in the absence of a neutral beam in ohmically heated and radio-frequency heated discharges, when charge exchange recombination spectroscopy does not function. Electron temperature measurements from the satellite-to-resonance line ratios have been important for a quantitative comparison with (and verification of) the Thomson scattering data. The paper will describe the instrumental details of the present and future spectrometer configurations, and present recent experimental results.

  1. NSTX-U | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL physicists win Torkil Jensen Award to conduct key experiments on DIII-D Physicists Luis Delgado-Aparicio and Egemen Kolemen of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)...

  2. Lithium Coatings on NSTX Plasma Facing Components and Its Effects On Boundary Control, Core Plasma Performance, and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.W.Kugel, M.G.Bell, H.Schneider, J.P.Allain, R.E.Bell, R Kaita, J.Kallman, S. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, D. Mansfield, R.E. Nygen, R. Maingi, J. Menard, D. Mueller, M. Ono, S. Paul, S.Gerhardt, R.Raman, S.Sabbagh, C.H.Skinner, V.Soukhanovskii, J.Timberlake, L.E.Zakharov, and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-01-25

    NSTX high-power divertor plasma experiments have used in succession lithium pellet injection (LPI), evaporated lithium, and injected lithium powder to apply lithium coatings to graphite plasma facing components. In 2005, following wall conditioning and LPI, discharges exhibited edge density reduction and performance improvements. Since 2006, first one, and now two lithium evaporators have been used routinely to evaporate lithium onto the lower divertor region at total rates of 10-70 mg/min for periods 5-10 min between discharges. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators are withdrawn behind shutters. Significant improvements in the performance of NBI heated divertor discharges resulting from these lithium depositions were observed. These evaporators are now used for more than 80% of NSTX discharges. Initial work with injecting fine lithium powder into the edge of NBI heated deuterium discharges yielded comparable changes in performance. Several operational issues encountered with lithium wall conditions, and the special procedures needed for vessel entry are discussed. The next step in this work is installation of a Liquid Lithium Divertor surface on the outer part of the lower divertor.

  3. Lithium coatings on NSTX plasma facing components and its effects on boundary control, core plasma performance, and operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugel, H. W.; Bell, M. G.; Maingi, R.

    2010-01-01

    NSTX high power divertor plasma experiments have used in succession lithium pellet injection (LPI), evaporated lithium, and injected lithium powder to apply lithium coatings to graphite plasma facing components. In 2005, following the wall conditioning and LPI, discharges exhibited edge density reduction and performance improvements. Since 2006, first one, and now two lithium evaporators have been used routinely to evaporate lithium onto the lower divertor region at total rates of 10-70 mg/min for periods 5-10 min between discharges. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators are withdrawn behind shutters. Significant improvements in the performance of NBI heated divertor discharges resulting from these lithium depositions were observed. These evaporators are now used for more than 80% of NSTX discharges. Initial work with injecting fine lithium powder into the edge of NBI heated deuterium discharges yielded comparable changes in performance. Several operational issues encountered with lithium wall conditions, and the special procedures needed for vessel entry are discussed. The next step in this work is installation of a liquid lithium divertor surface on the outer part of the lower divertor.

  4. Overview of innovative PMI research on NSTX-U and associated PMI facilities at PPPL

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    M. Ono; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. N.; Allain, J. P.; Maingi, R.; Scotti, F.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTX-U, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. Moreover, with ˜15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2.

  5. Central safety factor and β N control on NSTX-U via beam power and plasma

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    boundary shape modification, using TRANSP for closed loop simulations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Central safety factor and β N control on NSTX-U via beam power and plasma boundary shape modification, using TRANSP for closed loop simulations Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on April 23, 2016 Title: Central safety factor and β N control on NSTX-U via beam power and plasma boundary shape modification, using TRANSP for closed loop

  6. Frelinghuysen, Holt visit PPPL to report on bipartisan efforts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Rep. Rush Holt (D-NJ-12), Plainsboro Mayor Peter Cantu, and PPPL Director Stewart Prager next to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) during a June 13 visit...

  7. Arithmetic functions in torus and tree networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhanot, Gyan (Princeton, NJ); Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton On Hudson, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2007-12-25

    Methods and systems for performing arithmetic functions. In accordance with a first aspect of the invention, methods and apparatus are provided, working in conjunction of software algorithms and hardware implementation of class network routing, to achieve a very significant reduction in the time required for global arithmetic operation on the torus. Therefore, it leads to greater scalability of applications running on large parallel machines. The invention involves three steps in improving the efficiency and accuracy of global operations: (1) Ensuring, when necessary, that all the nodes do the global operation on the data in the same order and so obtain a unique answer, independent of roundoff error; (2) Using the topology of the torus to minimize the number of hops and the bidirectional capabilities of the network to reduce the number of time steps in the data transfer operation to an absolute minimum; and (3) Using class function routing to reduce latency in the data transfer. With the method of this invention, every single element is injected into the network only once and it will be stored and forwarded without any further software overhead. In accordance with a second aspect of the invention, methods and systems are provided to efficiently implement global arithmetic operations on a network that supports the global combining operations. The latency of doing such global operations are greatly reduced by using these methods.

  8. Unusual emission lines of carbon in the 170-190 A region on NSTX

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Unusual emission lines of carbon in the 170-190 A region on NSTX Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Unusual emission lines of carbon in the 170-190 A region on NSTX Authors: Lepson, J K ; Beiersdorfer, P ; Bitter, M ; Roquemore, A L ; Kaita, R Publication Date: 2014-02-14 OSTI Identifier: 1124893 Report Number(s): LLNL-PROC-650137 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: Atomic Processes

  9. Mechanical Design of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Ellis, R. Kaita, H. Kugel, G. Paluzzi, M. Viola and R. Nygren

    2009-02-19

    The Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) on NSTX will be the first test of a fully-toroidal liquid lithium divertor in a high-power magnetic confinement device. It will replace part of the lower outboard divertor between a specified inside and outside radius, and ultimately provide a lithium surface exposed to the plasma with enough depth to absorb a significant particle flux. There are numerous technical challenges involved in the design. The lithium layer must be as thin as possible, and maintained at a temperature between 200 and 400 degrees Celsius to minimize lithium evaporation. This requirement leads to the use of a thick copper substrate, with a thin stainless steel layer bonded to the plasma-facing surface. A porous molybdenum layer is then plasma-sprayed onto the stainless steel, to provide a coating that facilitates full wetting of the surface by the liquid lithium. Other challenges include the design of a robust, vacuumcompatible heating and cooling system for the LLD. Replacement graphite tiles that provided the proper interface between the existing outer divertor and the LLD also had to be designed, as well as accommodation for special LLD diagnostics. This paper describes the mechanical design of the LLD, and presents analyses showing the performance limits of the LLD.

  10. ELECTRON THERMAL TRANSPORT IN THE MADISON SYMMETRIC TORUS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ELECTRON THERMAL TRANSPORT IN THE MADISON SYMMETRIC TORUS by THEODORE MATHIAS BIEWER A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PHYSICS) at the UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON 2002 i Electron Thermal Transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus Theodore M. Biewer Under the supervision of Assistant Professor Cary B. Forest At the University of Wisconsin-Madison Abstract Due to diagnostic improvements and the development of the MSTFit

  11. Magnetic Diagnostics For Equilibrium Reconstruction And Realtime Plasma Control In NSTX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhardt, Stefan P.; Erickson, Keith; Kaita, Robert; Lawson, John; Mozulay, Robert; Mueller, Dennis; Que, Weiguo; Rahman, Nabidur; Schneider, Hans; Smalley, Gustav; Tresemer, Kelsey

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes aspects of magnetic diagnostics for realtime control in NSTX-U. The sensor arrangement on the upgraded center column is described. New analog and digital circuitry for processing the plasma current rogowski data are presented. An improved algorithm for estimating the plasma vertical velocity for feedback control is presented.

  12. Maass Cusp Forms on Singly Punctured Two-Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddig, Abubaker Ahmed Mohamed [Laboratory of Computational Sciences and Informatics, Institute for Mathematical Research Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Shah, Nurisya Mohd [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Zainuddin, Hishamuddin [Laboratory of Computational Sciences and Informatics, Institute for Mathematical Research Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2009-07-07

    Quantum mechanical systems on punctured surfaces modeled by hyperbolic spaces can play an interesting role in exploring quantum chaos and in studying behaviour of future quantum nano-devices. The case of singly-punctured two-torus, for example, has been well-studied in the literature particularly for its scattering states. However, the bound states on the punctured torus given by Maass cusp forms are lesser known. In this note, we report on the algorithm of numerically computing these functions and we present ten lower-lying eigenvalues for each odd and even Maass cusp forms.

  13. Hole in one: Technicians smoothly install the center stack in the NSTX-U

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vacuum vessel | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Hole in one: Technicians smoothly install the center stack in the NSTX-U vacuum vessel By John Greenwald November 10, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Closeup of the center stack being lowered into position by an overhead crane. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Closeup of the center stack being lowered into position by an overhead crane. Gallery: Technicians guide the unit into place. (Photo by Elle

  14. NSTX-U Advances in Real-time C++11 on Linux | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSTX-U Advances in Real-time C++11 on Linux Programming languages like C and Ada combined with proprietary embedded operating systems have dominated the realtime application space for decades. The new C++11 standard includes native, language-level support for concurrency, a requirement for any event-oriented realtime software. Threads, Locks, and Atomics now exist to provide the necessary tools to build the structures that make up the foundation of a complex realtime system. The National

  15. Charles L Neumeyer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L Neumeyer ITER Steady State Electrical Systems WBS Manager, NSTX Project Engineer Charles Neumeyer is a registered professional engineer with more than 30 years experience in advanced tech- nology research and project management. His experi- ence covers functions ranging from design to procurement and commissioning. Neumeyer has managerial roles in activities associated with ITER and the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U). He is responsible for U.S. equipment contributions for

  16. T

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wo major new components power the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade: A widened center stack that doubles the magnetic field strength and plasma current and quintuples the length of fusion experiments, and a second neutral beam injector that doubles the tokamak's heating power. Taken together, the new parts boost the NSTX-U operating conditions closer to those that will be found in a commercial fusion power plant. "This project was more complex than building the NSTX in the first

  17. Torus Network on a BG/Q System | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blue GeneQ Versus Blue GeneP BGQ Drivers Status Machine Overview Machine Partitions Torus Network Data Storage & File Systems Compiling & Linking Queueing & Running Jobs Data...

  18. "Stellar" progress on NSTX-U highlights strong year for PPPL, Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director Stewart Prager says | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab "Stellar" progress on NSTX-U highlights strong year for PPPL, Lab Director Stewart Prager says By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe May 5, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Lab Director Stewart Prager gave a "tour" of PPPL's accomplishments during his annual State of the Lab address on April 29. (Photo by Russ DeSantis/PPPL Office of Communications ) Lab Director Stewart Prager gave a "tour" of

  19. Disruption Analysis and Response Implicattions of Passive Plates for the NSTX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuhu Zhai, Peter Titus, Art Brooks, and Ron Hatcher

    2012-08-27

    The NSTX upgrade project requires analysis qualifications of existing vacuum vessel and passive stabilizing plates for increased plasma performance. Vertical stability is critically dependent on the passive conducting structure that surrounds the plasma. In this paper, the passive conducting structure is analyzed for the upgrade condition during plasma disruption to ensure the level of stress in the stabilizing plates and the fastener is within its design limits. The counter-bore of the passive plates for bolting is evaluated in details and counter-bore bushing is redesigned to prevent shear failure during disruptions as a result of high pulling and pushing forces, particularly for support at the corner bolts

  20. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5 PPPL- 4865 Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation April, 2013 Bin Cao, D.P. Stotler, S.J. Zweben, M. Bell, A. Diallo and B. LeBlanc Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Report Disclaimers Full Legal Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors or their employees,

  1. Laboratory Director Stewart Prager heralds start of new era with NSTX-U and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    looks to future projects in "State of the Laboratory" address | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Laboratory Director Stewart Prager heralds start of new era with NSTX-U and looks to future projects in "State of the Laboratory" address By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 13, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook PPPL Director Stewart Prager (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL Director Stewart Prager The completion of the $94 million National

  2. Laboratory Director Stewart Prager heralds start of new era with NSTX-U and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    looks to future projects in "State of the Laboratory" address | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Laboratory Director Stewart Prager heralds start of new era with NSTX-U and looks to future projects in "State of the Laboratory" address By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 28, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook PPPL Director Stewart Prager (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL Director Stewart Prager The completion of the $94 million National

  3. A New Era Begins | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Era Begins Welcome to the first major addition to the U.S. fusion program of the 21st century. The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's (PPPL) new $94 million National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) is the most powerful fusion facility of its kind on Earth and a device poised to bring the world closer to a bold new energy age. Publication File: PDF icon NSTX-U_presskit_print_NewEra

  4. Filamentary current structures in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 (2008) 095003 (10pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/48/9/095003 Filamentary current structures in the Madison Symmetric Torus P. Piovesan 1,2 , A. Almagri 3 , B.E. Chapman 3 , D. Craig 3 , L. Marrelli 1 , P. Martin 1,2 , S.C. Prager 3 and J.S. Sarff 3 1 Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova, Italy 2 Department of Physics, University of Padova, Italy 3 NSF Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas and Department of Physics,

  5. High-resolution Tangential AXUV Arrays for Radiated Power Density Measurements on NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L; Bell, R E; Faust, I; Tritz, K; Diallo, A; Gerhardt, S P; Kozub, T A; LeBlanc, B P; Stratton, B C

    2014-07-01

    Precise measurements of the local radiated power density and total radiated power are a matter of the uttermost importance for understanding the onset of impurity-induced instabilities and the study of particle and heat transport. Accounting of power balance is also needed for the understanding the physics of various divertor con#12;gurations for present and future high-power fusion devices. Poloidal asymmetries in the impurity density can result from high Mach numbers and can impact the assessment of their flux-surface-average and hence vary the estimates of P[sub]rad (r, t) and (Z[sub]eff); the latter is used in the calculation of the neoclassical conductivity and the interpretation of non-inductive and inductive current fractions. To this end, the bolometric diagnostic in NSTX-U will be upgraded, enhancing the midplane coverage and radial resolution with two tangential views, and adding a new set of poloidally-viewing arrays to measure the 2D radiation distribution. These systems are designed to contribute to the near- and long-term highest priority research goals for NSTX-U which will integrate non-inductive operation at reduced collisionality, with high-pressure, long energy-confinement-times and a divertor solution with metal walls.

  6. W

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a new era in fusion research at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Today we unveil the National Spherical Torus Experiment- Upgrade (NSTX-U), the most powerful spherical tokamak in the world and the first major addition to the U.S. fusion program in the 21st century. The NSTX-U represents a $94 million, nearly three-year upgrade of the original National Spherical Torus Experiment that ran from 1999 to 2011 in the Laboratory, which Princeton University manages

  7. Projects | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Projects Princeton Site Office (PSO) PSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Contact Information Princeton Site Office U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 102 Princeton, NJ 08543 P: (609) 243-3700 F: (609) 243-2032 Projects Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is yielding research results that may open an

  8. Towards identifying the mechanisms underlying field-aligned edge-loss of HHFW power on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, R. J.; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, N.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Kramer, G. J.; Maingi, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Podest, M.; Roquemore, L.; Scotti, F.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J-W.; Gray, T. K.; Green, D. L.; McLean, A.; and others

    2014-02-12

    Fast-wave heating will be a major heating scheme on ITER, as it can heat ions directly and is relatively unaffected by the large machine size unlike neutral beams. However, fast-wave interactions with the plasma edge can lead to deleterious effects such as, in the case of the high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) system on NSTX, large losses of fast-wave power in the scrape off layer (SOL) under certain conditions. In such scenarios, a large fraction of the lost HHFW power is deposited on the upper and lower divertors in bright spiral shapes. The responsible mechanism(s) has not yet been identified but may include fast-wave propagation in the scrape off layer, parametric decay instability, and RF currents driven by the antenna reactive fields. Understanding and mitigating these losses is important not only for improving the heating and current-drive on NSTX-Upgrade but also for understanding fast-wave propagation across the SOL in any fast-wave system. This talk summarizes experimental results demonstrating that the flow of lost HHFW power to the divertor regions largely follows the open SOL magnetic field lines. This lost power flux is relatively large close to both the antenna and the last closed flux surface with a reduced level in between, so the loss mechanism cannot be localized to the antenna. At the same time, significant losses also occur along field lines connected to the inboard edge of the bottom antenna plate. The power lost within the spirals is roughly estimated, showing that these field-aligned losses to the divertor are significant but may not account for the total HHFW loss. To elucidate the role of the onset layer for perpendicular fast-wave propagation with regards to fast-wave propagation in the SOL, a cylindrical cold-plasma model is being developed. This model, in addition to advanced RF codes such as TORIC and AORSA, is aimed at identifying the underlying mechanism(s) behind these SOL losses, to minimize their effects in NSTX-U, and to predict their importance in ITER.

  9. Construction completed, PPPL is set to resume world-class fusion research |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Construction completed, PPPL is set to resume world-class fusion research By John Greenwald September 25, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Staffers who worked on the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade. (Photo by Elle Starkman/Office of Communications) Staffers who worked on the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade. Gallery: Technicians inspect the new center stack that forms the heart of the NSTX-U. (Photo by PPPL) Technicians

  10. Major Milestone: PPPL completes first quadrant of the heart of the National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Major Milestone: PPPL completes first quadrant of the heart of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade By John Greenwald March 18, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Mission accomplished: The completed first section of the NSTX-U center stack capped months of demanding preparations and close teamwork. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) Mission accomplished: The completed first

  11. Observation of Non-Maxwellian Electron Distributions in th e NSTX Divertor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Jaworski, et. al.

    2013-03-07

    The scrape-off layer plasma at the tokamak region is characterized by open field lines and often contains large variations in plasma properties along these field-lines. Proper characterization of local plasma conditions is critical to assessing plasma-material interaction processes occuring at the target. Langmuir probes are frequently employed in tokamak divertors but are challenging to interpretation. A kinetic interpretation for Langmuir probes in NSTX has yielded non-Maxwellian electron distributions in the divertor characterized by cool bulk populations and energetic tail populations with temperatures of 2-4 times the bulk. Spectroscopic analysis and modeling confirms the bulk plasma temperature and density which can only be obtained with the kinetic interpretation

  12. Builders and Users | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Builders and Users Constructing the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade took years of detailed planning and oversight. The team in charge brought decades of experience to the task, working together to make the $94 million upgrade a reality. Publication File: PDF icon NSTX-U_presskit_print_Builders-Users

  13. Numerical simulation of torus breakdown to chaos in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Wang, Y. H.; Wang, D. Z. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Electron, and Ion Beams, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Electron, and Ion Beams, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Understanding the routes to chaos occurring in atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge systems by changing controlling parameters is very important to predict and control the dynamical behaviors. In this paper, a route of a quasiperiodic torus to chaos via the strange nonchaotic attractor is observed in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge driven by triangle-wave voltage. By increasing the driving frequency, the discharge system first bifurcates to a quasiperiodic torus from a stable single periodic state, and then torus and phase-locking periodic state appear and disappear alternately. In the meantime, the torus becomes increasingly wrinkling and stretching, and gradually approaches a fractal structure with the nonpositive largest Lyapunov exponent, i.e., a strange nonchaotic attractor. After that, the discharge system enters into chaotic state. If the driving frequency is further increased, another well known route of period-doubling bifurcation to chaos is also observed.

  14. Locked modes and magnetic field errors in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Locked modes and magnetic field errors in the Madison Symmetric Torus A. F. Almagri, S. Assadi, S. C. Prager, J. S. Sarff, and D. W. Kerst Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53 706 (Received 15 June 1992; accepted 7 August 1992) In the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch [Fusion Technol. 19, 13 1 ( 1991)] magnetic oscillations become stationary (locked) in the lab frame as a result of a process involving interactions between the modes, sawteeth, and

  15. NSTX presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Containing a star on earth: understanding turbulence at 100 million degrees Walter Guttenfelder Science on Saturday Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Jan. 11, 2014 2 Outline * Review of nuclear fusion and how we make fusion on earth - Fusion - Plasmas - Tokamaks - Progress in fusion plasma performance * The importance of turbulence in limiting fusion performance - What is turbulence - Measurements - Simulations - Methods to reduce it - Different "flavors" of turbulence 3 What is

  16. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium in a non-symmetric topological torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzner, Harold

    2014-02-15

    An alternative representation of an ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is developed. The representation is a variation of one given by A. Salat, Phys. Plasmas 2, 1652 (1995). The system of equations is used to study the possibility of non-symmetric equilibria in a topological torus, here an approximate rectangular parallelopiped, with periodicity in two of the three rectangular coordinates. An expansion is carried out in the deviation of pressure surfaces from planes. Resonances are manifest in the process. Nonetheless, provided the magnetic shear is small, it is shown that it is possible to select the magnetic fields and flux surfaces in such a manner that no singularities appear on resonant surfaces. One boundary surface of the parallelopiped is not arbitrary but is dependent on the equilibrium in question. A comparison of the solution sets of axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric equilibria suggests that the latter have a wider class of possible boundary shapes but more restrictive rotational transform profiles. No proof of convergence of the series is given.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic modes analysis and control of Fusion Advanced Studies Torus high-current scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villone, F.; Mastrostefano, S.; Calabr, G.; Vlad, G.; Crisanti, F.; Fusco, V.; Marchiori, G.; Bolzonella, T.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2014-08-15

    One of the main FAST (Fusion Advanced Studies Torus) goals is to have a flexible experiment capable to test tools and scenarios for safe and reliable tokamak operation, in order to support ITER and help the final DEMO design. In particular, in this paper, we focus on operation close to a possible border of stability related to low-q operation. To this purpose, a new FAST scenario has then been designed at I{sub p}?=?10 MA, B{sub T}?=?8.5?T, q{sub 95}???2.3. Transport simulations, carried out by using the code JETTO and the first principle transport model GLF23, indicate that, under these conditions, FAST could achieve an equivalent Q???3.5. FAST will be equipped with a set of internal active coils for feedback control, which will produce magnetic perturbation with toroidal number n?=?1 or n?=?2. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mode analysis and feedback control simulations performed with the codes MARS, MARS-F, CarMa (both assuming the presence of a perfect conductive wall and using the exact 3D resistive wall structure) show the possibility of the FAST conductive structures to stabilize n?=?1 ideal modes. This leaves therefore room for active mitigation of the resistive mode (down to a characteristic time of 1?ms) for safety purposes, i.e., to avoid dangerous MHD-driven plasma disruption, when working close to the machine limits and magnetic and kinetic energy density not far from reactor values.

  18. An In-situ materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) diagnostic to study particle density control and hydrogenic fuel retention in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allain, Jean-Paul

    2014-09-05

    A new materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) was designed, constructed and tested to develop understanding of particle control and hydrogenic fuel retention in lithium-based plasma-facing surfaces in NSTX. The novel feature of MAPP is an in-situ tool to probe the divertor NSTX floor during LLD and lithium-coating shots with subsequent transport to a post-exposure in-vacuo surface analysis chamber to measure D retention. In addition, the implications of a lithiated graphite-dominated plasma-surface environment in NSTX on LLD performance, operation and ultimately hydrogenic pumping and particle control capability are investigated in this proposal. MAPP will be an invaluable tool for erosion/redeposition simulation code validation.

  19. Implementation of the 3D edge plasma code EMC3-EIRENE on NSTX

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lore, J. D.; Canik, J. M.; Feng, Y.; Ahn, J. -W.; Maingi, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.

    2012-05-09

    The 3D edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE has been applied for the first time to the NSTX spherical tokamak. A new disconnected double null grid has been developed to allow the simulation of plasma where the radial separation of the inner and outer separatrix is less than characteristic widths (e.g. heat flux width) at the midplane. Modelling results are presented for both an axisymmetric case and a case where 3D magnetic field is applied in an n = 3 configuration. In the vacuum approximation, the perturbed field consists of a wide region of destroyed flux surfaces and helical lobes which aremorea mixture of long and short connection length field lines formed by the separatrix manifolds. This structure is reflected in coupled 3D plasma fluid (EMC3) and kinetic neutral particle (EIRENE) simulations. The helical lobes extending inside of the unperturbed separatrix are filled in by hot plasma from the core. The intersection of the lobes with the divertor results in a striated flux footprint pattern on the target plates. As a result, profiles of divertor heat and particle fluxes are compared with experimental data, and possible sources of discrepancy are discussed.less

  20. Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiments - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  1. Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE Experiment September, 2002 SeptemMyungkee Sung (LSU/MiniBooNE) 4th International Workshop on the Identification of Dark Matter Cosmologically Interesting Region; Hot Dark Matter? LSND Signal at High ∆m 2 KARMEN II narrowed the signal region MiniBooNE will fully address this signal. Neutrino Osillation at High ∆m 2 LSND: Searching for ν µ →ν e ν µ - From µ + decay at rest with endpoint energy 53 MeV L = 30m, L/E ~ 1m/MeV, 167 tons of Mineral Oil Look for ν e Appearance: ν

  2. Numerical study of the Columbia high-beta device: Torus-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izzo, R.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization, heating and subsequent long-time-scale behavior of the helium plasma in the Columbia fusion device, Torus-II, is studied. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical simulations while maintaining a high level of interaction with experimentalists. The device is operated as a toroidal z-pinch to prepare the gas for heating. This ionization of helium is studied using a zero-dimensional, two-fluid code. It is essentially an energy balance calculation that follows the development of the various charge states of the helium and any impurities (primarily silicon and oxygen) that are present. The code is an atomic physics model of Torus-II. In addition to ionization, we include three-body and radiative recombination processes.

  3. 3D Torus Routing Engine Module for OFA OpenSM v. 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-11-12

    This OpenFabrics Alliance (OFA) OpenSM routing engine module provides credit-loop-free routing while supporting two quality of service (QoS) levels for an InfiniBand fabric with a 3D torus topology. In addition it is able to route around multiple failed fabric links or a single failed fabric switch without introducing credit loops, and without changing path Service Level (SL) values granted before the failure.This OFA OpenSM routing engine module improves the operational characteristics of a parallel computermore » built using an InfiniBand fabric with a 3D torus topology. By providing two QoS levels, it allows system administrators to prevent application interprocess communication and file system communication from impacting each other. By providing the capability to route traffic around failed fabric components, it enables repair of failed components without impacting jobs running on the computer system.« less

  4. FMEA on the superconducting torus for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV accelerator upgrade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ghoshal, Probir K.; Biallas, George H.; Fair, Ruben J.; Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka; Schneider, William J.; Legg, Robert A.; Kashy, David H.; Hogan, John P.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Luongo, Cesar; et al

    2015-01-16

    As part of the Jefferson Lab 12GeV accelerator upgrade project, Hall B requires two conduction cooled superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet system consisting of 5 coils. Both magnets are to be wound with Superconducting Super Collider-36 NbTi strand Rutherford cable soldered into a copper channel. This paper describes the various failure modes in torus magnet along with the failure modes that could be experienced by the torus and its interaction with the solenoid which is located inmore » close proximity.« less

  5. Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FUSION TECHNOLOGY Confinement; H-mode Plasma Confinement; Spherical Torus; Spherical Tokamak; Stability, Microinstability; Tokamaks, NSTX; Transport Phenomena Word Cloud More...

  6. A Star on Earth

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2014-06-06

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  7. A Star on Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2014-03-05

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  8. Ahmed Diallo | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ahmed Diallo Staff Research Physicist Ahmed Diallo is leader of the pedestal structure and control tropical science group of the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) and is a recipient of a DOE Early Career award. He is developing a fast burst laser system to investigate the dynamics of the pedestal as well as to control it. He has contributed to the upgrade of the Thomson scattering diagnostic system in preparation for the NSTX-U, and has participated in the operation of the

  9. Tomographic analysis of neutron and gamma pulse shape distributions from liquid scintillation detectors at Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacomelli, L.; Department of Physics, Universit degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano ; Conroy, S.; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala ; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2014-02-15

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D)/Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. Neutrons produced in these plasmas are measured using various types of neutron detectors and spectrometers. Two of these instruments on JET make use of organic liquid scintillator detectors. The neutron emission profile monitor implements 19 liquid scintillation counters to detect the 2.45 MeV neutron emission from D plasmas. A new compact neutron spectrometer is operational at JET since 2010 to measure the neutron energy spectra from both D and DT plasmas. Liquid scintillation detectors are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation but give light responses of different decay time such that pulse shape discrimination techniques can be applied to identify the neutron contribution of interest from the data. The most common technique consists of integrating the radiation pulse shapes within different ranges of their rising and/or trailing edges. In this article, a step forward in this type of analysis is presented. The method applies a tomographic analysis of the 3-dimensional neutron and gamma pulse shape and pulse height distribution data obtained from liquid scintillation detectors such that n/? discrimination can be improved to lower energies and additional information can be gained on neutron contributions to the gamma events and vice versa.

  10. Observations of Improved Stability and Confinement in a High-{beta} Self-Organized Spherical-Torus-Like Field-Reversed Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, H.Y.; Hoffman, A.L.; Steinhauer, L.C.; Miller, K.E.

    2005-10-21

    An extremely high-{beta} (over 85%) self-organized field-reversed configuration (FRC) with a spherical-torus- (ST-)like core is produced in the translation, confinement, and sustainment experiment by highly super-Alfvenic translation of a spheromaklike plasmoid. Substantial flux conversion from toroidal into poloidal occurs during the capture process, resulting in the ST-like core. This plasma state exhibits a remarkable stabilizing property for the ubiquitous n=2 centrifugally driven interchange modes present in {theta}-pinch formed FRCs. This is explained, for the first time, by a simple model taking into account magnetic shear and centrifugal effects. The FRC-ST configuration has up to 4 times improvement in flux confinement times over the scaling of conventional {theta}-pinch formed FRCs and, thus, a significant improvement in the resistivity and transport.

  11. TORUS AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS PROPERTIES OF NEARBY SEYFERT GALAXIES: RESULTS FROM FITTING INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Ramos Almeida, Cristina; Mason, Rachel; Asensio Ramos, Andres; Rodriguez Espinosa, Jose Miguel; Perez-Garcia, Ana M.; Roche, Patrick F.; Levenson, Nancy A.; Elitzur, Moshe; Packham, Christopher; Young, Stuart; Diaz-Santos, Tanio

    2011-08-01

    We used the CLUMPY torus models and a Bayesian approach to fit the infrared spectral energy distributions and ground-based high angular resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy of 13 nearby Seyfert galaxies. This allowed us to put tight constraints on torus model parameters such as the viewing angle i, the radial thickness of the torus Y, the angular size of the cloud distribution {sigma}{sub torus}, and the average number of clouds along radial equatorial rays N{sub 0}. We found that the viewing angle i is not the only parameter controlling the classification of a galaxy into type 1 or type 2. In principle, type 2s could be viewed at any viewing angle i as long as there is one cloud along the line of sight. A more relevant quantity for clumpy media is the probability for an active galactic nucleus (AGN) photon to escape unabsorbed. In our sample, type 1s have relatively high escape probabilities, P{sub esc} {approx} 12%-44%, while type 2s, as expected, tend to have very low escape probabilities. Our fits also confirmed that the tori of Seyfert galaxies are compact with torus model radii in the range 1-6 pc. The scaling of the models to the data also provided the AGN bolometric luminosities L{sub bol}(AGN), which were found to be in good agreement with estimates from the literature. When we combined our sample of Seyfert galaxies with a sample of PG quasars from the literature to span a range of L{sub bol}(AGN) {approx} 10{sup 43}-10{sup 47} erg s{sup -1}, we found plausible evidence of the receding torus. That is, there is a tendency for the torus geometrical covering factor to be lower (f{sub 2} {approx} 0.1-0.3) at high AGN luminosities than at low AGN luminosities (f{sub 2} {approx} 0.9-1 at {approx}10{sup 43}-10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}). This is because at low AGN luminosities the tori appear to have wider angular sizes (larger {sigma}{sub torus}) and more clouds along radial equatorial rays. We cannot, however, rule out the possibility that this is due to contamination by extended dust structures not associated with the dusty torus at low AGN luminosities, since most of these in our sample are hosted in highly inclined galaxies.

  12. Building the Most Powerful Spherical Tokamak | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building the Most Powerful Spherical Tokamak Two major new components power the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade: A widened center stack that doubles the magnetic field strength and plasma current and quintuples the length of fusion experiments, and a second neutral beam injector that doubles the tokamak's heating power. Taken together, the new parts boost the NSTX-U operating conditions closer to those that will be found in a commercial fusion power plant. Publication File: PDF icon

  13. Experimental Fusion Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Fusion Research PPPL fusion research centers on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), which is undergoing a $94 million upgrade that will make it the most powerful experimental fusion facility, or tokamak, of its type in the world when work is completed in 2014. Experiments will test the ability of the upgraded spherical facility to maintain a high-performance plasma under conditions of extreme heat and power. Results could strongly influence the design of future fusion

  14. Magnetic reconstruction of nonaxisymmetric quasi-single-helicity configurations in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reconstruction of nonaxisymmetric quasi-single-helicity configurations in the Madison Symmetric Torus This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2011 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 53 105006 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/53/10/105006) Download details: IP Address: 128.104.166.218 The article was downloaded on 15/04/2013 at 17:18 Please note that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal

  15. Fast soft x-ray images of magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in NSTX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of these affect fast particle losses, which are of major concern for future burning plasma experiments. Usual diagnostics for studying these phenomena are arrays of Mirnov coils...

  16. TORUS: Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes - Year 1 Continuation and Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbanas, G; Elster, C; Escher, J; Mukhamedzhanov, A; Nunes, F; Thompson, I J

    2011-02-24

    The TORUS collaboration derives its name from the research it focuses on, namely the Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes. It is a Topical Collaboration in Nuclear Theory, and funded by the Nuclear Theory Division of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. The funding started on June 1, 2010, it will have been running for nine months by the date of submission of this Annual Continuation and Progress Report on March 1, 2011. The extent of funding was reduced from the original application, and now supports one postdoctoral researcher for the years 1 through 3. The collaboration brings together as Principal Investigators a large fraction of the nuclear reaction theorists currently active within the USA. The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration is to develop new methods that will advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct-reaction calculations, and, by using a new partial-fusion theory, to integrate descriptions of direct and compound-nucleus reactions. This multi-institution collaborative effort is directly relevant to three areas of interest: the properties of nuclei far from stability; microscopic studies of nuclear input parameters for astrophysics, and microscopic nuclear reaction theory.

  17. Electromagnetic Transport From Microtearing Mode Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, W; Kaye, S M; Nevins, W M; Wang, E; Bell, R E; Hammett, G W; LeBlanc, B P; Mikkelsen, D R

    2011-03-23

    This Letter presents non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing mode turbulence. The simulations include collisional and electromagnetic effects and use experimental parameters from a high beta discharge in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The predicted electron thermal transport is comparable to that given by experimental analysis, and it is dominated by the electromagnetic contribution of electrons free streaming along the resulting stochastic magnetic field line trajectories. Experimental values of flow shear can significantly reduce the predicted transport.

  18. Alcator C-Mod | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Alcator C-Mod Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities User Facilities DIII-D National Fusion Facility (DIII-D) National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Alcator C-Mod ITER External link Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941

  19. DIII-D National Fusion Facility (DIII-D) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    DIII-D National Fusion Facility (DIII-D) Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities User Facilities DIII-D National Fusion Facility (DIII-D) National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Alcator C-Mod ITER External link Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington,

  20. User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Facilities Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities User Facilities DIII-D National Fusion Facility (DIII-D) National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Alcator C-Mod ITER External link Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F:

  1. Creating a Star on Earth | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Creating a Star on Earth Creating a Star on Earth March 5, 2014 - 11:45am Addthis In the video above, learn how scientists at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab are creating a star on Earth in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Ben Dotson Ben Dotson Former Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Office of Public Affairs Matty Greene Matty

  2. Central Safety Factor and #12;N Control on NSTX-U via Beam Power and Plasma Boundary Shape Modification, using TRANSP for Closed Loop Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, M. D.; Andre, R.; Gates, David A.; Gerhardt, S.; Goumiri, I. R.; Menard, Jon

    2014-08-01

    The high-performance operational goals of NSTX-U will require development of advanced feedback control algorithms, including control of N and the safety factor profile. In this work, a novel approach to simultaneously controlling #12;N and the value of the safety factor on the magnetic axis, q0, through manipulation of the plasma boundary shape and total beam power, is proposed. Simulations of the proposed scheme show promising results and motivate future experimental implementation and eventual integration into a more complex current profile control scheme planned to include actuation of individual beam powers, density, and loop voltage. As part of this work, a flexible framework for closed loop simulations within the high-fidelity code TRANSP was developed. The framework, used here to identify control-design-oriented models and to tune and test the proposed controller, exploits many of the predictive capabilities of TRANSP and provides a means for performing control calculations based on user-supplied data (controller matrices, target waveforms, etc.). The flexible framework should enable high-fidelity testing of a variety of control algorithms, thereby reducing the amount of expensive experimental time needed to implement new control algorithms on NSTX-U and other devices.

  3. Fast-wave Power Flow Along SOL Field Lines In NSTX nd The Associated Power Deposition Profile Across The SOL In Front Of The Antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, Roy

    2013-06-21

    Fast-wave heating and current drive efficiencies can be reduced by a number of processes in the vicinity of the antenna and in the scrape off layer (SOL). On NSTX from around 25% to more than 60% of the high-harmonic fast-wave power can be lost to the SOL regions, and a large part of this lost power flows along SOL magnetic field lines and is deposited in bright spirals on the divertor floor and ceiling. We show that field-line mapping matches the location of heat deposition on the lower divertor, albeit with a portion of the heat outside of the predictions. The field-line mapping can then be used to partially reconstruct the profile of lost fast-wave power at the midplane in front of the antenna, and the losses peak close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS) as well as the antenna. This profile suggests a radial standing-wave pattern formed by fast-wave propagation in the SOL, and this hypothesis will be tested on NSTX-U. Advanced RF codes must reproduce these results so that such codes can be used to understand this edge loss and to minimize RF heat deposition and erosion in the divertor region on ITER.

  4. Stefan Gerhardt | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the NSTX organization. He operates numerous diagnostics on NSTX, along with designing plasma control schemes and running physics experiments. He has previously worked on a wide...

  5. Observational evidence of torus instability as trigger mechanism for coronal mass ejections: The 2011 August 4 filament eruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuccarello, F. P.; Poedts, S.; Seaton, D. B.; Mierla, M.; Rachmeler, L. A.; Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F. E-mail: Stefaan.Poedts@wis.kuleuven.be E-mail: marilena@oma.be E-mail: Paolo.Romano@oact.inaf.it

    2014-04-20

    Solar filaments are magnetic structures often observed in the solar atmosphere and consist of plasma that is cooler and denser than their surroundings. They are visible for dayseven weekswhich suggests that they are often in equilibrium with their environment before disappearing or erupting. Several eruption models have been proposed that aim to reveal what mechanism causes (or triggers) these solar eruptions. Validating these models through observations represents a fundamental step in our understanding of solar eruptions. We present an analysis of the observation of a filament eruption that agrees with the torus instability model. This model predicts that a magnetic flux rope embedded in an ambient field undergoes an eruption when the axis of the flux rope reaches a critical height that depends on the topology of the ambient field. We use the two vantage points of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory to reconstruct the three-dimensional shape of the filament, to follow its morphological evolution, and to determine its height just before eruption. The magnetograms acquired by SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are used to infer the topology of the ambient field and to derive the critical height for the onset of the torus instability. Our analysis shows that the torus instability is the trigger of the eruption. We also find that some pre-eruptive processes, such as magnetic reconnection during the observed flares and flux cancellation at the neutral line, facilitated the eruption by bringing the filament to a region where the magnetic field was more vulnerable to the torus instability.

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - SAND2005-2351C_RedStormEarlyExperiences [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early Experience with Red Storm April 19, 2005 Sue Kelly and Bob Ballance Sandia National Laboratories smkelly@sandia.gov, 505-845-9770 Outline of Talk * Overview of Red Storm * Where we are * How we got here * Where we're going * What we learned Red Storm is a Massively Parallel Processor Users /home Parallel I/O Compute Partition Service Net I/O 27×16×24 3D Mesh/Torus + I/O 10,368 Compute Node Mesh X=27 Y=16 Z=24 Torus Interconnect in Z 256 Service & I/O Nodes 256 Service & I/O Nodes

  7. Simulation of non-resonant internal kink mode with toroidal rotation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, J. Y. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Tritz, Kevin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Plasmas in spherical and conventional tokamaks, with weakly reversed shear q profile and minimum q above but close to unity, are susceptible to an non-resonant (m,n) = (1,1) internal kink mode. This mode can saturate and persist and can induce a (2,1) seed island for Neoclassical Tearing Mode. [Breslau et al. Nucl. Fusion 51, 063027 (2011)]. The mode can also lead to large energetic particle transport and significant broadening of beam-driven current. Motivated by these important effects, we have carried out extensive nonlinear simulations of the mode with finite toroidal rotation using parameters and profiles of an NTSX plasma with a weakly reversed shear profile. The numerical results show that, at the experimental level, plasma rotation has little effect on either equilibrium or linear stability. However, rotation can significantly influence the nonlinear dynamics of the (1,1) mode and the induced (2,1) magnetic island. The simulation results show that a rotating helical equilibrium is formed and maintained in the nonlinear phase at finite plasma rotation. In contrast, for non-rotating cases, the nonlinear evolution exhibits dynamic oscillations between a quasi-2D state and a helical state. Furthermore, the effects of rotation are found to greatly suppress the (2,1) magnetic island even at a low level.

  8. Impurity transport studies in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch during standard and pulsed poloidal current drive regimes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mdnornberg IP Address: 128.104.165.161 This content was downloaded on 16/05/2014 at 16:16 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Impurity transport studies in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch during standard and pulsed poloidal current drive regimes View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2014 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 56 075012 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/56/7/075012) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My

  9. Embedding global barrier and collective in torus network with each node combining input from receivers according to class map for output to senders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W; Eisley, Noel A; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Senger, Robert M; Salapura, Valentina; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Sugawara, Yutaka; Takken, Todd E

    2013-08-27

    Embodiments of the invention provide a method, system and computer program product for embedding a global barrier and global interrupt network in a parallel computer system organized as a torus network. The computer system includes a multitude of nodes. In one embodiment, the method comprises taking inputs from a set of receivers of the nodes, dividing the inputs from the receivers into a plurality of classes, combining the inputs of each of the classes to obtain a result, and sending said result to a set of senders of the nodes. Embodiments of the invention provide a method, system and computer program product for embedding a collective network in a parallel computer system organized as a torus network. In one embodiment, the method comprises adding to a torus network a central collective logic to route messages among at least a group of nodes in a tree structure.

  10. Electromagnetic and Mechanical Analysis of the Coil Structure for the CLAS12 Torus for 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoshal, P. K.; Pastor, O.; Kashy, D.; Schneider, W.; Wiseman, M.; Zarecky, M.; Young, G.; Rode, C.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Burkert, V.

    2014-12-18

    The torus magnet for the CLAS12 spectrometer is a 3.6 T superconducting magnet being designed and built as part of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade. The magnet consists of six coil case assemblies mounted to a cold central hub. The coil case assembly consists of an aluminum case and cover enclosing an epoxy vacuum impregnated coil pack. The coil pack consists of a 117 turn double-pancake winding wrapped with 2 layers of 0.635 mm thick copper cooling sheets. The coil case assembly is cooled by supercritical helium at 4.6 K. This report details the structural analysis of the coil case assembly and the assessment of the coil pack stresses. For the normal operation of the torus magnet, the coil case assembly was analyzed for cool down to 4.6 K and the Lorentz forces at normal operating current. In addition to the normal operating configuration, the coil case assembly was analyzed for Lorentz forces arising from coil misalignment and current imbalances. The allowable stress criteria for the magnet followed the approach of the ASME codes. Primary stresses were limited to the lesser of 2/3 times the yield strength or 1/3 times the ultimate tensile strength. Primary plus secondary stresses were limited to 3 times the primary stress allowable. The analysis was performed using ANSYS Maxwell to calculate the magneto-static loads and ANSYS Mechanical to calculate the stresses.

  11. Electromagnetic and Mechanical Analysis of the Coil Structure for the CLAS12 Torus for 12 GeV Upgrade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ghoshal, P. K.; Pastor, O.; Kashy, D.; Schneider, W.; Wiseman, M.; Zarecky, M.; Young, G.; Rode, C.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Burkert, V.

    2014-12-18

    The torus magnet for the CLAS12 spectrometer is a 3.6 T superconducting magnet being designed and built as part of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade. The magnet consists of six coil case assemblies mounted to a cold central hub. The coil case assembly consists of an aluminum case and cover enclosing an epoxy vacuum impregnated coil pack. The coil pack consists of a 117 turn double-pancake winding wrapped with 2 layers of 0.635 mm thick copper cooling sheets. The coil case assembly is cooled by supercritical helium at 4.6 K. This report details the structural analysis of the coilmore » case assembly and the assessment of the coil pack stresses. For the normal operation of the torus magnet, the coil case assembly was analyzed for cool down to 4.6 K and the Lorentz forces at normal operating current. In addition to the normal operating configuration, the coil case assembly was analyzed for Lorentz forces arising from coil misalignment and current imbalances. The allowable stress criteria for the magnet followed the approach of the ASME codes. Primary stresses were limited to the lesser of 2/3 times the yield strength or 1/3 times the ultimate tensile strength. Primary plus secondary stresses were limited to 3 times the primary stress allowable. The analysis was performed using ANSYS Maxwell to calculate the magneto-static loads and ANSYS Mechanical to calculate the stresses.« less

  12. PPPL to launch major upgrade of key fusion energy test facility | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab to launch major upgrade of key fusion energy test facility NSTX project will produce most powerful spherical torus in the world By John Greenwald January 9, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook NSTX-U cross section. NSTX-U cross section. Gallery: (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of

  13. Two PPPL physicists elected to receive prestigious honor | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab Two PPPL physicists elected to receive prestigious honor By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 17, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook David Gates was one of two PPPL physicists, along with Charles Skinner, to receive the prestigious honor of being named as an American Physical Society fellow. Gates is pictured here in front of the magnetic core of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) with a vessel of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

  14. TORUS: Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes - Topical Collaboration for Nuclear Theory Project. Period: June 1, 2010 - May 31, 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbanas, G; Elster, C; Escher, J; Nunes, F; Thompson, I

    2015-08-17

    The work of this collaboration during its existence is summarized. The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration was to develop new methods that advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct reaction calculations. This multi-institution collaborative effort was and remains directly relevant to three areas of interest: the properties of nuclei far from stability, microscopic studies of nuclear input parameters for astrophysics, and microscopic nuclear reaction theory. The TORUS project focused on understanding the details of (d,p) reactions for neutron transfer to heavier nuclei. The bulk of the work fell into three areas: coupled channel theory, modeling (d,p) reactions with a Faddeev-AGS approach, and capture reactions.

  15. W

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the first major addition to the U.S. fusion program of the 21st century. Today the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) unveils the new $94 million National Spherical Torus Experiment- Upgrade (NSTX-U), the most powerful fusion facility of its kind on Earth and a device poised to bring the world closer to a bold new energy age. This upgrade doubles the heating power and magnetic field strength of the original facility and enhances the worldwide quest for fusion

  16. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Kramer, G.; Liu, D.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; White, R.

    2015-01-01

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvn Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fast Wave heating.

  17. Processes and properties of edge-localised instabilities in 2T 2MA plasmas in the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, A. J. Webster, S. J.

    2014-11-15

    During July 2012, 150 almost identical H-mode plasmas were consecutively created in the Joint European Torus, providing a combined total of approximately 8 minutes of steady-state plasma with 15?000 Edge Localised Modes (ELMs). In principle, each of those 15?000 ELMs are statistically equivalent. Here, the changes in edge density and plasma energy associated with those ELMs are explored, using the spikes in Beryllium II (527?nm) radiation as an indicator for the onset of an ELM. Clearly different timescales are observed during the ELM process. Edge temperature falls over a 2?ms timescale, edge density and pressure fall over a 5?ms timescale, and there is an additional 10?ms timescale that is consistent with a resistive relaxation of the plasma's edge. The statistical properties of the energy and density losses due to the ELMs are explored. For these plasmas the ELM energy (?E) is found to be approximately independent of the time between ELMs, despite the average ELM energy (??E?) and average ELM frequency (f) being consistent with the scaling of ??E??1/f. Instead, beyond the first 0.02 s of waiting time between ELMs, the energy losses due to individual ELMs are found to be statistically the same. Surprisingly no correlation is found between the energies of consecutive ELMs either. A weak link is found between the density drop and the ELM waiting time. Consequences of these results for ELM control and modelling are discussed.

  18. Observation of dust torus with poloidal rotation in direct current glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Manjit Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K. Sharma, Devendra; Ghosh, J.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2015-03-15

    Observation of dust cloud rotation in parallel-plate DC glow discharge plasma is reported here. The experiments are carried out at high pressures (∼130 Pa) with a metallic ring placed on the lower electrode (cathode). The dust cloud rotates poloidally in the vertical plane near the cathode surface. This structure is continuous toroidally. Absence of magnetic field rules out the possibility of E × B induced ion flow as the cause of dust rotation. The dust rotational structures exist even with water cooled cathode. Therefore, temperature gradient driven mechanisms, such as thermophoretic force, thermal creep flow, and free convection cannot be causing the observed dust rotation. Langmuir probe measurement reveals the existence of a sharp density gradient near the location of the rotating dust cloud. The gradient in the density, giving rise to a gradient in the ion drag force, has been identified as the principal cause behind the rotation of dust particles.

  19. SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions - Iterated Finite-Orbit Monte Carlo Simulations with Full-Wave Fields for Modeling Tokamak ICRF Wave Heating Experiments - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Myunghee; Chan, Vincent S.

    2014-02-28

    This final report describes the work performed under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-08ER54954 for the period April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2013. The goal of this project was to perform iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wall fields for modeling tokamak ICRF wave heating experiments. In year 1, the finite-orbit Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF and its iteration algorithms with the full-wave code AORSA were improved to enable systematical study of the factors responsible for the discrepancy in the simulated and the measured fast-ion FIDA signals in the DIII-D and NSTX ICRF fast-wave (FW) experiments. In year 2, ORBIT-RF was coupled to the TORIC full-wave code for a comparative study of ORBIT-RF/TORIC and ORBIT-RF/AORSA results in FW experiments.

  20. SUZAKU VIEW OF THE SWIFT/BAT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. V. TORUS STRUCTURE OF TWO LUMINOUS RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI (3C 206 AND PKS 0707-35)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tazaki, Fumie; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Terashima, Yuichi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Tombesi, Francesco

    2013-07-20

    We present the results from broadband X-ray spectral analysis of 3C 206 and PKS 0707-35 with Suzaku and Swift/BAT, two of the most luminous unobscured and obscured radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with hard X-ray luminosities of 10{sup 45.5} erg s{sup -1} and 10{sup 44.9} erg s{sup -1} (14-195 keV), respectively. Based on the radio core luminosity, we estimate that the X-ray spectrum of 3C 206 contains a significant ({approx}60% in the 14-195 keV band) contribution from the jet, while it is negligible in PKS 0707-35. We can successfully model the spectra with the jet component (for 3C 206), the transmitted emission, and two reflection components from the torus and the accretion disk. The reflection strengths from the torus are found to be R{sub torus}({identical_to} {Omega}/2{pi}) = 0.29 {+-} 0.18 and 0.41 {+-} 0.18 for 3C 206 and PKS 0707-35, respectively, which are smaller than those in typical Seyfert galaxies. Utilizing the torus model by Ikeda et al., we quantify the relation between the half-opening angle of a torus ({theta}{sub oa}) and the equivalent width of an iron-K line. The observed equivalent width of 3C 206, < 71 eV, constrains the column density in the equatorial plane to N{sub H}{sup eq} <10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}, or the half-opening angle to {theta}{sub oa} > 80 Degree-Sign if N{sub H}{sup eq} =10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} is assumed. That of PKS 0707-35, 72 {+-} 36 eV, is consistent with N{sub H}{sup eq} {approx}10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. Our results suggest that the tori in luminous radio-loud AGNs are only poorly developed. The trend is similar to that seen in radio-quiet AGNs, implying that the torus structure is not different between AGNs with jets and without jets.

  1. Modeling the effect of lithium-induced pedestal profiles on scrape-off-layer turbulence and the heat flux width

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Russell, David A.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.; Myra, James R.; Canik, John M.; Gray, Travis K.; Zweben, Stewart J.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of lithium (Li) wall coatings on scrape-off-layer (SOL) turbulence in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is modeled with the Lodestar SOLT (“SOL Turbulence”) code. Specifically, the implications for the SOL heat flux width of experimentally observed, Li-induced changes in the pedestal profiles are considered. The SOLT code used in the modeling has been expanded recently to include ion temperature evolution and ion diamagnetic drift effects. This work focuses on two NSTX discharges occurring pre- and with-Li deposition. The simulation density and temperature profiles are constrained, inside the last closed flux surface only, to match those measured inmore » the two experiments, and the resulting drift-interchange-driven turbulence is explored. The effect of Li enters the simulation only through the pedestal profile constraint: Li modifies the experimental density and temperature profiles in the pedestal, and these profiles affect the simulated SOL turbulence. The power entering the SOL measured in the experiments is matched in the simulations by adjusting “free” dissipation parameters (e.g., diffusion coefficients) that are not measured directly in the experiments. With power-matching, (a) the heat flux SOL width is smaller, as observed experimentally by infra-red thermography, and (b) the simulated density fluctuation amplitudes are reduced with Li, as inferred for the experiments as well from reflectometry analysis. The instabilities and saturation mechanisms that underlie the SOLT model equilibria are also discussed.« less

  2. PPPL wins R&D 100 Award | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Vlad Soukhanovskii, who designed and led the experiments. (Photo by Elle Starkman, ... the NSTX program director, and Vlad Soukhanovskii, who designed and led the experiments. ...

  3. Mechanisms of Stochastic Diffusion of Energetic Ions in Spherical Tori

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; R.B. White; Yu.V. Yakovenko

    2001-01-18

    Stochastic diffusion of the energetic ions in spherical tori is considered. The following issues are addressed: (I) Goldston-White-Boozer diffusion in a rippled field; (ii) cyclotron-resonance-induced diffusion caused by the ripple; (iii) effects of non-conservation of the magnetic moment in an axisymmetric field. It is found that the stochastic diffusion in spherical tori with a weak magnetic field has a number of peculiarities in comparison with conventional tokamaks; in particular, it is characterized by an increased role of mechanisms associated with non-conservation of the particle magnetic moment. It is concluded that in current experiments on National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) the stochastic diffusion does not have a considerable influence on the confinement of energetic ions.

  4. Ignition Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ignition Experiments The goal of many NIF experiments is to create a self-sustaining "burn" of fusion fuel (the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium) that produces as much or more energy than the energy required to initiate the fusion reaction-an event called ignition. In moving closer to achieving ignition, NIF researchers are fulfilling the vision of early laser pioneers who conceived of using the x rays generated by a powerful, brief laser pulse to fuse hydrogen isotopes and

  5. He Puff System For Dust Detector Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Rais, C.H. Skinner A.L. Roquemore

    2010-10-01

    Local detection of surface dust is needed for the safe operation of next-step magnetic fusion devices such as ITER. An electrostatic dust detector, based on a 5 cm x 5 cm grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 50 V, has been developed to detect dust on remote surfaces and was successfully tested for the first time on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). We report on a helium puff system that clears residual dust from this detector and any incident debris or fibers that might cause a permanent short circuit. The entire surface of the detector was cleared of carbon particles by two consecutive helium puffs delivered by three nozzles of 0.45 mm inside diameter. The optimal configuration was found to be with the nozzles at an angle of 30o with respect to the surface of the detector and a helium backing pressure of 6 bar. __________________________________________________

  6. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Kramer, G.; Liu, D.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; White, R.

    2015-01-01

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fastmore » Wave heating.« less

  7. Multiwell experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, A.R.; Warpinski, N.R.; Lorenz, J.C.; Hart, C.M.; Branagan, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Multiwell Experiment is a research-oriented field laboratory. Its overall objectives are to characterize lenticular, low-permeability gas reservoirs and to develop technology for their production. This field laboratory has been established at a site in the east-central Piceance basin, Colorado. Here the Mesaverde formation lies at a depth of 4000 to 8250 ft. This interval contains different, distinct reservoir types depending upon their depositional environments. These different zones serve as the focus of the various testing and stimulation programs. Field work began in late 1981 and is scheduled through mid-1988. One key to the Multiwell Experiment is three closely spaced wells. Core, log, well testing, and well-to-well seismic data are providing a far better definition of the geological setting than has been available previously. The closely spaced wells also allow interference and tracer tests to obtain in situ reservoir parameters. The vertical variation of in situ stress throughout the intervals of interest is being measured. A series of stimulation experiments is being conducted in one well and the other two wells are being used as observation wells for improved fracture diagnostics and well testing. Another key to achieving the Multiwell Experiment objectives is the synergism resulting from a broad spectrum of activities: geophysical surveys, sedimentological studies, core and log analyses, well testing, in situ stress determination, stimulation, fracture diagnostics, and reservoir analyses. The results from the various activities will define the reservoir and the hydraulic fracture. These, in turn, define the net pay stimulated: the intersection of a hydraulic fracture of known geometry with a reservoir of known morphology and properties. Accomplishments of the past year are listed. 4 refs.

  8. Comment on Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D. D. Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Umansky, M. V.

    2014-05-15

    In the recently published paper Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)], the authors raise interesting and important issues concerning divertor physics and design. However, the paper contains significant errors: (a) The conceptual framework used in it for the evaluation of divertor quality is reduced to the assessment of the magnetic field structure in the outer Scrape-Off Layer. This framework is incorrect because processes affecting the pedestal, the private flux region and all of the divertor legs (four, in the case of a snowflake) are an inseparable part of divertor operation. (b) The concept of the divertor index focuses on only one feature of the magnetic field structure and can be quite misleading when applied to divertor design. (c) The suggestion to rename the divertor configurations experimentally realized on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) and DIII-D (Doublet III-D) from snowflakes to X-divertors is not justified: it is not based on comparison of these configurations with the prototypical X-divertor, and it ignores the fact that the NSTX and DIII-D poloidal magnetic field geometries fit very well into the snowflake two-null prescription.

  9. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - NSTX-U

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "field-label">Byline:

    John Greenwald
  10. NSTX-U Control System Upgrades

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Coupled w ith inline functions, refined scoping rules, and native IEEE 754 floating point ... & Factory A utom ation, 2009. ETFA 2009. IEEE Conference on 22nd Septem ber, 2009, pp. ...

  11. Current Schedule of Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Schedule of Experiments Current Schedule of Experiments - Updated 2/2016

  12. Fueling Requirements for Steady State high butane current fraction discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.Raman

    2003-10-08

    The CT injector originally used for injecting CTs into 1T toroidal field discharges in the TdeV tokamak was shipped PPPL from the Affiliated Customs Brokers storage facility in Montreal during November 2002. All components were transported safely, without damage, and are currently in storage at PPPL, waiting for further funding in order to begin advanced fueling experiments on NSTX. The components are currently insured through the University of Washington. Several technical presentations were made to investigate the feasibility of the CT injector installation on NSTX. These technical presentations, attached to this document, were: (1) Motivation for Compact Toroida Injection in NSTX; (2) Assessment of the Engineering Feasibility of Installing CTF-II on NSTX; (3) Assessment of the Cost for CT Installation on NSTX--A Peer Review; and (4) CT Fueling for NSTX FY 04-08 steady-state operation needs.

  13. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2002-04-22

    The results of the 2000 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2000. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality -- an alternative energy source. The year 2000 marked the second year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion power plants. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. In 2000, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on-site and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations with limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are precipitation, surface, ground, a nd waste water monitoring. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of nonradiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents). Monitoring revealed the presence of low levels of volatile organic compounds in an area adjacent to PPPL. Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the D-site stack; the data are presented in this report.

  14. Science and Technology of the 10-MA Spherical Tori

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Y-K.M.

    1999-11-14

    The Spherical Torus (ST) configuration has recently emerged as an example of confinement concept innovation that enables attractive steps in the development of fusion energy. The scientific potential for the ST has been indicated by recent encouraging results from START,2 CDX-U, and HIT. The scientific principles for the D-fueled ST will soon be tested by NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment3) in the U.S. and MAST (Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak4) in the U.K. at the level of l-2 MA in plasma current. More recently, interest has grown in the U.S. in the possibility of near-term ST fusion burn devices at the level of 10 MA in plasma current. The missions for these devices would be to test burning plasma performance in a small, pulsed D-T-fueled ST (i.e., DTST) and to develop fusion energy technologies in a small steady state ST-based Volume Neutron Source (VNS). This paper reports the results of analysis of the key science and technology issues for these devices.

  15. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  16. ORISE: Research Experiences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Experiences Research Experiences The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) administers more than 150 science education programs on behalf of the U.S....

  17. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of counter-helicity spheromak merging in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, C. E.; Belova, E. V.; Brown, M. R.; Gray, T.; Cothran, C. D.; Schaffer, M. J.

    2011-11-15

    Recent counter-helicity spheromak merging experiments in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) have produced a novel compact torus (CT) with unusual features. These include a persistent antisymmetric toroidal magnetic field profile and a slow, nonlinear emergence of the n = 1 tilt mode. Experimental measurements are inconclusive as to whether this unique CT is a fully merged field-reversed configuration (FRC) with strong toroidal field or a partially merged ''doublet CT'' configuration with both spheromak- and FRC-like characteristics. In this paper, the SSX merging process is studied in detail using three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations from the Hybrid Magnetohydrodynamics (HYM) code. These simulations show that merging plasmas in the SSX parameter regime only partially reconnect, leaving behind a doublet CT rather than an FRC. Through direct comparisons, we show that the magnetic structure in the simulations is highly consistent with the SSX experimental observations. We also find that the n = 1 tilt mode begins as a fast growing linear mode that evolves into a slower-growing nonlinear mode before being detected experimentally. A simulation parameter scan over resistivity, viscosity, and line-tying shows that these parameters can strongly affect the behavior of both the merging process and the tilt mode. In fact, merging in certain parameter regimes is found to produce a toroidal-field-free FRC rather than a doublet CT.

  18. ARM - Detailed Experiment Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detailed Experiment Description Related Links TWP-ICE Home Tropical Western Pacific Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Post-Experiment Data Sets Weather Summary (pdf, 6M) New York Workshop Presentations Experiment Planning TWP-ICE Proposal Abstract Detailed Experiment Description Science Plan (pdf, 1M) Operations Plan (pdf, 321K) Maps Contact Info Related Links Daily Report Report Archives Press Media Coverage TWP-ICE Fact Sheet (pdf, 211K) Press Releases TWP-ICE Images ARM flickr site

  19. Safety assessment document (SAD) for the Princeton Beta Experiment Modification (PBX-M)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.; Parsells, R.F.

    1988-04-01

    The Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) is an experimental device of the tokamak type. A tokamak is characterized by a strong toroidal magnetic field composed of an externally driven component parallel to the torus centerline modified by the field produced by a transformer-driven current (OH) in the confined plasma. A second magnetic field parallel to the major toroidal axis is added to provide radial equilibrium for the plasma. As an advanced tokamak, PBX-M will have additional magnetic fields to reshape the plasma cross section from a circle into a kidney bean shape; it will also be equipped with 6MW or more of auxiliary heating power provided by four neutral beam injectors, with RF systems, and with an extensive set of diagnostics. Potential hazards associated with PBX-M, which are analyzed in this report, result from energy stored in the magnetic fields, high voltages necessary for the operation of some of the equipment and diagnostics, neutron radiation when the neutral beams are run with deuterium and x-rays, especially those emitted as a result of plasma-wall interaction. This report satisfies the requirements set forth in the PPPL Health and Safety Directives, specifically HSD-5003, and in DOE Order 5481.1B and its Chicago operations supplement (DOE86, DOE82).

  20. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerator and Experimental Schedule Beam Time Request Form Experiment Scheduling and General Information Radiation Budget Form (pdf) Interactive beam request form (for contact persons / spokespersons) One-Page Summaries: Along with the aformentioned documents, spokespersons are also required to submit to User Liaison a one-page scientific summary of their experiment. The current archive of summaries can be viewed on line at http://www.jlab.org/exp_prog/experiments/summaries/. 12000 Jefferson

  1. Double Beta Decay Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanal, Vandana [Dept. of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2011-11-23

    At present, neutrinoless double beta decay is perhaps the only experiment that can tell us whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. Given the significance of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}, there is a widespread interest for these rare event studies employing a variety of novel techniques. This paper describes the current status of DBD experiments. The Indian effort for an underground NDBD experiment at the upcoming INO laboratory is also presented.

  2. Experiment Safety Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Safety Experiment Safety Requirements Print Safety at the ALS The mission of the ALS is to "Support users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." How Do I...? Complete an Experiment Safety Sheet? (Do this upon receiving beam time.) Complete Safety Training? Bring and Use Electrical Equipment at the ALS? Determine what Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to Wear? Get Authorization to Work with Lasers at the ALS? Ship Radioactive Materials to LBNL for Use at the

  3. Tritium Plasma Experiment and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plasma Experiment and its role in PHENIX program Masashi Shimada, Chase Taylor Fusion ... in metal - Tritium behavior in the fusion nuclear environment is not fully ...

  4. Operating Experience Summaries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU) Office of Analysis publishes the Operating Experience Summary to exchange lessons-learned information between DOE facilities.

  5. ORISE: Faculty Research Experiences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Faculty Research Experiences The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides short- and long-term programs for either faculty or faculty-student teams to...

  6. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns Meetings Recent Talks Archived Talks Additional Information Computing at JLab Operations Logbook Experiment ...

  7. Experiment Research | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Jefferson Lab's Accelerator Tunnel Jefferson Lab's accelerator is shaped like an oval racetrack and is located 25 feet below ground. This is a view of one of the straight sections, showing the cryomodules linked end to end in the accelerator tunnel. A D D I T I O N A L L I N K S: Current Experiments Experiment Research Proposals Experiment Schedule Research Highlights Publications JLab Library top-right bottom-left-corner bottom-right-corner Recent Experiments Jefferson Lab has an

  8. ORISE: Research Team Experiences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Team Experiences The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) brings together mentors and research teams to serve as a bridge between the classroom and the...

  9. BooNE Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Goals of BooNE BooNE in a Nutshell Making Neutrinos Detecting Neutrinos schematic of BooNE experiment A sample event (3M animated PDF file) A cosmic ray event as displayed by the MiniBooNE detector.

  10. Franklin: User Experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun; Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-07

    The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

  11. Coupled-channel scattering on a torus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Peng; Dudek, Jozef Jon; Edwards, Robert G.; Szczepaniak, Adam Pawel

    2013-07-01

    Based on the Hamiltonian formalism approach, a generalized Luscher's formula for two particle scattering in both the elastic and coupled-channel cases in moving frames is derived from a relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equation. Some strategies for extracting scattering amplitudes for a coupled-channel system from the discrete finite-volume spectrum are discussed and illustrated with a toy model of two-channel resonant scattering. This formalism will, in the near future, be used to extract information about hadron scattering from lattice QCD computations.

  12. Zone routing in a torus network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer

    2013-01-29

    A system for routing data in a network comprising a network logic device at a sending node for determining a path between the sending node and a receiving node, wherein the network logic device sets one or more selection bits and one or more hint bits within the data packet, a control register for storing one or more masks, wherein the network logic device uses the one or more selection bits to select a mask from the control register and the network logic device applies the selected mask to the hint bits to restrict routing of the data packet to one or more routing directions for the data packet within the network and selects one of the restricted routing directions from the one or more routing directions and sends the data packet along a link in the selected routing direction toward the receiving node.

  13. Booster Neutrino Experiment - Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    close The MiniBooNE Experiment next The Oscillating Neutrino The first phase of the Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is a smaller version of the final planned experiment, and has been dubbed "MiniBooNE." The physicists working on MiniBooNE are trying to find out more about the fundamental properties of neutrinos. But, what exactly is a neutrino? To answer that question, we need to look at what's called the Standard Model of particles and

  14. Booster Neutrino Experiment - Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    back The MiniBooNE Experiment next The Oscillating Neutrino Normal matter is made of atoms. Atoms are also composite objects, made up in turn of protons and neutrons (in the...

  15. ATLAS APPROVED EXPERIMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8MAY98 Exp Spokesperson Experiment Title Days 433-9 Miller Ion Irradiations of Anisotropic High-Tc Superconductors: Probing Dynamics of Magnetic Vortices 2 651-2 Paul...

  16. Corporate Operating Experience Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program helps to prevent the recurrence of significant adverse events/trends by sharing performance information, lessons learned and good practices across the DOE complex.

  17. The GLUEX Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.R. Shepherd

    2009-12-01

    The GLUEX experiment, to be constructed in the new Hall D at Jefferson Lab as part of the 12 GeV upgrade, will utilize a linearly polarized 9 GeV photon beam, produced via coherent bremsstrahlung radiation off of a diamond wafer, incident on a proton target to conduct a search for exotic hybrid mesons. A summary of the physics motivation for the experiment and the key factors that drive the design of the detector and beam line is presented.

  18. Sharing Smart Grid Experiences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sharing Smart Grid Experiences through Performance Feedback March 31, 2011 DOE/NETL- DE-FE0004001 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Prepared by: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sharing Smart Grid Experiences through Performance Feedback v1.0 Page ii Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

  19. Procedures for Experiments (PFX)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Proposal Submission Guidelines for Proposals Reports Archives Directory of Proposals Membership Summary Workshops Experiment Summaries 6 GeV: pdf 12 GeV: pdf Program Advisory Committee (PAC) Jefferson Lab currently supports research in two broad areas of scientific investigation, the Nuclear Physics program and the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) program. Each program has its own review process for consideration of proposed research. Experiments at JLab are reviewed, approved for beamtime and run

  20. Tritium Plasma Experiment and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plasma Experiment and its role in PHENIX program Masashi Shimada, Chase Taylor Fusion Safety Program Idaho National Laboratory Rob Kolasinski Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore Tritium Focus Group meeting September 23-25, 2014 at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID Outline: 1. Motivation 2. Tritium Plasma Experiment 3. INL/STAR's role on US-Japan collaboration 4. Role of TPE in PHENIX project 5. TPE modification and development of plasma-driven permeation M.Shimada | Tritium Focus

  1. The MAJORANA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, John; Wolfe, B. A.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.

    2011-10-01

    The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

  2. The Majorana Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Keillor, M. E.; Kephart, J. D.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F. T. III [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Back, H. O. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bergevin, M.; Chan, Y.-D.; Detwiler, J. A.; Loach, J. C. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); and others

    2011-12-16

    The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

  3. Water Vapor Experiment Concludes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Water Vapor Experiment Concludes The AIRS (atmospheric infrared sounder) Water Vapor Experiment - Ground (AWEX-G) intensive operations period (IOP) at the SGP central facility began on October 27 and ended on November 16, 2003. Researchers David Whiteman and Francis Schmidlin of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Holger Voemel of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Larry Miloshevich of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and Barry Lesht

  4. Experiment Safety Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Safety Requirements Print Safety at the ALS The mission of the ALS is to "Support users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." How Do I...? Complete an Experiment Safety Sheet? (Do this upon receiving beam time.) Complete Safety Training? Bring and Use Electrical Equipment at the ALS? Determine what Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to Wear? Get Authorization to Work with Lasers at the ALS? Ship Radioactive Materials to LBNL for Use at the ALS? Ship Samples

  5. Experiment Safety Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Safety Requirements Print Safety at the ALS The mission of the ALS is to "Support users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." How Do I...? Complete an Experiment Safety Sheet? (Do this upon receiving beam time.) Complete Safety Training? Bring and Use Electrical Equipment at the ALS? Determine what Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to Wear? Get Authorization to Work with Lasers at the ALS? Ship Radioactive Materials to LBNL for Use at the ALS? Ship Samples

  6. Experiment Safety Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Safety Requirements Print Safety at the ALS The mission of the ALS is to "Support users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." How Do I...? Complete an Experiment Safety Sheet? (Do this upon receiving beam time.) Complete Safety Training? Bring and Use Electrical Equipment at the ALS? Determine what Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to Wear? Get Authorization to Work with Lasers at the ALS? Ship Radioactive Materials to LBNL for Use at the ALS? Ship Samples

  7. Fermilab | Tevatron | Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiments In this Section: Tevatron Experiments CDF DZero Energy Frontier Tevatron Before shutting down on Sept. 29, 2011, the Tevatron was the world's largest proton-antiproton collider. Residing at Fermilab, the Tevatron accelerated and stored beams of protons and antiprotons traveling in opposite directions around an underground ring four miles in circumference at almost the speed of light before colliding them at the center of two detectors. The detectors, called CDF, for Collider Detector

  8. Experiment Safety Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Safety Requirements Print Safety at the ALS The mission of the ALS is to "Support users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." How Do I...? Complete an Experiment Safety Sheet? (Do this upon receiving beam time.) Complete Safety Training? Bring and Use Electrical Equipment at the ALS? Determine what Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to Wear? Get Authorization to Work with Lasers at the ALS? Ship Radioactive Materials to LBNL for Use at the ALS? Ship Samples

  9. Experiment Safety Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Safety Requirements Print Safety at the ALS The mission of the ALS is to "Support users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." How Do I...? Complete an Experiment Safety Sheet? (Do this upon receiving beam time.) Complete Safety Training? Bring and Use Electrical Equipment at the ALS? Determine what Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to Wear? Get Authorization to Work with Lasers at the ALS? Ship Radioactive Materials to LBNL for Use at the ALS? Ship Samples

  10. Experiment Safety Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Safety Requirements Print Safety at the ALS The mission of the ALS is to "Support users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." How Do I...? Complete an Experiment Safety Sheet? (Do this upon receiving beam time.) Complete Safety Training? Bring and Use Electrical Equipment at the ALS? Determine what Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to Wear? Get Authorization to Work with Lasers at the ALS? Ship Radioactive Materials to LBNL for Use at the ALS? Ship Samples

  11. Experiment Safety Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Safety Requirements Print Safety at the ALS The mission of the ALS is to "Support users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." How Do I...? Complete an Experiment Safety Sheet? (Do this upon receiving beam time.) Complete Safety Training? Bring and Use Electrical Equipment at the ALS? Determine what Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to Wear? Get Authorization to Work with Lasers at the ALS? Ship Radioactive Materials to LBNL for Use at the ALS? Ship Samples

  12. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2004-04-07

    The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's (PPPL) operations. The results of the 2001 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for PPPL are presented and discussed. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2001. PPPL has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The vision of the Laboratory is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality--a clean, alternative energy source. The Year 2001 marked the third year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors. In 2001, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on- and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations; also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are water monitoring--precipitation, ground-, surface-, and waste-waters. PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the D-site stack; the data are presented in this report. Groundwater monitoring continue d under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of nonradiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents). Monitoring revealed the low levels of volatile organic compounds in an area adjacent to PPPL. In 2001, PPPL was in compliance with its permit limits for surface and sanitary discharges and had no reportable releases. Additionally, as part of DOE's program for the purchase of recycled content and other environmentally preferred products, PPPL has ranked in the excellent category of 80 to 90% of the goal.

  13. PLASMA JETS AND ERUPTIONS IN SOLAR CORONAL HOLES: A THREE-DIMENSIONAL FLUX EMERGENCE EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2013-07-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) numerical experiment of the launching of a hot and fast coronal jet followed by several violent eruptions is analyzed in detail. These events are initiated through the emergence of a magnetic flux rope from the solar interior into a coronal hole. We explore the evolution of the emerging magnetically dominated plasma dome surmounted by a current sheet and the ensuing pattern of reconnection. A hot and fast coronal jet with inverted-Y shape is produced that shows properties comparable to those frequently observed with EUV and X-ray detectors. We analyze its 3D shape, its inhomogeneous internal structure, and its rise and decay phases, lasting for some 15-20 minutes each. Particular attention is devoted to the field line connectivities and the reconnection pattern. We also study the cool and high-density volume that appears to encircle the emerged dome. The decay of the jet is followed by a violent phase with a total of five eruptions. The first of them seems to follow the general pattern of tether-cutting reconnection in a sheared arcade, although modified by the field topology created by the preceding reconnection evolution. The two following eruptions take place near and above the strong-field concentrations at the surface. They show a twisted, {Omega}-loop-like rope expanding in height, with twist being turned into writhe, thus hinting at a kink instability (perhaps combined with a torus instability) as the cause of the eruption. The succession of a main jet ejection and a number of violent eruptions that resemble mini-CMEs and their physical properties suggest that this experiment may provide a model for the blowout jets recently proposed in the literature.

  14. Gyroharmonic conversion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, J.L.; LaPointe, M.A.; Ganguly, A.K. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); LaPointe, M.A. [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Generation of high power microwaves has been observed in experiments where a 250{endash}350 kV, 20{endash}30 A electron beam accelerated in a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA) passes through a cavity tuned gyroharmonic) and at 8.6 GHz (3rd harmonic) will be described. Theory indicates that high conversion efficiency can be obtained for a high quality beam injected into CARA, and when mode competition can be controlled. Comparisons will be made between the experiments and theory. Planned 7th harmonic experiments will also be described, in which phase matching between the TE-72 mode at 20 GHz, and the TE-11 mode at 2.86 GHz, allows efficient 20 GHz co-generation within the CARA waveguide itself. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Gyroharmonic conversion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, J. L.; LaPointe, M. A. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Ganguly, A. K. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    1999-05-07

    Generation of high power microwaves has been observed in experiments where a 250-350 kV, 20-30 A electron beam accelerated in a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA) passes through a cavity tuned gyroharmonic) and at 8.6 GHz (3rd harmonic) will be described. Theory indicates that high conversion efficiency can be obtained for a high quality beam injected into CARA, and when mode competition can be controlled. Comparisons will be made between the experiments and theory. Planned 7th harmonic experiments will also be described, in which phase matching between the TE-72 mode at 20 GHz, and the TE-11 mode at 2.86 GHz, allows efficient 20 GHz co-generation within the CARA waveguide itself.

  16. Construction completed, PPPL is set to resume world-class fusion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment-Upgrade. Gallery: Technicians inspect the new center stack that forms the heart of the NSTX-U. (Photo by PPPL) Technicians inspect the new center stack that forms the...

  17. Complete Experiment Safety Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview Upon receiving beam time: 1. Log in to ALSHub to complete an Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS). The ALS This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it is available to support you through this process. Please contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at the email link or at (510) 486-7222 at if you have questions or need more

  18. Complete Experiment Safety Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview Upon receiving beam time: 1. Log in to ALSHub to complete an Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS). The ALS This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it is available to support you through this process. Please contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at the email link or at (510) 486-7222 at if you have questions or need more

  19. Complete Experiment Safety Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview Upon receiving beam time: 1. Log in to ALSHub to complete an Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS). The ALS This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it is available to support you through this process. Please contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at the email link or at (510) 486-7222 at if you have questions or need more

  20. Fermilab | Tevatron | Experiments | DZero

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DZero detector in the Collision Hall DZero detector in the Collision Hall. A silicon strip disk for the DZero experiment's silicon tracker A silicon strip disk for the DZero experiment's silicon tracker. Energy Frontier DZero How it works DZero is one of two detectors positioned along the four-mile Tevatron accelerator ring.It takes its name from its location on the ring, D0. Physicists use the detector to study the array of particles and forces in nature by recording data about collisions of

  1. Complete Experiment Safety Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview Upon receiving beam time: 1. Log in to ALSHub to complete an Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS). The ALS This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it is available to support you through this process. Please contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at the email link or at (510) 486-7222 at if you have questions or need more

  2. Complete Experiment Safety Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview Upon receiving beam time: 1. Log in to ALSHub to complete an Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS). The ALS This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it is available to support you through this process. Please contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at the email link or at (510) 486-7222 at if you have questions or need more

  3. The MAJORANA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guiseppe, V.E.; Keller, C.; Mei, D-M; Perevozchikov, O.; Perumpilly, G.; Thomas, K.; Xiang, W.; Zhang, C.; Aalseth, C.E.; Aguayo, E.; Ely, J.; Fast, J.E.; Hoppe, E.W.; Hossbach, T.W.; Keillor, M.; Kephart, J.D.; Kouzes, R.; Miley, H.S.; Mizouni, L.; Myers, A.W.; Reid, D.; Amman, M.; Bergevin, M.; Chan, Y-D; Detwiler, J.A.; Loach, J.C.; Luke, P.N.; Martin, R.D.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Vetter, K.; Yaver, H.; Avignone, F.T. III; Creswick, R.; Farach, H.; Mizouni, L.; Avignone, Frank Titus; Bertrand Jr, Fred E; Capps, Gregory L; Cooper, Reynold J; Radford, David C; Varner Jr, Robert L; Wilkerson, John F; Yu, Chang-Hong; Back, H.O.; Leviner, L.; Young, A.R.; Back , H.O.; Bai, X.; Hong, H.; Howard, S.; Medlin, D.; Sobolev, V.; Barabash, A.S.; Konovalov, S.I.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, V.; Barbeau, P.S.; Collar, J.I.; Fields, N.; Boswell , M.; Brudanin, V.; Egorov, V.; Gusey, K.; Kochetov, O.; Shirchenko, M.; Timkin, V.; Yakushev, E.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, M.; Burritt , T.H.; Burritt , T.H.; Busch, M.; Esterline, J.; Swift, G.; Tornow, W.; Hazama, R.; Nomachi, M.; Shima, T.; Finnerty , P.; et al.

    2011-01-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

  4. The Majorana Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Bai, Xinhua; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hong, H.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Medlin, D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perevozchikov, O.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Reid, Douglas J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Ronquest, M. C.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, V.; Zhang, C.

    2011-08-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

  5. Panel ensures safe operation of the $94 million NSTX Upgrade...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anthony Indelicato, Tracy Estes, Stefan Gerhardt, Tim Stevenson, Al von Halle, Jerry Levine, Charles Gentile. (Photo by Elle StarkmanPPPL Office of Communications) Members...

  6. Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    R ; Majeski, R ; Mansfield, D ; Mueller, D ; Raman, R ; Roquemore, A L ; Sabbagh, S ; Skinner, C H ; Soukhanovskii, V ; Stevenson, T ; Zakharov, L Publication Date: 2006-08-21...

  7. Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Ono, M ; Paul, S ; Raman, R ; Roquemore, A L ; Ross, P W ; Sabbagh, S ; Schneider, H ; Skinner, C H ; Soukhanovskii, V ; Stevenson, T more ; Stotler, D ; Timberlake, J ;...

  8. Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    investigated as a tool for density profile control and reducing the recycling of hydrogen isotopes. Repeated lithium pellet injection into Center Stack Limited and Lower...

  9. NSTX-U Control System Upgrades | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control System Upgrades This system can serve as a control system for any fusion device, including ITER. Currently, the PCS calculates many complicated and disjoint algorithms...

  10. Panel ensures safe operation of the $94 million NSTX Upgrade...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the safety of the 94 million upgrade belongs to the Activity Certification Committee (ACC), whose work remains ongoing. "This is a critical group," said Adam Cohen, deputy...

  11. Electronics Engineer (NSTX-U) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C and C++. To excel in our diverse engineering culture the candidate must possess the ability to effectively communicate in a multidisciplinary team and travel occasionally...

  12. Upward-facing Lithium Flash Evaporator for NSTX-U

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The minimal time interval between the evaporation and the start of the discharge will avoid the passivation of the lithium by residual gases and enable the study of the ...

  13. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory achieves milestone, completing first

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    part of heart of fusion experiment | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory achieves milestone, completing first part of heart of fusion experiment By John Greenwald March 22, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The completed first section of the NSTX-U center stack. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) The completed first section of the NSTX-U center stack. Gallery: Related Images: Engineers and technicians at the U.S. Department

  14. Stirling machine operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, B.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that Stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and were not expected to operate for any lengthy period of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered.

  15. The LUX experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Akerib, D. S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Bernard, E.; Bernstein, A.; Bradley, A.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; et al

    2015-03-24

    We present the status and prospects of the LUX experiment, which employs approximately 300 kg of two-phase xenon to search for WIMP dark matter interactions. The LUX detector was commissioned at the surface laboratory of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD, between December 2011 and February 2012 and the detector has been operating underground since January, 2013. These proceedings review the results of the commissioning run as well as the status of underground data-taking.

  16. CASL Test Stand Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry Test Stand Experience Stephen Hess, EPRI Heather Feldman, EPRI Brenden Mervin, EPRI Martin Pytel, EPRI Rose Montgomery, TVA Bill Bird, TVA Fausto Franceschini, Westinghouse Electric Company LLC Advanced Modeling Applications 28 March 2014 CASL-U-2014-0036-000 Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs ii CASL-U-2014-0036-000 REVISION LOG Revision Date Affected Pages Revision Description 0 3/28/2014 All Original Report Document pages that are: Export Controlled

  17. Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment In northeastern India, the fertile land around the Ganges River supports several hundred million people. This river, the largest in India, is fed by monsoon rains and runoff from the nearby Himalayan Mountains. Through an intergovernmental agreement with India, the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deployed its portable laboratory, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), to Nainital, India, in June 2011. During

  18. Experiment Scheduling Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Scheduling Committee Title Name Phome Email Deputy Director for Research Bob McKeown (757) 269-6481 bmck@jlab.org Physics Division AD (co-chair) Rolf Ent (757) 269-7373 ent@jlab.org Physics Division Deputy AD Patrizia Rossi (757) 269-7740 rossi@jlab.org Physics Division Assistant Director Javier Gomez (757) 269-7468 gomez@jlab.org Halls A & C Leader Cynthia Keppel (757) 269-7580 keppel@jlab.org Hall B Leader Volker Burkert (757) 269-7540 burkert@jlab.org Hall D Leader Eugene

  19. Lower Hybrid Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lower Hybrid Experiments on MST M.C. Kaufman, J.A. Goetz, M.A. Thomas, D.R. Burke and D.J. Clayton Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madision, WI 53706 Abstract. Current drive using RF waves has been proposed as a means to reduce the tearing fluctuations responsible for anomalous energy transport in the RFP. A traveling wave antenna op- erating at 800 MHz is being used to launch lower hybrid waves into MST to assess the feasibility of this approach. Parameter studies show that edge

  20. In-Reactor Experiment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Update on the TMIST-3 In-Reactor Experiment Tritium Release and Speciation from LiAlO 2 and LiAlO 2 /Zr Cermets DJ SENOR 1 , WG LUSCHER 1 , AND KK CLAYTON 2 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 2 Idaho National Laboratory Tritium Focus Group Meeting, Princeton, NJ 5 May 2015 1 PNNL-SA-109847 Tritium Production Enterprise: Background Tritium is required for US nuclear weapons stockpile Tritium has a 12.3 year half-life and must be replenished 1988: DOE ceased production of tritium at SRS

  1. Stirling machine operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, B.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy operating lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and are not expected to operate for lengthy periods of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered. The record in this paper is not complete, due to the reluctance of some organizations to release operational data and because several organizations were not contacted. The authors intend to repeat this assessment in three years, hoping for even greater participation.

  2. The PANTHER User Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coram, Jamie L.; Morrow, James D.; Perkins, David Nikolaus

    2015-09-01

    This document describes the PANTHER R&D Application, a proof-of-concept user interface application developed under the PANTHER Grand Challenge LDRD. The purpose of the application is to explore interaction models for graph analytics, drive algorithmic improvements from an end-user point of view, and support demonstration of PANTHER technologies to potential customers. The R&D Application implements a graph-centric interaction model that exposes analysts to the algorithms contained within the GeoGraphy graph analytics library. Users define geospatial-temporal semantic graph queries by constructing search templates based on nodes, edges, and the constraints among them. Users then analyze the results of the queries using both geo-spatial and temporal visualizations. Development of this application has made user experience an explicit driver for project and algorithmic level decisions that will affect how analysts one day make use of PANTHER technologies.

  3. HPCToolsExperiences.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiences w ith T ools a t N ERSC Richard G erber NERSC User Services Programming w eather, c limate, a nd e arth---system m odels on h eterogeneous m ul>---core p la?orms September 7 , 2 011 a t t he N a>onal C enter f or A tmospheric R esearch i n B oulder, C olorado 2 * Thanks f or t he i nvita>on * My p rofessional g oal i s t o e nable s cien>sts t o u se H PC easily a nd e ffec>vely * Contribute t o i mportant d iscoveries a bout h ow o ur natural w orld w orks * Make a d

  4. Programs for Assembling SBH Experiments

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-11-28

    DB EXP ASSEMBLY is a suite of programs that enable selection of bundles of data, which are referred to as experiments, from the DB SBH archival database. In other words, an experiment is a bundle of data which is analyzed as a unit. Program DBJ creates raw experiments based on initial specification. Program DBK then tests the experiments for a number of consistemcy and completeness criteria, reports bugs in the experiment and recommends solutions, andmore » performs the desired corrections. An experiment that has passed the final DBK test is ready for analysis by the DB DISCOVERY programs.« less

  5. The polarized SRF gun experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Todd, R.; Wang, E.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Shultheiss, T.

    2008-10-01

    An experiment is under way to prove the feasibility of a super-conducting RF gun for the production of polarized electrons. We report on the progress of the experiment and on simulations predicting the possibility of success.

  6. Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology - Chicago David Schmitz, Fermilab Outline Quick Audience Survey Introduction Relevant Energies and Targets Current Cross-Section Experiments Recent...

  7. Experiment Report Instructions General Instructions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report Instructions General Instructions * Experiment Reports must be submitted for all experiments conducted at LANSCE. * A compilation of Experiment Reports for each run cycle will be published as part of the LANSCE Annual Activity Report. * Experiment Reports are reviewed by the Program Advisory Committee for continuing expements. * Follow detailed form instructions below and complete entire form. * Reports must be written in English. * The available space on the form must be respected.

  8. Subterranean stress engineering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.R.; Colgate, S.A.; Wheat, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    The state of stress in a subterranean rock mass has classically been assumed to be constant at best. In soil with a high clay content, preconsolidation and drainage methods can lead to more stable foundation material, but methods for engineering the stresses in large masses of rock are not well known. This paper shows the results from an experiment designed to alter the in situ rock stress field in an oil shale mine. This was done by hydrofracturing the rock by use of a packed-well injection system and then propping the crack open with a thixotropic gel, which slowly hardened to the consistency of cement. Successive hydrofracture and high-pressure grouting resulted in an overstressed region. Well-head injection pressures, surface tilts, injection rates, and subterranean strains were measured and recorded on floppy disk by a Z-80 microprocessor. The results were then transmitted to the large computer system at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). To put the data in a more useful form, computer-generated movies of the tilts and strains were made by use of computer graphics developed at LASL. The purpose of this paper is to present results from the Single Large Instrumented Test conducted in the Colony Oil Shale Mine near Rifle, Colorado. 13 figures.

  9. Development of a low-energy and high-current pulsed neutral beam injector with a washer-gun plasma source for high-beta plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ii, Toru; Gi, Keii; Umezawa, Toshiyuki; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; Asai, Tomohiko

    2012-08-15

    We have developed a novel and economical neutral-beam injection system by employing a washer-gun plasma source. It provides a low-cost and maintenance-free ion beam, thus eliminating the need for the filaments and water-cooling systems employed conventionally. In our primary experiments, the washer gun produced a source plasma with an electron temperature of approximately 5 eV and an electron density of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} m{sup -3}, i.e., conditions suitable for ion-beam extraction. The dependence of the extracted beam current on the acceleration voltage is consistent with space-charge current limitation, because the observed current density is almost proportional to the 3/2 power of the acceleration voltage below approximately 8 kV. By optimizing plasma formation, we successfully achieved beam extraction of up to 40 A at 15 kV and a pulse length in excess of 0.25 ms. Its low-voltage and high-current pulsed-beam properties enable us to apply this high-power neutral beam injection into a high-beta compact torus plasma characterized by a low magnetic field.

  10. Turner-Fairbank Scour Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    real scour 1 Turner-Fairbank Pressure Scour Flow Experiments TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Three dimensional data from bridge deck pressure flow scour experiments under clear water conditions conducted at the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) J. Sterling Jones Hydraulics Laboratory. The experiments included 3 girder, 6 girder, and streamlined scale bridge decks,

  11. APS Experiment Safety Review System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that present minimal hazards common to all beamlines should be submitted at least seven (7) days prior to the scheduled start of the experiment. Additional time is required...

  12. UNIRIB Participant Experiences: Ron Goans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Goans Ron Goans Ron Goans Ron Goans is a graduate research assistant working on the thesis component of his master's degree in physics while performing experiments at the...

  13. Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ao Nuclear Power Plant reactors. The experiment is being built by blasting three kilometers of tunnel through the granite rock under the mountains where the power plants are...

  14. Audit on Subcritical Experiment Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of nuclear weapon materials, such as plutonium, with the use of complex, high-speed diagnostic instruments. The experiments are subcritical because no critical mass is formed and...

  15. ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The diverse collection of programs available to graduate students meet a variety of needs across many different career paths. Experiences of graduate participants are...

  16. LANSCE | User Resources | Experiment Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Reports For experiment report guidance, examples or a blank form, select one of the following .pdf files: Instructions.pdf Experiment Report Form.pdf Send reports to the LANSCE User Office. Reports are due three months after you receive beam time. If you didn't complete a User Survey during your visit, please do so when you complete your Experiment Report. The responses to the survey are used by LANSCE to identify and address issues and are also reported to the agencies providing

  17. Experiments ? Simulations = Better Nuclear Power Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiments + Simulations Better Nuclear Power Research Experiments Simulations Better Nuclear Power Research Atomic Level Simulations Enhance Characterization of Radiation...

  18. Fellowships, Appointments and the Postdoctoral Experience | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experience Fellowships, Appointments and the Postdoctoral Experience Early career STEM professionals may join Argonne as Distinguished Fellows or Divisional Postdoctoral...

  19. DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-08

    The Order institutes a DOE wide program for the management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and facilitate the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Supersedes DOE O 210.2.

  20. User Experience Research and Statistics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To improve your website or application, especially for new projects, EERE strongly recommends, but does not require, conducting user experience (UX) research. We only require that you get the...

  1. User Experience Research Online Tools

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has a variety of online tools to help you conduct user experience (UX) research. The following tools are free for use by staff and contractors who work on the EERE website.

  2. ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    West Antarctic Radiation Experiment of the most advanced atmospheric research instrumentation for cloud, radiative, and aerosol observations. From the fall of 2015 to early 2017, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) will gather data from McMurdo Station at the southern tip of Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf. Using a portable observatory ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), researchers will be measuring clouds, aerosols, and energy coming from the sun and

  3. Learning Experiences | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    education@anl.gov Learning Experiences "Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge." - Carl Sagan, Astrophysicist Argonne Education provides a variety of learning opportunities to enhance middle and high school math, science and comptuer science curriculum. We offer programs that strengthen youth scientific inquiry and develop a research based mindset. We have programs that provide schools with: an intense inquiry-based learning experience in our learning lab

  4. The MINERvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Deborah A.; Kopp, Sacha; /Fermilab

    2011-03-18

    The MINERvA experiment is a dedicated cross-section experiment whose aim is to measure neutrino cross sections for inclusive and exclusive final states on several nuclei. The detector is fully commissioned and began running in March 2010. As a dedicated cross-section experiment, MINERvA has a particular need to know the incident neutrino flux: both the absolute level and the energy dependence. In these proceedings we describe the MINERvA detector, give an update on the experimental status, and discuss the means to determine the neutrino flux. The MINERvA experiment is now running and has completed 25% of its full Low Energy run. There are various techniques planned for understanding the flux, including taking neutrino data at several different beam configurations. The experiment has gotten a first glimpse of two of the six configurations, and completed four horn current scans. Because of its exclusive final state reconstruction capabilities MINERvA can provide the much needed input for current and future oscillation experiments. The inclusive final state measurements and comparisons of nuclear effects across as many states as possible will provide new insights into neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  5. Experiences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The Large Hadron Collider 1 (LHC), the most well-known high- energy physics collaboration, was a driving force in the deployment of high bandwidth connections in the research and ...

  6. Scientific Opportunities and Challenges in the Upgraded National Spherical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Torus Experiment | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab March 14, 2015, 9:30am to 11:00am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium Scientific Opportunities and Challenges in the Upgraded National Spherical Torus Experiment Dr. Jonathan Menard, Principal Research Physicist PPPL Abstract: PDF icon Menard.pdf Science On Saturday, March 14, 2015, "Scientific Opportunities & Challenges in the Upgraded National Spherical Torus Experiment", Dr. Jonathan Menard, PPPL Contact Information Website:

  7. Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the National Spherical Torus eXperiment divertor (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment divertor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment divertor Authors: Scotti, F ; Roquemore, A L ; Soukhanovskii, V A Publication Date: 2012-05-07 OSTI Identifier:

  8. Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade A new compact, multi-channel Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) diagnostic based on silicon photodiode array has been designed and is being fabricated for the National

  9. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in National Spherical Torus Experiment (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on November 3, 2016 Title: Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment Authors: Ren, Y. [1] ; Wang, W. X. [1] ; LeBlanc, B. P. [1] ; Guttenfelder, W. [1] ;

  10. Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyson, J. Anthony

    2013-08-26

    Next generation “Stage IV” dark energy experiments under design during this grant, and now under construction, will enable the determination of the properties of dark energy and dark matter to unprecedented precision using multiple complementary probes. The most pressing challenge in these experiments is the characterization and understanding of the systematic errors present within any given experimental configuration and the resulting impact on the accuracy of our constraints on dark energy physics. The DETF and the P5 panel in their reports recommended “Expanded support for ancillary measurements required for the long-term program and for projects that will improve our understanding and reduction of the dominant systematic measurement errors.” Looking forward to the next generation Stage IV experiments we have developed a program to address the most important potential systematic errors within these experiments. Using data from current facilities it has been feasible and timely to undertake a detailed investigation of the systematic errors. In this DOE grant we studied of the source and impact of the dominant systematic effects in dark energy measurements, and developed new analysis tools and techniques to minimize their impact. Progress under this grant is briefly reviewed in this technical report. This work was a necessary precursor to the coming generations of wide-deep probes of the nature of dark energy and dark matter. The research has already had an impact on improving the efficiencies of all Stage III and IV dark energy experiments.

  11. A Snowflake-Shaped Magnetic Field Holds Promise for Taming Harsh...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Communications, PPPL) National Spherical Torus Experiment The Science Heat escaping from the core of a twelve-million degree nuclear fusion plasma device was...

  12. Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment divertor Citation Details In-Document Search...

  13. Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design of solid state neutral ...

  14. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Plasmas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Divertor Heat...

  15. Solar neutrino experiments: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    The situation in solar neutrino physics has changed drastically in the past few years, so that now there are four neutrino experiments in operation, using different methods to look at different regions of the solar neutrino energy spectrum. These experiments are the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl Homestake detector, the realtime Kamiokande detector, and the different forms of radiochemical {sup 71}Ga detectors used in the GALLEX and SAGE projects. It is noteworthy that all of these experiments report a deficit of observed neutrinos relative to the predictions of standard solar models (although in the case of the gallium detectors, the statistical errors are still relatively large). This paper reviews the basic principles of operation of these neutrino detectors, reports their latest results and discusses some theoretical interpretations. The progress of three realtime neutrino detectors that are currently under construction, SuperKamiok, SNO and Borexino, is also discussed.

  16. DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12

    The Order establishes a DOE wide program for management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and to expand the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Canceled by DOE O 210.2A. Does not cancel other directives.

  17. Two LANL laboratory astrophysics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Intrator, Thomas P.

    2014-01-24

    Two laboratory experiments are described that have been built at Los Alamos (LANL) to gain access to a wide range of fundamental plasma physics issues germane to astro, space, and fusion plasmas. The overarching theme is magnetized plasma dynamics which includes significant currents, MHD forces and instabilities, magnetic field creation and annihilation, sheared flows and shocks. The Relaxation Scaling Experiment (RSX) creates current sheets and flux ropes that exhibit fully 3D dynamics, and can kink, bounce, merge and reconnect, shred, and reform in complicated ways. Recent movies from a large data set describe the 3D magnetic structure of a driven and dissipative single flux rope that spontaneously self-saturates a kink instability. Examples of a coherent shear flow dynamo driven by colliding flux ropes will also be shown. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) uses Field reversed configuration (FRC) experimental hardware that forms and ejects FRCs at 150km/sec. This is sufficient to drive a collision less magnetized shock when stagnated into a mirror stopping field region with Alfven Mach number MA=3 so that super critical shocks can be studied. We are building a plasmoid accelerator to drive Mach numbers MA >> 3 to access solar wind and more exotic astrophysical regimes. Unique features of this experiment include access to parallel, oblique and perpendicular shocks, shock region much larger than ion gyro radii and ion inertial length, room for turbulence, and large magnetic and fluid Reynolds numbers.

  18. Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thron, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment consists of a 1.1 Kton fine grained iron tracking calorimeter. It has a very isotropic detection structure which along with its flexible trigger will allow detection of multiparticle and neutrino proton decay modes. The detector has now entered its construction stage.

  19. User Experiment Time-Line

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Experiment Time-Line Event Target Call for proposal 2 months before proposals are due PAC Proposals Due 7 weeks before PAC meeting TAC Report for PAC Proposals (includes Independent Technical Review) 4 weeks after proposals are due PAC Report Published 1-2 months after PAC

  20. Soliton molecules: Experiments and optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitschke, Fedor

    2014-10-06

    Stable compound states of several fiber-optic solitons have recently been demonstrated. In the first experiment their shape was approximated, for want of a better description, by a sum of Gaussians. Here we discuss an optimization strategy which helps to find preferable shapes so that the generation of radiative background is reduced.

  1. Operational experience of the OC-OTEC experiments at NELH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, H.

    1989-02-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute, under funding and program direction from the US Department of Energy, has been operating a small-scale test apparatus to investigate key components of open- cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The apparatus started operations in October 1987 and continues to provide valuable information on heat-and mass-transfer processes in evaporators and condensers, gas sorption processes as seawater is depressurized and repressurized, and control and instrumentation characteristics of open-cycle systems. Although other test facilities have been used to study some of these interactions, this is the largest apparatus of its kind to use seawater since Georges Claude's efforts in 1926. The information obtained from experiments conducted in this apparatus is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which a positive net power production is expected to be demonstrated for the first time with OC-OTEC. This paper describes the apparatus, the major tests conducted during its first 18 months of operation, and the experience gained in OC-OTEC system operation. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Operational experience of the OC-OTEC experiments at NELH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, H.

    1989-02-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute, under funding and program direction from the US Department of Energy, has been operating a small-scale test apparatus to investigate key components of open- cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The apparatus started operations in October 1987 and continues to provide valuable information on heat-and mass-transfer processes in evaporators and condensers, gas sorption processes as seawater is depressurized and repressurized, and control and instrumentation characteristics of open-cycle systems. Although other test facilities have been used to study some of these interactions, this is the largest apparatus of its kind to use seawater since Georges Claude`s efforts in 1926. The information obtained from experiments conducted in this apparatus is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which a positive net power production is expected to be demonstrated for the first time with OC-OTEC. This paper describes the apparatus, the major tests conducted during its first 18 months of operation, and the experience gained in OC-OTEC system operation. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Erratum: "Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    microtearing-dominated National Spherical Torus eXperiment plasmas" [Phys. Plasmas 21, 082510 (2014)] (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Erratum: "Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in microtearing-dominated National Spherical Torus eXperiment plasmas" [Phys. Plasmas 21, 082510 (2014)] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Erratum: "Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in microtearing-dominated National Spherical Torus

  4. Shock Desensitization Experiments and Reactive Flow Modeling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Shock Desensitization Experiments and Reactive Flow Modeling on Self-Sustaining LX-17 Detonation Waves Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Shock Desensitization Experiments ...

  5. Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease April...

  6. Operating Experience Committee Charter | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Experience Committee (OEC), which is to support line management within DOE and the DOE community in developing and sustaining effective oeprating experience programs so that...

  7. Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) 2016 - Our 34 rd Year! SAGE is a 3-4 week research and education program in exploration geophysics for graduate, undergraduate students, and working professionals based in Santa Fe, NM, U.S.A. Application deadline March 27, 2016, 5:00pm MDT SAGE students, faculty, teaching assistants, and visiting scientists acquire, process and interpret reflection/refraction seismic, magnetotelluric (MT)/electromagnetic (EM), ground penetrating radar (GPR),

  8. AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment) Planning Meeting AMIE Science Steering Committee Chuck Long, Tony DelGenio, Bill Gustafson, Bob Houze, Mike Jensen, Steve Klein, Ruby Leung, Xaihong Liu, Ed Luke, Peter May, Sally McFarlane, Pat Minnis, Courtney Schumacher, Andy Vogelmann, Yi Wang, Xiaoqing Wu, Shaohong Xie Agenda * Proposal due May 1 !!!!!! * Primary purpose of this meeting is discussions and planning in support of completing the proposal * Defining the science and ACRF support needed to

  9. ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Precipitation Experiment a NOAA ship in the Pacific Ocean and on a DOE- sponsored plane over land and sea. These researchers will study: (1) water sources, evolution and structure of atmospheric rivers over the Pacific Ocean (2) long range transport of aerosols over the Pacific Ocean between Hawaii and the U.S. West Coast, and how aerosols interact with atmospheric rivers (3) the point where atmospheric rivers make landfall on the U.S. West Coast, especially how clouds form where

  10. Jitter debugging two laser experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, D.M.; Hackett, P.A.; Willis, C.

    1982-03-01

    A method to overcome the problem of timing jitter in two laser experiments is described. The technique involves the use of a time-to-pulse height converter to measure the interpulse separation and a data acquisition system capable of recording this and other experimental parameters on a shot-to-shot basis. The method is estimated to be useful in measurement systems with resolution down to 10 ps.

  11. Booster Neutrino Experiment - About Neutrinos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Neutrinos General Information Neutrinos Matter A colorful booklet presenting a general introduction to neutrinos, neutrino mass, and neutrino oscillations. Describes theory in a comprehensible way using graphs and diagrams. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab An introduction to the search for neutrino mass and the discovery of the tau neutrino produced by the Public Affairs office at Fermilab; also describes the neutrino experiments at Fermilab. Beam Line: Special Neutrino Issue A special issue

  12. Small-Scale Experiments.10-gallon drum experiment summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, David M.

    2015-02-05

    A series of sub-scale (10-gallon) drum experiments were conducted to characterize the reactivity, heat generation, and gas generation of mixtures of chemicals believed to be present in the drum (68660) known to have breached in association with the radiation release event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) on February 14, 2014, at a scale expected to be large enough to replicate the environment in that drum but small enough to be practical, safe, and cost effective. These tests were not intended to replicate all the properties of drum 68660 or the event that led to its breach, or to validate a particular hypothesis of the release event. They were intended to observe, in a controlled environment and with suitable diagnostics, the behavior of simple mixtures of chemicals in order to determine if they could support reactivity that could result in ignition or if some other ingredient or event would be necessary. There is a significant amount of uncertainty into the exact composition of the barrel; a limited sub-set of known components was identified, reviewed with Technical Assessment Team (TAT) members, and used in these tests. This set of experiments was intended to provide a framework to postulate realistic, data-supported hypotheses for processes that occur in a “68660-like” configuration, not definitively prove what actually occurred in 68660.

  13. RF breakdown experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurent, L. [University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Vlieks, A.; Pearson, C.; Caryotakis, G.; Luhmann, N.C. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    RF breakdown is a critical issue in the conditioning of klystrons, accelerator sections, and rf components for the next linear collider (NLC), as well as other high gradient accelerators and high power microwave sources. SLAC is conducting a series of experiments using an X-band traveling wave ring to characterize the processes and trigger mechanisms associated with rf breakdown. The goal of the research is to identify materials, processes, and manufacturing methods that will increase the breakdown threshold and minimize the time required for conditioning. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Booster Neutrino Experiment - Virtual Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Virtual Tour This series of pages about MiniBooNE will help you understand more about the what, why, and how of our experiment. When you begin the tour, a new window will open and you can use the next and back buttons to navigate. You may exit at any time by clicking on the "X" button in the upper right hand corner of the window. Start the tour here... This tour was created by Jessica Falco in 2000 and updated by Kelly O'Hear in 2002. Jessica and Kelly were high school students who

  15. AMIE (ARM MJO Investigation Experiment):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 AMIE (ARM MJO Investigation Experiment): Observations of the Madden-Julian Oscillation for Modeling Studies Science Plan ARM Climate Research Facility Tropical Western Pacific Manus Site October 2011-March 2012 C Long Principal Investigator A DelGenio P May W Gustafson S McFarlane R Houze P Minnis C Jakob C Schumacher M Jensen A Vogelmann S Klein Y Wang L Ruby Leung X Wu X Liu S Xie E Luke March 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S Government

  16. Torus through Integrated Data Analysis Mark Nornberg Matthew...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emissivity predicts bremsstrahlung and recombination emission * Parameter search using Markov Chain Monte Carlo - Allows many model parameters with reasonable processing time -...

  17. Critical Configurations of Hard Disks on the Torus

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-04-16

    CCHDT constructs and classifies various arrangements of hard disks of a single radius places on the unit square with periodic boundary conditions. Specifially, a given configuration is evolved to the nearest critical point on a smoothed hard disk energy fuction, and is classified by the adjacency matrix of the canonically labelled contact graph.

  18. Turbulent transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schemes, Varenna, Italy, 1990, edited by S. Ortolani and E. Sidoni (Societa Italian di Fisica, Bologna, 1991), p. 223. 9W. Shen, R. N. Dexter, and S. C. Prager, Phys. Rev. Lett....

  19. The polarized SRF gun experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Grover, R.; Todd, R.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Schultheiss, T.

    2007-09-10

    RF electron guns are capable of producing electron bunches with high brightness, which outperform DC electron guns and may even be able to provide electron beams for the ILC without the need for a damping ring. However, all successful existing guns for polarized electrons are DC guns because the environment inside an RF gun is hostile to the GaAs cathode material necessary for polarization. While the typical vacuum pressure in a DC gun is better than 10{sup -11} torr the vacuum in an RF gun is in the order of 10{sup -9} torr. Experiments at BINP Novosibirsk show that this leads to strong ion back-bombardment and generation of dark currents, which destroy the GaAs cathode in a short time. The situation might be much more favorable in a (super-conducting) SRF gun. The cryogenic pumping of the gun cavity walls may make it possible to maintain a vacuum close to 10{sup -12} torr, solving the problem of ion bombardment and dark currents. Of concern would be contamination of the gun cavity by evaporating cathode material. This report describes an experiment that Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in collaboration with Advanced Energy Systems (AES) is conducting to answer these questions.

  20. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative all modes failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  1. ISOTHERMAL AIR INGRESS VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H Oh; Eung S Kim

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory carried out air ingress experiments as part of validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. An isothermal test loop was designed and set to understand the stratified-flow phenomenon, which is important as the initial air flow into the lower plenum of the very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) when a large break loss-of-coolant accident occurs. The unique flow characteristics were focused on the VHTR air-ingress accident, in particular, the flow visualization of the stratified flow in the inlet pipe to the vessel lower plenum of the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR). Brine and sucrose were used as heavy fluids, and water was used to represent a light fluid, which mimics a counter current flow due to the density difference between the stimulant fluids. The density ratios were changed between 0.87 and 0.98. This experiment clearly showed that a stratified flow between simulant fluids was established even for very small density differences. The CFD calculations were compared with experimental data. A grid sensitivity study on CFD models was also performed using the Richardson extrapolation and the grid convergence index method for the numerical accuracy of CFD calculations . As a result, the calculated current speed showed very good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the current CFD methods are suitable for predicting density gradient stratified flow phenomena in the air-ingress accident.

  2. Sasol's Fischer-Tropsch experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dry, M.E.

    1982-08-01

    Product slate from Fischer-Tropsch processing can be selectively varied over a wide range. Depending on the type reactor chosen and conditions of operation, either gasoline or diesel components can amount to as much as 75% of the hydrocarbons produced. Based on over 26 years of commercial experience in Fischer-Tropsch operations, Sasol has identified factors for controlling the product slate with respect to fraction produced and yields. Experience with two reactor types demonstrates their advantages and limitations while manipulation of the operating conditions has established control techniques for yields. Reactors of the low temperature fixed bed type produce products that are paraffinic and largely wax while yields from operation of higher temperature fluidized catalyst are a product that is highly olefinic and falls in the gasoline boiling range. After work up using normal refinery processing, the final products meet specifications applicable for motor fuels that are entirely compatible with crude oil products. In fact, the diesel product is superior because it has a cetane number higher than normal and a lower ring compound content.

  3. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive SpectrumKinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  4. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  5. Fermilab SRF cryomodule operational experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A.L.; Theilacker, J.C.; DeGraff, B.D.; White, M.; Johnson, G.S.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is constructing an Advanced Accelerator Research and Development facility at New Muon Lab. The cryogenic infrastructure in support of the initial phase of the facility consists of two Tevatron style standalone refrigerators, cryogenic distribution system as well as an ambient temperature pumping system to achieve 2K operations with supporting purification systems. During this phase of the project a single Type III plus 1.3 GHz cryomodule was installed, cooled and tested. Design constraints of the cryomodule required that the cryomodule individual circuits be cooled at predetermined rates. These constraints required special design solutions to achieve. This paper describes the initial cooldown and operational experience of a 1.3 GHz cryomodule using the New Muon Lab cryogenic system.

  6. SOURCE PHENOMENOLOGY EXPERIMENTS IN ARIZONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessie L. Bonner; Brian Stump; Mark Leidig; Heather Hooper; Xiaoning Yang; Rongmao Zhou; Tae Sung Kim; William R. Walter; Aaron Velasco; Chris Hayward; Diane Baker; C. L. Edwards; Steven Harder; Travis Glenn; Cleat Zeiler; James Britton; James F. Lewkowicz

    2005-09-30

    The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments (SPE) have resulted in an important dataset for the nuclear monitoring community. The 19 dedicated single-fired explosions and multiple delay-fired mining explosions were recorded by one of the most densely instrumented accelerometer and seismometer arrays ever fielded, and the data have already proven useful in quantifying confinement and excitation effects for the sources. It is very interesting to note that we have observed differences in the phenomenology of these two series of explosions resulting from the differences between the relatively slow (limestone) and fast (granodiorite) media. We observed differences at the two SPE sites in the way the rock failed during the explosions, how the S-waves were generated, and the amplitude behavior as a function of confinement. Our consortium's goal is to use the synergy of the multiple datasets collected during this experiment to unravel the phenomenological differences between the two emplacement media. The data suggest that the main difference between single-fired chemical and delay-fired mining explosion seismograms at regional distances is the increased surface wave energy for the latter source type. The effect of the delay-firing is to decrease the high-frequency P-wave amplitudes while increasing the surface wave energy because of the longer source duration and spall components. The results suggest that the single-fired explosions are surrogates for nuclear explosions in higher frequency bands (e.g., 6-8 Hz Pg/Lg discriminants). We have shown that the SPE shots, together with the mining explosions, are efficient sources of S-wave energy, and our next research stage is to postulate the possible sources contributing to the shear-wave energy.

  7. Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misti A Lillo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

  8. First Subcritical Experiment Conducted at Nevada Test Site |...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Subcritical Experiment Conducted at Nevada Test Site | National Nuclear Security ... Subcritical Experiment Conducted at Nevada Test Site First Subcritical Experiment ...

  9. Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

  10. NNSA releases Stockpile Stewardship Program quarterly experiments...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in particular the first Pu experiment on NIF, the return to operations of the TA-55 gas gun, a successful series of plutonium experiments on Joint Actinide Shock Physics ...

  11. Students gain work experience at WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Students Gain Work Experience at WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., January 10, 2000 -- Students from two Eddy County high schools are gaining valuable experience by spending time with employees...

  12. Status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R. D.; Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Combs, Dustin C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Mertens, S.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; O'Shaughnessy, Mark D.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, David; Poon, Alan; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Snyder, N.; Soin, Aleksandr; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2014-07-08

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment is currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, USA. An overview and status of the experiment are given.

  13. Status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R. D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA and Department of Physics, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States); Abgrall, N.; Chan, Y-D.; Hegai, A.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A. W. P.; Vetter, K. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R.; Soin, A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone III, F. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Yumatov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bertrand, F. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); and others

    2014-06-24

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment is currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, USA. An overview and status of the experiment are given.

  14. CRAD, Operating Experience- February 11, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operating Experience Inspection Criteria and Approach, DNFSB 2004-1 IP, Commitment 20 (HSS CRAD 64-41, Rev. 0)

  15. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galic, H.; Armstrong, F.E.; von Przewoski, B.

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  16. Corporate Operating Experience Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program helps to prevent the recurrence of significant adverse events/trends by sharing performance information, lessons learned and good practices across the DOE complex. This program includes: Operating Experience Committee The Operating Experience Committee (OEC) is chartered under the DOE Integrated Safety Management Council and in conjunction with DOE Order 210.2A, DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program, which was approved on April 8, 2011. The

  17. NOvA Experiment - The Local Community

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Deb Wieber

    2010-01-08

    Local proprietors Steve and Deb Wieber discuss the impact of the NOvA experiment on their community.

  18. Experiments on eta-meson production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Following a review of some highlights of eta-meson characteristics, the status of eta-meson production experiments is reviewed. The physics motivations and first results of two LAMPF experiments on (..pi..,eta) reactions are discussed. Possible future experiments are also discussed. 42 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Operating Experience Committee Charter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committe Charter explains the purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE) Operating Experience Committee (OEC), which is to support line management within DOE and the DOE community in developing and sustaining effective oeprating experience programs so that lessons from inernal and external operating experience lead to improvement in future operational and safety performance

  20. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27[degree]C, but never 31[degree]C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  1. Deuterium accelerator experiments for APT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Causey, Rion A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hertz, Kristin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Cowgill, Donald F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories in California initiated an experimental program to determine whether tritium retention in the tube walls and permeation through the tubes into the surrounding coolant water would be a problem for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), and to find ways to mitigate the problem, if it existed. Significant holdup in the tube walls would limit the ability of APT to meet its production goals, and high levels of permeation would require a costly cleanup system for the cooling water. To simulate tritium implantation, a 200 keV accelerator was used to implant deuterium into Al 6061-T and SS3 16L samples at temperatures and particle fluxes appropriate for APT, for times varying between one week and five months. The implanted samples were characterized to determine the deuterium retention and Permeation. During the implantation, the D(d,p)T nuclear reaction was used to monitor the build-up of deuterium in the implant region of the samples. These experiments increased in sophistication, from mono-energetic deuteron implants to multi-energetic deuteron and proton implants, to more accurately reproduce the conditions expected in APT. Micron-thick copper, nickel, and anodized aluminum coatings were applied to the front surface of the samples (inside of the APT walls) in an attempt to lower retention and permeation. The reduction in both retention and permeation produced by the nickel coatings, and the ability to apply them to the inside of the APT tubes, indicate that both nickel-coated Al 6061-T6 and nickel-coated SS3 16L tubes would be effective for use in APT. The results of this work were submitted to the Accelerator Production of Tritium project in document number TPO-E29-Z-TNS-X-00050, APT-MP-01-17.

  2. The BigBoss Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schelgel, D.; Abdalla, F.; Abraham, T.; Ahn, C.; Allende Prieto, C.; Annis, J.; Aubourg, E.; Azzaro, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Baugh, C.; Bebek, C.; Becerril, S.; Blanton, M.; Bolton, A.; Bromley, B.; Cahn, R.; Carton, P.-H.; Cervanted-Cota, J.L.; Chu, Y.; Cortes, M.; /APC, Paris /Brookhaven /IRFU, Saclay /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, CPT /Durham U. / /IEU, Seoul /Fermilab /IAA, Granada /IAC, La Laguna / /IAC, Mexico / / /Madrid, IFT /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. / / /New York U. /Valencia U.

    2012-06-07

    BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (k{sub max} = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (k{sub max} = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.

  3. The XENON100 Dark Matter Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tziaferi, E.

    2010-06-23

    The XENON100 experiment is searching for WIMPs, which are particles that may consist dark matter. It is located in the underground laboratory of Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy at a depth of {approx}3600 m.w.e.. The experiment description, its performance and the expected background based on Monte Carlo simulations and material screening along with the projected sensitivities of the experiment are presented. In addition, a brief description of the upgrade XENON100 detector is given.

  4. Operating Experience Summaries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operating Experience Summaries Operating Experience Summaries The Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU) Office of Analysis publishes the Operating Experience Summary to exchange lessons-learned information between DOE facilities. We would like to hear from you regarding how we can make our analytical products better and more useful. Please forward any comments to Ashley.Ruocco@hq.doe.gov. Readers are cautioned that review of the OE Summary should not be a substitute for a

  5. Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiments & Projects icon: Energy Frontier Energy Frontier Particle physics experiments at the Energy Frontier explore the fundamental constituents and architecture of the universe. Here accelerators produce the highest-energy particles ever made by man. Experimentalists use particle collisions to search for undiscovered particles and interactions and to learn more about known particles and interactions. icon: Intensity Frontier Intensity Frontier Particle physics experiments at the

  6. Early Childhood Experiences Conference on October 30

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early Childhood Experiences Conference Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Early Childhood Experiences Conference on October 30 Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation's First Born Program presents "Understanding Early Childhood Experiences as a Primary Public Health Concern." October 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community

  7. NNSA releases Stockpile Stewardship Program quarterly experiments...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. The summary also provides the number of experiments...

  8. DEP Learning Experiences | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning Experiences "Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge." - Carl Sagan, Astrophysicist Argonne Education provides a variety of...

  9. Renewables-Friendly Grid Development Strategies: Experience...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    penetrations of variable renewable electricity. China is actively contributing to this body of experience given the rapid growth in renewable electricity deployment there, while...

  10. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galic, H.; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B.; Dodder, D.C.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Illarionova, N.S.; Lehar, F.; Oyanagi, Y.; Olin, A.; Frosch, R.

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  11. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Civil Construction Pictures The civil construction required for the MiniBooNE experiment consists of two independent construction projects. The Detector Construction: This project...

  12. ATLAS APPROVED IN-BEAM EXPERIMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 785 Baktash Band Termination, Superdeformation and Complex Clusters in 32S 5 TOTAL 82 ATLAS APPROVED SOURCE EXPERIMENTS (Depending on Gammasphere Availability) Exp Spokesperson...

  13. Capturing Pioneer Plant Experience: Implications for Synfuels...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    benefits of information from pioneer synfuel projects. As first-of-a-kind commercial plants, the first set of synfuel technology projects will generate experience and information...

  14. Operating Experience Summary, 2015-01

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 September 16, 2015 Inside This Issue * Explosion at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex ... 1 Page 1 of 8 Operating Experience Summary Office of Environment,...

  15. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE) Goals of BooNE BooNE in a Nutshell Making Neutrinos Detecting Neutrinos

  16. Operating Experience Level 3: Radiologically Contaminated Respirators...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Experience Level 3 provides information on a safety concern related to radiological contamination of launderedreconditioned respirators and parts that have been certified as...

  17. Bassi_Experiences-NUG-2006.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    we started experimenting with various compiler and runtime settings. * With NERSC & IBM playing about equal roles, most of the benchmark requirements were easy exceeded in what...

  18. Hydrogen Embrittlement Fundamentals, Modeling, and Experiment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Embrittlement Fundamentals, Modeling, and Experiment Embrittlement, under static load could be a result of the synergistic action of the HELP and decohesion...

  19. Overview of Field Experience - Degradation Rates & Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Dirk; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-14

    The way a PV module fails may depend not only on its design and the materials used in its construction, but also on the weather it experiences, the way it is mounted, and the quality control during its manufacture. This presentation gives an overview of Field Experience - what degradation rates and what lifetimes are being observed in various regions.

  20. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Details This page provides information on the MiniBooNE experiment. Images are linked in their own page with captions. Additional resources are the Talks, Slides and Posters page, Publications page, and Data Release page Beamline Flux Detector Cross sections Light Propagation (Optical Model) Calibration Particle Identification BooNE photo montage

  1. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collaboration Find here collaboration lists of MiniBooNE at various stages of the experiment Current MiniBooNE-darkmatter collaboration Original MiniBooNE collaboration From script reading a simple data base, last updated ~2008. from inspirehep.net Booster Neutrino Experiment FNAL-E-0898

  2. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For Physicists These pages provides information (numbers, plots, details) of the MiniBooNE experiment and analysis pieces. Images are linked in their own page with captions. Additional resources are the Talks, Slides and Posters page and the Publications page Experiment Details Data Releases BooNE photo montage

  3. Property:Past Pertinent Test Experience | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Past Pertinent Test Experience Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Past Pertinent Test Experience Property Type Text Pages using the property "Past Pertinent Test Experience"...

  4. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  5. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vs MiniBooNE MiniBooNE is the first phase of the Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE); in this phase, neutrino oscillation measurements will be made with a single detector. If oscillations are observed, then MiniBooNE will be upgraded to stage two (BooNE) with a two-detector configuration. The BooNE experiment proposes to definitively explore the neutrino oscillation signal reported by the Los Alamos LSND experiment. MiniBooNE represents the first phase for the BooNE collaboration and consists of

  6. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czarapata, P.

    2015-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2015. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2015 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment and Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  7. Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reliable, efficient, ultra-clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications US Department of Energy/ Office of Naval Research Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop Washington, DC March 29, 2011 FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. *FuelCell Energy, Inc. *Renewable and Liquid Fuels Experience *HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack for Shipboard APU *Solid Oxide Experience and Applications DOE-ONR Workshop

  8. Local scrape-off layer control using biased electrodes in NSTX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volts, and the radial profile of the plasma between them was measured by an array of Langmuir probes. The biasing caused large changes in the local SOL profiles at least...

  9. Local Scrape-Off Layer Control Using Biased electrodes in NSTX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volts, and the radial profile of the plasma between them was measured by an array of Langmuir probes. The biasing caused large changes in the local SOL profiles at least...

  10. Analyses of Divertor Regimes in NSTX (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    region. Recent measurements of radiated power, heat and particle fluxes in lower single null and double null plasmas with 0.8 - 6 MW NBI heating suggest that the inner divertor is...

  11. "Stellar" progress on NSTX-U highlights strong year for PPPL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    letters. He noted that three Office of Communications staff members: Science Writer John Greenwald, Photographer Elle Starkman, and Webmaster Chris Cane, received awards from...

  12. Progress towards steady state on NSTX (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number(s): UCRL-JRNL-221039 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Nuclear Fusion, vol. 46, na, May 3, 2006, S22-S28...

  13. NSTX-U Digital Coil Protection System Software Detailed Design | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab Digital Coil Protection System Software Detailed Design This system can serve as a protection system for anything that can be modeled as a system of equations that must stay within limits. Currently, DCPS calculates 1200 equations every 200 microseconds, but this is easily expanded to much higher amounts in shorter times. The inputs can be any combination of signals, digital, analog, or even packets over Ethernet. The system is designed to be flexible enough to run in any

  14. NSTX-U Advances in Real-Time C++11 on Linux (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Type: Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 62; Journal Issue: 4; Conference: 2014 IEEE-NPSS Real ...

  15. Local Scrape-Off Layer Control Using Biased electrodes in NSTX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to test the theory that biased electrodes can affect the local scrape-off layer (SOL) width by creating a strong radial ExB drift Cohen, R.H. and Ryutov, D.D, Nucl. Fusion...

  16. Local scrape-off layer control using biased electrodes in NSTX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to test the theory that biased electrodes can affect the local scrape-off layer (SOL) width by creating a strong radial ExB drift Cohen, R.H. and Ryutov, D.D, Nucl. Fusion...

  17. Upward-facing Lithium Flash Evaporator for NSTX-U (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The minimal time interval between the evaporation andmore the start of the discharge will avoid the passivation of the lithium by residual gases and enable the study of the ...

  18. Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The above illustration was drawn by Professor Yuan T. Lee, who shared the 1986 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. It shows the design for his crossed molecular beam experiment described in ...

  19. Operating Experience Summary, 2014-01

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 of 4 Operating Experience Summary Office of Health, Safety and Security March 19, 2014 body. Originally the SSW had a mentoring role, but when the SSW and JTG roles changed...

  20. A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print Two centuries ago, Thomas Young performed the classic demonstration of the wave nature of light. He placed a screen with two tiny slits in...

  1. A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print Two centuries ago, Thomas Young performed the classic demonstration of the wave nature of light. He placed a screen with two tiny slits...

  2. Publications - Madison Dynamo Experiment - Cary Forest Group...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment. Phys. Plasmas 15, 055910 (2008). E. J. Spence, M. D. Nornberg, C. M. Jacobson, C. A. Parada, N.Z. Taylor, R. D. Kendrick, C. B. Forest. Turbulent Diamagnetism in...

  3. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Goals of BooNE BooNE's primary goal is to investigate the neutrino oscillation signal reported by the Los Alamos Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment. In 1995,...

  4. Beta calutrons and Y-12 experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    calutrons and Y-12 experiments Among the most enjoyable parts of writing about Y-12's history is the feedback I get from those who actually lived the history I'm trying to capture...

  5. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  6. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-03-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring.

  7. Operating Experience Level 3, Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 OE-3 2015-02: Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter (xQ) for Calculation of Co-located Worker Dose This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document informs the complex of the...

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAerosol Lidar Validation Experiment - ALIVE Campaign Links ALIVE Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below...

  9. User Experience Testing | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or enable JavaScript if it is disabled in your browser. "The demand for user experience (UX) and design within GE is growing," says Greg Petroff, GE Software's (link to...

  10. Long term experiences with HDD SCR Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test bench results and on-road experiences of more than 1 million km offer comparisons of fresh and used catalyst activity and NOx conversion capability using appropriate methods of catalyst analysis.

  11. Operating Experience Level 3, Electrical Safety: Shocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE-3: 2015-03 This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to electrical shocks workers have received while performing work at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities.

  12. Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Proposed Projects and Experiments Inside view of drift tube in older 200 MeV section of Linac. Inside view of drift tube in older 200 MeV section...

  13. Reflectance thermometry in dynamic compression experiments. (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Reflectance thermometry in dynamic compression experiments. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reflectance thermometry in dynamic compression experiments. Abstract not provided. Authors: Dolan, Daniel H., ; Ao, Tommy ; Seagle, Christopher T Publication Date: 2012-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 1118217 Report Number(s): SAND2012-0864C 481321 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: 9th International Temperature Symposium held

  14. An overview of the star thrust experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Kenneth; Slough, John; Hoffman, Alan

    1998-01-15

    The Field Reversed Configuration, FRC, is a closed field fusion confinement geometry with great potential to be used as a space propulsive device and power source. Present formation techniques are cumbersome and severely constrain the resultant FRC. An experiment is presently under construction to study the formation and sustainment of the FRC using a rotating magnetic field. If successful, this technique would vastly simplify and enable future FRC endeavors. An overview of the STX experiment is presented.

  15. Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Collaboration Key to Enabling On-The-Fly HPC Data Analysis at Multiple Sites March 17, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov A collaborative effort linking the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) with supercomputing resources at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)

  16. Experiments ✚ Simulations = Better Nuclear Power Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiments + Simulations = Better Nuclear Power Research Experiments ✚ Simulations = Better Nuclear Power Research Atomic Level Simulations Enhance Characterization of Radiation Damage July 31, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov Radiation Damage PNNL In a study featured on the cover of a Journal of Materials Research focus issue, an international research collaboration used molecular dynamics simulations run at NERSC to identify atomic-level details of early-stage

  17. Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments S. Bottone and S. Moore Mission Research Corporation Santa Barbara, California Introduction Quality Measurement Experiments (QME) are a special class of Value-Added Products (VAP). QMEs add value to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program datastreams by providing for continuous assessment of the quality of incoming data based on internal consistency checks, comparisons between independent similar measurements, or comparisons between

  18. JLab Completes 100th Experiment | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Completes 100th Experiment The experiment, titled "Quark Propagation through Cold QCD Matter," began its run in December 2003 and wrapped up in early March. It probed Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), a fundamental theory of particle physics that describes the interactions of quarks and gluons - the basic building blocks of matter. A property of QCD, called confinement, states that no quark can ever be found alone. Instead, quarks combine in pairs or triplets to make up larger particles.

  19. Wireless experiments on a Motorola mesh testbed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riblett, Loren E., Jr.; Wiseman, James M.; Witzke, Edward L.

    2010-06-01

    Motomesh is a Motorola product that performs mesh networking at both the client and access point levels and allows broadband mobile data connections with or between clients moving at vehicular speeds. Sandia National aboratories has extensive experience with this product and its predecessors in infrastructure-less mobile environments. This report documents experiments, which characterize certain aspects of how the Motomesh network performs when obile units are added to a fixed network infrastructure.

  20. LCLS CDR Chapter 3 - Scientific Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Basis for Optical Systems TECHNICAL SYNOPSIS The LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) has recommended experiments in five scientific disciplines for the initial operation of the LCLS. These experiments cover a variety of scientific disciplines: atomic physics, plasma physics, chemistry, biology and materials science. The x-ray optics and detectors needed to verify the LCLS capability to address these five disciplines will be constructed and installed as part of the LCLS project.

  1. Research Laboratory Experiments with Energy Efficiency Upgrades |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Research Laboratory Experiments with Energy Efficiency Upgrades Research Laboratory Experiments with Energy Efficiency Upgrades August 30, 2012 - 11:52am Addthis Energy efficiency upgrades -- such as geothermal heating and cooling, nanogel-filled windows, and lighting sensors -- will help the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research reduce energy use and save money. | Photo courtesy of the University of Kentucky. Energy efficiency upgrades -- such as

  2. Statistical design of a uranium corrosion experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendelberger, Joanne R; Moore, Leslie M

    2009-01-01

    This work supports an experiment being conducted by Roland Schulze and Mary Ann Hill to study hydride formation, one of the most important forms of corrosion observed in uranium and uranium alloys. The study goals and objectives are described in Schulze and Hill (2008), and the work described here focuses on development of a statistical experiment plan being used for the study. The results of this study will contribute to the development of a uranium hydriding model for use in lifetime prediction models. A parametric study of the effect of hydrogen pressure, gap size and abrasion on hydride initiation and growth is being planned where results can be analyzed statistically to determine individual effects as well as multi-variable interactions. Input to ESC from this experiment will include expected hydride nucleation, size, distribution, and volume on various uranium surface situations (geometry) as a function of age. This study will also address the effect of hydrogen threshold pressure on corrosion nucleation and the effect of oxide abrasion/breach on hydriding processes. Statistical experiment plans provide for efficient collection of data that aids in understanding the impact of specific experiment factors on initiation and growth of corrosion. The experiment planning methods used here also allow for robust data collection accommodating other sources of variation such as the density of inclusions, assumed to vary linearly along the cast rods from which samples are obtained.

  3. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Peter T.; Mather, James H.; Vaughan, Geraint; Jakob, Christian; McFarquhar, Greg; Bower, Keith; Mace, Gerald G.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most complete data sets describing tropical convection ever collected will result from the upcoming Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the area around Darwin, Northern Australia in January and February 2006. The aims of the experiment, which will be operated in conjunction with the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin, will be to examine convective cloud systems from their initial stages through to the decay of the cirrus generated and to measure their impact on the environment. The experiment will include an unprecedented network of ground-based observations (soundings, active and passive remote sensors) combined with low, mid and high altitude aircraft for in-situ and remote sensing measurements. A crucial outcome of the experiment will be a data set suitable to provide the forcing and evaluation data required by cloud resolving and single column models as well as global climate models (GCMs) with the aim to contribute to parameterization development. This data set will provide the necessary link between the observed cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a large multi-agency experiment including substantial contributions from the United States DOE ARM program, ARM-UAV program, NASA, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, EU programs and many universities.

  4. Incorporating Experience Curves in Appliance Standards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbesi, Karina; Chan, Peter; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Kantner, Colleen; Lekov, Alex; Meyers, Stephen; Rosenquist, Gregory; Buskirk, Robert Van; Yang, Hung-Chia; Desroches, Louis-Benoit

    2011-10-31

    The technical analyses in support of U.S. energy conservation standards for residential appliances and commercial equipment have typically assumed that manufacturing costs and retail prices remain constant during the projected 30-year analysis period. There is, however, considerable evidence that this assumption does not reflect real market prices. Costs and prices generally fall in relation to cumulative production, a phenomenon known as experience and modeled by a fairly robust empirical experience curve. Using price data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and shipment data obtained as part of the standards analysis process, we present U.S. experience curves for room air conditioners, clothes dryers, central air conditioners, furnaces, and refrigerators and freezers. These allow us to develop more representative appliance price projections than the assumption-based approach of constant prices. These experience curves were incorporated into recent energy conservation standards for these products. The impact on the national modeling can be significant, often increasing the net present value of potential standard levels in the analysis. In some cases a previously cost-negative potential standard level demonstrates a benefit when incorporating experience. These results imply that past energy conservation standards analyses may have undervalued the economic benefits of potential standard levels.

  5. Photophoretic strength on chondrules. 2. Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loesche, Christoph; Teiser, Jens; Wurm, Gerhard; Hesse, Alexander; Friedrich, Jon M.; Bischoff, Addi

    2014-09-01

    Photophoretic motion can transport illuminated particles in protoplanetary disks. In a previous paper, we focused on the modeling of steady state photophoretic forces based on the compositions derived from tomography and heat transfer. Here, we present microgravity experiments which deviate significantly from the steady state calculations of the first paper. The experiments on average show a significantly smaller force than predicted with a large variation in absolute photophoretic force and in the direction of motion with respect to the illumination. Time-dependent modeling of photophoretic forces for heat-up and rotation shows that the variations in strength and direction observed can be well explained by the particle reorientation in the limited experiment time of a drop tower experiment. In protoplanetary disks, random rotation subsides due to gas friction on short timescales and the results of our earlier paper hold. Rotation has a significant influence in short duration laboratory studies. Observing particle motion and rotation under the influence of photophoresis can be considered as a basic laboratory analog experiment to Yarkovsky and YORP effects.

  6. The PEAK experience in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    The PEAK Institute was developed to provide a linkage for formal (schoolteachers) and nonformal educators (extension agents) with agricultural scientists of Clemson University`s South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station System. The goal of the Institute was to enable teams of educators and researchers to develop and provide PEAK science and math learning experiences related to relevant agricultural and environmental issues of local communities for both classroom and 4-H Club experiences. The Peak Institute was conducted through a twenty day residential Institute held in June for middle school and high school teachers who were teamed with an Extension agent from their community. These educators participated in hands-on, minds-on sessions conducted by agricultural researchers and Clemson University Cooperative Extension specialists. Participants were given the opportunity to see frontier science being conducted by scientists from a variety of agricultural laboratories.

  7. Operating Experience Summary, 2014-06

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operating Experience Summary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security OE Summary 2014-06 December 16, 2014 Inside This Issue * Truck Fire Underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ..... 1 * "We may have a problem..." ...... 10 Page 1 of 12 Operating Experience Summary Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security December 16, 2014 On February 5, 2014, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, a 29-year-old salt

  8. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, K.; Le Jeannic, H.; Ruaudel, J.; Morin, O.; Laurat, J.

    2014-12-15

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments.

  9. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a Nutshell BooNE will investigate the question of neutrino mass by searching for oscillations of muon neutrinos into electron neutrinos. This will be done by directing a muon neutrino beam into the MiniBooNE detector and looking for electron neutrinos. This experiment is motivated by the oscillation results reported by the LSND experiment at Los Alamos. By changing the muon neutrino beam into a muon anti-neutrino beam, BooNE can explore oscillations from muon anti-neutrinos to electron

  10. A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print Two centuries ago, Thomas Young performed the classic demonstration of the wave nature of light. He placed a screen with two tiny slits in front of a single light source, effectively converting it into a two-centered source. On a second screen far away, he saw a pattern of light and dark diffraction fringes, a well-known hallmark of wave interference. Along with later studies using particles instead of light, the experiment played a crucial role in

  11. A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print Two centuries ago, Thomas Young performed the classic demonstration of the wave nature of light. He placed a screen with two tiny slits in front of a single light source, effectively converting it into a two-centered source. On a second screen far away, he saw a pattern of light and dark diffraction fringes, a well-known hallmark of wave interference. Along with later studies using particles instead of light, the experiment played a crucial role in

  12. A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print Wednesday, 29 February 2012 00:00 Two centuries ago, Thomas Young performed the classic demonstration of the wave nature of light. He placed a screen with two tiny slits in front of a single light source, effectively converting it into a two-centered source. On a second screen far away, he saw a pattern of light and dark diffraction fringes, a well-known hallmark of wave interference. Along with later studies using

  13. Data production models for the CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antos, J.; Babik, M.; Benjamin, D.; Cabrera, S.; Chan, A.W.; Chen, Y.C.; Coca, M.; Cooper, B.; Genser, K.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hou, S.; Hsieh, T.L.; Jayatilaka, B.; Kraan, A.C.; Lysak, R.; Mandrichenko, I.V.; Robson, A.; Siket, M.; Stelzer, B.; Syu, J.; Teng, P.K.; /Kosice, IEF /Duke U. /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /University Coll. London /Fermilab /Rockefeller U. /Michigan U. /Pennsylvania U. /Glasgow U. /UCLA /Tsukuba U. /New Mexico U.

    2006-06-01

    The data production for the CDF experiment is conducted on a large Linux PC farm designed to meet the needs of data collection at a maximum rate of 40 MByte/sec. We present two data production models that exploits advances in computing and communication technology. The first production farm is a centralized system that has achieved a stable data processing rate of approximately 2 TByte per day. The recently upgraded farm is migrated to the SAM (Sequential Access to data via Metadata) data handling system. The software and hardware of the CDF production farms has been successful in providing large computing and data throughput capacity to the experiment.

  14. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interesting Facts About the Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE): BooNE is the only experiment to search the entire range covered by the LSND oscillation signal. First proposed in 1997, BooNE has been collecting data since August 2002. The BooNE collaboration is small by high energy physics standards, comprising 75 physicists from 16 instiutions. If BooNE detects a supernova, it will send an automatic signal to telescopes around the world describing its position. BooNE collaboration - click to

  15. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen

    2015-12-03

    This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiation. It is based on the model used to calculate temperatures and volume fractions in an annular vessel containing an aqueous solution of uranium . The experiment was repeated at several electron beam power levels, but the CFD analysis was performed only for the 12 kW irradiation, because this experiment came the closest to reaching a steady-state condition. The aim of the study is to compare results of the calculation with experimental measurements to determine the validity of the CFD model.

  16. A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print Two centuries ago, Thomas Young performed the classic demonstration of the wave nature of light. He placed a screen with two tiny slits in front of a single light source, effectively converting it into a two-centered source. On a second screen far away, he saw a pattern of light and dark diffraction fringes, a well-known hallmark of wave interference. Along with later studies using particles instead of light, the experiment played a crucial role in

  17. A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print Two centuries ago, Thomas Young performed the classic demonstration of the wave nature of light. He placed a screen with two tiny slits in front of a single light source, effectively converting it into a two-centered source. On a second screen far away, he saw a pattern of light and dark diffraction fringes, a well-known hallmark of wave interference. Along with later studies using particles instead of light, the experiment played a crucial role in

  18. About the MicroBooNE Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About MicroBooNE The MicroBooNE collaboration is currently operating a large 170-ton liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) that is located on the Booster neutrino beam line at Fermilab. The experiment will measure low energy neutrino cross sections and investigate the low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment. The detector also serves as a next step in a phased program towards the construction of massive kiloton scale LArTPC detectors for future long-baseline neutrino

  19. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brice, S.; Buchanan, N.; Coleman, R.; Convery, M.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Habig, A.; Holmes, S.; Kissel, W.; Lee, W.; Nakaya, T.; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2007. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2007 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  20. The BDX experiment at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celentano, Andrea; et. al.,

    2015-06-01

    The existence of MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. The Beam Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Laboratory aims to investigate this mass range. Dark matter particles will be detected trough scattering on a segmented, plastic scintillator detector placed downstream of the beam-dump at one of the high intensity JLab experimental Halls. The experiment will collect up to 10^22 electrons-on-target (EOT) in a one-year period. For these conditions, BDX is sensitive to the DM-nucleon elastic scattering at the level of a thousand counts per year, and is only limited by cosmogenic backgrounds. The experiment is also sensitive to DM-electron elastic and inelastic scattering, at the level of 10 counts/year. The foreseen signal for these channels is an high-energy (> 100 MeV) electromagnetic shower, with almost no background. The experiment, has been presented in form of a Letter of Intent to the laboratory, receiving positive feedback, and is currently being designed.

  1. Design and Simulation of Hybridization Experiments

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-11-28

    DB EXP DESIGN is a suite of three UNIX shell-like programs, DWC which computes oligomer composition of DNA texts using directed acyclic word data structures; DWO, which simulates hybridization experiments; and DMI, which calculates the information contenet of individual probes, their mutual information content, and their joint information content through estimation of Markov trees.

  2. Determining Supersymmetric Parameters With Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, Dan; Taylor, Andrew M.; /Oxford U.

    2006-07-01

    In this article, we explore the ability of direct and indirect dark matter experiments to not only detect neutralino dark matter, but to constrain and measure the parameters of supersymmetry. In particular, we explore the relationship between the phenomenological quantities relevant to dark matter experiments, such as the neutralino annihilation and elastic scattering cross sections, and the underlying characteristics of the supersymmetric model, such as the values of {mu} (and the composition of the lightest neutralino), m{sub A} and tan {beta}. We explore a broad range of supersymmetric models and then focus on a smaller set of benchmark models. We find that by combining astrophysical observations with collider measurements, {mu} can often be constrained far more tightly than it can be from LHC data alone. In models in the A-funnel region of parameter space, we find that dark matter experiments can potentially determine m{sub A} to roughly {+-}100 GeV, even when heavy neutral MSSM Higgs bosons (A, H{sub 1}) cannot be observed at the LHC. The information provided by astrophysical experiments is often highly complementary to the information most easily ascertained at colliders.

  3. ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Long, Chuck

    2014-06-13

    Results of the ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE) field campaign are contributing significantly to concurrent national and international research efforts addressing questions about how the MJO initiates and changes as it passes phenomenon differs in observations versus models.

  4. ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Chuck

    2014-03-29

    Results of the ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE) field campaign are contributing significantly to concurrent national and international research efforts addressing questions about how the MJO initiates and changes as it passes phenomenon differs in observations versus models.

  5. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The BooNE collaboration consists of approximately sixty-five physicists from 13 institutions. While small on the scale of high energy physics experiments, BooNE thrives from the diversity of its membership. This includes scientists from national laboratories, research universities, predominantly undergraduate institutions, as well as a high school physics teacher. List of Collaborators

  6. Operating Experience Level 3, Explosives Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about the dangers inherent in material handling and the role hazard analysis, work planning, and walkdowns can play in preventing injuries during heavy equipment moves. More than 200 material handling events reported to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) from January 1, 2010, through August 31, 2014.

  7. Stockpile Stewardship Program Quarterly Experiments | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration Program Quarterly Experiments | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  8. US graphite reactor D&D experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE).

  9. Experiment prediction for LOFT nuclear experiments L5-1/L8-2. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, T.H.; Modro, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    The LOFT Experiments L5-1 and L8-2 simulated intermediate break loss-of-coolant accidents with core uncovery. This paper compares the predictions with the measured data for these experiments. The RELAP5 code was used to perform best estimate double-blind and single-blind predictions. The double-blind calculations are performed prior to the experiment and use specified nominal initial and boundary conditions. The single-blind calculations are performed after the experiment and use measured initial and boundary conditions while maintaining all other parameters constant, including the code version. Comparisons of calculated results with experimental results are discussed; the possible causes of discrepancies are explored and explained. RELAP5 calculated system pressure, mass inventory, and fuel cladding temperature agree reasonably well with the experiment results, and only slight changes are noted between the double-blind and single-blind predictions.

  10. Experiment operations plan for the TH-2 experiment in the NRU reactor. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G.E.; Wilson, C.L.; Parchen, L.J.; Freshley, M.D.

    1983-06-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding materials deformation experiments were conducted using light-water reactor fuel bundles as part of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. This report is the formal operations plan for TH-2--the second experiment in the series of thermal-hydraulic tests conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The major objective of TH-2 was to develop the experiment reflood control parameters and the procedures to be used in subsequent experiments in this program. In this experiment, the data acquisition and control system was used to control the fuel cladding temperature during a simulated LOCA by using variable reflood coolant flow.

  11. Engineering-Scale Liquid Cadmium Cathode Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Vaden; B. R. Westphal; S. X. Li; T. A. Johnson; K. B. Davies; D. M. Pace

    2006-08-01

    Recovery of transuranic actinides (TRU) using electrorefining is a process being investigated as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). TRU recovery via electrorefining onto a solid cathode is very difficult as the thermodynamic properties of transuranics are not favourable for them to remain in the metal phase while significant quantities of uranium trichloride exist in the electrolyte. Theoretically, the concentration of transuranics in the electrolyte must be approximately 106 greater than the uranium concentration in the electrolyte to produce a transuranic deposit on a solid cathode. Using liquid cadmium as a cathode contained within a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, the co-deposition of uranium and transuranics is feasible because the activity of the transuranics in liquid cadmium is very small. Depositing transuranics and uranium in a liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) theoretically requires the concentration of transuranics to be two to three times the uranium concentration in the electrolyte. Three LCC experiments were performed in an Engineering scale elecdtrorefiner, which is located in the argon hot cell of the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex on the Idaho National Laboratory. Figure 1 contains photographs of the LCC assembly in the hot cell prior to the experiment and a cadmium ingot produced after the first LCC test. Figure 1. Liquid Cadmium Cathode (left) and Cadmium Ingot (right) The primary goal of the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments was to electrochemically collect kilogram quantities of uranium and plutonium via a LCC. The secondary goal was to examine fission product contaminations in the materials collected by the LCC. Each LCC experiment used chopped spent nuclear fuel from the blanket region of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II loaded into steel baskets as the anode with the LCC containing 26 kg of cadmium metal. In each experiment, between one and two kilograms of heavy metal was collected in the LCC after passing an integrated current over 500 amp hours. Analysis of samples from the liquid cadmium cathode ingots showed detectable amounts of transuranics and rare-earth elements. Acknowledgements K. B. Davies and D. M. Pace for the mechanical and electrical engineering needed to prepare the equipment for the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments.

  12. A Snowflake-Shaped Magnetic Field Holds Promise for Taming Harsh Fusion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasmas | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab A Snowflake-Shaped Magnetic Field Holds Promise for Taming Harsh Fusion Plasmas Recent experiments have confirmed the great potential of a novel plasma-material interface concept. By U.S Department of Energy Office of Science October 31, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook National Spherical Torus Experiment (Photo by Elle Starkman, Office of Communications, PPPL) National Spherical Torus Experiment The Science Heat escaping from the

  13. MCNP simulations of material exposure experiments (u) (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Simulations of proposed material exposure experiments were performed using MCNP6. The experiments will expose ampules...

  14. KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design You are accessing a document...

  15. KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design This PowerPoint presentation...

  16. Meter Scale Plasma Source for Plasma Wakefield Experiments (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Meter Scale Plasma Source for Plasma Wakefield Experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Meter Scale Plasma Source for Plasma Wakefield Experiments Authors:...

  17. Results From Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at FACET...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Results From Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at FACET Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Results From Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at FACET Authors:...

  18. Case Study Webinar: Cummins SEP 'Experience', November 19, 2PM...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Case Study Webinar: Cummins SEP 'Experience', November 19, 2PM eastern time Case Study Webinar: Cummins SEP 'Experience', November 19, 2PM eastern time November...

  19. Double Shock Experiments and Reactive Flow Modeling of High Pressure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Double Shock Experiments and Reactive Flow Modeling of High Pressure LX-17 Detonation Reaction Product States Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Double Shock Experiments ...

  20. Emissions Reduction Experience with Johnson Matthey EGRT on Off...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduction Experience with Johnson Matthey EGRT on Off-Road Equipment Emissions Reduction Experience with Johnson Matthey EGRT on Off-Road Equipment Poster presentation at the 2007...

  1. Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2015 Now Accepting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2015 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in ... Graduate students and early career professionals can gain hands-on field research ...

  2. Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report...

  3. Competition Provides Students with Real-World Engineering Experience...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Competition Provides Students with Real-World Engineering Experience Competition Provides Students with Real-World Engineering Experience April 10, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Fifteen...

  4. Application Experience with a Combined SCR and DPF Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experience with a Combined SCR and DPF Technology for Heavy Duty Diesel Retrofit Application Experience with a Combined SCR and DPF Technology for Heavy Duty Diesel Retrofit ...

  5. Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience In this study, we examine the ...

  6. Media invited to join students in crystallography experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media invited to join students in crystallography experiment Media invited to join students in crystallography experiment The student outreach effort is part of the events...

  7. SGIG Report Now Available: Experiences from the Consumer Behavior...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report Now Available: Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers SGIG Report Now Available: Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging ...

  8. Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers (September 2014) Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers (September 2014) One of ...

  9. DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissionin...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) The purpose of...

  10. Los Alamos offers participants hands-on experience with renewable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Los Alamos offers participants hands-on experience with renewable energy technology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Los Alamos offers participants hands-on experience...

  11. Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Plant Experience Naval Applications Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications Presented at the DOE-DOD Shipboard APU Workshop on March 29, 2011. PDF icon...

  12. Operating Experience Level 3, Update to Requalification Test...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Operating Experience Level 3, Update to Requalification Test Failure of Certain High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters Operating Experience Level 3, Update to...

  13. Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Fleet Experience...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Experiences Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Fleet Experiences AgencyCompany Organization: US DOE...

  14. High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Author University of...

  15. Single Crystal Preparation for High-Pressure Experiments in the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Experiments in the Diamond Anvil Cell Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Single Crystal Preparation for High-Pressure Experiments in the Diamond Anvil Cell You are ...

  16. Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    between Theory and Experiments Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research...

  17. Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experiments on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation Controlled Experiments on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash, ...

  18. Multiple Scattering Measurements in the MICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.; Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), under construction at RAL, will test a prototype cooling channel for a future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The cooling channel aims to achieve, using liquid hydrogen absorbers, a 10% reduction in transverse emittance. The change in 4D emittance will be determined with an accuracy of 1% by measuring muons individually. Step IV of MICE will make the first precise emittance-reduction measurements of the experiment. Simulation studies using G4MICE, based on GEANT4, find a significant difference in multiple scattering in low Z materials, compared with the standard expression quoted by the Particle Data Group. Direct measurement of multiple scattering using the scintillating-fibre trackers is found to be possible, but requires the measurement resolution to be unfolded from the data.

  19. Calibration Monitor for Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, M. E.

    2009-11-23

    The goal of this program was to design, build, test, and characterize a flight qualified calibration source and monitor for a Dark Energy related experiment: ACCESS - 'Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars'. This calibration source, the On-board Calibration Monitor (OCM), is a key component of our ACCESS spectrophotometric calibration program. The OCM will be flown as part of the ACCESS sub-orbital rocket payload in addition to monitoring instrument sensitivity on the ground. The objective of the OCM is to minimize systematic errors associated with any potential changes in the ACCESS instrument sensitivity. Importantly, the OCM will be used to monitor instrument sensitivity immediately after astronomical observations while the instrument payload is parachuting to the ground. Through monitoring, we can detect, track, characterize, and thus correct for any changes in instrument senstivity over the proposed 5-year duration of the assembled and calibrated instrument.

  20. Accelerated Application Development: The ORNL Titan Experience

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Joubert, Wayne; Archibald, Richard K.; Berrill, Mark A.; Brown, W. Michael; Eisenbach, Markus; Grout, Ray; Larkin, Jeff; Levesque, John; Messer, Bronson; Norman, Matthew R.; et al

    2015-05-09

    The use of computational accelerators such as NVIDIA GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi processors is now widespread in the high performance computing community, with many applications delivering impressive performance gains. However, programming these systems for high performance, performance portability and software maintainability has been a challenge. In this paper we discuss experiences porting applications to the Titan system. Titan, which began planning in 2009 and was deployed for general use in 2013, was the first multi-petaflop system based on accelerator hardware. To ready applications for accelerated computing, a preparedness effort was undertaken prior to delivery of Titan. In this papermore » we report experiences and lessons learned from this process and describe how users are currently making use of computational accelerators on Titan.« less

  1. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Qiuguang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.55 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energy regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.

  2. Experiment to Characterize Tropical Cloud Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Peter T.; Mather, Jim H.; Jakob, Christian

    2005-08-02

    A major experiment to study tropical convective cloud systems and their impacts will take place around Darwin, Northern Australia in early 2006. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) is a collaboration including the DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) and ARM-UAV programs, NASA centers, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, and universities in the USA, Australia, Japan, the UK, and Canada. TWP-ICE will be preceded in November/December 2004 by a collaborating European aircraft campaign involving the EU SCOUT-O3 and UK NERC ACTIVE projects. Detailed atmospheric measurements will be made in the Darwin area through the whole Austral summer, giving unprecedented coverage through the pre-monsoon and monsoon periods.

  3. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; et al

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced amore » clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.« less

  4. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Collin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Yingping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE ModelData Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  5. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energymore » regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.« less

  6. Overview of Recent Tritium Experiments in TPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masashi Shimada; T. Otsuka; R. J. Pawelko; P. Calderoni; J. P. Sharpe

    2010-10-01

    Tritium retention in plasma-facing components influences the design, operation, and lifetime of fusion devices such as ITER. Most of the retention studies were carried out with the use of either hydrogen or deuterium. Tritium Plasma Experiment is a unique linear plasma device that can handle radioactive fusion fuel of tritium, toxic material of beryllium, and neutron-irradiated material. A tritium depth profiling method up to mm range was developed using a tritium imaging plate and a diamond wire saw. A series of tritium experiments (T2/D2 ratio: 0.2 and 0.5 %) was performed to investigate tritium depth profiling in bulk tungsten, and the results shows that tritium is migrated into bulk tungsten up to mm range.

  7. CALIOPE and TAISIR airborne experiment platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chocol, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    Between 1950 and 1970, scientific ballooning achieved many new objectives and made a substantial contribution to understanding near-earth and space environments. In 1986, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began development of ballooning technology capable of addressing issues associated with precision tracking of ballistic missiles. In 1993, the Radar Ocean Imaging Project identified the need for a low altitude (1 km) airborne platform for its Radar system. These two technologies and experience base have been merged with the acquisition of government surplus Aerostats by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The CALIOPE and TAISIR Programs can benefit directly from this technology by using the Aerostat as an experiment platform for measurements of the spill facility at NTS.

  8. CMM Interim Check Design of Experiments (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montano, Joshua Daniel

    2015-07-29

    Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) are widely used in industry, throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to verify part conformance to design definition. Calibration cycles for CMMs at LANL are predominantly one year in length and include a weekly interim check to reduce risk. The CMM interim check makes use of Renishaw’s Machine Checking Gauge which is an off-the-shelf product simulates a large sphere within a CMM’s measurement volume and allows for error estimation. As verification on the interim check process a design of experiments investigation was proposed to test a couple of key factors (location and inspector). The results from the two-factor factorial experiment proved that location influenced results more than the inspector or interaction.

  9. Working at Congress : a Sandian's experience.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    During the 110th Congress (calendar years 2007 and 2008), Matthew Allen, a Sandian nuclear scientist, served as a Congressional Fellow on the Committee on Homeland Security in the House of Representatives. This report is an informative account of the role staffers play in assisting the members of Congress in their oversight and legislative duties. It is also a personal account of Matthew Allen's experience as a committee staffer in the House of Representatives.

  10. New Voices of Experience Report Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Voices of Experience | Insights into Advanced Distribution Management Systems report is the result of a one-day meeting in May 2014 that was followed by a series of conference calls about specific aspects of ADMS, interviews with individuals leading ADMS projects at their utilities, and a final small group meeting in October 2014. The information in the report came directly from the people in the industry on the leading edge of transforming their distribution systems

  11. ORISE Faculty Research Experiences: Dr. Eddie Red

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eddie Red Professor Makes Important Connections through Research Experience Dr. Eddie Red In ORNL's Chemical Sciences Division, Dr. Eddie Red of Morehouse College studies nanotube characteristics-technology that could impact future solar cells, as well as battery and fuel cells. Eddie C. Red, Ph.D., has longed to set up a functional research laboratory for the training and development of under-represented minorities in physics and engineering at Morehouse College, where he is a professor.

  12. ORISE Research Team Experiences: Joe Lake

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joe Lake One-Time Student Intern has 'Second Life' as ORNL Mentor Joe Lake Joe Lake, a full-time software engineer for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Computational Science and Engineering Division, is doing his part to help foster the next generation of scientists. As a former participant of both the ORISE-administered DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) and Higher Education Research Experiences (HERE) programs, Lake is currently co-mentoring his fourth student. As a former

  13. ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences - Benjamin Martin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Martin Engineering student fuses together satellite data to aid in emergency response Benjamin Martin Benjamin Martin, an engineering student at the Univ. of Tennessee enrolled in the Higher Education Research Experiences program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is trying to improve emergency response by developing computer codes to fuse together two different kinds of satellite image data. In the event of a man-made or natural disaster, Martin's codes could be used to enable a comparison of

  14. ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences - Benjamin Snyder

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Snyder Graduate student experiences computing in the fast lane Benjamin Snyder Benjamin Snyder, a graduate in geography, is using his stint at the National Energy and Technology Laboratory in Pittsburgh, Pa., to develop his skills in geographic information systems. Using mapping, he helps locate the best sites for natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale. Benjamin Snyder eagerly takes his coffee with creamer and just as readily without it. "I did not think I was that hard of a person to

  15. Recent Higgs results from the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brendlinger, Kurt; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    This paper presents recent results on the Higgs boson from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The Collaboration reports on measurements of the signal strength, couplings, and spin of the Higgs in several decay channels. We find all measurements to be consistent with Standard Model predictions. The Higgs branching fraction to invisible particles is constrained and no evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model is found.

  16. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Apply Who Qualifies Special Undergrad Information Contributors Faculty Past Programs Photo Gallery NSEC » CSES » SAGE SAGE, the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience Application deadline: March 27, 2016, 5:00 pm MDT Contacts Institute Director Reinhard Friedel-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director W. Scott Baldridge-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director Larry Braile-Purdue University Professional Staff Assistant Georgia Sanchez (505) 665-0855 Email Application process for SAGE 2016 is now open. U.S.

  17. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Talks and Proceedings This page contains links to talks and proceedings about the MiniBooNE experiment presented by members of the collaboration. Password protected link to page containing future talks schedule and unassigned talks list. Password protected link to seminar schedule. Conference talks Other talks Proceedings Posters All Experimenters Meeting talks The MiniBooNE Talks Committee is Jon Link (chair), Rex Tayloe, and Morgan Wascko. Conference Talks Speaker Conference Info Material Name

  18. Experiment Indicates Sound Waves Can Trigger Quakes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'memory' could spur aftershocks January 3, 2008 Experiment Indicates Sound Waves Can Trigger Quakes LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, January 3, 2008-Using a novel device that simulates earthquakes in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher and his colleagues have shown that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often long after a quake has subsided. The research provides insight into how earthquakes may be triggered and how they recur. In a letter

  19. Experiments with Wind to Produce Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nat EXPERIMENTS WITH WIND TO PRODUCE ENERGY Curriculum: Wind Power (simple machines, weather/climatology, aerodynamics, leverage, mechanics, atmospheric pressure, and energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: K-5 Small groups (3 to 4) Time: Constructing equipment needed in these activities varies based on student ability levels. Activities can be done in 1 or 2 class periods. Summary: There are five activities. The first activity demonstrates wind as energy, and that energy causes

  20. Duality Apparently Confirmed In Jefferson Laboratory Experiments |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Duality Apparently Confirmed In Jefferson Laboratory Experiments 1999 Isaac Newton, inventor of calculus and creator of classical physics, is thought by some to be the most intelligent person to have ever lived. When Albert Einstein introduced his theories of General and Special Relativity, Newton's Stature was not diminished, but increased. One genius, Newton, made the work of another, Einstein, possible. Einstein's theory is believable because the basic Newtonian mechanics we

  1. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrinos General Information Neutrinos Matter A colorful booklet presenting a general introduction to neutrinos, neutrino mass, and neutrino oscillations. Describes theory in a comprehensible way using graphs and diagrams. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab An introduction to the search for neutrino mass and the discovery of the tau neutrino produced by the Public Affairs office at Fermilab; also describes the neutrino experiments at Fermilab. Beam Line: Special Neutrino Issue A special issue of

  2. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact BooNE Spokespersons: E898 (ν running); E944 (anti-ν and beam-dump running) Rex Tayloe rtayloe@indiana.edu (812) 855-3057 Richard Van de Water vdwater@lanl.gov (505) 695 8364 BooNE Experiment: contact-boone@fnal.gov Current Shifter: (505) 500 5511 Detector Enclosure: (630) 840 6881 or 6081 BooNE Collaborators and Associates:

  3. National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NCERC capabilities National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) capabilities WHEN: Feb 20, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM WHERE: Courtyard by Marriott Santa Fe, NM CONTACT: Evelyn Mullen 505-665-7576 CATEGORY: Science INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description This talk will provide an overview of the capabilities and machines of NCERC followed by a description of the process of restarting Godiva in a new location as presented at the 2014 ANS Winter Meeting. Los Alamos National Laboratory

  4. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Science Objective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Science Objective Despite improvements in computing power, current weather and climate models are unable to accurately reproduce the formation, growth, and decay of clouds and precipitation associated with storm systems. Not only is this due to a lack of data about precipitation, but also about the 3-dimensional environment of the surrounding clouds, winds, and moisture, and how that affects the transfer of energy between the sun and Earth. To

  5. Source Physics Experiment | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Source Physics Experiment | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working

  6. Experience with Palladium Diffusers in Tritium Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motyka, T.; Clark, E.A.; Dauchess, D.A.; Heung, L.K.; Rabum, R.L.

    1995-01-27

    Hydrogen isotopes are separated from other gases by permeation through palladium and palladium-silver alloy diffusers in the Tritium Facilities at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). Diffusers have provided effective service for almost forty years. This paper is an overview of the operational experience with the various diffuser types that have been employed at SRS. Alternative technologies being developed at SRS for purifying hydrogen isotopes are also discussed.

  7. Belle-II Experiment Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asner, David; Bell, Greg; Carlson, Tim; Cowley, David; Dart, Eli; Erwin, Brock; Godang, Romulus; Hara, Takanori; Johnson, Jerry; Johnson, Ron; Johnston, Bill; Dam, Kerstin Kleese-van; Kaneko, Toshiaki; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Kuhr, Thomas; McCoy, John; Miyake, Hideki; Monga, Inder; Nakamura, Motonori; Piilonen, Leo; Pordes, Ruth; Ray, Douglas; Russell, Richard; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Jim; Sevior, Martin; Singh, Surya; Suzuki, Soh; Sasaki, Takashi; Williams, Jim

    2013-05-28

    The Belle experiment, part of a broad-based search for new physics, is a collaboration of ~400 physicists from 55 institutions across four continents. The Belle detector is located at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The Belle detector was operated at the asymmetric electron-positron collider KEKB from 1999-2010. The detector accumulated more than 1 ab-1 of integrated luminosity, corresponding to more than 2 PB of data near 10 GeV center-of-mass energy. Recently, KEK has initiated a $400 million accelerator upgrade to be called SuperKEKB, designed to produce instantaneous and integrated luminosity two orders of magnitude greater than KEKB. The new international collaboration at SuperKEKB is called Belle II. The first data from Belle II/SuperKEKB is expected in 2015. In October 2012, senior members of the Belle-II collaboration gathered at PNNL to discuss the computing and neworking requirements of the Belle-II experiment with ESnet staff and other computing and networking experts. The day-and-a-half-long workshop characterized the instruments and facilities used in the experiment, the process of science for Belle-II, and the computing and networking equipment and configuration requirements to realize the full scientific potential of the collaboration's work.

  8. Impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, B. J.; Owens, C. T.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Saavedra, R. A.; Luo, S. N.; Hooks, D. E.; Iverson, A. J.; Fezzaa, K.

    2013-01-15

    The impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments, or IMPULSE, is a 12.6-mm bore light-gas gun (<1 km/s projectile velocity) designed specifically for performing dynamic compression experiments using the advanced imaging and X-ray diffraction methods available at synchrotron sources. The gun system, capable of reaching projectile velocities up to 1 km/s, was designed to be portable for quick insertion/removal in the experimental hutch at Sector 32 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne, IL) while allowing the target chamber to rotate for sample alignment with the beam. A key challenge in using the gun system to acquire dynamic data on the nanosecond time scale was synchronization (or bracketing) of the impact event with the incident X-ray pulses (80 ps width). A description of the basic gun system used in previous work is provided along with details of an improved launch initiation system designed to significantly reduce the total system time from launch initiation to impact. Experiments were performed to directly measure the gun system time and to determine the gun performance curve for projectile velocities ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 km/s. All results show an average system time of 21.6 {+-} 4.5 ms, making it possible to better synchronize the gun system and detectors to the X-ray beam.

  9. Pressure-shear experiments on granular materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Vogler, Tracy John; Alexander, C. Scott

    2011-10-01

    Pressure-shear experiments were performed on granular tungsten carbide and sand using a newly-refurbished slotted barrel gun. The sample is a thin layer of the granular material sandwiched between driver and anvil plates that remain elastic. Because of the obliquity, impact generates both a longitudinal wave, which compresses the sample, and a shear wave that probes the strength of the sample. Laser velocity interferometry is employed to measure the velocity history of the free surface of the anvil. Since the driver and anvil remain elastic, analysis of the results is, in principal, straightforward. Experiments were performed at pressures up to nearly 2 GPa using titanium plates and at higher pressure using zirconium plates. Those done with the titanium plates produced values of shear stress of 0.1-0.2 GPa, with the value increasing with pressure. On the other hand, those experiments conducted with zirconia anvils display results that may be related to slipping at an interface and shear stresses mostly at 0.1 GPa or less. Recovered samples display much greater particle fracture than is observed in planar loading, suggesting that shearing is a very effective mechanism for comminution of the grains.

  10. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Colless, Matthew; Comparat, Johan; Coupon, Jean; Cheu, Elliott; Cunha, Carlos E.; de la Macorra, Alex; DellAntonio, Ian P.; Frye, Brenda L.; Gawiser, Eric J.; Gehrels, Neil; Grady, Kevin; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick B.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Huterer, Dragan; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kneib, Jean -Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Lahav, Ofer; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Menard, Brice; Miquel, Ramon; Moniez, Marc; Moos, H. W.; Moustakas, John; Papovich, Casey; Peacock, John A.; Park, Changbom; Rhodes, Jason; Sadeh, Iftach; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Tyson, J. Anthony; von der Linden, Anja; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zentner, A.

    2015-03-15

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-zs): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-zs will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large sets of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our training set of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ~30,000 objects over >~15 widely-separated regions, each at least ~20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo-z algorithms and reduce scatter further, enhancing the science return from planned experiments greatly (increasing the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit by up to ~50%); Options: This spectroscopy will most efficiently be done by covering as much of the optical and near-infrared spectrum as possible at modestly high spectral resolution (?/?? > ~3000), while maximizing the telescope collecting area, field of view on the sky, and multiplexing of simultaneous spectra. The most efficient instrument for this would likely be either the proposed GMACS/MANIFEST spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope or the OPTIMOS spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope, depending on actual properties when built. The PFS spectrograph at Subaru would be next best and available considerably earlier, c. 2018; the proposed ngCFHT and SSST telescopes would have similar capabilities but start later. Other key options, in order of increasing total time required, are the WFOS spectrograph at TMT, MOONS at the VLT, and DESI at the Mayall 4 m telescope (or the similar 4MOST and WEAVE projects); of these, only DESI, MOONS, and PFS are expected to be available before 2020. Table 2-3 of this white paper summarizes the observation time required at each facility for strawman training samples. To attain secure redshift measurements for a high fraction of targeted objects and cover the full redshift span of future experiments, additional near-infrared spectroscopy will also be required; this is best done from space, particularly with WFIRST-2.4 and JWST; Calibration: The first several moments of redshift distributions (the mean, RMS redshift dispersion, etc.), must be known to high accuracy for cosmological constraints not to be systematics-dominated (equivalently, the moments of the distribution of differences between photometric and true redshifts could be determined instead). The ultimate goal of calibration is to characterize these moments for every subsample used in analyses - i.e., to minimize the uncertainty in their mean redshift, RMS dispersion, etc. rather than to make the moments themselves small. Calibration may be done with the same spectroscopic dataset used for training if that dataset is extremely high in redshift completeness (i.e., no populations of galaxies to be used in analyses are systematically missed). Accurate photo-z calibration is necessary for all imaging experiments; Requirements: If extremely low levels of systematic incompleteness (<~0.1%) are attained in training samples, the same datasets described above should be sufficient for calibration. However, existing deep spectroscopic surveys have failed to yield secure redshifts for 3060% of targets, so that would require very large improvements over past experience. This incompleteness would be a limiting factor for training, but catastrophic for calibration. If <~0.1% incompleteness is not attainable, the best known option for calibration of photometric redshifts is to utilize cross-correlation statistics in some form. The most direct method for this uses cross-correlations between positions on the sky of bright objects of known spectroscopic redshift with the sample of objects that we wish to calibrate the redshift distribution for, measured as a function of spectroscopic z. For such a calibration, redshifts of ~100,000 objects over at least several hundred square degrees, spanning the full redshift range of the samples used for dark energy, would be necessary; and Options: The proposed BAO experiment eBOSS would provide sufficient spectroscopy for basic calibrations, particularly for ongoing and near-future imaging experiments. The planned DESI experiment would provide excellent calibration with redundant cross-checks, but will start after the conclusion of some imaging projects. An extension of DESI to the Southern hemisphere would provide the best possible calibration from cross-correlation methods for DES and LSST. We thus anticipate that our two primary needs for spectroscopy training and calibration of photometric redshifts will require two separate solutions. For ongoing and future projects to reach their full potential, new spectroscopic samples of faint objects will be needed for training; those new samples may be suitable for calibration, but the latter possibility is uncertain. In contrast, wide-area samples of bright objects are poorly suited for training, but can provide high-precision calibrations via cross-correlation techniques. Additional training/calibration redshifts and/or host galaxy spectroscopy would enhance the use of supernovae and galaxy clusters for cosmology. We also summarize additional work on photometric redshift techniques that will be needed to prepare for data from ongoing and future dark energy experiments.

  11. Hydrocarbon characterization experiments in fully turbulent fires.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricks, Allen; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-05-01

    As the capabilities of numerical simulations increase, decision makers are increasingly relying upon simulations rather than experiments to assess risks across a wide variety of accident scenarios including fires. There are still, however, many aspects of fires that are either not well understood or are difficult to treat from first principles due to the computational expense. For a simulation to be truly predictive and to provide decision makers with information which can be reliably used for risk assessment the remaining physical processes must be studied and suitable models developed for the effects of the physics. The model for the fuel evaporation rate in a liquid fuel pool fire is significant because in well-ventilated fires the evaporation rate largely controls the total heat release rate from the fire. A set of experiments are outlined in this report which will provide data for the development and validation of models for the fuel regression rates in liquid hydrocarbon fuel fires. The experiments will be performed on fires in the fully turbulent scale range (> 1 m diameter) and with a number of hydrocarbon fuels ranging from lightly sooting to heavily sooting. The importance of spectral absorption in the liquid fuels and the vapor dome above the pool will be investigated and the total heat flux to the pool surface will be measured. The importance of convection within the liquid fuel will be assessed by restricting large scale liquid motion in some tests. These data sets will provide a sound, experimentally proven basis for assessing how much of the liquid fuel needs to be modeled to enable a predictive simulation of a fuel fire given the couplings between evaporation of fuel from the pool and the heat release from the fire which drives the evaporation.

  12. Application experiences with the Globus toolkit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunett, S.

    1998-06-09

    The Globus grid toolkit is a collection of software components designed to support the development of applications for high-performance distributed computing environments, or ''computational grids'' [14]. The Globus toolkit is an implementation of a ''bag of services'' architecture, which provides application and tool developers not with a monolithic system but rather with a set of stand-alone services. Each Globus component provides a basic service, such as authentication, resource allocation, information, communication, fault detection, and remote data access. Different applications and tools can combine these services in different ways to construct ''grid-enabled'' systems. The Globus toolkit has been used to construct the Globus Ubiquitous Supercomputing Testbed, or GUSTO: a large-scale testbed spanning 20 sites and included over 4000 compute nodes for a total compute power of over 2 TFLOPS. Over the past six months, we and others have used this testbed to conduct a variety of application experiments, including multi-user collaborative environments (tele-immersion), computational steering, distributed supercomputing, and high throughput computing. The goal of this paper is to review what has been learned from these experiments regarding the effectiveness of the toolkit approach. To this end, we describe two of the application experiments in detail, noting what worked well and what worked less well. The two applications are a distributed supercomputing application, SF-Express, in which multiple supercomputers are harnessed to perform large distributed interactive simulations; and a tele-immersion application, CAVERNsoft, in which the focus is on connecting multiple people to a distributed simulated world.

  13. Experiences from the Roadrunner petascale hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerbyson, Darren J; Pakin, Scott; Lang, Mike; Sancho Pitarch, Jose C; Davis, Kei; Barker, Kevin J; Peraza, Josh

    2010-01-01

    The combination of flexible microprocessors (AMD Opterons) with high-performing accelerators (IBM PowerXCell 8i) resulted in the extremely powerful Roadrunner system. Many challenges in both hardware and software were overcome to achieve its goals. In this talk we detail some of the experiences in achieving performance on the Roadrunner system. In particular we examine several implementations of the kernel application, Sweep3D, using a work-queue approach, a more portable Thread-building-blocks approach, and an MPI on the accelerator approach.

  14. OPERATIONS ELECTRONIC LOGBOOK EXPERIENCE AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SATOGATA,T.; CAMPBELL,I.; MARR,G.; SAMPSON,P.

    2002-06-02

    A web-based system for electronic logbooks, ''elog'', developed at Fermilab (FNAL), has been adopted for use by AGS and RHIC operations and physicists at BNL for the 2001-2 fixed target and collider runs. This paper describes the main functional and technical issues encountered in the first year of electronic logbook use, including security, search and indexing, sequencer integration, archival, and graphics management. We also comment on organizational experience and planned changes for the next facility run starting in September 2002.

  15. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FermiNews A biweekly magazine published by the Fermilab Office of Public Affairs about work and life at Fermilab. 2002: September 20, 2002 - New Neutrino Experiment at Fermilab Goes Live June 14, 2002 - Changing of the Guard: Mike Shaevitz returns to Columbia May 24, 2002 - Beam Me Up: MiniBooNE gets ready to go May 10, 2002 - Dastow 2002: 3D neutrino event simulation Mar. 29, 2002 - Exploring the Invisible Universe Jan. 18, 2002 - A Clear View: MiniBooNE's detector oil 2001: Dec. 14, 2001 -

  16. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Making Neutrinos The Booster Neutrino Experiment starts by producing a beam of neutrinos. In a multi-stage process, protons from one of the Fermilab proton accelerators -- the Booster -- are used to generate muon neutrinos, one of the three types of neutrinos presently known. In the first stage of the production, a pre-accelerator speeds hydrogen ions up to an energy of 750,000 electron volts. The ions then enter a linear accelerator; this device gives the particles even more energy before

  17. Experiments for foam model development and validation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Mahoney, James F.; Russick, Edward Mark; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Gorby, Allen D.

    2008-09-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to allow observation of the foaming process and the collection of temperature, rise rate, and microstructural data. Microfocus video is used in conjunction with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to elucidate the boundary condition at the wall. Rheology, reaction kinetics and density measurements complement the flow visualization. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to examine the cured foams to determine density gradients. These data provide input to a continuum level finite element model of the blowing process.

  18. Driven reconnection in magnetic fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1995-11-01

    Error fields (i.e. small non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field due to coil misalignments, etc.) are a fact of life in magnetic fusion experiments. What effects do error fields have on plasma confinement? How can any detrimental effects be alleviated? These, and other, questions are explored in detail in this lecture using simple resistive magnetohydrodynamic (resistance MHD) arguments. Although the lecture concentrates on one particular type of magnetic fusion device, namely, the tokamak, the analysis is fairly general and could also be used to examine the effects of error fields on other types of device (e.g. Reversed Field Pinches, Stellerators, etc.).

  19. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Virtual Tour This series of pages about MiniBooNE will help you understand more about the what, why, and how of our experiment. When you begin the tour, a new window will open and you can use the next and back buttons to navigate. You may exit at any time by clicking on the "X" button in the upper right hand corner of the window. Start the tour here... This tour was created by Jessica Falco in 2000 and updated by Kelly O'Hear in 2002. Jessica and Kelly were high school students who

  20. ARM - ARM MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Links amie.png 34h AMIE Home cindy.png 50h CINDY2011 dynamo.png 34h DYNAMO ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Outreach News & Press Blog Backgrounder (PDF, 1.2MB) Education Flyer (PDF, 2.0MB) Images ARM flickr site Official AMIE Logo AMIE Gear Experiment Planning Steering Committee AMIE-MANUS Proposal Abstract AMIE-GAN Proposal Abstract Meetings Cloud Life Cycle Working Group Deployment Operations Science Plan - TWP Manus Site (PDF, 2.1 MB) Science Plan - Gan Island Site (PDF, 2.0 MB)